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You are not a FREELANCER! Stop acting like one.

How you describe yourself can have an effect on your beliefs.

Are you a freelancer? Or is that how you describe yourself to others? You might not realize it, but labeling yourself as a freelancer actually creates some limiting beliefs.

In this video, Chris takes a deep dive with Ben Burns and Greg Gunn on the topic of freelancing and what it really means. If you claim to be a freelancer, Chris has one message for you: you are not a freelancer.


What is a Freelancer?

Merriam Webster defines a freelancer as a person who pursues a profession without a long-term commitment to any one employer. Freelancers generally look for specific, short-term jobs, and get paid an hourly rate.

A freelancer sells their time and is expected to do the work themselves. They’re expected to have all the necessary tools to get the work done and be self-sufficient. They’re temporary employees, are directed by a supervisor/manager, and can either work on or off site.


Why Precision of Language Matters

So, what exactly is the harm in calling yourself a freelancer? Let’s think of it this way: what you think, you end up saying; and what you say, you end up doing.

We often say that your beliefs manifest into your reality, so if you believe you’re a freelancer—a temporary employee who works gig after gig—that’s what you’ll be.

The things you repeatedly do will become your routine, and your routine will become your habit. That habit eventually shapes your behavior, ultimately affecting your beliefs.

What you think, say, and do all have an impact on what you believe is true for you.


You Are a Business, Not a Freelancer

It’s time you start viewing yourself as a business and not just a freelancer. A business owner does everything you’re more than likely doing on a daily basis. Their responsibilities include:

  • Sales and marketing
  • Negotiations
  • Client bids and proposals
  • Providing estimates
  • Drafting payment documents
  • Submitting SOW (Scope of Work) documents
  • Working on a project-to-project basis
  • Working independently

Seeing the parallels yet? That’s because you aren’t a freelancer—you’re a business owner!

Businesses look for clients (or even better, accounts). They look for project awards. They sell projects and are expected to run the projects. Sometimes they work purely solo, while at other times, they work alongside several people.

Businesses need to make a profit, whereas freelancers simply bill for their time. Even if you’re a solopreneur, you’re only getting paid as a temporary employee. When you position you and your services as part of a business, you’ll make a profit year over year.


Final Thoughts

Going from freelancer to business owner requires making a shift in your mindset. How you view, label, and talk about yourself reflects on your work ethic and ability to grow.

If you want to learn what it takes to start operating as a business, check out the recommended course below. And for more tips from freelancers-turned-business owners, watch the full video above.

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