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Nick Harauz

Nick Harauz is a content creator, video editing expert, and student of the creative process. In this episode, Nick and Chris talk about the challenges of teaching (and learning) online, how they each prepare for presentations, and why starting is the hardest part of the creative process.

Why you dread doing the work
Why you dread doing the work

Why you dread doing the work

Ep
172
Jan
19
With
Nick Harauz
Or Listen On:

We all pay a time tax.

Nick Harauz is a content creator, video editing expert, and student of the creative process.

He’s also a certified Adobe, Apple, and Avid trainer and founder of Creative 111; a company that specializes in video and motion  graphics training. You might recognize him from instructional videos all over adobe.com.

In this episode, Nick and Chris talk about the challenges of teaching (and learning) online, how they each prepare for presentations, and why starting is the hardest part of the creative process.

Nick also shares an incredible (and kind of funny) story about how his camera was stolen during a shoot! Further proof that there is always someone watching.

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produced by
edited by
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Episode Transcript

Nick:

I think that you place expectations on yourself that aren't realistic, and that's a tough thing because it's ingrained in me that whole idea of a 9:00 to 5:00 work week. That's the time that you dedicate towards work, but not all of those work hours are equal. So I think that there's something to that where you're expecting to be as efficient as possible during those hours, but it just never ends up being the case.

Chris:

So, Nick, there's a story about how you and I met. I can't remember exactly, but Las Vegas, a bar or something, late nights, that's how it began, I think, when we were getting to know each other.

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

But there's a whole bunch of people who don't know who you are. And for those people, please introduce yourself.

Nick:

Sure. My name is Nick Harauz, and I'm a content creator, a video editing expert, and a student in the art of creativity or the creative process.

Chris:

I love that. You forgot to include a couple of things in there.

Nick:

I'm trying to sum up the first a little better. We hopefully get more into it if people are intrigued. You know?

Chris:

Well, I'm going to do it for you right now. I didn't know this, but you were also an actor for a period of time.

Nick:

Yes. Oh my gosh, this is so true. So I was a actor for a number of years. In fact, in high school, this is what I wanted to be. I wanted to be an actor. And I participated in a ton of high school plays as well as even wrote some. What happened was, when it came to university, I never got accepted to any of the schools that I wanted to go to. And I got this lecture from somewhat at a school called George Brown, which was primarily known for theatrical acting. And his big pitch to everybody was, "If you want to be an actor in theater, you can't make money." And this was his story.

Chris:

That's his pitch?

Nick:

And it scared the living bejesus out of me. He's just like, "Most theater actors make no money. You're going to be broke, and you're going to give your life's passion to it." And it didn't connect to me.

Chris:

Okay. Something about being broke didn't appeal to you?

Nick:

It didn't. Yeah. I mean, I was already ... I mean, I was a high school student. There was not a lot of money coming in anyways, but the potential for that to continue did not sit well with me.

Chris:

And the pitch from the theater director is like, "You know the way you're living right now? Nothing's going to change. You have no money, no life, but you could be really passionate." No, thank you. Check, please.

Nick:

Yeah. So it really got me questioning about that career. And I mean that was the direction of the school. There's other schools that I would say appealed more to film acting, but theatrical was definitely what I was passionate about. So there were a few years in university where I would call the filler period where I started taking classes, but there was no real passion behind wanting to pursue what I was learning at the time.

Chris:

Yeah. So here's the thing. I'm trying to do some research on you to set some kind of context for our conversation today. There's not a lot I have to say. Most of any content with you is you teaching, and we'll get to that because I think that's a big part of your identity.

Nick:

Yep.

Chris:

But I did find this little bit where, on IMDB, at least, you're credited as being the actor and the editor of the film. Not of the ... I mean, you're an actor in the film, but you're an editor of the film called My Father and the Man in Black, a film I never heard about before but was featured at the Toronto Independent Film Festival. And I was like, "What?" I didn't know this about you.

Nick:

Yeah. No, this was such a great experience partaking in that. It was about 2008, circa 2009, when the production happened. In the film, everything was shot in 35-millimeter at the time. I got to play a Statler Brother. It was a Johnny Cash documentary. And long story short, Johnny Cash's second manager was named Saul Holiff, and he lived in a small town called London, Ontario, which is about two and a half hours west of Toronto.
His son decided to do a documentary about him after he passed. His father committed suicide, euthanasia. And he eventually discovered a storage locker of all of his dad's collections and everything that happened during the Johnny Cash years, including these recordings with Johnny Cash and Saul. He basically recorded conversations during a period where he didn't trust Johnny, so that's actually featured in the film. But long story short, I had met him in Toronto through another colleague when I was doing a ton of training. And it eventually led to me doing the entire rough edit and some of the fine-tuning edit on the film.

Chris:

And where did that take you? I saw you were interviewed for this clip in 2012.

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

And it seemed like a red carpet event. There was a step and repeat pattern behind you, and you were talking about your participation. Where did this leave you in your career in the direction in which you were heading?

Nick:

This actually opened up a gateway of, funny enough, in terms of the world of teaching, which I have, as you've mentioned, have wrapped my identity out quite a bit for a long time, but it did. If we're going to talk about the experience of the film, it allowed me to partake in a long-form post-production venture, which I hadn't done before. So in that process, I was primarily, before that, cutting short-form content for branding activation companies and a few commercials here and there, but this was a long-form experience for something that I wasn't prepared for, but let's just call it the accidental filmmaker where some experience met opportunity, and I was able to edit this with the director one on one.
And so it led me to being able to play and work with narrative content for a period of time and go through that entire experience working with a company such as Technicolor to get the final product done. In terms of the red carpet, it was just amazing to see your work eventually, after three years ... it did take the director a long time to release the final product ... but be seen on the big screen. So that was a glorious moment at that point in time in Toronto when it was released and to take part in that event, not to mention another event a year later, or actually probably about six months later in Chicago, because it did tour a few film festivals, and I did go to the Chicago one.

Chris:

How prominent was your role in the film?

Nick:

I'm in about three minutes of screen time that got cut down to 45 seconds. So the rough cut was two and a half hours long. And then, based on feedback when it went through test screenings, it got chopped down eventually to 86 minutes. So in all of that, the content, this was how the director had written it. It was a two-and-a-half-hour film, and he wanted to see it that way before he started to strip the content away from the final product. So yeah, I'm in a bunch of behind-the-scenes features, and then I have these silent on-film rolls where I'm a Statler brother. In fact, I should send you after this ... I'll send you a clip.

Chris:

I think that would be great for the podcast if we can include a clip there. All right. So your big screen moment got cut down to under a minute.

Nick:

To 45 seconds. There's another one too. I was an extra for a number of years before that, and I get a good 10 seconds of screen time with Kelly McGillis in a police lineup. That was the other one.

Chris:

And what about anything after this?

Nick:

In terms of acting, no, nothing. But I would say that there is a certain amount of acting that is involved with live presentations.

Chris:

Well, I'd like to make that thread with you. Okay, so this being a podcast, you have no idea what Nick looks like, and I'm trying to figure out how to describe you. You have that leading man matinee kind of look like. I would say you could be a cousin to John Hamm, the guy from Mad Men.

Nick:

Yep.

Chris:

You know, kind of a rugged classic, and you're Canadian, but that rugged American kind of look to you.

Nick:

Yes.

Chris:

And that's how I would describe you. So I think you being on camera, speaking, teaching, performing, tapping into those initial inclinations towards stage acting and all that, I think it makes a lot of sense now to understand why you do what you do.

Nick:

Yeah, I totally agree with that. Actually, my wife does refer to me as John Hamm too, when she met me, and that was the connection and stuff.

Chris:

All right, I nailed it.

Nick:

So you nailed it. Definitely that, and yeah, I think that is that charismatic nature to me in terms of, I am also tall too, 6'3", so there is a presence about me, whether it be on-screen or in a room and presenting as well.

Chris:

I'm a big believer of this, Nick, that whether you believe in God or a creator, but we all are here on this planet. And I think we have a set of skills that is unique to us, a unique combination of skills and the way we think, the way we speak, the sound of our voice, something like that, that a lot of us wind up living our life and not having discovered that.

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

I think you are one of the people who have found that. You get to perform the way you perform. You get to direct and edit yourself, and you get to teach, and you get to talk and share about your passion for filmmaking and editing. Is there something else that's part of your repertoire that you haven't been able to tap into yet?

Nick:

Tons, of course. I think-

Chris:

Tell me about some of those things.

Nick:

I'm going to talk about teaching for a little while and just about my evolution as a teacher.

Chris:

All right.

Nick:

When I first began to teach at conferences, I would talk primarily about software applications. One thing that makes me a very successful teacher in my opinion is the fact that I can communicate, in some cases, very basic essential skills and keyboard shortcuts that sometimes get missed even by industry professionals in the way that you go across looking at a piece of software. And I was able ... I think because of my own learning and needing to understand that in order to accel ... I can communicate that really well to an audience. But upon reflection, when I first started presenting at NAB, there was something masked behind there as well. And that is the ability that I wanted ... the editing application itself was ... I felt primarily comfortable presenting static at a desk, so not taking advantage of a full room of people.
Didn't realize it at the time, but this is ... I would give a brief introduction, go to my computer, and then just carry through the necessary means to get to the end of the presentation. And for that type of audience, it was awesome. And then, looking on that, I wanted to talk about more. While you get to show people pretty footage and beautiful motion graphics, I wanted to talk about general topics, such as creativity, and even go back a step. A realm of I've never really done or felt comfortable with where I would usually just rely on a keynote presentation of a few points versus carry out a conversation with the audience, just looking at them in the eye. I decided to take a risk a few years back, where I talked about the imposter syndrome at NAB. I picked the topic and went for it, and it was nerve-wracking as much as it was a relieving experience.

Chris:

What year was that?

Nick:

I'm going to say around 2018, but I could be wrong. So it's about 2018, 2019. I can dig it up. And the cool part about that presentation was I actually asked, at the time, and she's completely blown up ... Valentina V spoke on the stage with me about it.

Chris:

Hmm. If it's 2018, that means that's right around when you and Ian and I were hanging out. Right?

Nick:

Yeah, to be honest, that's exactly where we hung out the first time at NAB. That was around when I was presenting the imposter syndrome. We had crossed paths at a conference, I believe, just prior to that. I think you spoke at AE World for future meter concepts and were the head presenter there at that time. So I had seen you on stage, but we'd just shake hands versus an actual full, two-hour, three-hour sit down at a Las Vegas hotel just off the strip.

Chris:

So what people don't know is once you get on the "speaking circuit," you see the same faces over and over again from one conference to the next. Right?

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

And so FMC produces a lot of different things, and naturally, I would see you, and I would see Ian. There's a bunch of other people I would see. And it was like a professional courtesy like, "Hey, how's it going?" But it's one of those weird things, like where does this conversation go? And I had seen Ian many times. We chatted a couple of times, and I think we even sat on a panel together. And so when we all got together, it was like one of those moments where, away from the conference, we get to talk and share ideas.
Now here's one crazy thing, though, about that night. I wasn't intending to stay very long because I hadn't finished my presentation for the next day. I had two more presentations ago.

Nick:

Oh, man.

Chris:

And I was just thinking, "Oh, my God! I got to get back to the hotel room, but I'm enjoying our conversation, so I'm going to stay out with you for a little bit." And then, minutes turned into, I think, an hour and a half. It was a long conversation. I get back to my hotel room. I'm wiped out, and I'm looking at the clock thinking, "Why did I do this to myself?" So I wound up grinding on my presentation at like 4:00 in the morning, the night before my presentation. Do you ever do something like that?

Nick:

Yes. When I first started in the conference circuit, I would say ...Okay, so the first parts of the story would be that I over-prepared for presentations, which led to later nights. But in general, in Vegas, even as a prepared speaker, let's be honest, Vegas is a big place. The distance between hotels is very deceiving, and they make it extremely difficult for you to get from one place to another. Not to mention that you're in a world like one of these conferences where there are thousands of contacts that you have probably not seen in a year or a long time, and you do want to give people some time to talk and to catch up. At least to me, some of those face-to-face conversations are some of the most powerful ones I've had in my life, and I love that about NAB. But with that comes the problem that, okay, there's a finite amount of hours. Right? And now, you've got to prepare and be ready for your next presentation.
At NAB, at least for the last three years, my average presentation schedule was anywhere from 8:00 to 12:00, 75 minutes to three-hour talks. It's a lot to prepare. I mean, I'm curious your perspective on this, Chris. But the first time that I had to take my thoughts and then decompress them into that 75-minute presentation, it took a very long time to do. I would say just shy of a month, the first time I presented in that fashion. But now, because there's, in some cases, recycled assets from past presentations that you can then bring in, not to mention that you develop a skill as well as a pattern that does work, you're able to apply that to other presentations, so it takes less time, way less time. Do you find that in those cases, although you were preparing for a presentation at 4:00 am, it takes you a lot less time to do?

Chris:

Yeah, yep, and I'll talk about that, but I want to clarify for everyone. When you said typically you do from eight to 12, you're talking about eight to 12 presentations. Right?

Nick:

Correct.

Chris:

Yeah. In a span of, I think, five days, four days?

Nick:

Five days, yeah. And then-

Chris:

Five days.

Nick:

... for the last ... just before that, two of the years, as well, was a full-on 360 VR demo, so Insta360 sponsored it. You would go to the desert and film with their pro-cameras, and the second day would be a full-on editing lab. And then, add on another six presentations on top of it.

Chris:

And here I thought I was the ultramarathon runner doing five presentations. You're like, "Dude, I don't get out of bed for any less than eight." Get out of here. We get five. Right? I'm like, "Nick, let me tell you how hard I work. I do five."

Nick:

Oh.

Chris:

People don't understand this, though. In a five-day period to do 12 presentations, you are pretty much just going wall-to-wall presentations. There's not a lot of room. So I then would have to assume then, you go to this having already prepared, or are you preparing each night for the next day?

Nick:

No. Now everything is pretty much prepared ahead of time to some degree. I would say that there are certain presentations that need 30 to 45-minute tweaks, depending on either what I've presented ahead of time, or the fact that I just need a little bit more room to refine the initial idea. But no more am I preparing stuff at a conference just before presenting, but that was something that I did do, which was very, very unsuccessful.

Chris:

So for me, just to answer your question, though, yeah, like anything, when you're doing it for the first time, it takes you a really, really long time. A lot of it is just trying to figure out what am I going to say, how to sequence the stories, and the data, and the research, or any visuals that you need to create. The actual making of the presentation itself ... because I'm typically doing anywhere between 100 to 300 slides per presentation, and that's for even short ones. It's a lot of slides because it's very visual. I'm stepping through lots of stuff. It's not to say every slide is a massive slide. A slide could have one word on it. And I find that it's the idea part that really is the part that you torture yourself over.
But when you get into production mode, you said you have repurposable assets. You need to tweak something, you have a template ready to go, and so you're just adjusting things to shape the conversation. My challenge is typically, because I don't teach software at all, it's almost always soft skills. And so the event organizer will say, "Can you speak about this?" And I foolishly say yes. And it's not one where I have a deck for.

Nick:

Oh, no.

Chris:

Yeah. So I'm literally ... When that thing came around that I need to do five presentations, I only finished two or three before arriving in Las Vegas. I had an idea as to what I needed to say, and I have a bunch of old decks that I could probably pull from. But sometimes, that's more work than just doing it from scratch. You're looking for the slide, and it doesn't conform to what you're doing, and it's just a nightmare. Right? And so that was my moment of clarity. I shouldn't have gone out with Nick and Ian that night because now I'm really, really tired, grinding through this.

Nick:

Oh, man. I can totally relate to that too, where there have been times, especially when you mention soft talks where you might want to try to pick up assets from a previous presentation, but it doesn't suit the style, or it ends up being way more work to edit that asset in your new presentation versus find new content and start from scratch or start from a newer perspective.

Chris:

Yeah, absolutely. For me, it's like, "Where was that image and slide from? I can't remember what presentation." I'm digging through old presentations, rifling through 300 slides. There it is. And then you copy-paste it, and it's like, "Well, I should have just did it from scratch because this is not right."

Nick:

How did that presentation go, by the way?

Chris:

It went great. Yeah. Yeah, you make it happen, but there's always the presenter remorse, which is after you deliver it. I'm constantly going through this because I'm a constant improver. I should have said this, and if I phrased that and sequenced it differently, it would've been more interesting or funny. And so you need that ability to continually present the same thing over and over again so you can refine it and really deliver just a polished talk on subject X.

Nick:

Yeah, it's so true. I think, at least through ... It's a fairly new field, me doing soft talks. I actually continued it this year, but they've been all virtual, which is also a very different field to an audience compared to something where you're live.

Chris:

Tell me about the feeling. I want to compare notes with you. Just talk shop for a little bit here.

Nick:

There's a conference I participated twice this year. It's called The Creativity Conference. And one of the people who puts it together is a gentleman named Maxim Jago, as well as one of his colleagues who I can't remember the name of, but who's in Iceland. And I just love the idea of a conference dedicated towards creativity. And speaking about the virtual idea through a Zoom conference where you're not seeing people's faces, sometimes it's a bit harder to judge to see if people are actually connecting to what you're saying.
So although I'll still pause in the presentation to see if people have questions, there's a bit more of an uncomfortable pause that happens because someone's typing or you don't know if they're listening or they want to participate, not to mention I'm pretty sure that when you're watching something on the web, it's a lot harder to get distracted by things if you're just left to your own computer. When you're confined to a room with a presenter, there's potentially a better chance for you to absorb more information versus get distracted by all of the other things that technology has to offer.
I would also say that in seeing flickering numbers go in and out of rooms because it's a lot harder for you to jump from one room in Vegas to another. You can go into a presentation, but then if you want to go into another presentation, you have to decide, "Do I really want to walk five minutes to that other room to check out the presentation?" And then you also have to leave a room of a lot of people. But virtually, no one sees you. You can hop in and out of a presentation. No problem. So you never know where someone is in your story.
If you're designing, let's say a presentation for 15 minutes, how do you know that someone's engaged when they come in at the 25-minute mark? And how do you make parts in your story for them to be able to pick up and then become engaged? This is something that I think about more on the side that everyone who attends these presentations. Of course, you want valuable feedback at the end of your segment. How did this person do? How was the presenter? How was the content? Your review, but how are they reviewing you, and at what time? So I'm very curious about that. And I believe it to be that while there are a great core group of people who will listen to your presentation from beginning to end, there are also a core group of people equally as much so who are jumping around from one presentation to the other?

Chris:

Yeah. I want to highlight a couple of things here because for years I was an attendee before I was a speaker. And there is something about these rules in society where we feel a little bit bad when a presenter's not doing well, but we don't want to get up, especially if we're not near the aisle. And we get up, and it's like, Excuse me. Pardon me. Excuse me. Pardon me." And you shimmy your way across different people, and you leave. And this noise, and you feel bad for the presenter. And you're absolutely right. The thing that I think about, not so much as the five-minute walk, but who's to say the next person you walk into that room, that room's going to be any good, or there's even a seat available for you because you're just going to be in the back of the hallway or the auditorium, and it sucks back there. You can't really see things, and you feel really disconnected.
And a funny story is my cousin who worked with me for a period of time over 10 years, he doesn't give an F. He's like, "This person is insulting my intelligence and my time. This presentation is boring." We would gesture to each other like we were in high school together. He's nodding off like, "Dude, I can't do this." And he's pissed, and he gets up. And it's interesting because I would watch him walk out and think, "What am I doing here? This is a terrible presentation. This person doesn't know how to speak, isn't engaging me. Isn't asking rhetorical questions. Isn't teaching me something."
I now just get up myself. I'm like him now. I've adopted this. I'm pissed off. I'm leaving. And you're right. In a virtual sense, we're not worried about it at all. Nobody can see you, so you literally can pop in and out of rooms as you see fit. And as a presenter, as you're watching the numbers fluctuate, sometimes wildly, it can be a little dysregulating like, "Jesus, are people leaving because I'm boring or this is stupid?" Now new people are coming in, and now do I recap what I've already done? It's a little bit confusing. Right?

Nick:

It's something to get ... I mean, I've been doing it now for, well, pretty much that's the steady stream of communication in terms of conference presenting that I've been doing since April 2020.

Chris:

And do you feel like you've found your groove doing it virtually versus in person?

Nick:

Definitely. Yeah. To back up a little bit, my first experience in terms of teaching was where people were able to follow along with computers. It's still my favorite way to teach people because I think that they get the most out of it. In a software basis where you have an instructor in the room who is running you through a curriculum where you're following along with the same type of media, and you're performing editing operations or motion graphics, to be able to listen to what the instructor does and then repeat it right there in the class is so valuable.
And I think that while 15-minute presentations with video editing and motion graphics have their place to teach tips and tricks and people write that down, most of the presentations, people don't have the ability to follow along. And I don't have the ability as an instructor in most of these presentations to see what you are doing on a computer and be able to then process what are you doing wrong, or can I help you solve what is probably a really simple thing, but because you're new, you don't know what you've pressed. It could be something as easy as pressing the C key versus the V key in an Adobe application or platform.
So going back to that recap of that question, I think that is something that I miss quite a bit, but that's not to say that I haven't gotten a groove in presenting online. The 50-minute presentation seems to be able to give the audience a great amount of content with also allowing them to ask questions. And then, if they want, they can go then to the next presentation and continue to do that pretty much until 9:00 PM at night, let's say, from 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM. But yeah, there's definitely a ... I have a comfort, for sure, during Zoom.

Chris:

Yeah. And just to clarify, Nick's been teaching a long time, recording courses that are not interactive and not in real-time. I was mostly referencing the real-time quality that is being live broadcasted, that you can actually interact with the instructor in some way, either throwing up an emoji, or asking a question, or submitting something for the Q&A, which is a little bit different.
With an edited video, you could do it 10 times. Take the best takes. You could be scripted. You're not distracted by anybody's questions, at least because you're focusing on the teaching part, not the interaction. So just for clarification. Okay. I got a couple of questions for you because I'm visiting your site, and there's this URL, Finding Creativity in Uncertain Times, this new book that you're working on. Can we talk about that?

Nick:

We can totally talk about that. By the way, that is two days old, so be gentle, Chris.

Chris:

Always, always, Nick. Okay, this is your second book. Right?

Nick:

This is my second book. Yeah. I wrote a technology book on motion, Apple Motion, which is, for those of you who don't know, it's a motion graphic software that works in tandem with Final Cut. It's $50.00. And in some ways, it's like the gateway to anything that you want to create motion graphics-wise and have the ability to update inside of Final Cut. So it's been around for a while. That was my first book.
Three years ago, I came up with an idea for a book on creativity. What stroked the passion was a book I read by a Canadian called David Usher. He's a musician. He's most known for playing in a band called Moist, but now he is a solo musician, and he wrote a book called Let the Elephants Run. It's a book on creativity. What I loved about the book was it's these small passages that are mixed with beautiful graphical elements. And wow, it's like talking about creativity. It's not just words. It's that mixture between graphics, and it was just something that really hit home with me. And I'm like, "I would like to express some of the things that I've learned through my own creative journey as an instructor, as someone who's been involved with the post-production community."
So like any good creative, I wrote down 100 ideas for different sections, and then I forgot about it. I shelved it. I got scared, not forgot about it. But I did. I got scared. There was a moment that was like, "Who am I to talk about creativity?" Then fast forward to, we can say, eight months into the pandemics, so that's early 2021, and I land back on this sheet of ideas that I had fleshed out into three different sections. And I'm like, "I want to go for it."
And I'm not only going to go for it, I'm going to hire a book editor. I hired someone to help me with the website, and I got LinkedIn Learning, which is where I do most of my online courses to also allow for a course portion of it to come out. So I'll come out in January. I already finished recording the course. It's 45 minutes divided into 20 movies, all about my journey to finding creativity in uncertain times.
Talking about the course, it pretty much goes through a similar story arc in the book. The first chapter is called Down in the Dumps, which is the idea of how do you look at creativity when you are stressed or anxious or just in the weeds. And the second part is what I call all at the little things and about the small little things that you can do and hopefully repeat so that eventually that turns into a compound effect. And then the third part of the book, as of now, is called Continuous Learning. So you're even at the top of your game, and how do you continue to be creative and challenge yourself creatively? Because I think that's important too.
I would say that one of my favorite ideas, and it's still in the works, is that it does have a lot of graphic passages. Have you seen the movie Pleasantville?

Chris:

Yes, I have.

Nick:

So I got inspired by this film for the graphics and also telling the journey of this idea of being trapped to being somewhat creatively free. In Pleasantville, when they hop into the TV, if you haven't seen it, it's basically Reese Witherspoon and Toby McGuire are your modern-day family in the ... I think it's in and 90s. And eventually, they get sucked into this old, perfect 40s, 50s town called Pleasantville. Eventually, what they bring there is people start to have sex with each other. And once they do, they start to see color. And eventually, the entire town comes from black and white to color.
I was like, "Wouldn't that be cool in a book where you have a moment when you are struggling with creativity. Everything is like scribbles or like a rough type of drawing." And then, essentially, as you start to grow through that process, the drawings become clearer. There's little elements of color. There's a bit sharper strokes to your actual graphics. And then there's the last part of the book, which is then full color or almost full realization. So that's how the graphics are planned to be done. And I've already started this with one illustrator and hopefully with another, from black and white to color through the journey of the book.

Chris:

That's a neat little concept there. And if I remember, when I was reading through the description of the book, it's like a workbook. Right? It's not just a book that you read and you put down. Like you said, there's space for you to write and interact with the book. Is that right, or no?

Nick:

Yes. So this book, through my own personal want for this first one that I'm releasing in this genre, it's going to be hardcover only. And in the hardcover book will be passages where you can freely write and fill out forms to measure and take a look at your own creativity.

Chris:

Are you self-publishing?

Nick:

That is the plan. Although I do have a couple of book stores in Toronto who have agreed to stock them on their shelves as well as there is an interest in another publisher jumping on board after the book is fully structured, and it's at the 80% mark right now.

Chris:

When are you planning to finish it?

Nick:

The entire rough copy of the book will be done in December, late December. And then, the refinement will take a few months. So the idea to finish and then be ready for publication, we're looking at spring 2022.

Chris:

Wonderful. Time for a quick break, but we'll be right back.

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Chris:

Welcome back to our conversation. You said you broke the book into three main sections. Right? Dealing with the stress and finding creativity when things aren't going right. And the little things and this whole concept of continuous learning, remaining curious, regardless of where you are on your path. I want to circle back to the little things. Can you share some of the concepts from the little things?

Nick:

Yeah, sure. So I'll give you one that I've presented a couple of times this year too. It's called ... One is something I like to call the 10-minute rule, and there's a lot of different versions on it. But the idea is that if you have a long-form project and you spent the entire day getting lost in a TikTok thread, like 3:00 PM, and you just haven't done anything. I find that in looking at certain creatives I've talked to, they'll surrender the day. They'll hand it in because they weren't able to jumpstart what they had initially set out for themselves in terms of committing themselves to, let's say, three hours of a flow.
And what I say to that is, instead of surrendering the day, commit to 10 minutes. Commit to five minutes and just sit yourself in the room and just write down a few different things. Worst case, if you stick to that commitment, you have five to 10 minutes of stuff that you don't have to do the next day, and you're ahead of the game versus what you would have to do in its entirety. Best case scenario, and this is through personal experience, is that 10 minutes is a wonderful trick to get you to do a little bit more time than what you set out for yourself.
So usually, I'll be like, "Wow, 30, 40 minutes." If you get into a flow, awesome. And then you have, while not what you set out for yourself, you're still pushing that project forward. So that was one little thing that's in the book. Another that I love, I call it perfect scenario thinking and breaking up with it.

Chris:

Wait, wait, hold on. I want to just mention something before we go to perfect scenario thinking to respond to this. Okay. So you feel like you've lost a day, and rather than just give up, you're saying make a personal commitment, the shortest amount of time, five to 10 minutes. And it's a mental trick to allow you to focus and say, "You know what? Okay, fine. I'm just going to do this one thing." And the momentum of actually focusing and doing that thing builds more momentum, and you might actually spend more than 10 minutes doing highly focused work. That's the general concept. Right?

Nick:

That's the general concept. Yeah.

Chris:

Perfect. Now, this reminds me of this classic ad that I like to refer to from Adidas. And it's a street. It's like a double-page spread, and it's got almost a one-point vanishing point. So the street tapers off into the distance. You can actually see the horizon of this suburban neighborhood. And then there's a little bit of type, and it says, "Just to the mailbox, just to the street corner, just to the post office, just to the grocery store, or just to the next car." And that's this idea that starting is usually the hardest part. And I love that you're finding that just this little mental trick, little bit of leverage, and then you could change the outcome of that day. And potentially, if you do this consistently throughout your life, you can change your life.

Nick:

I'd love that. You have to send me the link to that commercial or anything. I want to totally check it out.

Chris:

Yeah, I'll find it for you.

Nick:

That sounds so cool, but-

Chris:

You know what's really cool about the internet? I share this story, and I mistakenly attribute to Nike. And of course, I can't find this ad. I'm searching all over. I think I'm pretty good at research. Somebody on YouTube is like, "Chris, it's Adidas, and here it is." And then, from that point forward, I know it's an Adidas ad, and I could be transposing it now and just totally screwing it up once again. But I will find it for you, and I will send it to you.

Nick:

Awesome.

Chris:

It's so awesome. It's a really old ad too.

Nick:

Oh, I can't wait to see it. Yeah. And pretty much what you summed up there is exactly what I was trying to go for. And it does, from my perspective, and this is from my own creative journey. It did change my life 100% in applying that rule. And I started applying it pre ... I would say quite a bit circa 2018, 2019, and my productivity went through the roof.

Chris:

So I want to ask you this question because we're all like, "Yeah, I totally get this. But really? Come on." So here's the question I have for you. What is something that you really dread that you're like, "Dude, I don't want to do this?" You really are postponing, procrastinating, and then you tell yourself, "Let's do the mental trick. Let's take the smallest viable action." Do you have an example for us?

Nick:

Sure. I love the idea of writing. I don't always love to write, and I'm writing a book. But it's true. It's such a great idea. Chris, if you could give me an author badge, and then all of a sudden, there was a bestselling book, that's sometimes how it goes. But then when you sit down and have to take a concept, and then, not only that but rework the concept, that is sometimes something ... that is one thing that I could sometimes dread on certain days.
I would also say that there is a certain amount of dread I have towards multiple rounds of feedback. And I actually even talk about feedback in the book and how to manage it because I think that in some cases, the management needs to be firing your client, which I think you say so well. And the other thing is setting expectations. But then, with your own, I draw a lot of connection to the stuff that I do when I work. And when clients gave me feedback in the past, I would take it very personally.
I would also say today, sometimes I do find myself having a personal reaction and connection to where someone I interpret responds negatively to something I've created. And I find that in those moments, the best thing I can do for myself, although not always taking that, is to step away and come back to it. That is something in some cases, dreading revisions, and then the ultimate feedback that you might receive from people who are critical.

Chris:

Good example. I'd love to share something that I hate doing, and it's going to sound strange when I say it. I actually do not enjoy the process of recording a video going live. I know internet. You see me on the internet all the time. You're like, "What is he talking about?"

Nick:

No, you don't. Come on.

Chris:

I do. So my team will say, "Chris, we need you to record this thing." And they know if they just leave it like that, it'll never get completed. So what they do is like, "Okay, we wrote a script or an outline for you, so now you can just record this thing." And it sits in my inbox. It's festering like an open wound. And I keep thinking, "Tomorrow, I'll do it. Well, you know what? The light's not good today. Oh, my son's going to be home soon, and I don't want to start it and have him come home and then make all this noise and ruin the take. I got to get this all done at once." And so I'm dreading and dreading this thing.
And eventually, it's the love of inertia. Right? A body at rest tends to stay at rest, and a body in motion tends to stay in motion until force acts upon it. And so it's just that first step. It just requires so much energy to get off that idea that I'm not going to do it today. And so then I'm like, "You know what? I'm going to open up Word. I'm going to refine this thing." And when I'm typing, I'm getting excited. It's starting to feel a little bit more tangible and real. And I'm like, "Oh, I have a smart, funny phrase I can say here." And then you prepare the idea, the script, the outline, and then you record it. The first couple takes suck, but you're like," The light is on. I combed my hair. I'm ready to go." And then you do it.

Nick:

That's awesome. Again, I'm actually still flabbergasted, the fact that that is the thing that you dread. You would never expect that. You know?

Chris:

But it's like what you said. You fancy yourself a writer. You just hate writing. If you could just be like an award-winning writer without having to write, you would have your dream life. Right?

Nick:

Yeah. I mean-

Chris:

It's the same.

Nick:

There are ghostwriters, but at the same point in time-

Chris:

Then what's the point?

Nick:

Yeah. Then what's the point? Exactly. Yeah, so fascinating.

Chris:

We're exposing some weaknesses here, both you and I. All right. Let's move on to the next idea that you were talking about, this perfect scenario thinking. Tell me more about what that is.

Nick:

Perfect scenario thinking, we're going to phrase it in the idea for workweek. Okay? And I'm going back to, let's say, your traditional or typical work week. Right? 9:00 to 5:00 is the idea, Monday to Friday. And you commit to a certain amount of things based on that schedule. Right? 9:00 to 5:00, okay? I'm doing this, this, this, and this and this. I think it's slightly a disservice to do that when accepting jobs and work and long-form projects based on that schedule, meaning that a typical workday in this day and age, and again, this is from my opinion, you get distracted. And distractions come in many flavors and forms.
In some cases, the distraction is just a client from three weeks ago from a wrapped-up project, maybe in my case, asking you to export a video again. Let's just say that project is light on render. I've got to open up Premier. I've got to export it. I've got to upload it. That's essentially 15 minutes, although it happens in the background. But then there's a phone call. Then there's something, not to mention just your general personal life and the things that revolve around that.
And I think that having a schedule based on you thinking that you have eight hours a day, and maybe you dedicate 14 hours, is not necessarily the best way to go about thinking about how to structure the amount of time that you have for your commitment in long-term projects. And to give yourself what I like to phrase a time tax in long-form projects could be of great service to you, especially if it's a new venture. In fact, the more newer the venture, the larger the time tax that you should give yourself.
And what I mean, just to explain that a bit more, let's just say that you anticipate a long-form project will take you hours of your time. Take that number and times it by three or four. If it's not a brand new venture to still add a time tax, and I draw a parallel with this with high budget Hollywood films and contingency budgets. So the idea is that you will say that you have a $150 million budget for this production, but the executive producers and producers behind the money will add 15% just in case anything goes wrong, which in most cases, it does.

Chris:

So they build into their budget some padding so that if and when it goes over budget, they're not screwed, and they can actually deliver a picture because you can't deliver an unfinished product. So you're saying that historically speaking, creative people are horrific about understanding how long something really takes.

Nick:

Yes.

Chris:

And we have to build that into our schedule so that we don't either beat ourselves up or ... and this has happened to me. I don't know if it's happened to you, where we underestimate how long something is going to take. We overestimate how easy it is for us to do, so we wind up making more commitments than we can deliver on, and we're overextended. And circling back to your first section of the book, which is all about dealing with stress, this is a stress that could be avoided, that could have been planned for. But because you have that perfect scenario thinking, you paint yourself into a corner.

Nick:

Yes, I think you do. And I think that you place expectations on yourself that aren't realistic. And that's a tough thing because I want to say that it's ingrained in me, 1979, I'm 42 now, that whole idea of a 9:00 to 5:00 work week. That's the time that you dedicate towards work, but not all of those work hours are equal. So I think that there's something to that where you're expecting to be as production and efficient as possible during those hours, but it just never ends up being the case. So to account for that, to realize that there are interruptions, distractions, you're not going to be in your full flow state in certain cases all the time gives you, like you said, Chris, a little bit more room for forgiveness and runway to actually get to the finish line.

Chris:

Okay. I'm looking at you, and I'm thinking, "Okay, this book is going to be out the middle of next year." Right?

Nick:

I said spring, yes. So spring mid 22.

Chris:

Ish-

Nick:

Now you're like, "Okay, now June 2022." Yeah, it's like, "Oh, I see what you're saying."

Chris:

In my hands, what have we got? Yeah. Okay. There's still a lot of work to be done.

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

But the fact that you said the first real rough draft will be done by the end of this month, you're on your way. You're going to get this thing done, and it might be self-published, or it might be published through another label or whatever. Okay. If I want to make sure I get a copy of this book, what do I need to do?

Nick:

If you want to get a copy of this book on January, just shy of January 3rd, I'll have a pre-order button on my page set up, ready to go, and you can get a copy of that there. So that is the plan. It will be a little bit easier for you to do it, but at the time that we're talking right now, I don't even know if we have to say this, but just shy of Christmas. But I'm assuming by the time this pod comes up, all you'll have to do is click on that pre-order now button, and you'll be able to get a copy.

Chris:

I think so. Yeah. We've gotten a lot better at turnaround in terms of when we record something and when it's actually airing live. But you guys will want to go to finding-creativity.com, and you can get more information about the book and a little bit more about Nick, I guess, for today. But in case you can't figure that out, just look for Nick Harauz on LinkedIn and on Twitter, and you'll be able to probably find your way back here. We didn't talk up about this, but you have been associated with Linda.com, now LinkedIn Learning, I think, for many years. Can I talk to you a little bit about that and what that means?

Nick:

Oh, 100%. Yeah.

Chris:

Okay. So when did you record your first course for Linda.com before it was acquired by LinkedIn?

Nick:

First course for Linda, they're interchangeable now in my head, would be, I believe, 2015.

Chris:

And what was it?

Nick:

The first course I did was a final cut pro-color correction course. I don't think it's on the site anymore. There's a revision of it that's on the site, but that was the first course I did.

Chris:

Now, I'm a big believer and a big proponent of creative people having secondary sources of income to help give them some leeway when they're talking to a client about a project they don't want to work on for a budget that is below what they want to get paid. It's nice to have an alternative plan. And so when you record a course or release a product, whether it's through LinkedIn, Course AIR, or any one of these other places, it's nice to have that little pad. Now, it's been explained to me before from people that are on the management side from LinkedIn Linda that you can earn a decent amount of money recording courses. Has that been the case for you?

Nick:

Yes. Not all courses, but let's just say that we were ... I think I have just shy of 36 courses on LinkedIn Learning now.

Chris:

Holy cow!

Nick:

And I would say that, not say, it is that two of them are the majority of the income that comes from that, and it has been so, that way since they came out. There's a good amount of residual income that comes in every month from those courses, and then the rest are just nice little bonuses here and there.

Chris:

These two courses, can you tell us what they are?

Nick:

Yeah. So Final Cut Essentials is one of them, and the other one is the iPhone Production Essential course.

Chris:

Hmm. And I have to ask this question. Did you know beforehand when you were writing those courses and preparing that those were going to be the hits?

Nick:

I had an idea that the Final Cut one would be a hit just for the fact of knowing other people who had done essential courses for Linda. That was the bread and butter of the audience that they brought in. And it was a nice translation in some ways to the LinkedIn Learning audience where the algorithm has somewhat switched, just because of the nature of more of a business community versus just solely something that's focused on creativity. I had no idea what would happen with the iPhone course. And in fact, it was a nightmare to shoot the first part of it.
Long story short, the first day of the shoot of that course, I was in a coffee shop. A friend of mine owns a coffee shop called ARVO in the distillery district in downtown Toronto. It's a historic site and a tourist attraction. We're filming. We're just about to wrap up. My director went to the bathroom, and in the span of 60 seconds, the camera that we shot with got stolen.
Best part about this, not even best part about this, I'm shooting the owner of the coffee shop, and I captured the person who stole my camera on film. He walked with it under a jacket and just ... it was a planned ring. Anyhow, I basically had lost a day of shooting. Long story short, had to go. Luckily, it was covered by insurance. Went through it again. I was happy to have it released. And then it was just such a wonderful surprise that it ended up picking up quite a bit of steam and me making my money back on that and a little bit, which is great.

Chris:

So you have actual footage shot on a DSLR-type camera if someone stealing your-

Nick:

On my iPhone, because I was shooting with the iPhone an interview and showing people how-

Chris:

Okay, so one iPhone is filming, another iPhone being stolen.

Nick:

One iPhone is filming the production camera being stolen, which was a Panasonic.

Chris:

I see.

Nick:

I'm forgetting the name of the camera, but it's just shy of $8,000. It's a nice production camera. And yeah, I have the person-

Chris:

Wow!

Nick:

... who grabbed it under a jacket on camera right in front of me, not even noticing because I'm paying attention to the director at the time. And there is a little bit of people moving around in the coffee shop.

Chris:

Yeah. Wow. Did you ever recover the camera?

Nick:

No, but insurance covered it in a check, and the fact that I had footage showing the person stealing the actual camera, there was some form of forgiveness, which was fantastic.

Chris:

Nice. Okay. So you lost a day, but you weren't killed financially, so everything was fine.

Nick:

No, it wasn't killed financially, but it was more just ... if we were to go back to something we talked about earlier, Chris, where you're like ... Sometimes I do also a production, like a full production where I'm at the helm and also responsible for a crew. It's a lot of energy, and it's a lot of work. So to have that day taken away from you made it a lot harder to then start the course again. I had so much resistance to go forth the next shoot.

Chris:

I know exactly what you mean.

Nick:

I could have done it in two weeks, but it took two months. I'm like, "I'm not doing this."

Chris:

Yeah. If I understand you correctly, let me try and explain this to everyone who's been in a similar situation. You work on a file, and you've been grinding on it for days or weeks, and then the file is corrupt, and there's nothing you can do. Now, in theory, you should be able to rebuild that file in one-quarter of the time because you now don't have to work through all the iterative steps, and you can just get to the end because you know what it's supposed to look like. But there's a bigger thing that's killing you. The pure anger, the resentment, and just you're fuming with all the emotions, and you just can't get over that part of it. So the creation or the recreation of the thing that you lost is the thing that's so painful. That's what you're talking about. Right?

Nick:

Oh, yeah. Yes, exactly what I'm talking about.

Chris:

Because you're like, "That thief!" I mean, you don't know, and then you're like, "It'll never be the same, and I have to rerecord this." You're going through all of that. So I often point to the whole five stages of grieving, which apparently has its own ups and downs, too. But where there's denial, there's anger, there's bargaining, and there's depression, and you go through all those phases. But the last one, the most important one is acceptance. So my whole life hack is speed past those four and just goes straight to acceptance. No amount of emotion or negative energy is going to change the outcome of this, so deal with it and accept it, and then get on with your life.

Nick:

Totally, yeah. And I will say that when I got over that hump and then started producing again, it was awesome to see the content finally come to life.

Chris:

So maybe the book itself is therapeutic for you to remind yourself, "Nick, you remember? You did right about this in chapter two or whatever it is." You go back to the small steps, the smallest viable action. Right?

Nick:

Yeah. No, totally. It is. There is definitely a bit of ... It's therapeutic in two natures. One is that I can go back to it because I think that in this industry of being creative, the idea of self-reflection with your own creativity is extremely important. In fact, going to one of the questionnaires, and this is not my idea, but something which was evolutionized for this book, it's called the creative checkup, where you just ask yourself simple questions, like how creative are you on a scale of one to 10? How does that creativity shape up compared to when you were younger?
Very simple questions in terms of how you're feeling about your own creativity. So on that case, it's therapeutic. On another case, I wanted to come up with a reason for writing this book in 2021. And I just wanted a very simple one, and that was to write a book to say I wrote a book on creativity, and it's going to happen. And I'm most excited about it. It's so simple, but to me, to see that come to fruition just makes me extremely excited.

Chris:

I don't necessarily want you to reveal the number, but perhaps the percentage of money that you draw from these courses that you've created relative to your overall income. I know you have a full-time job, and you do other kinds of things. What percentage does this passive income from teaching does that represent of your total income percentage-wise?

Nick:

So it's very new, the full contract work, but I was working with a company pretty much in that position up until now. And I would say it's a good ... For last year, it was about 50%, but this year, it's about 35% of my income just from that.

Chris:

Well, the 50% is a lot. Oh, my goodness.

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

Is it because the amount of revenue from the courses is going down as more and more courses are coming out, or is it because you're making more money in your capacity as the director of marketing or whatever else that you're doing?

Nick:

I've started to make more money in those other capacities, so that just took off.

Chris:

Okay.

Nick:

During the pandemic, and like a lot of other people, it ended up being very economically viable for me. My income went up quite a bit. It was, in some ways, like a perfect storm had hit. And what I mean by that is, as someone who produces content ... while at that time, I would say 70% of my communication was still online video, mostly doing it through companies, so LinkedIn Learning or third-party plugin providers. You have all of these companies, like Adobe and Apple, and other companies, like Maxon, who had most multiple ways of spreading their message.
Some of that was online. Some of that was in conferences, in-person events, group meetings, and chats, and communities. And all of a sudden, overnight, the communities, the events in-person, all were done. And all you had was the form of communication of people who were able to chat and produce video.
That job, that ability, that skill was highly needed, and it ended up being very, very good for me during that time. So that's why I would say that side of the business, besides the residuals, did increase because I was producing more of that stuff as well as just as someone who I think, in working with people, I've become more and more of someone who tries to work with someone. And I still remember to this day when I had my first internship working for a company in Vancouver. The thing that the owner had told me at the time was the most reliable thing that you can do for me is think outside of the box, the idea of anticipating what the needs of me and the company were.
And I try to now do that with the people that I work with. And I think it's a really, in some case, sought-after skill and needed skill in the company that I work for now, Boris Effects, which is small, needed for someone to take initiative and then start and finish projects. So that's why the long-form of that story. That's why my income increased on that side of things.

Chris:

Mm. My last question for you is a selfish one. I have often thought about authoring and releasing a course on LinkedIn, not because it's going to pay me more, but because it's a different audience, and I need new ways to bring in people. So I weighed the cost-benefit analysis. If I record a course, and I release it on our channel, I'll make not 100%, but the majority of the profit that comes from that course. But if I release it on LinkedIn or one of the competitors, they bring in a different audience, and perhaps some of them will jump. I'll make some residual income from it. Do you think this is a good idea, or knowing what you know about me, do you think I should just release it on my own platform?

Nick:

Ooh, this is a great question. So I think my first question to you would be, well, what topic are you thinking of presenting on LinkedIn Learning?

Chris:

Probably some sales negotiation, business-oriented thing.

Nick:

And you would do this in conjunction with your own channel? So you're basically releasing it on your channel and LinkedIn, or solely through LinkedIn?

Chris:

I think my strategy going in would be only to release on LinkedIn because the price in which you can access it on LinkedIn is fairly insignificant relative to how much you'd have to buy it from me as a course. So it wouldn't make sense for us to charge our customers, say $200.00, for the class, as opposed to whatever percentage I get of the pie.

Nick:

I would say to go for LinkedIn. And the reason why I would say this is, worst-case scenario is that the topic doesn't work with that audience. And you can still pull your product from it and then always put it back on your channels. And the worst thing that would happen is that you don't gain that audience that you were hoping for, but at least you test that mechanism to see if it gets you what you want.
The only thing that I would say in terms of maybe caution along those lines is to make sure that the topic that you're thinking, sales and negotiations, actually does align with the audience that you're hoping for. And I'm not exactly sure about that because I'm mostly in the creative field, but I don't think there's any harm in going for it. If you find that right topic that you think will align, find the producer at LinkedIn to make it happen, and then get the course up there. They would love to have your voice. I know that.

Chris:

Well, we have friends. We have all mutual friends there. Right? So it can happen. Maybe 2022 is that year where we actually try that strategy because we want to continue to grow the company, and that might be one of those loss leaders that we just have to do.

Nick:

Yeah, yeah.

Chris:

Yeah. Well, I appreciate that.

Nick:

I hope I was helpful.

Chris:

Yeah. Okay, I'm going to spring this on you. I should have prepared you for this, but I've been ...

Nick:

Uh-oh.

Chris:

I went for a walk this morning, and I've been thinking I need to ask guests some kind of oddball question. So I have an oddball question for you. Okay?

Nick:

Sure.

Chris:

And take as much time as you need to think about it. But what I'd like for you to do is to tell me three truths about Nick and one lie, and then let me guess which one is the lie.

Nick:

Ooh.

Chris:

Now, I'm springing this on you, so it's going to take a little time. So if you need time to think about it, or you're like, "Dude, I can't do this on the spot like this," that's fine too.

Nick:

Three truths and one lie?

Chris:

Three truths, so the truths have to be almost unbelievable because you have to disguise it so that when you tell me the one lie, I won't be able to figure it out. So what I'm trying to do is get unusual, not talked about things that people don't normally know about you.

Nick:

Okay. I'm going to just need a minute, but I'm going to come up with them.

Chris:

Yeah, take as much time as you need, man.

Nick:

Okay. Man, this is more difficult than I thought. I got two.

Chris:

It's hard.

Nick:

I got two. I got two, but-

Chris:

You got two? Okay. Take your time. You're halfway there.

Nick:

You know what it was? I think that the challenge is like, "Oh, how do I make this so like, 'Oh wow. This is totally out of the place?'" But it's not going to be, but it'll be my own personal take on this. Meanwhile, it's almost 9:00 at night as we tick away and wait for Nick to decide what to share with the audience.

Chris:

Next time I'll prepare my guest for this, so it doesn't-

Nick:

Yeah, no. This is-

Chris:

You're sweating it out there.

Nick:

I think I'm just thinking about it way too much. Okay.

Chris:

Got it? All right, here we go.

Nick:

I think I have. Okay, so I have one. I've seen-

Chris:

Now you have to be able to repeat it because sometimes I'm like, "Tell me number one again." And if you can't repeat it ... I know that's a lot.

Nick:

Oh, I got to repeat it too? Okay, okay, okay. Give this one more minute, one more minute.

Chris:

Got it. Yeah, three truths and one lie. Okay, take your time.

Nick:

Let's give it a shot.

Chris:

I'm ready. Let's do this.

Nick:

Nick was the captain of his volleyball team, beach team, for four years.

Chris:

Okay, so a beach volleyball guy, huh?

Nick:

Beach volleyball guy.

Chris:

Okay, for four years. Okay.

Nick:

Nick has seen the Northern Lights 10-plus times.

Chris:

All right.

Nick:

When Nick was in high school, he was heavily involved in debating.

Chris:

Okay.

Nick:

When Nick, just out of university, he lived in L.A. for two years.

Chris:

All right. Let me say it back to you here. And to hide the lie from the truth, Nick had to talk about himself in the third person.

Nick:

Yes, totally. I've tried to disguise it. How am I doing?

Chris:

You're doing pretty good. It's almost like you have to talk about a different Nick to make sure that it was real. Okay.

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

Number one: you were the captain of your volleyball, your beach volleyball, team for four years. Number two: you've seen the Northern lights 10-plus times. Number three: in high school, you were heavily involved in debating. Number four, after university, you lived in L.A. for two years. One of these is the lie. And rather than just me blurt out what I think the answer is, I'm going to take you through my rationale.

Nick:

Okay.

Chris:

He did tell this before. He's six foot three, and tall people tend to play in sports like volleyball. So I'm feeling like that could have been a give me, like he's trying to trick me here like the Princess Bride. He knew I was going to tap into that. I'm going to leave that one alive for just a second. Alive, not a lie. The Northern lights 10-plus times, considering where you are in the world, I believe that 100%. Now, it could be you fooled me on that one, but I'm going to take that one off as a truth.
In high school, heavily involved in debating. Since you were interested in theater, I think theater debate, public speaking, that's no skin off our back. I feel like that one has a higher percentage of being truthful. The last one here is you lived in L.A. for two years. We've talked a couple of times. You've never mentioned being in L.A., and it seems like you like cold weather, so I'm not quite sure what you would be doing in L.A. So of all these, I'm going to take a wild guess, and I'm going to say you did not live in L.A. for two years. Nick, please reveal the answer.

Nick:

Chris, you are correct.

Chris:

Yes!

Nick:

Yes, yes. Yes, yes. With that said, though, I do not like cold weather, but I happen to live in Canada.

Chris:

You could have fooled me.

Nick:

The closest thing is I did live in Vancouver for a couple of years, so that is the West Coast trip.

Chris:

Still coldish.

Nick:

A good one. That was a good one, man. I know. We never talked ... I had a feeling you might get L.A., but I've been down there quite a bit, and I've had a chance to ... one of my favorite things to do, well, just in California in general, is that highway one drive. How stunning is that?

Chris:

Up to PCH?

Nick:

Yeah.

Chris:

Yeah. It's pretty cool. Now, I will say this. And the reason why I can usually tell is because people who live in L.A. talk to other people who are in L.A. like, "Oh, do you know this?" And, "Oh, you were around the corner from that, between this and that street." I'm like, "Really?" Okay. That's how L.A. people talk.

Nick:

Oh, God, that would give you specifics, you know? Yeah. It's like, "Oh yeah, I've been out there forever." Yeah, it was a total giveaway, man.

Chris:

No, you-

Nick:

[crosstalk 01:12:30] Got to get better at this on-the-spot thing with that question. Yeah.

Chris:

I'm sorry. I sprang it on you just because I wanted people to learn a little bit about you and your personality. My guest today has been Nick Harauz, and he has been working on a book, and it's forthcoming, I think, in the middle of next year, in 2022. It's called Finding Creativity in Uncertain Times. He's a certified video editing trainer. He's a certified motion graphics trainer and editor for a future documentary called My Father and the Man in Black. He's also a demo artist and all-around nice guy. And if people want to reach out to you, where's the best place that they can go and find you?

Nick:

Yes. So reach out to me on either LinkedIn, Nick Harauz. You can find my profile there. That's a great place. And finding-creativity.com, you'll find some contact forms there.

Chris:

Wonderful. Nick, thanks very much for jumping on this podcast.

Nick:

Thanks so much for having me, Chris. It's been such a pleasure.
Hi, I'm Nick Harauz, and you're listening to the future.

Greg Dunn:

Thanks for joining us this time. If you haven't already, subscribe to our show on your favorite podcasting app and get a new insightful episode from us every week. The Future Podcast is hosted by Chris Do and produced by me, Greg Gunn. Thank you to Anthony Barrow for editing and mixing this episode, and thank you to Adam Sandborn for our intro music.
If you enjoyed this episode, then do us a favor by rating and reviewing our show on Apple Podcasts. It'll help us grow the show and make future episodes that much better. Have a question for Chris or me? Head over to the future.com/hey Chris, and ask away. We read every submission, and we just might answer yours in a later episode. If you'd like to support the show and invest in yourself while you're at it, visit the future.com. You'll find video courses, digital products, and a bunch of helpful resources about design and creative business. Thanks again for listening, and we'll see you next time.

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