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The 3 Most Common Objections You’ll See On A Sales Call

We’ve all been there– you’re vibin’ with a potential client because they need something, and you know you have what it takes to help them reach their goals or meet their objectives.

You’ve pleasantly talked through the scope and expectations and maybe even bridged the budget part of the conversation.

All seems well until the convo suddenly gets a bit awkward when they hit you with… DUN DUN DUN! An objection!

If you’re picturing a lawyer shaking their fist in the air and dramatically proclaiming, “I OBJECT,” then you’re not quite right, but you are pretty funny.

No, no, when the objection hits, it’s highly unlikely that it’s a calculated, “gotcha” move on their part. Let’s take a closer look at what we’re really talking about here.

What Are ‘Objections’ Anyway?

When we talk about “objections” in the business world, we’re basically talking about the different ways that potential client says “no,” questions the value of your work or credibility, or shuts down the conversation before committing to moving forward.

In some cases, they may not even realize they’ve hit you with an “objection” because, for them, it probably feels more like an underlying fear or concern versus questioning you or your ability—even though it can totally feel that way, especially when taken personally (we’ve all been there too!).

Objection-type questions could also come from a standard series of ‘questions to ask everyone about this project,’ and they just have to check it off a list they were given.

Either way, it can feel less than great to have objections lobbed over to you during a sales or discovery call. But it doesn’t have to be scary!

In fact, objections can be one of the best ways to learn about how your potential client thinks, any misconceptions they may have, bad past experiences, worries you might be able to ease. Objections can sometimes even highlight a few red flags that tell you they may not be a great match for you.

Good, bad, or indifferent, objections will come. And the best way to handle with them is to be totally prepared to face them head-on, cool as a cucumber, with clear and concise responses.

So, let’s get you prepped for the three most common objections you’re likely to face.

“You’re too expensive.”

Sometimes this sounds like, “That’s more than we anticipated,” or “This is way beyond our budget.” Or maybe you’ll have a straight-shooter that says it like it is, “Can you tell me why you’re so expensive?”

“You don’t have enough experience.”

“We were looking for someone with more experience,” “You haven’t been doing this for very long,” and even “Your business seems really new” are all different flavors of this one.

You can refute this and back it up with proof, or you can own it and put your own spin on the idea of “experience” as a necessity. Either way, you gotta have that answer locked and loaded for when this objection inevitably comes up.

“You don’t know enough about __________.”

Sometimes clients don’t understand how you could know enough about their business or industry to do what they’re looking for. Other times, for reasons they can’t even explain, they just don’t think you know what you’re doing in your own craft.

Either way, they’re tellin’ ya “you don’t know enough,” and that can be a big ol’ stop sign on the sales expressway.

What Happens Next?

Is all hope lost? Are you doomed to be shut down at every turn?

Nah, b. You got this! Like we said, the best way to overcome these objections is to be ready with a clear, concise, and confident response.

One of our favorite ways to prepare for these sometimes-awkward interactions is to role-play your reply. Enlist the help of a fellow designer or creative, a friend who will give it to you straight, or a family member you know will enjoy trying to push your buttons.

If you don’t have a practice partner, no worries! Try talking to yourself in the mirror. Yes, for real! Run through the different scenarios and practice responding when looking in the mirror.

You might also try walking around your office or house while reciting your well-crafted comebacks as a way to avoid direct script-reading or to get comfortable with more than one thing happening at once (i.e., walking and talking) to prepare for possible curveballs or interruptions from the prospect.

There are many ways to practice, but what do you say in response to these objections?

To learn some solid responses to these objections and more, brushing up on other sales skills while you’re at it, you might be ready for Business Bootcamp—take this quick quiz to see if you’re ready to rock and roll with our next cohort!

Pssst.. In case you missed ‘em be sure to click the hyperlinks throughout this article to watch Chris role play and teach on these exact objections!

Aug 8

The 3 Most Common Objections You’ll See On A Sales Call

We’ve all been there– one minute you’re vibin’ with a potential client because you know you have what it takes to help them meet their objectives. All seems well until the convo suddenly gets a bit awkward when they hit you with… an objection!

We’ve all been there– you’re vibin’ with a potential client because they need something, and you know you have what it takes to help them reach their goals or meet their objectives.

You’ve pleasantly talked through the scope and expectations and maybe even bridged the budget part of the conversation.

All seems well until the convo suddenly gets a bit awkward when they hit you with… DUN DUN DUN! An objection!

If you’re picturing a lawyer shaking their fist in the air and dramatically proclaiming, “I OBJECT,” then you’re not quite right, but you are pretty funny.

No, no, when the objection hits, it’s highly unlikely that it’s a calculated, “gotcha” move on their part. Let’s take a closer look at what we’re really talking about here.

What Are ‘Objections’ Anyway?

When we talk about “objections” in the business world, we’re basically talking about the different ways that potential client says “no,” questions the value of your work or credibility, or shuts down the conversation before committing to moving forward.

In some cases, they may not even realize they’ve hit you with an “objection” because, for them, it probably feels more like an underlying fear or concern versus questioning you or your ability—even though it can totally feel that way, especially when taken personally (we’ve all been there too!).

Objection-type questions could also come from a standard series of ‘questions to ask everyone about this project,’ and they just have to check it off a list they were given.

Either way, it can feel less than great to have objections lobbed over to you during a sales or discovery call. But it doesn’t have to be scary!

In fact, objections can be one of the best ways to learn about how your potential client thinks, any misconceptions they may have, bad past experiences, worries you might be able to ease. Objections can sometimes even highlight a few red flags that tell you they may not be a great match for you.

Good, bad, or indifferent, objections will come. And the best way to handle with them is to be totally prepared to face them head-on, cool as a cucumber, with clear and concise responses.

So, let’s get you prepped for the three most common objections you’re likely to face.

“You’re too expensive.”

Sometimes this sounds like, “That’s more than we anticipated,” or “This is way beyond our budget.” Or maybe you’ll have a straight-shooter that says it like it is, “Can you tell me why you’re so expensive?”

“You don’t have enough experience.”

“We were looking for someone with more experience,” “You haven’t been doing this for very long,” and even “Your business seems really new” are all different flavors of this one.

You can refute this and back it up with proof, or you can own it and put your own spin on the idea of “experience” as a necessity. Either way, you gotta have that answer locked and loaded for when this objection inevitably comes up.

“You don’t know enough about __________.”

Sometimes clients don’t understand how you could know enough about their business or industry to do what they’re looking for. Other times, for reasons they can’t even explain, they just don’t think you know what you’re doing in your own craft.

Either way, they’re tellin’ ya “you don’t know enough,” and that can be a big ol’ stop sign on the sales expressway.

What Happens Next?

Is all hope lost? Are you doomed to be shut down at every turn?

Nah, b. You got this! Like we said, the best way to overcome these objections is to be ready with a clear, concise, and confident response.

One of our favorite ways to prepare for these sometimes-awkward interactions is to role-play your reply. Enlist the help of a fellow designer or creative, a friend who will give it to you straight, or a family member you know will enjoy trying to push your buttons.

If you don’t have a practice partner, no worries! Try talking to yourself in the mirror. Yes, for real! Run through the different scenarios and practice responding when looking in the mirror.

You might also try walking around your office or house while reciting your well-crafted comebacks as a way to avoid direct script-reading or to get comfortable with more than one thing happening at once (i.e., walking and talking) to prepare for possible curveballs or interruptions from the prospect.

There are many ways to practice, but what do you say in response to these objections?

To learn some solid responses to these objections and more, brushing up on other sales skills while you’re at it, you might be ready for Business Bootcamp—take this quick quiz to see if you’re ready to rock and roll with our next cohort!

Pssst.. In case you missed ‘em be sure to click the hyperlinks throughout this article to watch Chris role play and teach on these exact objections!

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Kristin Lajeunesse

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