Randy Hereman

Randy Hereman has lived many professional lives. He started as a web-designer, then a professional kite-surfer, then a high rolling poker player and is now an execution coach, on a mission to help people become who they need to be to attain their goals.

Stop Thinking and Start Doing
Stop Thinking and Start Doing

Stop Thinking and Start Doing

Ep
86
Jun
08
With
Randy Hereman
Or Listen On:

Stop Thinking. Start Doing.

Randy Hereman has lived many professional lives. He started as a web-designer, then a professional kite-surfer, then a high rolling poker player and is now an execution coach, on a mission to help people become who they need to be to attain their goals.

He also happens to be a member of The Futur Pro Group. If you don’t know what that is, visit the http://thefutur.com/pro to find out. It might be where your people are.

In this episode, Randy and Chris talk through the mindset it takes to have an idea and then see it through to fruition, which is a problem a lot of us struggle with. Consuming the content is easy, but taking action from it, not so much.

You can probably guess by the title of this episode that Randy is a pretty adventurous person. This “why not” attitude is one of the things that makes his approach to coaching so unique: he wants people to stop thinking and start doing.

When working with clients, he helps them get clarity and focus first. They write down what they’d like to achieve down the road, and prioritize what they’d like to accomplish first. It’s a simple, practical approach that many of us don’t think to do. Visualizing what we’d like to accomplish, then organizing it all by biggest priority to smallest, is one of the ways Randy helps clients act on what they’re thinking about.

As creatives, we are always questioning what we can do to improve our skills, or how we can change what we do today to impact our futures. While many of us have ideas as to how to make things happen for ourselves, our ideas are nothing without action.

Get out of your head and into the mind of an action-taker.

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Episode Transcript

Randy:
If we want to do something we've never done before, it's impossible for us to understand what it is that we need to do in order to do it, because we've never done it before.
However, 99% of the people, they want to understand what it is they need to do. Hence, they always question the people who they should be receiving advice from, because they already did it before.
(singing)

Greg:
Hello and welcome to The Futur podcast. I'm your producer Greg Gunn, and I'm here to introduce you to our autodidactic guest in this episode. That is a fancy way of saying self-taught. Yeah, I had to look it up. Today's guest has lived in many professional lives.
He started as a web designer, then a professional kitesurfer, then a high rolling poker player. He's now an execution coach, on a mission to help people become who they need to be in order to attain their goals. He also happens to be a member of The Futur Pro group.
Now, if you don't know what that is, you can visit thefutur.com/pro to find out, because it might be where all your people are hanging out. In this episode, our guest and Chris talk through the mindset it takes to have an idea and then see it through to fruition, which is a problem that a lot of us struggle with.
Consuming the inspirational content is easy, but taking action from it, not so much. Get out of your head and into the mind of an action taker. Please enjoy our conversation with Randy Hereman.

Randy:
Hello, my name is Randy Hereman. I'm the founder of the Young Human Club and I help people execute online.

Chris:
What does that mean, help people execute online?

Randy:
Well, a lot of people have a lot of ideas and they know how to do the things, they just don't manage to do them. I help them basically lay out what it is that they truly want, and then build a strategic plan to actually get there. Then help them become the person they need to become, in order to achieve these plans.

Chris:
Obviously for people who are listening to this, you can pick up an accent here and you can't see Randy, but I can. Tell people where you're from.

Randy:
Well, I'm from the Netherlands. You can hear that, probably a little bit of my accent. I lived abroad my whole life, and I've been traveling and always my girlfriends were from foreign countries. English was mostly the native language that I spoke.

Chris:
There's something interesting about you too. You're a former professional athlete, right?

Randy:
Yeah. When I was 17 or 16, I picked up a kite for the first time and from 17 on I... yeah, I was a professional kitesurfer, traveling the world.

Chris:
Wow.

Randy:
Competing and yeah, learning a lot.

Chris:
When we say professional, that's how you made a living, by kitesurfing?

Randy:
Well, it depends how you want to describe it, because the overall thing was that kite surfing was my main job. I was competing. I was earning price money, but it's not a big sport. You're not earning a lot of money, but there are sponsor deals that you have and they will pay for your travel expenses.
Then the equipment that you have, you can sell that. Then slowly by scraping everything together, you can make the budget to travel around the world, which is a lot of fun. If you're top three in the world, and maybe your personal brand is strong enough to... yeah, fully live off that.
I did get a Nescafe TV commercial for example, which was a lot of fun. Which was all due to the fact that I was on the tour, that I was present. Like this way, you make money a little bit like YouTubers today.

Chris:
Okay, a lot of scraping and scrapping to kind of make ends meet, right?

Randy:
Yeah.

Chris:
If you hit it big, you get a sponsor. If you're very marketable, maybe there is another life for you. You discover kitesurfing at 16, you said?

Randy:
No, I discovered it when I was 12 or so.

Chris:
Oh, 12? Okay.

Randy:
The equipment is really expensive to start.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
Especially at that time, there was no second hand market yet, because it was just starting out.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Yeah, two and a half thousand euros, which is about $3000-ish. That's a lot of money for a 12-year-old. I learned how to build websites, because maybe then eventually I could buy something. I really enjoyed computers, and I made a website for my uncles. That's when I was 13.
This got me really hooked on technology, and slowly I figured out different ways to finally get my first kite, by convincing my mother on a payment plan. Yeah, then it all started.
Then quickly I worked at other things, and bought my second kite and decided that, "Well, I'm now good enough to actually compete with the national guys I'm seeing on the internet." I was always hanging around on forums, et cetera. I spoke to a guy who made pictures and asked him, "Hey, could you make some pictures of me?"
I published it on the forum. The authorities in the niche let's say, they picked it up. A week later, I had my first sponsor [inaudible 00:05:30], where I got a 60% discount on the equipment I had to purchase.

Chris:
I see. Okay, so when I picture the Netherlands, I think of the canals. I don't think of surfing or kitesurfing, or is there a big scene in the Netherlands to go kitesurfing?

Randy:
The best kitesurfers in the world are from the Netherlands.

Chris:
Oh, wow. Is this where it was invented or why is that the case?

Randy:
No, it's because we have a lot of wind here often.

Chris:
Yes, I felt it when I was there.

Randy:
There's the whole seaside of course, like the Northern sea. Then we have the IJsselmeer, which is also the big center lake you see in the Netherlands, in the Northern part. Then we have the Dutch islands. We're full of beaches and waters. Winter sport, water sport-

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
... boat sport, these types of things are really big here.

Chris:
The water, what's the temperature of the water like? I imagine it being quite cold.

Randy:
Well, I can remember... like there is obviously a different level of engagement. When I started kitesurfing, I was such a fan that one Christmas morning, I went kiting with a bunch of friends. We had to crawl over the ice, before we even hit the water. We kite until it's freezing, below zero like-

Chris:
Wow.

Randy:
People kite-

Chris:
What do you do to stay warm though? Are you wearing a really thick wetsuit?

Randy:
Well, now I'm living in [inaudible 00:06:56], which is also on the beach side in the Netherlands, but more in the South.
Every day there's people here... no matter how cold or how freezing it is, that wake up at six and go in the sea. That's a group of 40, 50 people. We have this Dutch guy, Wim Hof. I don't know if you've ever heard of him.

Chris:
Yes.

Randy:
If you're used to it, it's not that hard. Now, I'm not used to it. I've lived in Brazil for seven years, and I'm not going there in the water when it's that cold anymore.

Chris:
Okay. Well, it's kind of interesting that you're a teenager, early teens, you become interested in kitesurfing, but it's expensive. The way that you start to kind of dip your toes into the entrepreneurial world, is to build websites for people.
Of all the things that you could do, why build websites? I mean, isn't there a different way to make money? What attracted you to building websites?

Randy:
Well, it's funny that you mention the word entrepreneur, because it's such a label that we can put on ourselves, which can either empower us or disarm us.
I never heard of the word entrepreneur until I saw Gary Vaynerchuk three years ago for the first time. Like the word... we don't have this in the Netherlands, entrepreneur. We say, [inaudible 00:08:08], which means a person who is doing things.

Chris:
Oh, interesting.

Randy:
Like is making things happen, let's say. Yeah, the website thing was just another... well, we have to go back first.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
I've always been bullied at school.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
I've never been the guy who was part of the group. I was always the outsider let's say. That caused me to isolate... not isolate myself, but just figure out my own thing. I don't care what people think about me.
It's really easy for me to just do my own thing and fail very often, because I've never had this peer pressure of wanting to be part of the group, because I've never associated myself with the people who I grew up with.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
This automatically drew me to computers, because my mom, she was running a little business for my... well, they had a lot of different businesses. A little [inaudible 00:09:06] my dad's musician, and my mom was managing his bands and a couple of other bands for weddings and booking, all these things.
She needed like accounting software. She needed the computer. We had this little like internet, like [inaudible 00:09:18]. Yeah, when I saw her computer, I was just... I don't know, I just got drawn to it from day one. I was having Napster, I was burning CDs for friends.
I was like, I learned how to photoshop and play with paint. I was just spending all my time there, because well, I didn't have the friends that I would hang out with after school.
I was going there at my computer, and going in forums and like yeah, learning how to do all these things. Then my uncle, his brother was hacking computers for fun. He was learning this.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
He was talking about this on a birthday and well, I was like, "Okay, I want to do something like that. This sounds so cool." Yeah, so then I just dove in and tried to figure out my way with computers.

Chris:
Okay, I see. You being the outsider, you were drawn to computers as something that you could get lost in. Then you developed some skills, and now you're building websites to be able to basically fund your dream of kitesurfing.
Then you got to a level where you're good enough to be professional. How long did you do the kitesurfing thing for?

Randy:
I think it was five years. Then I broke my ACL-

Chris:
Oh, no.

Randy:
... my cross ligaments. Then I had to recover, come back. Went back, then I hurt my knee again. Had to recover, came back. Went back on tour, but then I got so disappointed by the sponsors who dropped me in the process of recovering. I had to figure out everything myself.
That's when a friend took me to a bar to play poker, just on a... like my whole life at that point of recovery was just waking up, eating, training, eating, training, having the rest of the day off.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
What am I going to do with the spare time? It was a great time after traveling the world, to hang out with the people that I grew up with, that actually were my friends at the time that I was living there.
One friend said, "Hey, let's go to play poker." I love gambling, so yeah, we went there. I came forth and the top three got paid. Well-

Chris:
You're on the bubble.

Randy:
I was on the bubble. If you give a dog a bone, he will chase it. For me it was like, "Oh my God, this is such a fun game."
There was so much strategy behind it and there were so much... like I saw these people calculating different things. I had no idea what they were calculating. I think they didn't have either, but they thought they did.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
After that, it picked my interest. I started learning and within two weeks, three weeks, I figured out that everybody who was talking about what it is they were doing, never actually opened a book to actually look at like, "How does this work? What's the strategy? Is there a framework?
Is there some logic about, when do you do what or how do you see these patterns?" This really got me excited about how deep strategy goes actually, and how much... well, then you get into game theory optimization.
Like how you can play the perfect game against an opponent, and how you can go in different levels of thinking. Poker is very much like... well, it's empathy basically.
It's like you try to get in the hat of the other person, and sometimes this person is thinking about what you're thinking. Sometimes this person is just looking at his cards and trying to figure out, "What do I have right now?" He doesn't even know that part yet.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Yeah, this whole strategic thing got me super excited. I started buying books and I started going on forums. I started diving in, and I lost about €2000 investing, learning, failing. Then I won a tournament for €15,000.

Chris:
Wow.

Randy:
Then the next day I won another tournament for €10,000. Then we went to Brazil, on our trainings camp, which we did every year. Me and my girlfriend at the time, we said, "Well, why don't we just stay here?" Like, "I don't know if I can make a living off poker, but for sure I can try."
We bought a little house and we tried to make it happen. Then I found an investor who I've been networking with on forums. He decided to pay for all my tournaments and we split difference. Yeah, then the Brazil's venture started and kitesurfing ended.

Chris:
You're kitesurfing and then playing poker at night, is that the idea?

Randy:
Well, that was the idea, but-

Chris:
What happened?

Randy:
Well, work happened.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
When I started poker, it was way after the American poker boom. When Chris Moneymaker basically turned America upside down.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Which at that point in time, to make $200,000, $300,000 a year in poker was like, if you could literally make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, you could make $300,000 in poker, just by following the basic strategy. Everybody was trying to play poker and nobody opened the book about how to play poker.
Everybody was so exploitative on their behaviors and their actions, that making money was really easy. By the time I started, it basically dried up. Only the best of the best were playing.
Then you have a choice, "Am I going to play in the high stakes? Do I want to get the best out of myself mentally? Or do I want to grind away the boring tournaments-?"

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
... "And just slowly grind the profit?" Well, that last part is not really the thing I like. I prefer to take on the challenge, which ended up $150,000 in debt.

Chris:
I need to take a step back, because I do know a little... I don't know how we wound up there, but we were talking about poker. I do know a little bit about poker.
We're talking about Texas Hold'em and you're playing in some of the biggest tournaments. When Chris Moneymaker... a relatively unknown entity, wins the world poker series, does he win $1 million?

Randy:
I don't know how much he [crosstalk 00:15:16].

Chris:
It's a lot of money though, right?

Randy:
Yeah, but the entry fee is $10,000, right?

Chris:
Yes.

Randy:
There were like 5,000 people playing, so-

Chris:
Yeah, so he wins and then it creates this craze in America, where everybody gets in. When you get in early, there're a lot of idiots who think they can be a champion. There's easy money, and you could just take them to town and you can win.
Now you're at that phase where you decide, "I don't want to be a grinder. A grinder who's just a guy who plays the odds and just very mathematical." It's a job. You do it like eight, nine hours a day.
You make money slowly, but surely, but it's a grind. Then you decide, "I'm going to go and play against the best of the best." This is how you wind up $150,000 or euro in debt?

Randy:
Yes.

Chris:
Whose money was that, that you lost?

Randy:
My investor's money.

Chris:
Okay, and was he or she concerned that you're losing?

Randy:
No, because he understood it was part of the game.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
Like if you play tournaments, there is a lot of variants to it. It's like, when you flip a coin-

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
... if you do it 10 times, it's not necessarily going to be five times heads, five times tails. It could be nine times heads, one time tails, or eight times tails and two times heads. If you make this bigger and you say, "Let's flip it a million times," now the percentages slowly get closer to like 500,000, 500,000-ish.
In tournaments, it's like you started tournaments... I had one tournament where, I think it was the WCOOP or the SCOOP. It's like the biggest tournament of the year online, entry fee is $5,000. I'm playing day one. I'm ending somewhere around 80 out of the 1,000 left. We're about 80 people away from the money.
I start day two, it goes super smooth. I've been playing this tournament right now already, behind my computer for more than 20 hours. I'm 1 out of 93. The first prize is $1.8 million. [crosstalk 00:17:12].

Chris:
You mean you took [crosstalk 00:17:13]?

Randy:
[crosstalk 00:17:13].

Chris:
What do you mean you're 1 out of 93?

Randy:
No.

Chris:
Or just 93 people left?

Randy:
Yes.

Chris:
Okay, got it.

Randy:
Five hands later, I'm out.

Chris:
Oh, what happened?

Randy:
Well, at first I made a bad bluff.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
I tried to apply pressure to somebody who was not bluffing. Well, that happens.

Chris:
Yes.

Randy:
I mean, that's part of the game, move on. Then I had Ace, Ace and lost against King, King I think [crosstalk 00:17:36].

Chris:
[crosstalk 00:17:36].

Randy:
Still it's like you have Ace, Ace, but still it's like 80% chance you're going to win. That means one out of five times, you will still lose, which is a lot. If it happens at that exact that you're in this big event, where you're this deep and you're... yeah, in such a great spot, if you lose that, it really hurts.
Then 1 hand later, I had to 2, 2 on the button with 18 big blinds, which is not very much. If you would raise... like you already have too much money invested, so you cannot really fall.
Your best move and the only move, is to just go all in and hope they fault. Whatever they have, they would be 50/50 or better against you. They have two, three, four... it's a coin flip basically.

Chris:
Right, okay.

Randy:
I go all in, and then the button has Ace, Ace.

Chris:
Oh, okay.

Randy:
I don't [inaudible 00:18:28], so I'm out.

Chris:
Then you're out.

Randy:
Yeah, but this is poker. Every mistake you make, every loss you have, there's no point in dwelling on the past. It's just looking at, "Where I'm at now? What's the next best move? What's my position?
What's my position on the table? Which cards do I get? How does the table behave? What's my state in the tournament?" There is a lot of strategy to it, and that's the part that makes it so much fun.

Chris:
Is there a part of this mathematical, kind of cold calculating gamesmanship, that reflects your personality and who you are? Some people can't handle that kind of pressure. You seem to be okay with it.

Randy:
I think it's like, what's the pressure? Pressure is something we create internally. If we have very high expectations, then there is a lot of pressure on us to achieve those expectations.
In poker it's like, "I'm playing a game. The money is invested." Now this is not money, this is chips. This is moves. They're strategic calculations. There's risk involved, that's part of the game.
That's why somebody can be not having the best hand, but bluff the other person out of the game, because the other guy cannot handle the pressure, because he doesn't know what to do in a certain situation.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
It's just a game like playing behind a computer, a video game. You start with a certain amount of chips. This money is gone. This is where bankroll management is super important, and that's my worst thing ever. Handling money is the thing I'm the least good at.
Imagine you've played tournaments from $5,000, how much money do you think you should have in order to play a tournament of $5,000? If you have 10,000, you're basically gambling.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Whereas if you would have half a million, now 5,000 is just a single investment in an opportunity where you think you will achieve a positive ROI. You may not achieve this ROI in the first tournament.
If you play this 5,000 tournament, 500 times, at the end of the road, you would have a 10% return of investment on that tournament. Every tournament you play on average, you would make €500.
If you would have played 1,000 times, you expect to make €500,000. After playing 1,000 tournaments, $5,000 with this strength of a playing field and your skill level.

Chris:
Yeah, you're saying that and you're giving me the answer kind of like, it's numbers, it's math, it's a game and there's nothing else attached to it. You've become detached and desensitized to the money.
I think that's an important part, whether you're playing in poker or in business, is that you kind of have to process things like, it's just a series of trying to make the best decision with the information you have available at the time. Then staying out of the results.
Like you said, you went in with Ace, Ace and you went up against Kings. You should have beat that person four out of five times, but there's still one out of five times that you can get a bad draw and you're going to lose. It's just playing the numbers.
Okay, so you're 150K in debt. Basically, you've lost your investor's money and he is aware of the risks associated with professional gambling, which is what this is. How do you guys resolve this?

Randy:
Well, in poker, an investor knows the risk he's taking on. If you decide mentally, you can not handle the pressure anymore, you can walk away anytime. Your name in the poker scene... like it's a really small scene.
If you talk about the people who are willing to invest and know the big names, everybody knows everyone, especially online. If you damage your name or your reputation, that screws up every other opportunity you would ever have online.
Right now if I would say, "Hey, there's the World Series of Poker." No, it's not going to happen this summer. Let's say next year the World Series of Poker is going to happen and it's going to cost me $10,000 to play.
Well, I can call up right now people I didn't speak to for two years, three years and say, "Hey guys, do you want to buy stake in me at a markup?" They would pay everything for me, because I have a good reputation in that scene. That's so valuable, poker players don't often walk away.
Most people, they continue to play and they will grind it out. It does happen that the investor says, "Well, right now, I don't want to take the risk on anymore, because mentally I think you are not in the winning mindset-"

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
... "Because you've been losing for nine months."

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
"I'd rather take the risk now of cutting my loss at 150K, because also, we've made a lot of money in the past." Every time you profit, you split and you start at zero. You only play with the investor's money.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Let's say I play with for $10,000 worth of tournaments, lose it all. Now I'm 10K in makeup, which means that I owe my investor 10,000 on the next profit we make. Let's say I make 15,000 the next day, profit, 10,000 goes back, 5,000 is left. He gets two and a half K, I get two and a half K.

Chris:
Got it.

Randy:
Even though we made money, right now we were in a downswing of $150,000. He just said, "I'm going to cut my losses here-"

Chris:
I see.

Randy:
... "Because I don't think you're in the winning mindset at this moment. I don't want to continue taking on this risk." On the other side, he played [inaudible 00:23:39], one of the highest stakes. His expected win rate would be 9 blinds per 100 hands played for example, but he ran about 30.
Three times more than he was expected to win, because he was on a hot streak for a whole year and he made a couple of million. He understands the variance part, and he understands that he was lucky there.
I was unlucky in the other part, but now his investment ended. I was being stuck in an investment situation, and suddenly I was free and I could do whatever I wanted to do.

Chris:
I see. As you're on a losing streak, if the investor who's staking you wants to continue to play, your obligation is to keep playing until you can make up the losses and get back into the win column.
Unless he or she decides that they're done, they're going to try something else. They're basically saying, "You're off the hook, your reputation is intact. You're still good, Randy. You do what you need to do." That's kind of what happened here, right?

Randy:
Yeah, and also I think I still owe him about 30K in living expenses that he paid for me. If I'm in debt too long and I cannot afford my living, I can also not even play optimally. My mind is just on surviving rather than thriving.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
The moment I can afford it, I'm paying him back every single cent, because that reputation is way more valuable than the 30K, that even I don't need to pay him back. This is another... I mean, maybe we're going too as much sideways, but when I was in Brazil, I was living there illegally.
We had to do something to contribute to the country, in order to get a visa. We opened up a sandwich and smoothie bar. I didn't have money for that, but I borrowed everything from people I've never met before in my life.
Only spoke to them on Skype and the poker tables. That's how crazy poker players are with money, or how differently they treat money. It just depends how you want to look at it.

Chris:
All right, so your kitesurfing career kind of comes to an end I assume, because two ACLs, your poker career at least for the time being in this storyline, also comes to an end. The guy who's staking you... and I now understand also why he stakes you. He's also a player himself, because he has some extra money.
He sees some talent in you and he wants to win even more money, so he invested in you. That's kind of how these things work. I know that people who play poker professionally, are very loose with money.
Like money has no meaning to them. They'll bet on anything. They'll go for anything, because it's just thrilling for them. Okay, how old are you at this point?

Randy:
27, I think.

Chris:
Okay, so you've been doing this for a little while now.

Randy:
The poker?

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
I played like six years professional.

Chris:
All right. Now at the beginning of our conversation, you were talking about the Young Humans Club. Okay, that's an interesting name. What does that mean and what are you trying to do with this?

Randy:
Well, after poker ended, while I was still playing poker, I already moved back from Brazil to the Netherlands. I became vegan. I realized that the person who I thought I was, was not the actual person I was being. My actions were not aligned with the idea of who I thought I was.
This really changed something in me. People call it enlightenment or whatever, but it's like this awakening of awareness that the way you saw things, were not actually the way they are.
This fueled so much... like as you can see in my journey, that when I want to do something, I try to go all in. I like the journey of climbing up a new path, and figuring things out and yeah, being the entrepreneur.
Veganism sparked such a... my identity got really impacted by that. In no time, I became an activist. In no time, I started the YouTube channel. In no time, I started interviewing people on the streets. Trying to plant little seeds to make them think about some different aspects, or look at things in a different way.
Like Errol Gerson said, "If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change." Just tried to spark that same thing, that at least this seed is planted, so people try to think about the choices they're actually making.
Then I was like, "Okay, activists... they maybe create awareness, but entrepreneurs create solutions." When I look back at my own journey, I am way more enjoying the entrepreneurial journey.
If I would follow that trajectory as an activist, it would mean I would end up in slaughter houses to make really hardcore documentaries. That would be my [inaudible 00:28:26]. I would see that clearly.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
I was like, "Oh, that's not the life I want to live." Then I started to think about how I wanted it to turn out. Then I... yeah, I was fed up with poker, I wanted to change. Then I was like, "Okay, I'm going to coach people on how to become their best self."
Well, then the questions came. Like, "How am I going to do this? How am I going to get clients? What should I do online?" Luckily I had experienced in the past with building websites. Building a WordPress site was really easy. I had it online in a few days.
I had no experience really getting off real clients. I started building a Facebook group, forums, building communities. That's what I knew how to do. That's what I've always done. I started building the vegan entrepreneur.
Then slowly I was like, "I also don't want that trajectory, because that's very exclusive. If I want to help people realize their bigger goals and make the world a better place, then I shouldn't really stick myself to vegans."
Then again, I listened to Chris Do and he's like, "Positioning and branding. You should really pick your niche and you should [inaudible 00:29:30]." Then I'm like, "Well, there's inclusive and exclusive. If I would only target the vegans, then I would be more exclusive and I want to be more inclusive."
Then really, I spent three years really trying to position myself and trying to... yeah, build the business and the system and the websites the way I wanted it to be. Then the Young Human, basically comes out of the fact that we're entering in a new era.
I think this virus and what it does to us, and our economy and everything is really like a big jump towards this. Digital technology, we're really at the beginning of everything.
Like, if you look at the hockey stick curve basically, we're at the bottom of the hockey stick curve. In the next 10 years, the innovations we're going to see is going to blow everyone's mind. We cannot even fathom what this is really like.
We're not the investors who look at behind the scenes of what it is that's coming, but I think it's going to be really amazing. Oh, amazing, that depends on the perspective of course, the way you look at it.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
I think that it's full of opportunity. I think it's really cool, but as a human species, it requires us to reeducate ourselves. To rethink about everything and to totally... well, change the way you are today, to become the person you need to be in order to succeed at the future or in the future.

Chris:
Okay, so how does this initiative go then?

Randy:
What do you mean?

Chris:
Well, you said you wanted to create this website, to bring people together and there's entrepreneurship, where does this part of the story go?

Randy:
Well, I cannot see the future, but-

Chris:
You're still in it?

Randy:
Right now I'm in the process of working for clients.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
Like making money, trying to survive as a startup with little spare time, to grind every free hour I have to finish every little system and the automations. Once people come, I don't want to take care of everything. The way I've set it up right now, I've got like 14 employees working for me, but they're all robots.
All my data automation is processed everywhere. You sign up, you get emails, Facebook Pixels fire, you get marketing campaigns running. The whole funnel or the system-

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
... is basically automated, in a way that the only people who would be able to schedule a call will be so interested, that they're ready to pay a premium to work with me. I'm not going to waste any of my time trying to convince anyone about anything, because everything is available for free online.
I'm not going to charge any money ever about anything. When people go through these online workshops, it's with a checkbook, then it's really cool. You should check it out, theyounghuman.com.

Chris:
Okay. I'm curious then, obviously you've been busy building the system, while you're managing clients and doing client work. Building this other thing.
Now at the beginning, you were saying you want to focus on and go really narrow, but then you decided, "No, I'm going to do something maybe a little different." Who is for, the Young Humans? Is it humans or young human?

Randy:
The Young Human Club.

Chris:
Okay, the Young Human Club. Who's it for?

Randy:
Well, the Young Human Club is for anybody that wants to learn how to make money online, doing what they love, while making the world a better place. We're focused... and like better is a subjective thing.
What's better? Well, if you want to build an equal, positive, compassionate world, then that's how I would define better. Yeah, the idea is very simple. Social media is working best, if you have a network of people. We basically create our own bubbles.
If we would have 1,000... like just the Dan Kelly story, who would have 1,000 people with a network of 1,000 people, then collectively we'd have a reach of 1 million.
If you really want to make the world a better place, then connecting with the people who want to do that and helping each other create a bigger digital world, the more impact you can make and the faster everyone can grow within that ecosystem.

Chris:
Okay, I feel like I'm part of this group. I've become interested, what do I find on the site? How do you help people who are in this group that you've described?

Randy:
Well, everybody starts at a different journey. Basically I said, if you have the journey of high impact leadership, then basically there's like seven or eight stages. It depends how you really define it.
First, you start with a seeker, like a person who's curious. A person who... they don't really know what they want to do, but they know that what they do right now is not the thing they truly want to do-

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
... but they're on a journey. They have to seek out what it is that they need to do. Most people are already stuck here, because it's really hard to make a decision. To help them with that, I created a free workshop, it's called Start your Journey.
I might change the name to be like, the three-weeks sprint system. That basically helps them find their ikigai. What is it that you really love to do, that you're good at, that you can also get paid for and that you think the world really needs?

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Of course, you're not going to find it in one workshop, but it's the process of making choices to move forward, that only the road in front of you starts to get more clear. I didn't know what I wanted to do.
I knew I wanted to help people, but in what shape, way or form that would end up...? That changed 1,000 times, but everything I'm trying out, "Do I like this? Do they like this? Are they willing to pay for this? Is this a big enough problem?" There're so much variables that are not clear in the beginning.
Just by choosing a direction, at least it becomes easier to say no to a lot of opportunities that are now basically wasting up your time. I help them get clarity and focus first, figure out what it is they want to do in a year.
Then they will basically write down the projects they would like to achieve, pick out the top three projects. This way, I force them to make a decision. Then they have to prioritize which project is more important right now.
Then they will look at like, "Okay, this is the most important project. That's my first focus. This is what I really want to do first. What are all the different ways I can think of, that I can actually achieve that?"
Then we place it on something I learned from you, the impact effort scale. Well, once people see that, just going through these simple steps of clarifying a vague idea and turn it into something that is tangible, and set a three-weeks smart goal.
Just for this little thing, that already gives so much clarity to people, that suddenly the actions that they need to take become a lot more obvious. Once they're more obvious, we give them a system, the three-weeks sprint planner, to actually plan them out.
Like, "Okay, where are you right now? Where do you want to go? What are your limitations? What's the time and money that you have right now available for this specific project? Then what's the goal? What's the three-weeks smart goal and what's the story? How do you plan to achieve this?"
Now these are all concepts I basically learned from you, by looking at the frameworks that you were presenting early in the core system. Of course, sharing with the pro group and observing what people were doing.
Like Melinda, she showed this really simple thing. "Where do you want to go as a client? B. Well, where are you today? A." "Okay. Well, I can not bring it to B today, but I can do this first little step in between."
Just slowly by learning and trying and perfecting the system that I've been using over the past three years, I now have a framework that every person who is in the club, that wants to be more effective, wants to get more results and do this more consistently. They can just try it out and it's for free.
They have a complete workbook, everything. Like later on as you see, how would I want to develop it? Is that, all this data, I collect it and create a timeline. Then the people in the club, they can see what the progress they've made.
You store the ikigai, and slowly they can build on this project. There is a lot of fun things you can do with the data that you're then collecting, and really mapping out the journey for a person to reach their... yeah, bigger goals is what I say to them.
Once they have that, it's the startup. Then you start up, you know what you want. You're figuring out, you're trying to get product market fit. Well, then you have to hustle. After your startup, you have to wear all the hats. You have to do everything, so it's really chaotic.
Then there's the successful one, he's got his scope full. He makes enough money, so that time is not the limitation anymore. I love your schedule, where every Tuesday you have a full day of reading a book.
I wish I had a full Tuesday that I could commit to just relaxing and reading a book, but you're in a different part of the journey. You're already beyond that. You're in the training stage.
After you're successful, now you have the freedom to do whatever it is that you want to do. Now you have time to focus on that bigger goal of yours, because first you need to get into your cup full.
If you're in fear, if you're overwhelmed, if you're not in a state of abundance mentally, that you feel like you can do whatever you want to do, doing the bigger things is impossible.
You're just hold back by this, "I need to pay the bills. I need to do this, I need..." your decision making is heavily influenced by this, if you like it or not. Once you know what you want, you have your cup full, then you can start training.
You're in the training, preparation, you hire coaches, mentors, you're willing to invest in yourself more, because now you have the money, you have the time. Then you have to become a leader. You have to bring really... a lot of people together, because if you really have a bigger goal, you probably need more people.
It's hard to reach a big goal all by yourself. You have to really work on becoming the leader of what it is that you want to do, until eventually you bring them and well, you're the philanthropist. You're the person who's contributing and giving back without any expectations, because you have the ability to do so.
This is where every person starts in their journey. Everybody is at a different stage. Now I'm slowly building out each step. I start at the beginning, because I'm at the beginning.
Every journey is a new journey, so I just passed the seeker stage. I have the startup phase. I'm now getting my first clients, for the exact thing that I really want to do. I'm in the hustle stage right now, I would say.

Chris:
We'll be right back, with more from Randy Hereman.
(singing)

Ben Burns:
Hey, Ben Burns from The Futur here. If you don't recognize my voice, you might know me from our YouTube channel, as the friendly guy with a big beard. Yeah, that's me. Listen, The Futur's mission is to teach 1 billion creatives how to make money doing what they love, without feeling gross about it.
Let's be honest. Historically, we creative types, are great at producing the work, but not so great at running the business. Especially when it comes to things like sales, marketing and money.
I know personally, I used to struggle with all of those. Now fortunately for you though, we have a slew of courses and products designed specifically to help you run your business better.
These are tools like, the Complete Case Study and the Perfect Proposal. These things are there to help you attract new clients, and then wow them with a thorough and professional presentation.
Now you can go even deeper with one of our business courses like Project Management, How to Find Clients and the Intensive Business Bootcamp. Check out all of our courses and products about running a creative business, by visiting thefutur.com/business.

Chris:
Welcome back to our conversation, with Randy Hereman. Okay, so you said that a lot of this stuff, if not all of it, except for the part where they work with you, is all automated. It's free, it's open.
What is the experience like? Is it a bunch of questions? Is that a workbook? How do I interact with this content that you're talking about, to find my purpose? How does this work?

Randy:
I don't know if I should spoil that.

Chris:
Okay, you [crosstalk 00:41:56].

Randy:
No, it's really a... you get a workbook. It's for free. It's the complete workbook that you're going to use.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
You're going to enter, you're going to leave your details. Then a bot starts, and the bot will take you through the whole journey. Everything goes through the bot, and the bot will ask you a couple of questions. There are some funny GIF animations in it.
After a couple of interactions, you will go to the first page. There you'll see a video, where you will learn... the whole first introduction is taking about eight minutes. That's all the mindsets, talking, teaching, preparing you. It's execution mindset, I call this little eight minutes.
It's just like, how do you get things done? How do you get from not knowing anything, to actually figuring out what is it you want to do? Understanding where you are today, how to map out in a strategy. This principle of getting your cup full, like a bit of basic mindset foundation.
After eight minutes, you're done, you [inaudible 00:42:53] your workbook. The music goes on, and you start filling in the questions on your ikigai. I will just read the question to you, music goes. It's basically like I'm coaching you next to you, without me being there.

Chris:
Okay, all right. What prompts somebody to take it to the next level? Obviously you can't do this in a kind of sustainable way, if you're just giving a lot of free stuff. At some point, somebody is going to say, "I need to engage with Randy." Take me through the next step then.

Randy:
You go through the workshop. After the workshop I asked you, "Well, what's your thought on the workshop?" I basically say, "If you could refer this to a friend or a colleague, of which you'll..." like, the NPS score. The question, "How likely is it that you are referring it or recommending this to a friend or colleague?"
Then on a scale of 1 to 10, if they score 7, 8 or 9 or 10, I think, "Okay, this is maybe a prospect. This is a person who was warmed up. They like what they see." Then I just say, "Hey, do you want to do this with me? You designed the sprint, you have a plan, you know exactly what you need to do these next three weeks.
The question is, are you going to do it? Or maybe you want to review the plan and get more insights? I might have more experience, so I can help you strategize better, because I see more than what it is that you see."
If they say, "Yes," they're already in my sales system. There is a sales system. All the data [inaudible 00:44:22]. I have a complete visual look of whoever is in the workshop, whatever they put in, et cetera.
If they qualify and they say yes, then I will look at the data that they've given me, based on their strategy, based on their plan, their goals, the time, the money they have available, et cetera. I will, 99% of the time, schedule a call regardless.
Then I have a one-on-one conversation, and then there's basically three sales points that I give them. They can go to the academy, which is 300 a month. They can do a three-week sprint with me, which is 1,650. Or they can go for a one-year coaching practice, which is 26,000.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
Those are basically the three options they have. Then there is a 12-week workshop, which is like a digital 3D program, where I help them build a digital foundation. These are the different entry points. Now because I work with digital technology, my business model is more built around the SaaS products.
I white label different products. I have a complete funnel building system for example, where I'm completely transparent. I say, "Hey, this is a software package.
It's not mine, but if you use it, you get our templates, you get our designs. You get our funnels, you get live chat support, you got this." We offer the support and the strategy behind the technology.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
Now, there I charge affiliates fees. I get white label. I get 100% of the money I make on the software that I'm using. This way I can create a lot of different business models with revenue streams, without charging for any knowledge, because that's just the gateway for people to come to the platform.

Chris:
Right, okay. I'm putting myself in the mind of the person who might be listening to this and saying, "Randy sounds like a pretty incredible, motivated, self-starting, autodidactic human being. He decides he wants to go kitesurfing, he becomes a kitesurfer.
He decides he wants to go play poker, he becomes a professional poker player. Are you developing a system that the average person can get into and understand? Let me preface this by saying this. I recently put together a video, a whiteboard session called How to Find your Purpose, Do What you Love and Ikigai.
I explained the framework pretty clearly, the feedback that I get, the comments and the questions is, "Okay, so I wrote this down. I don't know what it is I want in my life, I'm stuck."
My reaction is, "Yeah, because it's not meant for you to figure out your life's purpose, when you're in your early 20s or even in your 30s. It takes time to figure it out. You try many things, before you find the thing that really resonates with you.
Where you can actually make money and what the world needs and that you're good at." How can a self-study guide with whatever technology you're using... how can it help them get to that place or can it? Or is that just an unrealistic expectation?

Randy:
We are our own limitations. It's not what you need to know, in order to achieve your goal. It's, who do you have to become to achieve your goal? This is the biggest thing.
If you would just take a step back and say, "Okay, if I want to do something and I want to make money with it," it means you need to be better than average. That's just a fair assumption to make, right?

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
You want to build expertise in something, what is an expert? What makes somebody an expert?

Chris:
Are you asking me?

Randy:
Yeah.

Chris:
Oh, what makes somebody an expert is having a narrow focus and having been exposed to the same problem multitudes of times, that they can then extract certain patterns and connect dots.

Randy:
How come they can connect those dots?

Chris:
They've seen it so many times.

Randy:
The key thing in that, is that they are able to make the distinction between what is and what isn't. Our brains... we have our intellect and we have our intelligence basically.
Now, if we want to do something we've never done before, it's impossible for us to understand what it is that we need to do in order to do it, because we've never done it before. However, 99% of the people, they want to understand what it is that they need to do.
Hence, they always question the people who they should be receiving advice from, because they already did it before. Then they're self-sabotaging themselves, because they value their own thoughts, even though they have no idea about what it is that they're doing.
Whereas an expert can say, "Well, look, if you're running Facebook ads, then if you have an ad set, you should at least copy it five times. If you copy it five times, you trigger five learning algorithms." Now let's say your ad set budget is €100 or €1000.
If you increase the budget more than 20%, again, you will trigger a new learning algorithm, so you screwed up all the work you did in the past. Now, if it's somebody who never ran Facebook ads before, he will never be able to see this.
He would say, "Yeah. Well, Facebook ads doesn't work." I press in, I make an audience. I say, "Well, the Netherlands." Then I say, "Well, they're vegan and I sell vegan shoes. Let's advertise this to vegans." Yeah, and nobody buys it from me.
Or they might have the perfect audience and somebody goes to the website, but when somebody goes to the website, well, they don't often buy at the first touch point. Watch your system for getting the people who arrive at your website, to then enter your digital ecosystem, so that they will start seeing you everywhere.
You become top of mind. The moment that their problem is big enough, that they know, "Hey, I need this from this guy or this person." Most people advertise, send it to Facebook, don't even have a Facebook pixel on their website.
You can not know what you don't know. Thinking you know everything or thinking like, if you want to... most people, they're very uncomfortable with the idea of not knowing.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
If you look at building expertise, basically there's four stages. First, you don't know what you don't know. Then you start to see what you don't know. You realize that you cannot do it, but you see it. You learn the language, you learn the vocabulary.
You see who the experts are. You can understand the difference, why this guy is more an expert than the other guy, because clearly his language shows more distinctions in that certain area of expertise. Then you start practicing. In order to practice, you have to do.
In order to do, you have to change who you are today. This is where the hard part comes, because you will have to put in the work. You have to build that muscle. In the beginning, this is always uncomfortable. Once you practice, you're not an expert yet. It's pretty hard. It takes a lot of energy, late nights.
You cannot even stop your mind, once you're studying for hours and hours. You're trying to understand, that your mind is racing, you can't do anything. All day, every day, you're thinking about it. It just doesn't work, until one day suddenly, it clicks.
You understand the connections between this and that, and this and that. Then it's the difficult part, because then you have to go out of the content you've been consuming. Then you have to start really focusing on perfecting, and trying and practicing. That's the system I developed, which is like TORO.
Every idea you have, test it, observe it, reflect and optimize. Repeat this loop over and over again, with whatever it is that you want to do. "Maybe I should be a typography designer." "Well, let's test it. Let's try it out." Well, observe, "How do I feel? What's my experience?"
Okay, you've done it. You did it. You observed yourself, now you're going to reflect, "Okay, is this what I like? Is this the experience that I like? If I would continue to do this for another three years, what would my life look like? What do I want my life to look like?" Write it down and then optimize.
"How can I steer or course correct the ship, to go back to the optimization that I've created?" I think this framework works for everything. Whether it's becoming a pro-athlete, building a business or becoming a better designer.

Chris:
Okay, I think you've hit the problem on the head there. That you do have to test your ideas. You have to actually do something with it and you have to take action. Otherwise, all this information that you've gathered is just information collecting.
It's an intellectual exercise, intellectual entertainment, but you got to go do something. It seems to me like you do understand the problem, okay. Now, Randy, shifting gears here, did we talk yet about things that you want to talk about? Do I need to ask you a question or you can just tell me?

Randy:
No. My goal of this podcast is... I've been in the Futur Pro Group, and I've attended the meetings. Not as much as I would like, but well, I was busy executing.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
I didn't need the help. Only when I needed it, I showed up-

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
... and I asked. Every time I went to the Pro Group... it's an example, most people listen and don't actively engage. What happens when you...? Maybe this podcast, maybe people who are listening right now, they're listening, but are they hearing what we're saying?
Are they actively listening, or are they listening to the voices in their own head? Agreeing with what it is that we say, or disagreeing with what it is that we say. Then thinking about the agreements that they've made with themselves, and not diving deeper about how they can apply this already to their business.
By the time we are here, their thoughts have run off 1,000 times. That's okay, that's happening to me too. It happens to everybody. You can not shut off your thoughts, but you can take a step back and observe them. Let them go and engage more within the physical reality of what it is.
I think that's what people need to do. People need to get out of their heads, stop thinking and start doing. Now, how do you do this? What do you want to do? What are the actions you need to take in order to do it?
Who do you need to become, in order to achieve that or to take these actions? It's not about learning new things. You can learn everything you want, but I right now, I have a content overwhelm for example.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
I've been consuming too much content from too many people, which kills my own creativity. There's so much inside of me that wants to go out, but I keep pouring more stuff in. I keep getting new ideas. I keep getting new insights. I keep getting new trends. I keep getting new frameworks.
I keep getting new technologies. Now I need to shut off everything. Look at [inaudible 00:54:50] what I want, what do I need to do? Just do it. Whether you like to do it or not, whether it's cool or not. Whether it's fun or not, whether it's motivating or not. No, you just have to do it.
If you stay within the same framework of your life, like your day-to-day routines, et cetera, as you are today, you're not going to get different results. You want an internal transformation.
You want to transform yourself, to become a person who is capable of creating himself as whoever he needs to become, to do whatever it is that he needs to do, to get whatever it is that he wants to get.

Chris:
Okay, very motivating. I mean, I get it. I get it, and I'm right there with you. Trying to help people figure out how to take that very critical first step, because there's where you are.
There's where you want to be. There's... for some people, a pretty wide gap between those two points.MDesigning your life, your intention to be able to take those steps, so that you can move closer inch by inch towards your goal.

Randy:
What do you see as the biggest problem for people not taking action? You clearly lay out if like... it's not like you're Gary Vaynerchuk. I love him. He's giving so much value on the internet, but really The Futur is the only channel that really gives practical advice that I've been consuming, that you can actually use.
Literally, I watched what you did. I contacted the company and I earned €3200 a month just by... I didn't even know what I was doing. I was just following your advice. Trusting that if I will buy this step overview course-

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
... and I will learn that in a few days.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
I buy Ben Burn's... his proposal. I will make a killer proposal.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
The layout is there. You just have to change the words-

Chris:
Yes.

Randy:
... and do it. Why don't people do it?

Chris:
They don't do it, because like you said, there's no shortage of information out there. We live in a wonderful time, where almost everything that you want to learn, if you can type some words into it and get close enough, Google will spit out the closest possible answer to your question.
It's not a lack of information. Now, that might have been the case just 10, 20 years ago. Today, that's not a barrier to getting that anymore. I think a lot of things... Seth Godin talks about this in one of his lectures.
He talks about like, when you want to play baseball or you want to learn a martial art, I mean, some people do read the manual and then they go try. Most people, they just throw themselves into it. You pick up a bat, you swing it.
Then you start to get a feel for the game and you become thirstier for more information, then you start to get a coach. You might read some books, you might watch videos, but it's putting yourself out there.
I think we are living in a time where... especially the people you and I are talking to, they think reading or consuming the content is actually getting them closer to the goal.
Without having to take any action, without risking anything, without putting themselves out there, being vulnerable and being susceptible to having small setbacks, aka failures. What do you think?

Randy:
Well, I totally agree. I also think in some way, people fear their own success.

Chris:
Tell me what that means.

Randy:
Well, "What if I could do that?" It would basically break every belief they have about themselves, because they don't believe they can do it. It's a self- destructing pattern. I saw this video from this coach, from Tom Bilyeu, like Impact Theory Show.
He had this coach who is coaching the best athletes in the world. He was saying that, "The words that come out of your mouth..." like you can have scary thoughts about yourself.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
Maybe our own thoughts are the things that hold us back. If I talked to you about, how much do you think you can charge for your design strategy in a one-day workshop? Your answer would be 100K-

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
... if it's the right company, with the right person. If I ask it to 99% of the people who do strategy, they think 5K is a big ask.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Even without considering that, yeah, 5K would be a big ask for a really small company, with small revenue, but it's your choice who you target.
If you would target a company with millions or billions, 100,000 is nothing, because the impact you create is more important. They've already decided and told themselves, "This is not possible."

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Then they're not open to even consider, "Is the way I think about it, the only way I can think about this or are there other ways?" If you can charge 100,000 for that, then other people can do too.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
"No, I need a better website. No, I need a better this. No, I need..." all my clients that I have... like the bigger projects, never asked about my credentials, never asked about my website. Now, they had a big problem that they wanted to solve and I told them I could solve it. That's it.

Chris:
Yes.

Randy:
They didn't even read testimonials. Yeah, they checked out a YouTube video and saw I was on YouTube and they had some things. Which I think is also a smart way of why you should be on the internet, because clients will research you a little bit or Google you and they will find things.
They don't care about your problems, or your insecurities or your whatever. They have a problem. They want to fix it. They want somebody who they feel confident with, that that person or that company can solve it for them. That starts with like the [inaudible 01:00:15] the sales stuff.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
All this stuff is out there. You read a book... you can read whatever book, there is a million books, but don't read 20 books. You can pick up one book, a pocket full of dough, you don't need to pick up any book ever.
Just do the things that say in that, if you want to be a design strategist, if you want to be a business designer, if you want to learn how to build brands. Pick up that book, only do these frameworks and just blindly sell one thing in a workshop format to a company for €500.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
The first job I got was with a vegetarian snack bar. I got €250 a month, because I just wanted them to value it at least somewhat.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
He was not capable of affording more, because he only has a small revenue. He was the leader in the scene online, in the niche that I wanted to perform in. I got the job, I worked one year, €250 a month.
Creating multiple videos a month, helping him build his brands online. After that, I got a job that paid me more, that paid me 3,600 a month. I only got that, because the other job made me visible to this other person.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
It's also about breaking down your goal. Maybe the vision you have is too big. Maybe it's too overwhelming. Maybe it's too far.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
It feels like it's not possible for you. You have to break it down. That's what I did, is like a three-week sprint planner. Break it down in just three weeks, what's only necessary in these three weeks. Forget about the rest, because you cannot live in four weeks from now. Just focus on what you need to do today.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
What do you need to do today? Make a highlight. Then just, what are the first actions you need to take tomorrow or today when you start, to get this process going?
Often, getting started is the hardest part. Once you're in the flow, everything happens. Getting behind the computer, writing the first sentence, that's how it happens.

Chris:
Right.

Randy:
Of course, all these changes are not going to happen in one day. It's not like, "This is the person who I need to become. I want to be like Chris Do. I want to have the same habits, the same structure, the same thing." I wake up tomorrow and I'm Chris.
No, I'm going to wake up in the morning. My alarm goes off and yeah, I know I should wake up at 6:00 because I have a lot to get done. The voice in my head says, "Maybe tomorrow," and you snooze it down, but you have to forget about that voice. That voice is just a thought.
All the thoughts you have, is just a collection of all the content and all the experiences, and all the emotions you've gathered over your lifetime and maybe beyond. That's a discussion for another [inaudible 01:02:49].

Chris:
Yes, it is. It's interesting. I was watching this video. This guy was talking about fears and what holds you back. He says that as humans, we're only born with two fears that are instinctual to us. One, natural fear of heights, falling. Two, the fear of loud noises.
He says, "All the other fears, are ones that you've learned through parents, through caretakers, through teachers, coaches, life experience." He's like, "Here's the really empowering thought. If you learned it, you can unlearn it."
For a lot of people, the reason why they don't take action, the reason why they won't take that first critical step, or open that book or apply it, because they're delaying the time in which they're actually going to do something.
The reason why they don't just read one book and apply it I think, is because they want to read 17 books. "If I read another book, I don't have to do anything. My knowledge, my courage will never be tested."

Randy:
It's getting high on your own ideas.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
I mean, of course, when I sit down and I think about, "What do I want?" I get happy feelings, when I think about these things that I truly want out of my life. Some people... they cannot even think about what it is that they want.
It's only scary, because it confronts them with the fact that they don't even have anything to strive for or anything to do. Which then is like, "Okay, what am I doing? What am I going to do?" Which then creates questions. Then you start questioning your questions and you get into this loop.
The only way again, is figure out what you want to do. Set a simple goal and just start moving. To coach, I had to develop this little system called... I really like systems.
The 313 method like, write down 10 crazy ideas you want to do. Select the three you want to do, and plan out like month one, you do idea number one, month two, regardless you do idea number two. Month three, you regardless do idea number three. Now you have data on three different ideas, which one felt good?
What did you like? What didn't you like? Even if you don't like the idea, finish the month, because you want to be a person who finishes what they start. It's about building the habit of finishing what you start, it's the type of person you want to become.
If you want big things, you have to learn how to continue, because so many people here, they've started things. I have other projects that I do the same thing with. You start things, but then you stop.
If you would have just continued, even at a slower pace, you just continued, every day, one hour, every day, one hour, improving this little thing. Eventually compound interest comes in.
I mean, in one year, one hour a day, if you work on the system you've created for yourself, to be the person you need to be, in one year from now, you're 37 times better at the system that you've created for yourself than you are today. It takes patience. 1% every single day, it adds up over time.
Whether that's improving your business system or your life system, your habits, whatever it is that you want to improve, if you're consistent and you don't stop, you will reach the results.
If you don't know what you want to do, use the 313 methods. Write three things down, try three things, build a habit of finishing the things you want to do. Then pick one, "Which is the one I want to move forward with?"
Now, if that's the thing you want to do, awesome. If it's not, again, pick three things and you continue to 313, 313, until you find what it is that you want to do.

Chris:
Randy, I feel like I can probably sit here, and get really into the weeds with you and have a really long discussion. I realize we're like well over an hour here, if somebody is interested in this and want to try out your systems and your methods, where do they go?

Randy:
Younghuman.com.

Chris:
It's younghuman.com, it's human single and not humans, like I said earlier, younghuman.com. There's going to be a variety of tools and resources, you can use them. I think all you're asking for is an email to sign up for the materials that you put together, right?

Randy:
Yeah. I promise you not to spam you with nonsense. That's a no-go with us. Soon I will also... like completely on YouTube, help people how to... yeah, design, build, manage and grow their own digital platforms. What technology do we need to use?
Shorten the learning curve, and show people step-by-step how to use this technology. Even though... if you're a CEO of a big company, or if you are a startup and you don't know anything.
Or if you're a creative freelancer or a strategist, understanding how to use technology is a fundamental skill in today's world. Hence the Young Human. We need to learn this. We need to understand this, Facebook ads, segmentation, pixels, all these things.
If you don't understand this, and you need to lead a team or a company or anything, you will never reach your goals as effectively as those who understand. Step-by-step, I created a... inspired by the PDF you had in The Futur group a few years ago, kind of a framework that says, "Start here, learn these tools.
Learn how to use this technology, set up a Facebook ad." Just €5 a day, for €100, you already have your whole workflow, which is basically your rent. Your rent this €100 a month, to have your business online, have email systems, automations, everything working.
Then €10 a day on Facebook ads, just drive traffic to a landing page. Write an ebook. It doesn't need to be good. Just get system in place, so you can get the baseline metrics, the first metrics.
That's the challenge for everybody who listens to this podcast. If you do that, I will have the video step-by-step for you, set up an ad, run €10 of ads and start training that muscle.

Chris:
I love that. You know what? At first, you're probably sitting here thinking... if somebody's listening to this, "Why did Chris talk about his past in kitesurfing and being a professional poker player?" You can see in the way that Randy thinks, he is a very systems kind of guy.
He likes to dive in, figure things out and process everything, so it becomes formulaic. Then it takes all the hard work away. He's done a lot of the work for you, but you still need to show up with your stack of chips, so to speak. You have to throw a chip in there and you have to just go for it.
Just to realize that you have a supply of energy that's not depletable, unlike in poker. There's always going to be someone who's going to stake you and that's you. If you just step in and play the game or you chip in, you're going to start to be able to collect very useful information and take steps closer towards your goal.
Randy, thanks very much for coming on. If they want to follow you on social media, where do they go?

Randy:
To Randy Hereman on Instagram or YouTube.

Chris:
Randy Hereman on Instagram or on YouTube. You've got a couple of videos on YouTube. Are you active on Instagram?

Randy:
Not so much yet.

Chris:
Okay.

Randy:
I bought Dave's course, so I'm planning to start. I've been trying to like... if you're very active on Instagram, but the people who engage with you have no place to even go-

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
... then you're wasting a lot of energy.

Chris:
Sure.

Randy:
I wanted to assist them first.

Chris:
Yeah.

Randy:
Now I already have like 300 vlogs online already, because I've been documenting this whole journey.

Chris:
I see.

Randy:
I have like 200 vlogs that I still need to edit, from the past two and a half years.

Chris:
Wow.

Randy:
There is a lot of content that is waiting to hit the internet. Yeah, time is of course always a thing that we have to overcome. I hope to extend my team, and then let people edit it and then slowly build that out.
Yeah, engage with me, ask me questions. I'm very willing to help. I look forward to... yeah, hearing your feedback from everybody, about what you think about the workshop and if it really helped you.

Chris:
Awesome, so here's the test everybody. Don't go and listen to the next episode just yet. Go check this site, younghumanclub.com, go check it out. Start getting engaged and take some action today.
However small, whatever little steps you can take, you're going to start to feel that muscle being developed and over time it becomes easier and easier. Go do something, put something that you've learned today into action and I'll see you guys on the next podcast.

Randy:
Hello. My name is Randy Hereman, and [inaudible 01:11:05] Chris Do.

Greg:
Thanks so much for joining us in this episode. If you're new to The Futur and want to know more about our educational mission, visit thefutur.com. You'll find more podcasts episodes, hundreds of YouTube videos and a growing collection of online courses and products covering design and business.
Oh, and we spell The Futur with no E. The Futur podcast is hosted by Christ Do and produced by me, Gregg Gunn. This episode was mixed and edited by Anthony Barro with intro music by Adam Sanborn.
If you enjoyed this episode, then do us a favor and rate and review us on iTunes. It's a tremendous help in getting our message out there, and let's us know what you like. Thanks again for listening. We will see you next time.

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