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Natasha Takahashi

Whether you were aware of it, you've probably encountered (and talked with) a chatbot. But have you ever thought about how messaging automation might help you and your business? If you get overwhelmed with DMs or want to learn more about how chatbots work and the benefits that come with them, then give this episode a listen.

How chatbots and messenger automation work
How chatbots and messenger automation work

How chatbots and messenger automation work

Ep
191
Jun
01
With
Natasha Takahashi
Or Listen On:

How you can be there for your customers 24/7

In 2017 Natasha Takahashi completed her first semester at the prestigious (and quite expensive) college, University of Southern California.

She'd spent many nights writing essays and working tirelessly to attain any scholarship she could find to pay her tuition. But Natasha had a scary epiphany halfway into her second semester: This is not for me.

Frustrated and unhappy with her USC experience, she decided to drop out. She even wrote a letter to her parents expressing her gratitude and reasoning.

Five years later, Natasha sounds more than happy with her decision. She's started two businesses and is well on her way to achieving the goals outlined in the letter to her parents.

In this episode, we discuss Natasha's business focus: messenger automation.

Whether you were aware of it, you've probably encountered (and talked with) a chatbot. But have you ever thought about how messaging automation might help you and your business?

If you get overwhelmed with DMs or want to learn more about how chatbots work and the benefits that come with them, then give this episode a listen.

Hosted By
special guest
produced by
edited by
music by
Appearances

Episode Transcript

Natasha:

So regardless of how big you are as a business, it's important to be there for your customers. People want to be able to talk to someone or something before they buy. And so why not be there for them 24/7 before they move on to a competitor if you don't reply to them for three days. And also why put that stress on yourself of having to always be online applying to people when you can be operating and creating better high-quality products instead of all the stuff that needs to happen, but that you don't need to be involved with anymore.

Chris:

I'm fascinated by chat automation. I think it goes by a couple different things DM chat, messaging automation by we're using robots to replace the things that people do. And I think I'm fascinated by what you do and how you teach other marketers to use chat automation. So why don't we just start at the beginning, first, for people who don't know who you are, can you introduce yourself. Tell us a little bit of a story about you and then we'll go from there.

Natasha:

Absolutely. Firstly, thank you for having me, so excited for our conversation. So the short story is that back in 2016, I found out about chat automation because Messenger bots had just become a thing. And like you said, there's a lot of different phrases that get thrown around to refer to this. At this point in time, I think what resonates the most with people that doesn't have negative stigma around it is messaging automation and just making it clear that it's all user consent based. And that it's not the spaming DMs that we are all too familiar with. So I started back in 2016 and the first way that I got involved with it was I started a chat bot agency with my now husband, Kyle. And so I left school which we were just talking a little bit about, I left school to start this.
It was very much so kind of a leap of faith to see, hey, would this pan out and work out? And so I left school, we started serving clients while we were actually traveling around living the digital nomad life in a sense. And from there, we ended up taking our agency to $100,000 in revenue in the first year. And so that was a good milestone to be like, okay, we're getting people results, people are paying us for these skills. This is cool. This is resonating. It seems like this space is going to continue to blow up. So let's scale this as big as we can and also get really grounded in what exactly we want to deliver to our clients. Because at the time it was the beginning of apps or the beginning of websites.
And even now, the beginning of NFTs where there's all this crap getting thrown around, you've got the Fud apps and the Bubble apps and all that stuff if you remember back in the app days and we like to compare it to that because back then no one knew what the heck to do with it. They were just like this is cool tech, but how do you actually make money with this? And so, of course, that's evolved to then now, and along the way, we started our education company as well as school of thoughts to where at this point, using messenger automation on Facebook Messenger, Instagram DM Automation, SMS, and WhatsApp as well because you can essentially do everything that we'll talk about today on these four platforms as well as others, but this is our focus.
We've generated over 30 million in revenue which is a good milestone to say, okay, this has done something good for businesses. And there's a lot of other great case studies from both small businesses and enterprise that Facebook has collected and other platforms such as what we like to use Minichat. And I know that you're a fan of them as well and use them. So we'll probably get a little bit more into that stuff in another chat. But yeah, so at this point, what I would define as us is that our goal whether we're going in as an agency to one of the key clients that we work with or when we go into train marketers because we have a whole education institute, essentially where agencies and marketing teams can come in and learn our strategies, our goal is to double their conversion rates of their revenue that they're getting from the platform that we're engaging with.
So if that's going to be Instagram, then typically it's not unrealistic for us when it's our team to go in and actually double what they're getting. And when others go in and take our education on as well, they're able to get great results. Maybe it's not going to be doubling their sales, especially when you're a larger company and maybe Instagram's a smaller channel or what have you, but nonetheless, they're able to really boost things and save a ton of time. So that's the fulfillment pieces that come with it. And also briefly how I got into it.

Chris:

Wonderful. There is a stigma against chat automation because of the way it's been implemented in the past. I've used it, I've seen other people use it and it's terrible.

Natasha:

Yes.

Chris:

It's an autoresponder and if that's what you're thinking, this is way more sophisticated than that. And I love the word that you use it's like user consent and it's just doing, I think, in the way that we've seen it used, doing what a normal person would be doing, but just accelerating that process so that you can scale. So keep that in mind everybody in case you're like, ugh, I don't like this conversation where it's going. There's a lot more for you.

Natasha:

Don't go anywhere.

Chris:

Don't go anywhere. Yeah. Please stick around. Stick around just for a little bit. And we will make it worth your while. I have a question for you in terms of your company, what percentage is it in services and what percentages in training? I'm just trying to get a makeup or an idea of how it works.

Natasha:

Yeah. So over the last like pretty much... So to give you a timeline, we started for about a year as an agency and by that point, there were very few courses and educators out there saying here's how to make money with this channel in an ethical way. And serve clients with this. It was still very much like here's how to use the platforms. It's kind of be like if you're trying to learn Facebook ads or how to create YouTube videos, it'd be like, here's how to upload a video to YouTube. That was the type of education that was out there. And we're like, no, there's so much more, right? Here's how to make the video engaging. And here's a formula to use to get people to keep watching and grow your subscribers, et cetera. So in that same way, we saw a big opportunity to just share what it was that we were doing with our clients with other people.
And so it started small. I think the first time we did a beta coaching program just to see if we could help people, was like 30 people and then from there it started to become a larger part of our business. And I feel a lot of fulfillment when I'm able to teach and present, but we also understood that there's the dichotomy to be managed that you have to be implementing actively when you're teaching something like digital marketing on platforms that are constantly evolving along with policies, along with tech evolution. And so for us for a long time, pretty much the entire lifetime of the business from there on it was about 50/50. We were always serving clients and we were also always then being able to document that and say, hey, here are the most recent case studies. And so here's how our principles and tactics are evolving over time.
At this point though, and actually last year, we made a very intentional shift to move away from the agency services and change them more into consulting and then be able to have the coaching programs as well. So at this point we have both self-paced education and then coaching, but what we find and maybe you find this as well, is that when we're active in that process with people and we give them a specific timeline to get something done, they're just going to get the result faster instead of have fun going through this course where there's no one to keep you accountable. And so now at this point we are 100% consulting and coaching at this time.

Chris:

I don't know how comfortable you are disclosing things. So I'm going to ask and if it's uncomfortable you just say and we edit it out, okay?

Natasha:

Yeah.

Chris:

How big is the company today in terms of revenue?

Natasha:

Today we're going through a transition phase. We were five people full time up until the end of 2021 and then now we are continuing to evolve into bringing on a sales team for the first time which is exciting. And then also being able to grow out the team of coaches. So from that point, it's been like marketing and coaching has really been the only two sides of the business that we've needed to have up until that point. And then now as we're scaling the coaching, it's like, okay, now, how big can we really make this? And how many more businesses can we reach?

Chris:

There's a couple things and I have to go here because I'm interested in the human part of this.

Natasha:

Yeah.

Chris:

You and then now your husband, were you guys classmates in school? How did you guys form this company?

Natasha:

No. So we were dating before we went into business together. And the way that it happened was that we met through a mutual friend years back in, I think, in 2015 or 2016 is when we had met, like tail end of 2015. And then from there we dated for about a year, but then I was going to go off to overseas and be a part of this college program that I was telling you. And so I was looking at it as a temporary like, this is amazing, we align, but it's not the right time right now for me to be fully committed to a relationship, there's so much I want to do. But little did we know as we dove into it more and we're like, okay, well, I'm thinking now leaving school and starting a business instead and he was wanting to leave the job that he was at. He had just though gone through the process of working at a start up for a couple years and seeing them get acquired and be really close to the founding team and everyone who was a part of that.
So he had very relevant experience. And then I was like, okay, how do I just take everything I've learned in these startup jobs that I was working at that time and apply both of these to our agency. So we work really well because we are complete opposites. So it somehow worked out to be a beautiful dichotomy, although challenging to manage, at times it's a relationship unlike anything, I think, I've ever observed in a lot of the couples that we meet or other people even business partners. And it allows us to also have just a really special layer of trust and respect towards each other as well, that comes in the form of a lot of things. So that's how it all came to be. We started dating, started the first business and then started the second business which I would say is the education side. And then now we are going into another business venture. And the idea is for us to just continue to be building together really side by side from here.

Chris:

Okay. For context, people may not understand this, but you're going to USC business school, I think you told me about a semester in you're like, this is not right, I'm going to leave. So when people hear that, we're not talking about two, three years in, one semester, you knew you had to leave this wasn't right for you. That sounds like a really scary decision to make. What gave you the confidence to just say, you know what? I'm in a great school and a great program, well known, internationally known, and I'm going to say, no, it's not right for me. Where did you find that confidence to just be able to do that?

Natasha:

I love talking about this, firstly, just to preface because I find that so many people are afraid to even voice their opinion on this because it's still very taboo, although becoming not so quickly which is exciting. And so what I did was for a long time, well, a long time is in a couple months for me at that time, but every day I would wrestle with the decision. I was like, oh, should I stay safe and stay here or do I leave? And so I ended up doing a leave of absence which would allow me to come if I ever wanted to. I knew I wasn't going to, but I did it more so for my parents. And so what ended up happening is I wrote my parents a letter because they were the ones that I was, I think, most afraid to tell. It wasn't so much going to the school and being like, hey, I'm leaving, it was telling my parents, hey, I'm making this big life decision that I know you guys have been saving for for a long time, et cetera.
And to add to that real quickly as well, I feel privileged that I worked really, really hard for this, but I also feel privileged that I knew about scholarships and things initially because I was able to get $200,000 of scholarship money to go to college. And that was done by me writing hundreds of essays from 4:00 AM to midnight for weeks on end, right? I was able to get a lot of amazing scholarships. And so I didn't feel as bad because my parents had only put think a couple thousand dollars into my education at the time. So I didn't necessarily feel like I owed anybody anything.
And I wrote a letter which people can look up. If you just look up my name, Natasha Takahashi in college you'll probably find it first thing that pops up because I get asked all the time on interviews. People are like, I read your letters, so tell me more about that. But I shared the letter that I wrote to my parents and in writing that it gave me a lot of closure and confidence and being like, okay, this is the right thing. Here's what I'm going to do after college. This is what I want to do with my life. Here's why I don't believe in the education system as it currently upholds, et cetera, et cetera.
And doing all of that gave me some closure. And that's how I process information as well. So I think it was really helpful for me to write it out and then say, okay, I can actually do this. I'm going to go give it to them. I'm not going to make that decision, but it was definitely a lengthy and painful process for me because I went through it mostly by myself. I didn't really talk to anybody about it.

Chris:

Wow. Well, Asian parents everywhere that are listening to this episode, they're cringing here because not only did you get into USC, you got a $200,000 scholarship and you said goodbye to all of it because you pretty much at this point almost have a full ride, right? $200,000. That's a lot of money.

Natasha:

You know what though? I don't think it was because USC, if I'm remembering correctly, it was like $76,000 a year at the time to go which is insane.

Chris:

Yes, it is.

Natasha:

And so yeah, I think would've covered most of it, I can't do the math in my head right now, but pretty close to it. And nonetheless though, I was like, I know there's going to be other expenses. I really don't want to take out loans for this. That was one of my biggest things was I wanted to come out of college if I were to do it debt free instead of having a hold on to that.

Chris:

Well, onward and upward as it goes, so you're running the company. You are just a really bold person because I generally recommend people do not date and marry the person you're going to work with because it's just complicated. Things are so intertwined. And then when things get really rough you're like, oh, of God, there is no exit out of this. A business marriage to me, it's even harder to get out than a marriage because you have assets, you have clients, you have all kinds of stuff and there you are, you quit school and then you're dating a person, then you marry the person and you are both running the business together, is that right?

Natasha:

Yes. 50/50 pretty much everything. And even up until the point we were married because we started the business together and then obviously most of our income was coming from the business, a lot of our things were tied together, finances, we bought a car together. We have had four cats together now, been pet parents as well, we lived in a lot of places. So for us at the same time, we saw it as these different litmus tests of the relationship, right? We tested the boundaries of moving in together which we did right after I left college and we were starting the business.
So we could be spending all our time together working, we moved away from everyone we knew, so we'd have no distractions, but that also came with a lot of challenges such as like because we were moving pretty often, I had read four hour work week, right? And was glamorized with the idea of, oh, we should travel and start our first business too which I strongly don't recommend, but we're having to meet people, figure out where are we going to work out? What are we going to eat? All these things. We're in different countries. They don't always speak English properly. And so it was a lot of things at once that I am honestly baffled that we were able to get through all of that because we put a lot of strain on the relationship that we didn't to, but it all just happened more so from my naivety and being excited about all these things at once.

Chris:

Yeah. As a couple who's been able to manage starting not only one, but two companies, I guess, with the training and then now we'll talk about your next project in a little bit, give some people who are in some relationship advice, if you will, how do you keep it sane and not be at each other's throats?

Natasha:

Yeah. One of the things that I heard recently that I related to so much and I think is the true definition is that you have to manage that dichotomy of separation and closeness. And so when we are together all day in the same room on the same meetings, doing all the same stuff together which oftentimes you have to be when you're first starting a business up because you guys have got to get aligned on the mission and the business model and all that good stuff. And so that can be a lot. And so just creating certain separation like one day a week or maybe spend half a day doing something else out with friends or at the beach or doing something else. We'll try to create separation in our day through things like working out. I'm not going to work out together because I want to have that time for myself and just making sure that those kinds of boundaries are set because we both pretty much work all day.
We love being able to be on the grind, but also we are very health conscious. And so there are practices we'll do together like meditation or breathing and then I'll have my own things as well. So I think in regards to relationship advice though, that's more so for working, I would say relationship advice wise, two things that I think are helpful are A, if you're in a new relationship being able to test out small things like a weekend trip and see how each person reacts, right? I think that that's always helpful is like what stressful situations can you intentionally put yourself in that are safe environments, but that allow you guys to get a little bit more uncomfortable and grow and allow yourselves to be there for each other.
And the other thing too, I would say, well, I'm not a huge proponent of doing a lot of things like personality tests and things where you're putting this identity on yourself because people tend to go to extremes where they're like, oh, well I'm like... People use their horoscope all the time. I'm an Aries so this is why I do this. It's always an explanation for some behavior sometimes used as an excuse. But for me, what was actually really helpful was we, about a year and a half ago, took a DISC assessment. So it's one of the popular personality tests. And that was super beneficial for me. Not as much in the business sense as for the personal relationship because I was like, oh, this gives me so much clarity around like just gives me a little bit more definition and concrete detail as to why we are the way we are. And that was really beneficial for me to better communicate and understand how he works and vice versa. So just a few quick tactical things that might be helpful to look into.

Chris:

Okay. I always just want to make sure I'm clear. Tests with small things that my stress relationships so don't go all in at once was the second thing to have some personality lined up, was that-

Natasha:

Yes.

Chris:

Okay.

Natasha:

And to name a few, I would say the DISC assessment is the one that we've done that I really like, there's a gazillion, so choose whatever you want, but the DISC is great. And then also doing, which is more surface level but I think is helpful to new couples, is the love language quiz. So if you just look up the five love languages quiz on Google, it should come up. It's like a free online test. There's a book that dives a lot deeper which personally, I didn't find that helpful, but maybe that's just my perspective. It was very surface level. I think that it's more so just useful to know as a person, do they appreciate thoughtful gifts or things that you can share with them. Do they want you to show a lot of physical affection, et cetera. And so that was a big game changer for us as well because I make sure every day I consciously make sure that I'm coming up and giving him a kiss or giving him a hug in the middle of the day or something that makes him feel loved and appreciated.

Chris:

So what is your love language?

Natasha:

My love language at the time I think was acts of service. And I think that's because I was pretty stressed out when I took it and I was like, I'd be so great if someone could be helping me with stuff all around, even though we're both very 50/50 with things around the house and whatnot, but I think now it's probably more so thoughtful gifts. I know there's a specific word they give it and I can't remember what it is, but I think that gifts initially, I was like, this is very superficial and why would you care if someone gives you gifts or not? But I think now having given a lot of thoughtful gifts to clients and partners and students, employees, et cetera, I actually find gifts a really thoughtful way to be able to connect with someone and have something to remember them by. So I would say that's probably it right now.

Chris:

Nice. So in case Kyle's listening to this and he can just reaffirm that's what it is. I have one last question for you on this and then I think I'd like to transition into, I think, the meat of our conversation, but I notice something, at least, on social media, you seem to be the face and the voice of the brand. I don't see Kyle very much. I see him here and there, is that intentional. Is there a strategic reason why that is?

Natasha:

Yeah. It was intentional initially because what happened was that Kyle ended up taking on more of the management and backend side of things for the business. And then I was really honing in on the Chapa skills side of things. And so because I was always the one testing out new things with clients and on the calls with them, it just made more sense for me to be teaching the education, doing the content, that kind of thing. So over time we've fluctuated between me being at the front and then us doing live boot camps together, for example, where he'll talk about the agency side a little bit more, but now as we move forward, it was really helpful to test an experiment. Like now moving forward for us, it's really important to have that power couple positioning to where we both equally add a lot of value to everything that we're a part of, but I feel like content is obviously the place where people are going to perceive how it is.
And so first we always want to make sure that that's clear. And so moving forward, that's actually a transition that we're making now to where we are always seen in content together and it's never just Natasha doing her thing or Kyle doing his thing, at least when it comes to our businesses. But yeah, this time I am still more of the face of school of bots just because it ended up happening that way over time. And we never really made a big shift to bring him back into content.

Chris:

Okay. Now I think I'd like to transition and talk to you more about this idea about how we can use messaging automation to generate followers and more importantly convert or generate leads into clients. And I have a whole community of creative people who are confused by this like what is this all about? So I'm going to turn this over to you and just be a student right now.

Natasha:

Sweet. To quickly start off. I'm curious actually to know if you want to share in 30 seconds or something quick, what have you tested so far with Instagram DM Automation since we last spoke maybe late last year?

Chris:

Okay. A couple things that we're doing right now is I get a lot of messages and so I can't keep up with them. So we're identifying certain patterns to save just me some time. So this is just about building a better customer user experience. So if there's a resource I want to share with someone because people ask me, what was that book and what was that video? And I just can't copy paste so much. So now if I teach people, if you type in certain words, my chatbot will talk to them and it's not to exchange anything more than just provide information.
And if people want to register for an event that I'm doing or more information, I will then write a script and then it will walk them through certain things. The thing that I'm most excited about Natasha is I've been experimenting with using chat automation, messaging automation to teach that's my core, is I'm a teacher. So I thought and I wrote out this script about how to teach people to price projects. And so the chatbot will ask you some questions, you answer, and it keeps walking you through the whole process. And then it even tells you a price based on what you're talking about. And then it's very meta in, what did you learn from this.

Natasha:

Incredible that's exciting. And you guys have already shipped that and are starting to see some data come in for it.

Chris:

Absolutely.

Natasha:

Dude. That's awesome. Yeah. To that point and something we can maybe chat a little bit about too then is quizzes, I would say are one of the easiest ways if you already have an established brand, but also have more than one product that you would sell. So this is not so much for the services side, but if you've got five of products and people always ask, what should I buy? Or you want to start a little bit more from a high level view of their pain points, quizzes are such an incredible tool to be able to use within bots, so that's awesome. Everyone should go and check that out and maybe take some inspiration for how that might apply to their business. But we can go ahead and dive into this and thank you for sharing that. This first slide that we have up, I just wanted to show a quick example for people to see what we are talking about. As you guys can see, it looks like you are talking to just a regular person DMing.
The difference is though that you will be able to create these prompts for people to reply with. So these buttons that show up in the left image towards the bottom that say things like, yes, please or no, change it, in this context, we're asking, do we have their correct email on file? And so buttons are the best way that we have found right now to create automated interactions that can actually go all the way through because if you have a lot of open input, then it's going to be tough, at least where AI is right now for someone to have a great user experience. So you do want to treat it a little bit more guided, but just be really clear with your instructions. Let them know, hey, you've got to click that. And then over time as you guys get better at building these or you have someone help you or you're using templates, just keeping in mind that you always want to account for things people might say that don't allow them to stay in that path.
So that's a quick overview of that. And what I think we could dive into from here is, let's talk a little bit about what people could expect after implementing because the most important thing in diving into any new tech like this can get complicated very quickly and overwhelming, especially for those of you who don't consider yourselves as tech savvy or wanting to create all these automations and integrations, you just want to get more clients, provide a better experience, save yourself a little bit of time or a lot of time. And so a few of the things that you can benefit from if you are a design agency, a design freelancer, creating content from an Instagram profile, and you want to generate leads into your business for services, then one of the easiest ways to use this is of course, to qualify people or gauge some interest.
And so that's one massive benefit that at the end of any path that someone would interact with you in, that's the goal is for you to get their name, their email, phone number, anything that would be helpful to you. And then from there, what we find as well is that within about 90 days and you don't have to be crazy good at this stuff. It's just about noticing what people are saying and creating automated responses for it just like Chris, you mentioned you guys are creating just a better experience for people.
We find that we can automate usually at least up to 80% of the DMs that are going in and out by continuing to add on to the things that the bot can reply to. So don't expect a number so big initially, and especially if you don't have a huge, huge account where you're getting like thousands of DMs every day, then this should happen much slower over time, but this can save you a ton of time and also get you a lot more DMs and interests because people are willing to reply to you in a DM more so than clicking on a link or going to the link in your bio if you are telling them, hey, you're going to get this. Instead of just peeking their curiosity first, talking to them a little bit in the DMs and then being able to offer what it is you have.
In regards to some of the things that, I think, are interesting. What we've been able to accomplish since this publicly came out last June is, within 30 days is when all these results were created. So we were able to get an average conversion rate from a conversation into something like a free lead magnet or maybe a lot of you have a free assessment or a free audit of someone's business or even a free proposal, however you want to position what it is that is going to help you get clients in the door.
We've been able to get a 60% average rate there which is really good compared to what most of our clients were getting on a typical landing page because the thing is with a conversation, you can always pivot it and say, okay, you're not interested, well, how about this? Or why don't I ask you a few questions to see if you might be interested in how we can help you with something else. Whereas when you send somebody to an online form or an online landing page or anything like that, even just to straight booking a call, sometimes it's too quick and you're just going to lose a lot of people in that process instead of capturing all of them in a DM and then being able to adjust the conversation for them based on what they're looking for. So that makes sense so far, any questions on that.

Chris:

It does. And so I think the general concept here is anything that creates friction for the end user is going to potentially decrease whatever action you want them to take. And so getting the go off platform or to add an initial step of clicking on your profile, figuring out the links and then going off, you're not giving the best possible user experience, right?

Natasha:

Exactly. And so to your point of keeping people in the platform as much as you can, this is now a way for you to replace a lot of the processes while still having those options available. And you're not just doing a full 180, but allowing people to complete those processes that usually they would've done off platform like giving you their email or even booking an appointment with you, signing up for a webinar, these things that honestly are not usually great mobile experiences as well. And being able to do it in such a seamless way to where someone's like, oh, wow, I didn't realize. I just signed up for a class. This is awesome. I just had to type something in real quick. It took me 10 seconds. So you're not only reducing that friction, but also then reducing the amount of time both sides have to take to get that end result. So spot on, on of that.

Greg:

Time for a quick break, but we'll be right back. Welcome back to our conversation.

Chris:

Now, as a person who grew up in the 80s, the parallel I draw here is that choose your own adventure. Like if you write a really good story and give the reader, the audience member some choices, it feels really good. So you want to keep it nice and engaging. You don't want to chat too much and just make them feel like they're in control. And it's a pretty fun thing. So then if you look at it like that chat or messaging automation is only limited by your creativity, your writing skills and what kind of audience you have.

Natasha:

Absolutely. And to that point, that's why I love to say and help people understand that everyone is an expert chatbot copywriter simply because we all know how to use social media messaging. And so if you know messaging etiquette like not sending someone five exclamation points at the end of every sentence and silly things, all of us know what it takes to have a respectful conversation, you're doing it all day anyways. And so people find this process to not be as overwhelming or as challenging as writing a landing page or email or other forms of communication. Like you said, it's a lot more fun, not only for the end user, but also when you're going through the creation process.
So to move on a little bit here, I want to talk more about how you actually make this happen for yourselves because depending on what type of account you are, what kind of business you have on the backend, you will approach this a little bit differently just based on your content strategy, but when it comes down to it, typically we're going to try to generate DMs from two types of content. And so what I would encourage all of you to do, and I'll get into a more tactical approach here in just a little bit, the next piece of content that you have going out, think about which of these two buckets it falls into.
I know there's a lot of subcategories under this, but from a broad standpoint, right? Are you promoting something that you want people to go to like an upcoming webinar or you've got a sale going on right now? It's probably going to be more promotional where you're telling people, hey, you can get this thing. So it's more transactional direct response whereas we use this entertainment bucket quite often because most of the time we just want to peak people's curiosity about the topic that we're discussing in the post.
And so, because a lot of the good content on Instagram is going to either peak curiosity, teach you something you don't know or help you with some tip towards problem that you're trying to solve. This is an easy way to be able to say something like which of these problems you struggle with? And maybe it's a real, that's like showing people what the common problems are that people struggle with in let's say that niche or that business model, then you might have simple things like when you're asking people to introduce themselves because maybe you do an introduction post once a month to say, hey, welcome new followers. I'd love to know more about you, here's me and reintroducing yourself to remind people what your mission is and what you do.
Anytime people are commenting on these, that can be a trigger for the DMs. And in fact, if you have an upcoming piece of content for tomorrow or next week or anything where you think that this could apply, just to start a conversation with your followers about something casual or maybe about a direct offer that you can leverage here, then any of these places can be an opt-in point for you to create an automation that takes like five seconds to set up inside of Minichat which, Chris, I know you've talked quite a bit about Minichat. So I imagine maybe the there's a link somewhere in your YouTube or you guys can maybe put it in the notes for people.

Chris:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Natasha:

Cool. So that'll be the easiest tool for you guys to use and essentially just hook up your Instagram account and then now you'll be able to trigger from any of these places. So to my point about the content, you can use any of these as inspiration for what we've seen work the best just like a direct, hey, comment this or reply to my story with this word just making it really easy for people with simple instructions so that they know what they need to do in order to get a specific thing or just be able to engage with what you're referring to.

Chris:

I have a question for you here. So the trigger is when the chatbot or a messaging bot is looking for something you have defined, hey, pay attention, these are words, then you can spring into action, right? So it's constantly looking for things. I do lives from time to time. How is it going to respond to that? So if you are chatting during the live, it knows that and it starts to message that person. Is that how that works?

Natasha:

So it's not as proactive of as what you shared there in that example. You have to tell it, hey, I want you to attach to either a specific one or whenever you do go live, you'll want to use... So to back up, when it comes to the triggers that we like to use, we want to make sure that it's something people aren't going to be saying very commonly to you. And so yes, Minichat is watching for certain things like lives, posts that might go out, reels, et cetera. And then from there you want to have a word that could be a little bit better defined like instead of saying, yes, you might have like, yes, and then the number one or something very specific to your business so that it doesn't go off because like you said, people can be saying things all the time and it might go off and trigger a indirect response there.

Chris:

Right. Okay.

Natasha:

Fantastic question on that and something that I think a lot of people tend to forget. So I really do want to highlight that. And at the end of the day, it's really not a big deal. Like you guys will catch things that might happen that you weren't aware of as you get in the process and people aren't going to hate you for it. You'll be able to adjust things as you go. There are a few ways that you can approach this. And I'd like to emphasize using stories here because they are hands down the easiest way for you to get a lot of DMs at once. There is quite a few different factors in this, but A, it's an expiring thing, so if you are going to be testing this for the first time, it's great to test it in a story because the automation is very simple. You just have to set up a keyword for people to type in. Whereas sometimes there still are a few bugs that can happen around lives and posts and things of that nature.
So a story is an easy way to test and see how it works and also be able to see what language might resonate with your followers. And then the second one, I want to talk a little bit more about this. So this is a formula that we've been refining since the beginning of 2021 because that was when we got access to Instagram DM Automation in the beta phase. And so we were able to test out a lot of stuff before most people had access to the tool. And so what we've found in Instagram share's that story sequences with three stories get the most engagement regardless of what they contain. And so here in this example, what we have found works well is this five part process.
So if you can take away one thing today from how you might go about implementing this through content, it is that you want to have a few questions that you are leading people through to ultimately get them to say, okay, yes, I do have this problem or, oh, I didn't know about that. And I want to support your brand in some way, maybe like a donation or that kind of thing. So this is an example of what we call the prime and convert formula story sequence. And so the idea is that in the first story, we are connecting with our users in some way. So that's either asking them, hey, did you know about this? So some kind of fact and in your case and for your audience, depending on the services that you have or the promise that you give people when you're servicing them, I would like to probably start with something like that so that you can emphasize on the main thing that they're having a challenge with or did you know you could do this two times faster, what have you.
And then from there, after we connect with them, we want to get some clarity on the problem. So we're going to dive a little bit deeper. That's what the second is for. The third is going to be curiosity around like, are you willing to try something new? What do you think about this? Are you ready to ditch that old method and do something new? And then finally is your call to action. The last piece that we don't see here is what happens in the DMs. And so before we do that, any questions on that, Chris?

Chris:

That seems pretty clear. You're just gently walking them through a series of easy to answer questions before you prompt them to engage with you via messaging, right?

Natasha:

Correct. Yes. And making it as easy as possible for them to be like, yes, yes, yes. So you'll notice there's never a no response in the poll. I know polls have changed a little bit as well in terms of a visual aesthetic since we grab these screenshots, but nonetheless, it's still the same thing and we haven't seen a change from that there. So then as you go into the DMs, the most important thing to keep in mind is confirming that somebody wants to engage with you there. The idea with the very first message is for you to confirm the person's interest. So let's say that you sell videography services for conferences. And so when somebody engages you in the DMs after they went through your story funnel, for example, whether they came from organic or paid, then they can dive in and you can say, hey, it sounds like you're interested in getting video services for your event.
And then from there you have a button that says yes, and you also have a button that says no or maybe not right now. And the reason we want to have those two options is because we always want to give the user an opportunity to proceed and then share their feedback with us so we can keep them as a lead if we can or at least guide them in the right direction, provide that good experience. And after they do this, then we're going to aim to get their information here which we can talk about in a moment, but I want to emphasize that that step at the very beginning, instead of just being like autoresponder, hey, thanks for your interest, go to this link to sign up for my services. Instead, actually making people engage with that first message, usually results in, in our case we've seen 50% increases in people actually completing the lead form or whatever action you wanted them to do simply because you had them micro commit at the very beginning.
And of course there's a lot that you'll want to do over time to test copy and the visuals and what the buttons say and what you're asking for, but the easiest way to replicate what you're already doing on project services forms or anywhere else where you're getting new client information that are interested in working with you, would be to replicate that inside of your bot here, but we typically won't entire form. If you have 15 questions in A like, hey, work with me form, then usually what we want to do here is ask, hey, what's your email. We're usually aiming for a 60% capture rate there. What's your name, aiming for a 90% there and then some kind of qualifying, segmenting, or commitment question.
So what I mean by that is if your services rely on, let's go back to the videographer for example, for conferences, maybe you only do video services for conferences that make a certain amount of revenue or are certain amount of people because you know that they can afford the rate that you want to be paid. And so in that case, then maybe you say something here like, and is your event this size? Or do you guys make X amount? You can also have a commitment question here which is sometimes the easiest to go with to get a quick response here of like, how soon are you looking for these services or is this something that you'd be willing to invest X amount in.
Anything that's going to be a little bit of a filter here and allow people to be like, okay, I'm serious I'm going to move forward. Or okay, I might be holding off a little bit, put me on your email list or something like that, but I was just curious and you'll get a lot of people who go through your DMs just to be like, oh, wow, that was a cool experience. I haven't seen this before too.
So this also will weed out those people sometimes as well, but the idea is for you to capture leads quickly, this is something you can build in 24 hours or less. And then from there be able to follow up with these leads manually, but the idea of this is that you are replacing the next call to action you have in your content like click the link in my story, go to the link in my bio. And instead just asking people to engage in a conversation with you and guaranteed, you will at least get some valuable feedback if not close, hopefully a few discovery calls for that upcoming week because you are getting people who have been following you for a while or new people to engage with you and learn more about what you're about instead of having to skip through to a more friction full experience, if you will.

Chris:

That was a very clear high level overview. Let me just see if I understand this by summarizing some of the things that you said. One of the big messages that I heard was, don't go straight from one thing straight to sign up for this. There's too much friction. It's a big decision. And what you're asking for in the very beginning is may I have your consent to start this conversation with you? Are we talking about the same things? They say, yes, that's a very easy thing.
And so the first big ask is what's your email? And you were saying that you should target about 60% conversion there because half the people are not going to give you their email because they're going to feel like I don't want to be spamed but once they give you the email, the rest of the questions should convert at a very high rate because now you're just saying like, what's your name? And then you're doing a little qualification process. What this sounds to me is very natural conversation that somebody's going to have in determining and qualifying if a prospect is a good fit for you and if you're a good fit for them. If the answer is no, we don't need to waste anybody's time at this point. Is that the general understanding? Did I get that right?

Natasha:

Exactly. And if I can add one thing which we didn't talk about and to be honest is more of a layer that you would want to consider after you get this done, but that being said, one of the things you can take advantage of is the power of follow up inside of the messaging conversation because this is not something that you can do with any of the other ways people currently capture leads on Instagram. You go to a website, okay, now you have to retarget them through ads or maybe they gave you their email there, but here we can just send them a direct DM. And so what we can do at each of these steps, two things I want to highlight is that at each step, if someone doesn't reply, then you can just send a friendly nudge and be like, hey, might you still be interested in this? Or have you already found a videographer for your event to go back to that example? So just being able to leverage that tool would be something I recommend doing after this.
And the second thing is that for the people here because you mentioned about 40%, 50% of people maybe don't want to give their information up front. We will either let people skip that question, be like, okay, no worries, we have somebody available to chat with you. Maybe you direct conversations to yourself, right? Or somebody on your team. And then from there you can still get the rest of the questions and be able to engage with them. Or at this point, maybe you can lead them if you have some freebie that maybe walks through or your services or tells people something that acts as a lead magnet for you, then you could also offer people that here for free as well. So I think there's always a way to close the gap and provide some value to people even if they say no to the initial question that you're asking them which in this case is, can I have your information?

Chris:

The beautiful part of this is it can all be automated, you can add a delay. So for example, if somebody doesn't give you the email and it stops there, you can just set a very specific delay like four hours, 24 hours, whatever it is just to say, hey, have you given up on this? Are you still interested in this? Or we moved on? And then you can reactivate the chat bot again, right?

Natasha:

Exactly.

Chris:

So I can see this as a huge productivity booster enhancer, but also understanding this, we will teach them of the creative people who are going to be listening and watching this, you're you're going too fast to close everybody, slow down, have a real conversation with a real person. And this might actually get you a really nice qualified lead. That's the other problem that creative people suffer with is they're like let's jump on a call. And then they realize, oh, my God, we're in a two different universe in terms of budgeted scope. And so it's a waste on everyone's time.

Natasha:

Yeah. Exactly. And especially if you're one man or one woman show and you're working on building your business or you just love doing what you do on your own, then this is just such an amazing way for you to be constantly talking to people without actually taking your own time and be able to put out your content out there and engage people get back to them because I know it can be so tough to switch constantly between doing the creative work that you love and then having to spend a ton of time answering messages, answering emails, all the admin stuff. And especially for those of you who are just starting out or don't have an assistant and these kinds of things for support, this is a very cheap 24/7 salesperson/assistant for you to support with and get you a little bit more business while also being able to create relationships for you on autopilot in a sense.

Chris:

The other thing I want to highlight is we all have our on days and we have our off days. If the chat bot is written well, it's always on meaning it doesn't fumble for words, it doesn't get confused by things because of the way that you've written the scripts and the way you've trained your messaging bot there, right?

Natasha:

Yeah. Exactly. Right. And so I like to say, it's your new favorite employee in the sense it never gets sick. Like you said, it's always in a good mood which without going too deep is one of my biggest, I wouldn't say arguments, but just things I'm excited for as AI gets better is that, you won't have to deal with grumpy humans who maybe don't like what they do and could be fulfilling their life's purpose doing other things, but haven't been pushed to do that or what have you. There's a lot of conversation to be had there, but I find that it's exciting that we are able to continue to evolve that. And then also even to go a step further, there are already really fun things that people are doing with written and voice chatbots where you can design or choose the character you're engaging with, right? And be able to engage in that story and you really build a relationship, but it's all to like how you want to do it, choose your own adventure. So it's an exciting new world for sure when it comes to all of that.

Chris:

Wonderful.

Natasha:

So the last thing then that I can walk us through here that I think is important to understand from the business side is how an Instagram DM chatbot actually interacts with the rest of your business system. And so as a creative, as a content first person, I'm sure that all of you can appreciate that you want to be able to send people to your bot from any content that you can to start those conversations because I find that's one of the hardest things people have is they're like my reel got a million views, but I got no customers from it. So this is an easy way to start that conversation. And then the other side of it as well is, well, how do we send these people to other parts of the system too because never want to rely on just one platform as a business.
Sure. You might have a big following on Instagram or that may be where you get most of your customers, but if Instagram were to go down tomorrow, well, do you have their emails? Are they following you on other platforms, et cetera. So in terms of advertising, you can actually send paid traffic into your DMs now instead of just to a website page. So this is a creative way for you to use all the strategies and tactics we've talked about so far, whatever you're already doing in fact, if you're running ads or plan to, but instead of the call to action being on your website, you're going to lead people into a conversation and build essentially that funnel into the messages.
And so that is the first easiest way to start implementing this. And we always see better results with this than we do with a typical landing page because like I said, you don't lose anybody that opted into your ad because you will have their information one way or another and be able to serve them or at least get their feedback if they think they're not a fit for whatever reason, still valuable data.
Then when it comes to content outside of Instagram here with YouTube, for example, one of the things we can do with Instagram DM is that instead of saying, hey, go and check out our new YouTube video which a lot of brands want to do because they just have longer form content they want to point you to or go subscribe to me over there. We can have deep links inside of the conversation, send them over there, and so instead of just sending them to the link, we've now also caught them inside of the DMs. And in fact, we can also deliver things from maybe the YouTube video if you mention a worksheet or a giveaway entry or something in your YouTube video that people would have to engage with.
Secondly, here we have or thirdly, we have the Instagram content which we've already talked about. Then from outside of that, now we get into the email marketing side of things. So we've had a lot of fun creating email sequences that happen in parallel with the Instagram DM messages so that you can think of Instagram DM sequences just like you would with email except that it can play off of what you're doing with the emails. You can also later on, get a little fancy with it. If someone answered you in the DMs, maybe you don't send them an email about that same thing or if they didn't, then you could also follow up there too because you'd be like, hey, I didn't hear back from you in the DM. So maybe email's a better place for you, et cetera, et cetera.
So content emails, funnel specific stuff, sales, all that good stuff, now that you have their info, you can go into there. Text marketing tools are another great tool to take advantage of later down the line if you want to start with this first and you can also do that inside of Minichat as well, and actually just duplicate the experiences if you even want from Instagram to text, but we use texts a little bit differently. It's more so for announcements and that kind of thing, not too much of the back and forth, but once we get someone's phone number inside of the DM bot and now they can sign up for a weekly text we're going to send out or anytime we have announcements, even simple things like, hey, we're about to go live on Instagram and then be able to constantly have people engaging with all of your communication channels. That's really the goal is for you to be omnichannel and omnipresent for them.
And then finally we have Messenger and WhatsApp. And I want to highlight this the most because Facebook, if you weren't aware is working on a concept that they call interoperability. It's been in the work since 2019. So they are a couple years in and it and slowly happening, but they are creating a way for Instagram users, for example, to be able to talk to Messenger users and WhatsApp users, the other platforms in their ecosystem without having to have accounts on those platforms. And that for businesses then means that if you've got an Instagram business account that you've created a bunch of different chat experiences for, theoretically in the future, you should be able to just have that same experience happen on all three of these platforms.
And these platforms are some of the largest messaging platforms in the world as well as social, of course. And so there's a lot of benefit here to start to build on all of these knowing that they will all be merging together in that way. They'll still be separate, but you will be able to talk to people more seamlessly across them. So that's just a quick overview of how this might play into the rest of your marketing system and things you want to be thinking about as you're building out your DM experiences so that you can be omnipresent and omnichannel for your people.

Chris:

That was really cool. There's a lot of things to dive into. And here's a quick one for people who want to use chat just to increase views or followers for their account. You don't always need to capture someone's email or to get them to download some free document that you have. You could just tie your content together with a series of questions. For example, you could say, what topic are you interested? Give them a few options and then they pick something and you can just then link it to your live stream or your short or something like that. Am I understanding that correctly, Natasha.

Natasha:

Exactly. And to go even further than that too, to get some engagement with your followers at a level that really hasn't been possible before. Only to a certain extent is actually being able to get their feedback on your content too. And so for example, let's say they go to your livestream and then maybe a couple hours later you send them a follow-up on Instagram DM and you say, "Hey, did you attend the livestream? What did you like? What would you have liked to see more of? What type of content should I shoot next, choose from these three." And then you can send all that information to a Google Sheet and you and your content team can say, okay, cool, so this is what people want to see next. And now again, you're being able to connect with your community at scale, without you having to have had those thousands or hundreds of DM conversations. It's just another little idea for people.

Chris:

And here's the other thing, as far as I know, the algorithm doesn't like people who send their audience off platform with external links, but as far as I know in the DMs, they don't care, they're not monitoring those things the way they would say a post or a story, correct?

Natasha:

Yes. We have not seen anything negative happen or decreased views or engagement, anything like that which to your point is a big deal because then people are able to A, get relevant content, but also be able to get a lot of links being sent to them inside of the DMs that are relevant without you having any negative consequences from that. So absolutely spot on.

Chris:

Okay. Before we run out of time, there's something I want to talk to you about in terms of the high level thing, because I heard you say this before in terms of messaging automation is like a paradigm shift for marketing. So can we talk about the high level? Like why? Tell us the benefits? Why should someone invest time and energy into learning this and implementing it in their marketing?

Natasha:

Yeah. As we can see with whether you like Facebook or not, they are one of the most powerful companies in the world because of the amount of data that they have. And so be it good or bad, positive or negative, the fact is that they make their decisions based on all that data that they have. And Mark Zuckerberg at FA every year shares really valuable insights that you can take from and say, okay, here's what's happening next over the next few years in media and in content and in social and how people connect. And so many times now, Zuckerberg has talked about how if he was starting to Facebook over today, he would start with messaging and he recognizes that people want to have these private environments to have conversations with people. COVID accelerated that a lot as well. People are really desperate for that one-on-one interaction and connection.
And so when it comes to messaging, it's only natural that as long as humans have been around, we've always interacted in business through conversation. You walk into a store, you learn a little bit more. And so that was automated through the form of websites and automated emails and funnels and social media to an extent, but most of the time, people are still having a conversation with your business even if they're reading stuff on your website, they're thinking in their head, okay, well, now I want to know this, let me scroll through this and find it. Now I want to know this. And we've found that not only can connection and engagement be accelerated and deepened at an incredible level with automation, but also the sale which does your customer potential customer a big by saying, hey, do you want to make your decision much faster than you might? Here you go. And here let's talk about it real quick.
And so while it's still very early and you'll probably go through a lot of crappy messaging experiences like I have to test things out and see how they are. You can see how many more people, especially through COVID realize the power and the benefit of having this automation. So regardless of how big you are as a business, it's important to be there for your customers. People want to be able to talk to someone or something before they buy. And so why not be there for them 24/7 before they move on to a competitor if you don't reply to them for three days. And also why put that stress on yourself, right? Of having to always be online, replying to people when you can be operating in your zone of genius, operating and creating better high quality products and delivery for people. Spending your time with the most urgent, but also the highest quality or most important things that you can be doing instead of all the stuff that needs to happen, but that you don't need to be involved with anymore.

Chris:

Right.

Natasha:

So just a few thoughts from that to get people incentivized, at least like test it out, right?

Chris:

Right.

Natasha:

Why not, at least, see how it goes.

Chris:

It's actually really fun to do. And once you get into it, I think how I want to use it is to teach. And so I start thinking about if I had a real student in front of me, what would I say to them? What would they say back to me? And how would I guide them through this process so they can walk away feeling more empowered or inspired or having a new resource that they can use on their very next client interaction. And so I'm very excited about this because as an instructor, I've said the same thing a 1,000 times already. That doesn't improve my life, but I realize I have to do it, but if there were a better way, I should at least investigate this. And I'm very excited about it. And I have to say whether you use Minichat or one of the competitors in terms of chatbots, they make it really simple. They walk you through the process. So it's like all flowchart, you drag and drop like a pick whip.

Natasha:

No code.

Chris:

No code. Super smart. And it's getting smarter because every time I log in to create a new automation, there's more instructions in there. It's teaching you how to do it the right way, which I applaud Mike and his whole team for doing that.

Natasha:

Yeah. Agreed with you completely. And it'll be really fascinating to see where this goes in regards to AI development. And just how we have platforms like JARVIS who I know just changed their name, but they're a good example of a good copywriting AI platform, right? Where you can get Facebook ads written in their, Instagram captions, that future is going to come soon for messaging as well. And you'll be able to just benefit from all this stuff over time if you start now and just experiment a little bit and understand how people engage with you in those conversations and have that data built up.
So that then as these tools come out where you can reach more people, impact more lives, like you said, teach a lot more people as well. It'd be impossible for you to teach all 8 billion people on the planet, but if they could all go through a messaging conversation with Chris bot, well, then their lives are changed for the better. And it allows you to extend yourself past your physical being. And so I love that you use that example because it allows you to turn a sales conversation or a lead generation conversation into an educational experience for people that is tough to do and might be a little bit tiresome and burdensome for actual humans to have to do in every single interaction.

Chris:

Now this may be a lot for people to process. So if you're listening to this, we'll make sure it include relevant links in the show notes. You can check them out below and just look at them and hopefully you get started. Now before people go out there and get crazy and start breaking things on the internet, what are a couple of mistakes or words of wisdom you can share with them for them to avoid so they don't create a bad user experience for their potential clients?

Natasha:

Yeah. I'll share a couple here quickly. The first one which we briefly touched on, but just to harp on it again, so people can write it down and remember is to never reply with just a dismissive, okay, cool, you can go and get that here, click this link. We see that a lot as well as blasts that go out where regardless of the platform, but Instagram in specific, let's say that you say, hey, are you interested in my services on my story, DM me the word service or something. And then someone comes in and you're like, cool, go fill out this link here. Well, that didn't accomplish literally anything different than you sharing a link otherwise. And it feels very dismissive and almost disrespectful to the consumer. And it's not going to convert that well. That would be one thing.
The second thing as well is when you're following up with people and sending out what I would say like the bot is starting the conversation at that point, the user has not invited you to reply, but it's like, hey, whether it's a friendly nudge or it'd say, hey, I'm going live soon, come and check this out. Always making sure that that first message has a way to engage with it or tell people, hey, stop messaging me. I'm not interested anymore because you always want to respect people's inboxes. It is the most sensitive channel and the most precious real estate that you can be in online. And so really respect that because creating that sustainable relationship with your users is going to elongate the amount of time that they actually have that relationship with you. Instead of them being like, oh, my gosh, Natasha's getting so annoying in the DMs. Like I got this lead magnet. It was great, but man, I'm just going to block them because they're being too much.
And we saw that happen a lot with Messenger. I think people learned a little bit with Instagram and there's also stricter policies around when and how you can message people so they learned as well. But I think it's still a super important thing to keep in mind there. So I think those two tips will help people get started. And then the rest of the tips honestly, should be learned through experience because then from there you guys can see what data you're getting and see, okay, only 9% of people are clicking on this. Let's test out this new copy and whatnot. From there it's more optimization.

Chris:

Yeah. There's this thing that has been an idea that you don't own your customer data on social platforms, the platforms own the data. And that's why there's been a big emphasis on you capturing emails and building the relationship. What's really neat about chat automation, messaging automation is that you can segment who's interacted with what, what level of interaction they've had. And you can message very specific groups of people and have this very, very intimate conversation with them. And you're saving yourself an additional step and this is done all through the platform. So it's really, really cool. I haven't done it yet, but I can see that they're there because the software platform tells me you have X number of new people engaging with your thing. And it's a pretty neat thing to be able to see.

Natasha:

Yes. Exactly. It is really cool for... What we find too is that with any size business, I've had a CEO of $100,000 a year client business as well as a smaller, let's say $300,000 a year business. Both of those leaders looking at the conversations and being like wow, I feel like we are there for our customers. And this is just giving me a good idea of whether there's an overall positive sentiment or negative sentiment. And sometimes initially it is negative because they were not creating the best experience and we come in and help them turn it around, right? Or they see a lot of positive stuff and they're like, oh, this is amazing. This is working. So it's great to be able to see that again, without having to be responsible for replying to all of that as well.

Chris:

Natasha, thank you very much for sharing this information with us. I feel like I benefited from us having this conversation later than we originally scheduled because I got more time to use a platform and test it. So I feel smarter. You've given me some things to think about. I probably have to go back and make sure I'm not committing some of the sins that you're talking about. I feel like I am guilty of one or two of those things. I'm going to go and change that right after we finish. If people want to find out more about you and what you're up to, where should they go?

Natasha:

Yeah. Well, first off, thank you so much for having me and as always such a pleasure to speak with you, I love what you do and your energy and your audience is incredible. So I hope they benefit from what we shared and if people want to connect Instagram and Twitter are the easiest places to find me. So feel free to shoot me a DM if you have any questions and I can point you towards a resource or at least answer a quick question for you. So my Instagram is Natashaofficial_ and my Twitter is Natasha Willis GG. So feel free to hit me up there.

Chris:

So the last question is, if they chat with you, will it be talking to the real you or the chatbot version of you?

Natasha:

On Instagram... One thing that I didn't mention in the sins or whatnot to do is that if you're running a personal brand account where you are the face of the brand or you're managing this for someone you work for, we don't always have automation linked to every single possible thing that someone might type in because we may have influencers or partners or people of important stature reach out and we don't want them to have a negative experience. It's impossible to capture it all right now. So with me, I have specific triggers on for if you're going to download this resource for me, you're going to watch this YouTube video, but people won't always get automation with me. And then Twitter is not quite there yet, but hopefully soon for Twitter and LinkedIn.

Chris:

Okay. Then maybe that's a hint and more to come. Wow.

Natasha:

Indeed.

Chris:

I'm very excited about it. Thank you very much, Natasha.

Natasha:

Thank you. I am Natasha Takahashi and you're listening to The Futur.

Greg:

Thanks for joining us this time. If you haven't already, subscribe to our show on your favorite podcasting app and get a new insightful episode from us every week. The Futur Podcast is hosted by Chris Do and produced by me, Greg Gunn. Thank you to Anthony Barro for editing and mixing this episode and thank you to Adam Sanborne for our intro music.


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