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After Hours

This episode comes from a unique event that we like to call After Hours. It’s a raw, revealing, and open-ended discussion with Chris Do and some our friends from The Futur Pro Group.In this After Hours chat, we delve into how to reframe the way you think about goals. What they are, their meaning to you, and why looking to the past won’t help you today.

Why do you believe what you believe?
Why do you believe what you believe?

Why do you believe what you believe?

Ep
131
Apr
28
With
After Hours
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Why do you believe what you believe?

Why do you believe what you believe? How much of it was hardwired and how much of it did you inherit from other people? Like, for instance, your parents.

This episode comes from a unique event that we like to call After Hours. It’s a raw, revealing, and open-ended discussion with Chris Do and some our friends from The Futur Pro Group.

In this After Hours chat, we delve into how to reframe the way you think about goals. What they are, their meaning to you, and why looking to the past won’t help you today.

And things get deep in this vulnerable pep talk. Albeit sage wisdom, you will hear tough love doled out from Chris.

So buckle up, settle in, and please enjoy this deep chat, after hours at The Futur.

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special guest
produced by
edited by
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Episode Transcript

Greg:
Welcome to The Futur Podcast, a show that explores the interesting overlap between design, marketing, and business. I'm Greg Gunn. Here's a deep question for you, why do you believe what you believe? How much of it was hardwired? And how much of it did you inherit from other people, for instance, your parents? The conversation you're about to hear is unpolished and unscripted, and it comes from what we'd like to call After Hours. Revealing open-ended discussion with Chris and some of our friends from The Futur Pro group. In this chat, we delve into how to reframe the way you think about your goals, what they are? Their meaning to you? And why looking to the past won't help you with them today? And things get deep in this vulnerable little pep talk. Albeit sage wisdom, you'll hear some tough love dulled out for Chris. So buckle up, settle in, and please enjoy this deep chat After Hours at The Futur.

Chris :
What is up, everybody? Maybe you're getting tired of seeing us, but since we have some people in from out of town, we're going to make more content. It's been a little while since we've done one of these After Hours sessions, and usually, it's with the crew with Jona and Ricky. But today, since they here, I'm going to introduce you guys to the rest of the After Hours crew, at least for today. So on my left is Mo Ismael, he goes by Mo Ismy. This is Chris Franklin over here, what's up, Chris? With the deep voice. And then Rodrigo Tasca, is it Tasca?

Rodrigo:
Tasca.

Chris :
Yeah, from Brazil.

Rodrigo:
That's correct.

Chris :
And he's here. And you may have seen these people just not that long ago, less than 24 hours ago we were here, and we're we're back at it. So this is the format, we're going to do some kind of informal conversation. None of this is scripted, so bear with us. And for those of you that can't stand watching a really long live stream without a clear point with timestamp, I suggest you skip this video right now. And the parts that are good, the team will come back and edit and drop very bite-sized pieces. But if you enjoy these kind of campfire discussions, these fireside chats, that's what the intent is. So I don't know what we're going to talk about, but I'm ready for you. Whoever has something that they want to bring up, it could be a followup to a question. And also we'll be monitoring your comments on a little bit on YouTube because that's where we're streaming to. Ricky has got us. He's raised his hand there. And, Mo, you want to kick it off? You seem like you're itching to say something.

Mo:
No, no, no. Before we started, I think Franklin was going to kick off.

Chris :
Okay. Don't move too much. Go ahead.

Chris Franklin:
Absolutely. So we had a conversation earlier where basically you were telling us that we inherited this mindset of dreaming too small, and that resonated with me because over the past 11 months, I hadn't been very forward-thinking, I've been trying to keep it contained and keep the day-to-day going because the future can be a bit unpredictable. So, with today's climate, and alongside with basically me coming out of a partnership where we were dreaming super, super far, now I'm in the mindset of dreaming small and immediate and the future can't be too, too in my hands I should say. So I basically would like to say, I need help to dream bigger, because the examples that you gave yourself and the things that you talked about were really inspiring. And they made me realize that I was satisfied with the pace I was going and that I thought that good enough was good enough, but how do you dream bigger with all of these external factors going on?

Chris :
Okay, great. Thanks for helping to kick off the conversation. I want to give everybody some context as to what the heck we're talking about because I'm not privy to the hours of dialogue we had on Sunday and then yesterday, and all the other conversations we have in between. The first thing that you mentioned was that we inherited this dream small mentality, and some people are going to take offense to me even suggesting that's not literally what I said, that's a takeaway. I'm not disagreeing with that. But let me just say this, when you were born and raised, and hopefully you were raised by parents who loved you, who cared for you and want the best for you, they by example, by virtue of what they do and what they say, they're giving you life plan, some of it is overt, and some of it is implied.
And so you may have parents who believe in the American dream of working hard, paying your dues and putting your nose to the grindstone and living a good life, working nine to five, and then planning for the weekends in terms of barbecues and get togethers, the weekend warriors, if you will. And they gave you a lot of this, and you're not even aware of what they gave you. And you can just take a quick look and ask yourself, what city do you live in? What religion do you practice if you practice religion? What political party do you affiliate yourself with? And all of a sudden you're going to realize that is all pretty much from my parents. The reason why you think there's so much negative discourse that's going on in such a polarized climate especially if you live here in America between whether you're a Republican or a Democrat, a far right person or liberal, whether you're this faith or that faith.
And the interesting thing that I heard, I think it was Bill Berg who talked about this, he said, "Religion is a pretty stupid concept if you really think about it. And he said, "Are you guys know about Scientology and how a guy named Ron found a religion, and you can't take any religion seriously by a guy named Ron? And how there are people from Zenfar who are going to come in a spaceship?" And we listened to this and the crowd is erupting in laughter and disbelief. He goes, "Here's the thing, just as we get older, we become really cynical, we become really skeptical, and that sounds like a crazy fairytale." But he said, "If you weren't raised Christian and somebody told you a woman gave birth to God's son from immaculate conception, you would laugh them out the door too. And why is it that we don't use the same standards of investigation of seeking truth? It's because we just accepted these things to be true."
Here's the other thing I want to share with you guys is that one day, I mean, if you should have the good fortune to live longer than your parents, you take care of yourself, you don't die of unnatural causes, they'll pass away. And if you're the only child, they're going to hopefully leave a will where you inherit all their stuff. You might inherit their house, their cars, whatever else they've acquired and accumulated throughout their life. They can't do anything with it once they've passed, so they're going to leave it to you. And then you get a call from your attorney who tells you, "Hey, there's an inheritance here, and we need to go through some paperwork."
But you get all this stuff and you arrive at their house and you open the garage door and it's just packed with stuff you didn't realize in the years in which you've not lived at home your parents have become pack rats, they've accumulated things to become hoarders. And you now have the difficult and emotional task of emptying things and getting rid of things. You don't need another house, you don't need another car to maintain and keep up. And there's a lot of stuff that your parents kept for sentimental reasons, they have an emotional attachment to those things that you clearly do not.
So you're going to go through, and very judiciously, sort out a few things that have meaning to you, maybe that you want to pass onto your children to keep the family tradition alive. But the rest of it, you're going to give away as state sale. You're just going to get rid of it because you don't need more stuff, right? That makes sense. You're going to actively decide what you want to take on and everything that you take on means you have less space in your current house or apartment, you're going to do that. That seems very clear to you. So why haven't we done that same kind of auditing and that same kind of decision-making that's objective saying these are ideas my parents had, it worked for them, but they don't work for me. That's their religion, that's their political party, that's the way they see the world. It was good for them, but I don't want that anymore.
So part of this is that they want for you not to suffer, they want to make sure you're not starving, fighting to make ends meet. Maybe they have had those moments with themselves where they had to decide between food and rent, and that's a very, very tough situation to be in. And so they give you this game plan and it just becomes baked into your DNA. And for a while, you don't have a lot of choice because you're not fully formed as an adult who has an awareness to your own mind, but when you do, when you turn whatever age that may be some, sometimes it's earlier 15 years old, sometimes it's later in your earlier mid-20s, and then you wake up one day and you realize everything that I think about, now I have a choice to keep or to get rid of just like the estate sale.
And so it is convenient for us to tell ourselves a story that this is how I was made. My multiple generations of my family have believed this, and therefore I blame my parents for giving me this thing. But that's not taking accountability for who you are, and not saying you have agency over your thoughts and actions, which is a horrible way to think of yourself like you're some automaton, somebody's pulling strings. Nobody wants to see themselves like that. So when you come to that realization that you need to be accountable for everything that you are today moving forward, not to say that your parents didn't have some responsibility, but looking to the past as I found out, doesn't help you today and it will not help you tomorrow, you got to make the decision.
So let's say you're an early riser and you decide, I don't want to do that anymore, it's not really good for me. I want to get up at 10:00 AM. And the day that you decide to do that and follow through with that is the day that you no longer are an early riser. Take that idea and apply it to everything in your life. Rodrigo, you're a vegetarian. Were you raised vegetarian? Did your parents eat meat?

Rodrigo:
They do, I am Brazilian, so we eat a lot off meat.

Chris :
Lots of meat, lots of really delicious meats, by the Way.

Rodrigo:
[inaudible 00:10:13] Yeah. The thing for me was I worked on a short documentary about what happens in the animal stuff, and I saw things that I was I can't-

Chris :
You can't unsee?

Rodrigo:
And I knew about it. My sister is a vegan for two or three years. I made a lot of fun of her. I'd be the guy eating burger in front of her, you want this? And she go, ha, ha. And later on I was, wow, I was so insensitive to this. I knew about it, but I just didn't really want to open up and saw stuff for myself and then I couldn't go back when my mind.

Chris :
Right. So you illustrated something perfectly for me is that once you decided I don't want to do this anymore, that you're no longer comfortable participating in habits and traditions of your fore fathers and parents, you're done. And you made that decision. So of all the things in your life are you that clear as a rhetorical question? I just want you to think about, and I want everyone who's listening to this to think and ask themselves that same kind of question is everything you decide, if your favorite typeface is Caslon why is it Caslon? Probably because your favorite instructor used Caslon and told you that was the best typeface, or maybe it's Times New Roman, because it just turns out that it's the default typeface and you are used to just using things by default, the defacto standard, right? You're not committed to any of that.
The beautiful thing about the human mind and our so-called journey of life here is you could change your mind. You could be raised a Republican and then decide to be a Democrat or vice versa. You could follow one faith and decide another faith or no faith at all. And that's the most beautiful thing that we have is we can change our mind. And changing our mind should be celebrated more than it is in current culture. When people change their mind today, they're attacked for being inconsistent or doublespeak, it's like I can change my mind many times and that's how we grow. So let's get back to the real question that was the context for the conversation. The real question is how do I begin to change my mind about dreaming bigger?
Now, do you want to say something here? I'm not here to judge whether or not you have a big enough or small enough dream, and you said, how do we dream bigger? And I'm not encouraging you necessarily, and I want to be more precise with my language now, not necessarily just dream bigger because you need to have bigger goals, and a goal is a dream with a plan. So you could sit here and you are on the world's biggest dream where you can't believe it, me and Kanye, I'm going to be an Oprah, and you'll see me running for the president of the United States soon. That's a dream and dreams are kind of empty. So what's your plan? Like you and your former partner, we won't mention his name at this point in time, he's dead to you. But you have big dreams, but how much of it did you put in to planning and executing, right?
Did you break it down into quarters, like four quarters a year? Did you break it down into months then things you had to do every week and down to the day and down to the hour? Did you know what it is that you needed to do? Because if you don't then you just have a dream. And dreams are kind of nice, but they won't get you anywhere. So let's talk about your own specific goal. So let's refine the question, the question would be then how do I know if my goal is going to push me enough that I know I'm not just being complacent? We want to just be okay, right? You know me, I've talked about this a lot, my feeling, this is just my feeling, I believe this, that if we stop growing, we start dying in every aspect, except for our waistline. If we stop growing, we start dying, that's it.
Because life to me is about the pursuit of growth about this insatiable curiosity that never gets filled because you fill one bucket and you realize there's 35 more buckets. The more I learn, the more I learn that I don't know anything. And that's why I love learning, and I get to apply that. Let's talk about your specific goal. Do you know what it is? And do you know how you feel about your goal without saying the specific goal? Do you know what your goal is where you want to be in one year, three years and five years from now?

Chris Franklin:
To that extend, I don't.

Chris :
Okay.

Chris Franklin:
I can't say I have small, tangible and financial goals that I want to hit for next year. But it's kind of where it stops for me.

Chris :
Okay. So let's do this, realize something and he goes to mix metaphors potentially, and I could get in trouble. Is that your goal is your compass, your hustle is the velocity. With a lot of hustle, and I know that a lot of people think about hustle and grind culture and to celebrate it, to a degree, you do need some of that to be able to work hard for your goals. But without the direction of that compass, you could be going 100% off in the wrong direction. I read in a book, can't remember which book now where if you set a destination from the West Coast where we are today in Santa Monica to the East coast, and let's just say, it's 37 degrees and you go 38 degrees instead 37, you'll be hundreds of miles off course, you probably won't even know where the heck you are. That matters a lot.
So sitting down with somebody, that somebody could just be yourself and saying, where do I see myself? Yesterday we talked about vision casting, to kind of say, okay, I don't know exactly how to get there, but I know what there looks like, and that's really important. So if we were to go around this room and ask every single person, where is there where do you want to be? It should be clear. It should be fairly concrete. It should be fairly specific. I know where I want to be, I could tell you, I could see my future already. And that's why sometimes when it happens, I'm pleasantly surprised, but I feel like it's deja vu. Because I visualize that, and it's important in a lot of sports people are athletes, they do this visualization, seeing themselves walk into the ring, circling around the cage, eyeing their opponent, bowing, nodding, and then just tearing them apart.
And they even say it will happen in the second round. It will be this kind of strike, it'll be an elbow to the side of the head and it'll be a kale of victory. They see themselves being applauded and celebrating and walking out victorious and celebrating in the locker room, that's how clear they see it. So when they see people walking into the ring and you'll see the commentators say this, something is off, doesn't have that spark, that killer instinct, it's that fighter arrived in the ring defeated. Now we all can look at each other, we can all look at each other, right? Mo? And we can say, Mo is going to tell you some big goal of his and you can tell by the way he says it, that spark in his eye, the quickening of his pulse, the white knuckling of his fist, whether he really wants it or not. It's like he doesn't even believe in its own goal. He's saying it as an external thing to make you think he's going to go somewhere, but internally he really knows it's not going to happen.
And that's what we can see as the objective friend looking at it without judgment, saying like, "Oh, I don't think he believes that." Then you can tell, you can almost always tell because there's a hesitation in a way of him phrasing it in his tone that you can tell. So if you don't have that clear goal, Chris, you could just be really lucky that you get there and then you will falsely attribute your amazing planning to that. So my whole thing for all of you is visualize where you want to go to paint the most vivid high fidelity image that you can in your mind, and then articulate that in any which way you can and you make videos. So you can say it in your video, like say here's where I see myself heading in five years, I want my community, you all to hold me accountable for this. Here's how I plan to get there, these are the steps that we'll be taking, and I'll be reporting back to you each and every quarter, how I'm doing.
Now I'm going to fail, I'm going to take the wrong direction, I'm going to make mistakes. Hang in there with me, don't give up on me because I won't give up on myself. And then you go. So you have to be able to visualize it, it has to be clear in your mind, you have to be able to articulate that. And if you don't make videos, you can just write in a journal this is really what I want, and then share that with somebody. Because here's the thing, you would think we're really motivated as human beings to do the things we promise ourselves, but actually we're more motivated by not letting other people down that we care about than we are about living up to our own promise. Mo is going to talk about this in a second.

Chris Franklin:
I will be leaving that to Mo.

Chris :
I feel it right, right?

Chris Franklin:
Right.

Chris :
This is kind of what you need to set for yourself. So my thing for you is whatever your goal is, at least include a couple things in there that scare the heck out of you, that you have to transform in order for that goal to happen. That's the tricky part of goal setting. It has to stretch you in the way that you look at the world, maybe your work ethic, maybe how you take care of yourself, maybe the books that you have to read, or you are going to have to face your demons and slay your own dragons. That's how you know there's some component of risk and fear, and therefore on the other side of that is growth. You got to do that.

Mo:
So I get what you're saying right now.

Chris :
You do? You don't sound like it. You see the way he phrased that? Watch where this goes, I already can tell you where it's going.

Mo:
Where it's going to go, Chris? You're already there.

Chris Franklin:
It's hard, but it just feels like-

Chris :
Yeah, it is a hard, yeah, but-

Chris Franklin:
It is.

Chris :
It is, isn't it, is it-

Mo:
[inaudible 00:20:14] I was right.

Chris Franklin:
No. So I feel Franklin is that, right? So the whole visioning of where the business is going to go it's not something that's out of sight for me. For me, the big thing is to dream bigger. When I heard you talking about the things that you want to do, do they? Me and Mo walking back to the Airbnb and we're, whoa, the stuff that Chris is talking about doing things I never thought about even during my life. And then yesterday when we're leaving here you're like "Hey, you guys have any questions about the setup or anything like that?" We're like, "No." I didn't think anything of it until I got home, and I was like, "Was that Chris testing us about how the stuff works here so we can use this gear to shoot something?" Because he is take advantage of everything, all these impossibilities. So here today, I was like, yo guys can pull the whiteboard and do take it. But when he talks to you about it you're like that was me.

Chris :
You try.

Chris Franklin:
But it sparked something in me, right? Because I was let me think of something bigger than me during the white board. And I don't know for me and I don't know, just because being an immigrant and things like that is that mindset? I've always just looked to try to reach things that are within my grasp. And I want to do something bigger than that now, but it's I just don't know how to tap into that.

Chris :
Okay.

Chris Franklin:
I mean, I don't know how you went from going from starting blind to the future and then talking about these different things? What is that pivot? Because you talk about one degree off, you're talking about hundreds of miles off is how do we find ways where we should be going?

Chris :
Yeah. So here's the thing before I answered your long observation in a short question in there, I do want to answer to the people who are tuning in live. This is live, you guys, what's up? What's up? This is totally live because you know how? Because I'm reading your comments right now., it's totally live. And there are 291 people in it. Okay. So just hang out with us, we're going to talk. I'm not going to pay too much attention to what's going on in the chat because Ricky is going to do that for me. And he'll find appropriate times to flag me and let me know what's up. Okay. I also can see Jona there with his hands up with the wrench. I don't know what the wrench means, Jona? Is that what it means? The wrench is the moderator? Dang, he just upgraded his status there. I love that. Beautiful. Very good. Nice.
Okay. Now let's get back to your thing. Let's talk about a couple of things. Let's break it down. One of the things I want to help you develop a skill set of is not over complicating what it is you want to say. Don't do the big buildup, don't do compounded questions because the weird thing is the person who's standing in front of you might choose to answer the wrong question that you actually had. So just go straight to it, it's going to help you out a lot. Yesterday when I asked you after we finished wrapping as we often do, we'll say, okay, let's review, let's see happenings when? But because you guys were here, Jona, Rick, and myself, we really didn't get to do that. And we spoke, but before I left, I said do you guys have any questions about what just transpired?
So what I want you to do is start to train your mind, to experience this right now, as Rodrigo sitting in that Eames lounge chair. It's beautiful chair, it's really nice so don't mess it up.

Chris Franklin:
It's really nice.

Chris :
It is really nice.

Mo:
It's a beautiful, he wants to break the chair?

Chris :
Right. It's a nice chair. So you're there, and then once you start to master, just being present as to who you are and listening to what's going on and not thinking about what's happening tomorrow or what happened yesterday? I want you to step outside of your own body to kind of travel an astral plane with me and look at this room, try to see it from my point of view, try to see it from Franklin's point of view or what Jona and Ricky are doing. It's hard to do, but you can do it if you make the practice of this to kind of have this outer body experience.
So when I asked you these kinds of questions do you have any questions about what we just did? You were still experiencing as Rodrigo. You weren't experiencing if I had to run this production one day, I want to know what we're talking about here. So you're going to elevate yourself, just kind of, not in terms of value, but elevate yourself in terms of point of view, to float above it and say, what is going on? And if you can develop this for yourself, you're going to be able to learn not one time, but maybe one and a half times or two times as much as Rodrigo was going to experience. And this is what I do, so when I was working for people, I did my job, which was to do design work, but I was watching them, watching me and trying to...

Chris :
Design work, but I was watching them watching me and trying to figure out how is he or she going to respond to my work? What are they doing? Are they searching for words? Are they going to just slap the, or smashed a sledgehammer on my face and say, "This was all garbage." And just brush it off the table. What are they going to do? I'm studying their communication style. I'm looking at what they're thinking about because I'm imagining in my mind now what it's going to be like for them to take this work that I've done and to go present it to their client, their bosses. And I wanted to kind of get a feel for that. So, that will then prompt me to ask certain questions. Do you feel good about the work that was done? It's not even my work. I'm trying to step to the side and not look at them, but look at the problem together.
It's like, "What are you missing? What are you looking for? What do you think will sell? What do you think they'll say? How will they respond?" That's the kind of level of thinking I'm talking about. So you want to also make the deliberate practice of doing something like that. And then you're going to start to see yourself float. This is how you get to go from the person doing the work to the person who's in charge of other people doing the work because you're asking those higher level questions. You've heard me say something like just before, I would judge a person and their potential by the quality of the questions they ask. Period. So your goal in life is to learn how to ask better questions, because you're going to communicate to the person I'm somebody that you should take notice of. I'm not here just to do the work.
I'm not here just to be the hands and the operation. I'm good at that, I enjoy doing that. But I'm going to help to think this through on a higher level. And you know when you've hired people in the past, Rodrigo, that they don't just show up and like, "What kind of lens you want? What kind of body do you want on the camera?" They're going to ask you, "Tell me more about the environment. What's the vibe we're going for? Or are they any references?" And then you step back and go, "Whoa, that DP, they got something going on. She's got it going on. She's somebody I need to take care of because we together can grow." That it needs smart people like that to anticipate the next steps to see beyond what is materially present right in front of them. Does that make sense?

Chris Franklin:
It does.

Chris :
Okay. I haven't got to your question yet.

Chris Franklin:
This is good.

Chris :
Okay. Let's get to your question though. What is your question?

Chris Franklin:
It's just about dreaming bigger. I mean, I don't know. I feel like to a certain extent I'm already fortunate enough that I got to come to America and become a citizen, all these different things. And sometimes I feel like I could be doing more. You know what I mean? Just of what it can achieve.

Chris :
Stop there. Then this idea of wanting to do more, feeling like that. What's the emotion that's attached to this observation is that one where you feel like you're beating yourself up like, "Oh, I could be doing more or I could be doing more." Does it empower you? Or it doesn't make you feel bad that you're not working as much as you like to work. What's the emotion assigned around that?

Chris Franklin:
Honestly speaking the first one.

Chris :
That's what I suspected. So, that's not a good voice inside your head. That's the inner voice that is being critical of not being satisfied with what you have. Okay? That's not coming from a place of growth and encouragement. That's coming from a place of judgment and probably criticism. Now you have to ask yourself, even though you believe it to be your voice, whose voice is that that saying that to you? Do you know?

Chris Franklin:
Sounds like Mo.

Mo:
I knew you were going to say that. You're going to say it's me.

Chris Franklin:
Honestly, I don't know, because in the same situation, I'm very fortunate with my mom, that her dad and my grandpa, shout out to you grandpa in Brazil. He made my mom go to school, get a degree they should not want. And then when she graduated school, she was like, "Hey, here's your diploma." So with me, she's always been like, "Hey, do what you want. Just make sure you're doing something that you love." And she's always been very supportive of that. So I go in and sits, it was my mom or most of it, honestly, it's kind of you, but it's just because I think you see the potential in us. And it's one of those things of I don't want to just be happy that I'm in the building. I want to be doing something more and I don't know, but it's not I'm letting myself down.

Chris :
Okay. Okay. Hold on. I'm going to challenge a couple of things. You mentioned your mom. You did not mention your father. I won't go there. I'll leave it to you to figure out how you want to talk about that. So you're saying I'm just going to check. Can you guys make sure we're keeping each other honest in this room is if you never met me, you're the happiest guy in the world and you're just going to do what you're going to do and you're going to be okay with that?

Chris Franklin:
No.

Chris :
I can't believe that. See, so I don't believe I have the power to make you feel or think anything that you don't want to feel or think, you know this. If I say something and you feel it, it's because you knew it was there and you let that idea in, you invited that idea in now I learned something about medicine, which I did not know about before.
And you know how they say we have to save the rainforest. We're talking about Brazil. So save the rainforest because all the medicines, 99% of the medicines come from botanicals or animals within the rainforest. And it's how we discover things. And here's the really interesting thing about science and medicine. They say that when you take a Tylenol for your headache, then your body already produces the chemical that's in that Tylenol. Like what? The only reason why the Tylenol works is because they've figured out how to artificially reproduce that same chemical. And if your body didn't know it, it would not work. That was shocking to me. It is pretty crazy if you really think about it.
So they say that people who take a placebo, even though they have real diseases like cancer, they take the placebo and they cured themselves of cancer because they believe enough in whatever it is that they're taking. That's why placebos work 50% of the time for serious medical issues that when they take the placebo, their mind starts to say, "We're going to feel better. We're going to heal ourselves." The cancer is in remission and they start to produce more of whatever it is that they need to produce. And the reason why we have these maladies and these illnesses is because our bodies stopped producing that people I don't know on any kind of medical levels, I'm probably going to get in trouble. People who suffer from depression, don't produce enough of the happy chemical in their brain. So they have to be artificially creating that. Why did I tell you all that stuff? Well, I present to you like I'm Tylenol.
It's not effective on you if you don't already have the thing that matches inside. So something deeper inside of you that was like little Rigo running around. And the Brazilian jungles, he already knew. He learned from his environment, from a parent, from a teacher, somebody influential somebody, you cared about somebody that you needed the approval of, that was there. And oftentimes it remains buried in dormant inside of you. And you don't recognize it as such and doing deep inner work, talking to therapists and people that are psychologists and professionals. I start to learn about this and it starts to become very clear to me. Most of the people who are these self-help gurus, they understand this about how your mind works and they help you reframe and associate this feeling with something else, allowing you to be unlocked. Okay. This is a lot of deep stuff that we're talking about is why it's after hours, hang in there.
Okay? So this exists within you. Some random Asian dude says this to you, that you have never met before through the internet. And you're like, "Huh? I think I feel this." And then you say, "I won't feel this way if it wasn't for you Chris." I'm like, "No, I think you feel this way. I'm pretty sure." Now that we know that that's the connection, I believe now we can work towards the solution. Okay? I need you to judo flip this negative emotion from, "Oh, it's not enough to, it's not enough." Because it's hard for us to feel enthusiastic, to feel motivated, to show up every day when the thing that we know we need to do, we have a strong, negative emotion attached to it. It's like you're trying to swim, but there's this five pound anchor on your leg. You can fight it for a long time, but eventually it's going to take you down.
So we need to reprogram the mind, okay? I don't have the skill or the training to do that 100%, but I'm just telling you that's what needs to be done. So I want more for you because I want you to have all that you're going to earn. Not that you deserve, but that you earn. I see the potential in you in the kind of neuroplasticity of your mind, how open you can be and how quick you're to apply things that you've learned, how quick you are to cast the way the old ideas when you hear a superior idea. And that to me says, you're a critical thinker who's open to new ideas. That is the bedrock of people that I think are highly coachable. Now you could be the same Drigo sitting in front of me and be dense as a doorknob, thick as a brick wall.
I'm not going to invest my energy in you because I already know you have too much invested in keeping a static with who you were to ever move forward. There's a lot of people come and ask me for advice. And I said, "Don't be an askhole." Right? A-S-K hole is to ask for a piece of advice and never to do anything because you're only looking for advice that aligns with what you already believe. I don't believe you're that kind of person. I would probably would not spend this kind of time with you if I thought you were. I've seen the little bits that you do. And I'll tell you, you guys don't know this, but I had a workshop for two people. Guess who? One of the two people were? This guy. He jumped on a plane from Miami, flew out here to do the workshop.
So what turned out to be a lack of poor promotion on our part. And follow-through turned out, I think to be a benefit where I basically trained two people where it should have been 50 people. It was two people. This is a guy who consistently keeps showing up, right? When you hear something that's happening, he's on the plane. The reason why I'm talking to the two of you, and there's no coincidence that the two of you are here is I just produced a workshop at art center. It wasn't even me headlining. And next thing I know you guys are like, "We're from Mississippi, we're going to be there." I'm like, "What the frick are you guys doing?"

Chris Franklin:
It was the chance.

Chris :
Right? You see what I'm saying? It's like hundreds, maybe thousands some other people found out about the same thing. Only two people jumped on.
Actually it's more than two people but-

Chris Franklin:
Three, I was there.

Chris :
You were there too?

Chris Franklin:
I was there too.

Chris :
Damn, I don't... You guys did you know him back then?

Mo:
No, I didn't.

Chris :
Oh my God.

Mo:
We found out that he was there two days.

Chris :
Holy hack a moley. What a weird small world. So is it any coincidence that the three very people that are spending November pre-Thanksgiving with me on weird lockdown, coronavirus shutdown life are the same three people who showed up for an event I did not even headline. Now you can say you believe in chances and miracles and coincidences, but I don't. I believe each and every one is you set this intention and whether you convince him or he convinced you, you both said yes, because you wouldn't be here. Nobody held a gun to your head. Isn't that weird?

Chris Franklin:
Right.

Chris :
So maybe you guys are three of the four apocalypse. You know the horseman of the apocalypse, I don't know.

Mo:
Pretty diverse.

Chris :
We don't know. [crosstalk 00:36:40] Right? So that's where I think Drigo, if you have a positive emotion, so my wife always wonders this about me. I'm sure she's watching. She always wonders like, "Why do you keep doing this to yourself?" Because that challenge, that fire, the do or die situations and the moments I put myself into, force me to get out of that suit of complacency and comfort and it forces me to change, to become who I am. It forces me to read that book, which I wasn't going to read. It forces me to watch that movie with intention like I didn't have time to give, so I'm going to give three hours binge-watching, I need to pull lessons from this. And that's why we dropped the Better Call Saul episode and we're going to drop on for Breaking Bad and Mad Men and every other series I've seen, because I need to cash in on that investment of time.

Mo:
Queens Gambit.

Chris :
Soon, soon my friend. See what I'm saying?

Chris Franklin:
I do.

Chris :
So you need to be able to change your emotion around this thing, because if you don't feel good about it, you're not going to do it. If you don't feel good about going to the gym, you do a couple of curls. And I come done with 10 pound weights.

Chris Franklin:
Why'd you looked at Mo?

Chris :
I don't know. [crosstalk 00:37:50] I'm just scanning the room. I'm just scanning the room as all. You know what I mean? That when it gets hard and you're tired and you're sweaty. And you're like, "Oh, I've done enough." Because you don't enjoy it. You have to learn to love the process. Not so much the results, but the process. All right, let's move on. We'll come back to you if we need to. Okay?

Chris Franklin:
I'm good.

Chris :
All right. Ready?

Mo:
I just want to expand on this a little bit, because the original question was like, "How do I dream bigger?" And then it turned into like, "How do I have bigger goals?" I know them both well and myself well enough. I think we do dream big. And I think we do have big goals. And when we have the dialogue with ourselves, we say, "Dang, that's a pretty big goal." You know what I mean? Like, "Oh, I'm trying to make this much money. At the end of the day, I'm trying to buy this amount of gear. I'm trying to be featured here." But then we're exposed to people like you.
And then you say something along the lines of, I'm trying to build a compound and it's this huge goal. And you're able to tap into that kind of thinking by yourself, but we need to hear it from you to recognize, "Oh, I'm not thinking big enough." And I think that's why he says something along the lines of it's your voice in my head, because you're able to do that for Chris though, but we're not because when we think, "Oh, here's the goal that I have." It's like, "This is big in my mind." Until I hear you're going like, "This goal is not big at all."

Chris Franklin:
Yeah. My goals were not big relative to me.

Mo:
Okay. But you already knew that?

Chris Franklin:
But I knew that before we had a conversation with Chris, I knew that I was floating somewhere in the ether. That's why I wanted to know Chris, how do you tactfully like when we asked him, he immediately knew and it was tactile and it was present. It was you could see it because if you asked me, mine is like, "Well, I want to make this much next year." And when I do because I know I will. It's just like, "All right, well that wasn't too much less and it's just floating through life." But the purpose now is to go out and to make it tangible and to make it scary big, and to make it to where I can be afraid of my own potential big and go out there and do it. And that's what I need personally. I need that driving force and that north star to aim for.

Chris :
Okay. I have things to respond to, but Ricky's got a hot question. So Ricky, what's up. Tell me, okay. So Ricky is saying, how do you deal with it being so scared that it paralyzes you? Right? Oh, it was in the chat. So it's not Ricky's question. Okay. So let's talk a little bit about this. This is something that everybody is watching all 360 view right now it's growing a little bit can do. I want you to think about this. Okay. So you don't need to close your eyes, but I really need you to visualize this for you right now. Think about a person or company or brand or an agency that's in your space right now. Somebody who's really far ahead of you. Imagine them right now. Okay. And that's the King or queen of whatever it is that you hope to do one day.
That's your north star. Don't look for the two or three people who are in front of you. They can knock over really quickly if you just take a couple of steps. So when we look at our channel, we have small term goals and then we are short term goals. And then we have really long-term goals. And we want to be the best at doing what it is that we do. And I believe that in terms of the design business space, there may be a couple of people are in our space, but I hope to put as much daylight between us and them as humanly possible. And this can change for you. So Mo do you know who your person is or your company and Chris, do you know who it is? And Drigo, you should know. Now you've heard me say this before success leaves clues.
So this, the next part to this, which is now we can feel crushed by the enormity of this goal. Like if you said you want it to be bigger than PewDiePie, which I think MrBeast is going to be apparently, he's on that trajectory right now. So he has his dream and he's even afraid to say that that's what it is because he loves PewDiePie too much to say. And then he starts doing what he needs to do. And he starts to study what other people are doing so that he can get there. That's the most beautiful thing is because maybe prior to the age of the internet, everything's documented. As soon as it goes online, it lives forever. That's why it's like they say, once it hits the internet, it's real because you can't get rid of it. That means you could go back to year one of Bruce Wayne and see him fumbling around with his costume and his skills.
And how did he become collaborator with James Gordon? How did he do all of this? And you can go back to year one. And that's what you can do. You can rewind the tape and look at the people who are super successful, where you'd like to be and go reverse engineer, read every book they've written, read every blog post they've written because they're dropping clues all over the place. Watch every video they produce in the order in which it was produced chronologically. And you can get there. So if you study who it is that you want to emulate and you study who they studied, that's going to get you even closer to the source code. And I like clean source code. We don't want this whole copy paste fourth generation version. You go back to the source. That's why I go back to Jim Rohn.
I don't know where else to begin before that. And Jim Rohn's sites the Bible, I'm like, "Okay, that's too far. That's enough for me." Right? So that's what you want to do. So the problem is when you have this goal and it suffocates you and it paralyzes you is because you have no plan of attack. Imagine this. Imagine you wanted to learn a martial art and you are the most unathletic person but if you went into a dojo and you met with a great teacher, Sifu Sensei, and they started to teach you for the most basic parts of breathing, stance and position, right? They teach you about how to move and they slowly take you through a process. You're not going to feel like this is overwhelming because they've taken something complicated and they've broken it down to bite sized pieces for you to practice.
That's why it's called practice. Right? Tying into yesterday's conversation. That's what you want to be able to do. So you can take small steps that are iterative, that build to something much bigger. And it's also like video games where you play and you move through a level and the beat the boss, that's just the mini boss and it's doable. And the game designers know this. So they teach you skills that you need to have. And they make it a little bit harder each time. There's a new trick that you have to learn. To like duck three times before you punch something like that.
And you keep going, but they don't allow you to use the same pattern over and over because it'd be too easy. So it's like that. Except for in real life, you don't have this Sensei Sifu, you don't have the video game designer designing your life. You design it for yourself, which for some people can be debilitating or it can be very empowering. We like to be in control of our own destiny. We don't like to be told what to do. That's the empowering part. The debilitating part is where it began.

Greg:
Time for a quick break, but we'll be right back. Welcome back to After Hours at the Future.

Mo:
I don't know, man. I think for me, I'm at an interesting point in my life right now, where I want to be doing something that is an extension of who I am. I feel like what I'm doing right now is strictly out of obligation. And we've talked about this a little bit. I don't know if I want to use the word lost. I don't know if I want to use the word scared. I just want to know how to do the thing or find the thing that I can be unapologetically committed to do or die. No, flip-flopping and I don't know if that's too big. I'm sure you're going to ask me for context, but that's the feeling I have right now.

Chris :
Yeah. So the way that you phrase that question makes me feel that you don't believe that you actually have a hundred percent control over the decisions of your life, that you are exactly where you are, because the decisions you made yesterday, right? Because, well, my business coach used to say to me all the time was there are no victims, Chris, just volunteers, whatever situation you find yourself in your life right now, you volunteered for it. And that goes, I'm not saying this is you, but for people who are in an unhappy relationship, whether you're married or whatever. You chose that person, you chose to stay in it. You choose to continue to accept being treated less than to be taken advantage of or disrespected. You choose all of that. Unless your life is in mortal peril, danger, where you can't literally get away.
You choose to keep that. And I've been in super toxic relationships just one before. And every time I was thinking, let's break up and we didn't. You know why I didn't break up? Because at that point in time in my life, I kept telling myself, "Maybe she's the best I'll ever get." And so I'm going to put up with this abuse, or maybe this is like a phase that relationships go through. Maybe I haven't tried enough in this relationship. Maybe I haven't been there to be the person that she wanted me to be. So in doing all that stuff, I quickly slipped into states of depression. I was always feeling like I'm a victim like life is unfair. And I wouldn't have dreams of just being in a happy relationship versus the one that was in. It was just a horrible time in my life.
But it taught me a lot. I wasn't emotionally mature enough to realize what that was happening. And I was telling myself that story that, "Tough up, this is it." And it wasn't until circumstances presented themselves that we're actually going to break up. And then I just made a promise to myself. Never go back, never go back. And of course, these breakups, it's almost like two magnets. They're drawn to each other like, well, we can make it work this time. This will all be okay. And you tell yourself the lie, you tell each other the lies that's going to work. And then you get back together. When you say like, "I want to pick something that I can stick with." Well, who the heck told you to pick whatever you did want to stick with. I didn't see a gun to your head, Mo.
Mo these are all decisions you make. The faster you realize you're in charge of your life, that you have agency, that everything has happened to you thus far in one way or the other. You either actively decided or passively decided this is where you're going to be. There's no coincidence. There is zero coincidence right now that we're in Santa Monica, in a building because this is what I want for my life. And it comes at great costs. It really does, right? I grew up in San Jose in the Valley. I went to Art Center because they told me this is the best school to go to. Once I was in Los Angeles, I look for work that was going to be the most challenging to get to excel at and to be recognized for. And one of the most competitive markets is the entertainment capital of the world.
So if you're in entertainment, only the strong survive here. Okay. And it can be by luck, good fortune or by hard work or sheer talent. But I decided I was going to make it here. I remember one time, a couple of years after graduating, my uncle we call him Elvis like, "Kiddo. We don't see you enough. And these reunions, the gatherings, and they get together all the time, big Asian, extended family and all the stereotypes that go with it." And he said, "As soon as you tell Hollywood to move the business to San Jose, I will go there.
But until then, this is the market to make it happen." I could have chosen to go to San Jose. I could have chosen to go to some other state where it's a little easier going, but I wanted to survive and I want to make it here. If you can make it here in entertainment, I think you'd make it anywhere. And people know this, you know this. If you want to be big and automotive industry, it's probably Detroit. If you want to be big and you name it, there's going to be a city and a place for that thing because that's what the world knows.

Chris :
But there's going to be a city and a place for that thing. Cause that's what the world knows them for. So here I am, I'm in Los Angeles paying extremely high rent and then mortgage to live where I live, right? And then to establish a place of business and to hire people where it's going to cost even more to do the work. I chose this, and then my wife was going to say, "well, why did you choose this? There's so much pressure and work and why can't we just chill?" I said, "you can't undo that part of my brain. It's like, I want to compete at the highest level on the global stage. This is where I'm at." I've told all of you, all three of you. I don't know what you guys are doing. Cause you're all filmmakers. Why you aren't in LA? I don't know.
I do not know, look at Ricky, he's out from Michigan. Look at Jonah from Texas. Y'all see what I'm saying. H town over there, shout out to the South. You see what I'm saying? They decided for whatever reason, they're going to get in their car, they're going to drive across the country and they're going to try to make it in Los Angeles, that's what they want. And there's no surprise that they're also here. So the kid who's in Iowa or wherever else they're from, I'm like running out of States. I ran out, I'm done. I'm done, Washington, you know where they're from. There's a reason why they're there. Like, if you want to be in politics, you're probably in Washington. Right?

Greg:
Right, right, right.

Chris :
That's where you're going to be. You can't make it.

Mo:
I want to interject. If I can.

Chris :
... go ahead.

Mo:
I'm fully aware that where I am, where I'm at up to this point is because of me volunteering, I don't believe to be a victim in my own life I want to make that very clear. I'm at a point as I've tried different things coming out of my academic background, I'll do them and then I just don't feel like my heart's in it. And-and don't get me wrong. I've had success in these areas, but I'm not like you say what staying up until 5:00 AM wanting to make this excellent all the time though if it's client work, I'm making sure that it's excellent. So I just feel like something is missing and I'm unable whether to see it or how I've been conditioned to things-to for things to come easy and immediate gratification, I don't know-I don't know. That's the thing. It's not that like, if I-if I felt it in my bones, I would probably take action on all of it right now. My immediate priority is just to continue getting paid. So I'm not even thinking about the-the big immaculate, I guess, dream or goal at the moment, so...

Chris :
Let me stop you right there. Let me stop you for a couple of things. The things that you choose to do with your life you chose. So why do you choose things that don't do it for you somehow you've translated an interest into, maybe I'm passionate about this into, I'm just showing up to get paid. Cause every time you go up against somebody, who's more passionate than you, you're going to lose every single time...

Mo:
I believe that.

Chris :
...right? And I've done a talk on this already, right? Because look, if the four of us, let's just say, and it's going to sound egotistical when I say this I'll deal with the blow back in a second. But the four of us had to give her presentation to the next big conference-design conference. Okay? Just imagine it, we're all going to be there on closing night and you guys are all going to do a talk, who cares what the order is. Who's going to show up for that more than the next person, the person who feels it in their heart and their bones. So you're like I'm done... I'm okay. They go to sleep at 10 o'clock...

Greg:
Right.

Chris :
...I'm sitting there like in my underwear trying to figure it out, like just how to make that slide a little bit better or how to work on the flow or any other key things that I can do to innovate and to add to that, theoretically, all things being relative equal, I'm going to crush you every single time, just because you don't feel it the way I feel it. I'm not casting judgment on any other public speaker. They're doing the best that they can. But sometimes I hate to say this...

Greg:
Speaking the truth,

Chris :
...My Mo- my motivation is just embarrassed them. Like I want to show up I worked really hard for this, and I want the people who are in attendance.
And I know this is a problem of mine. I've had therapy about this before, which is to say that I feel the obligation, the duty that if they paid $200 for, to see 35 speakers, that the $200 I'm going to earn right then and there.
And I've said to you before, if you do more than what you're paid for, eventually be paid more than what you do. I'm trying to do that. And I've noticed something, well, I've noticed that over time in this short arc of my speaking career, I'm getting put in more prominent positions because maybe somewhere somebody recognizes that work and that passion and the energy that I put into it...

Greg:
Right.

Chris :
...I was talking to my friend, Aaron, and he said, "Chris, man, the amount of work and you don't make it easy on yourself because you just keep writing new decks." And I say to him, "I would love to give the same talk over and over again." But he asked me to write about something new I'm like, dang it, am I the only person who has to do this? Or what? But I accept it and it's grueling. It's nasty, it's horrible. But I do it.
Here's the other thing that you've said. You're like, but I don't want to be the guy who's up at five in the morning trying to do this thing, but I'll do it for our client. So that's sending all kinds of signals to me that you'll show up more for our client than you'll show up for yourself. So you are perhaps, maybe a person is motivated by the obligation to others by not letting others down, but you don't use the same standard for yourself. And the only person that you should really be concerned about, not in letting not letting down is you, you should be the first person in the Mo is my club. Fan club. You should be the first person in line to say like of all the people have to like make happy. I need to make Moe happy.

Drake:
Hearing that makes me mad uncomfortable.

Chris :
Why?

Drake:
I could feel my body. I could feel myself like going crazy foot.

Chris :
People are wondering why Drake is uncomfortable.

Mo:
Why?

Chris :
why is Drake uncomfortable?

Drake:
Because the word selfish just comes to mind. It just is what it is like. That's the only answer I have.

Chris :
Don't pull a Trump, "It is what it is." Give us an explanation, like why dig into your soul and your heart and your mind pull it out of you and let us know what's inside.

Drake:
I don't know. When I hear like, worry about Mo first or put the only person you should be considering out of all of this is yourself. It's like, yeah. But what about the people that are in my life that I owe a responsibility to, or that are needing something from me or looking out for me? And I know there's the cliche of like, well, you can't give a hundred percent to anyone else. If you're not a hundred percent with yourself or whatever, whatever, but I don't know. It's just how I think that's just, that's my answer to that.

Chris :
That's not a very clear, that's not a clear or enlightening or soul searching or life-changing explanation of any of that. I think you're beating around the Bush. I'm going to call it right now.

Rodrigo:
Or if it's around the Bush, just to watch it. I mean, I think just a lot to take on, just to think about in very short amount of time, to me, that's, that's kind of deep. So, and so from what you're saying, Chris, are you going to send you suggesting, but should we be doing something else or for not that passionate about the thing that we're doing right now?

Chris :
Let me think about that. Yes.

Rodrigo:
Yeah. But like, okay. I get so like, so in that situation right now, if I'm not waking up to shoot videos, I should just find some announced.

Chris :
I'm going to drag my crew right into this conversation right now. I'm going to put them on the hot seat, even though you can't see them and you can't hear them. And so for a wildlife from Ricky from time to time, let me just say this right now. Oftentimes, I'll come into the office and I'll talk to Jona and Rick and I'm like, "Dude, I've been watching this shot. This is how they do it. Here's this camera, here's the lighting. I need you to think about this." And then I yell at them, not yell at them, I raised my voice slightly and I say to them, "This is your job. This is your passion. It's not even my job or my passion. Why am I the guy watching these videos, telling you how to light and move things around and eat it." You know what I'm saying?
It's like, do you always want somebody else to tell you how to do your job? Do you want to be the best version of you that you can be? And this is where all that passion comes into play, right? So if you don't have it find something that you love, you either find something you love or love. The thing that you found. I don't know which it is. You can lie to yourself, but here's the other thing I've been thinking about. So Mo and I are unique in this situation between the four of us in this room or the six of us actually, I'm the only Mo and I are the only ones who are married, who have kids. We have other people that we got to think about besides us, but I'm going to tell you right now, I never want my two boys, I have two boys, right?
To look at me and say, "That's how you live a compromised life." I never want them to see that. If they love me, if they like me, if they enjoy being around me. Yeah. I never want them to think that, that I phoned it in that my unhappiness comes from me making compromises around what my wife want and what they want. We've seen that all you have to do is look around your life and see who's done that. Right? You see the the mom who's grown into her dress a little bit, who is a little bit wrinkly and in her face, but underneath all that, you're like, "you were a dancer, an actress, once weren't you, you were the BD queen. Like what happened to that?" "Well, I got married and I had you guys." And then you see the dad who was like a pretty brilliant engineer, but then wound up just working on his car. And you're like, what happened? "Well, I got married and had you guys."
We just have this one life. It's so precious. And it's a miracle that you're alive, that you are exactly who you are. Why would you waste that? I don't understand that. I have a hard time reconciling that. And I think I honor my parents and in my, my larger family and my wife and children, to be the best person that I can be. It does come at a cost for sure, it means sometimes I don't go to the warmup recitals for my children, right? It might mean that I'm working more than they would like me to, but until they invent a way to be at two places at the same time, I don't know how else to do that.
I'm often reminded this story and I read it in The Power of Self-confidence by Brian Tracy. And he talked about how, I think, the painter Gauguin. He dream- dreamt of being an amazing painter. So they hang out at these cafes and Paris and all the greats were there and he would just sit there and like have coffee and drink and just study them. And he just wanted that life so much that one day, and he was working at the post office, he just quit. He packed his bags, he left his wife and his children and went to Tahiti, I think, he started to paint. Then we came the person that he needed to become.
Now there's a tragedy in here that he left his wife and his kids but I think if he's miserable, he's not that good to them either. We've seen parents who hate their lives and then take it out on their family that you always, when you see this in the stories and cinema, you're like, why don't you just do everybody a freaking favor and just leave, leave this poor family alone.

Drake:
It is so true.

Chris :
[crosstalk 01:01:37] Because you come home drunk, you hate things. And then, your kid says something totally innocent and you just whip them one, it's like, what is that? You hate your life. You're not willing to take responsibility for it so you just take it out on the poor people who can't stand up to you, for financial reasons they can't for physical reasons. They can't. Why would you do that?

Greg:
Someone said someone in the comments that it's a pep talk at this point.

Chris :
Well, that's what... Welcome to after hours,

Greg:
Welcome to after hours!
[crosstalk 01:02:04] vulnerable with you,

Chris :
You don't realize what after hours is because you may not have seen one of these things in a really long time. This is like, I'm a little older than you guys so I think I can say it as the father son talk you never had, and the son that I don't have right now, cause they're actually pretty young kids, right? We try to do that different tone. I'm not like high energy, Chris. I'm not white boarding, strategizing frameworks and things like that. We're just having real talk. And I think, and somebody who's going to, I'm going to get myself in trouble, again. My wife's going to yell at me after this, but like even Buddha, Buddha was like, comes from a rich family and he was married and he decided, you know what?
The world is suffering, I want to end suffering, I want to lessen the suffering humankind. So he leaves his wife and his children. Then he goes on to like share his ideas with people that have changed generations of people. Sometimes it takes that kind of sacrifice. I'm not encouraging anybody here to leave their wife and their children or the husband or their dog or whatever, and just abandoned things. But I need you to dig deep inside yourself and mine out. What makes you tick to try to make it work within that construct. But life should not be a series of one compromise after another.

Greg:
Right?

Chris :
It shouldn't be that. So whatever you picked in your life, unpick it, pick something new, pick something that you can get up.

Mo:
I'd like to say something because I read a comment and I think it's for people to feel intuitive. Someone's like, although I'm having a hard time getting a grasp on the actual situations, these guests are in it all sounds quite vague. Let me shoot it real straight to you. I've been in business for two and a half years, made a significant amount of money in, in the six figures in the first year of business. And now I just feel like I'm doing it because it's an occupation that I'm good at that gets me paid and allows me to give clients things that they want. I don't necessarily feel passionate about what I'm doing. Though, I'm good at it. And I haven't been able to figure out exactly how to take my icky guy or all the things that I'm good at and all the things that I'm passionate about and turn it into something unique that I can give to the world.
This is something that really cripples me a lot, most of the time. And when I talked to Chris and hear what he's saying out loud, it does sound like professionally. I am settling because the things that I am passionate about, whether it be music or rap or public speaking or entertaining, I don't see them getting me paid the same way this occupation is getting me paid. So... And I think the reason why I struggle on following through on certain things, when it comes to this is like, I am comfortable on what I'm doing right now in my work, and because of the lack of like deep rooted, foundational passion, I'm cool. I'm not, you know what I mean? Like, does that make sense? I'm trying to in this particular space, and then I hear these conversations and then I end up not having the excited, eager I could do more, but the judgmental, I could do more where I'm like, "well, I could be doing more in this space.
I could be creating a course. I could be creating more content," but then it feels like I'm doing it for the sake of just making the money for the business, versus it being a real passion that isn't sustainable. And then I don't commit. And then I'm, on that bipolar trajectory of like making a little bit of content here and stopping. So to answer that that is with all the detail I could muster where I'm at personally and the advice I'm looking for is like, I guess is what you just said. Like, just pick something at this point that you're better-that you feel better with.

Chris :
Yeah. I want to say a couple of things that we'll, we, we need to do some editorial work right now. So I want to prep you guys for this. I wanted you guys to introduce yourselves real quick and I'll prompt you when to do that so we can use it for that. It's some people aren't familiar with the after hours series, cause we it's been months. Well, maybe almost a year since we've done one, we've been busy. Y'all, I've been a little busy with COVID and all that stuff, trying to keep our business going, but we do these kinds of talks and they are very much centered around exactly what you see here.
So first of all, let me know in the comments that you're enjoying this kind of format, because it's very different, it's very real. This is unvarnished unpolished, unscripted that I'm running out of "un" words here. It's the underworld, this was unplanned. I mean, well sort of, I don't know exactly what we're going to talk about, but it's a chance for us to like strip away all that stuff and just reveal ourselves to be who we are and have real meaningful conversations. So joining me today are some people I would consider my friends that started at as strangers and we've, we've hung out in different cities in the world and it's been a pretty amazing experience. I at least for me now Mo introduce yourself to the camera.

Mo:
My name is Mo Ismail. I'm a solo preneur, I run a video marketing agency that helps course creators thought leaders and digital entrepreneurs multiply and scale their video content online for their business marketing.

Chris :
What is the name of your company, Mo?

Mo:
MOCS, M-O-C-S

Chris :
Okay, next up is Chris Franklin, Franklin look right into that lens to down the barrel and give us your soul

Mo:
On the spot. My name is Christopher Franklin. I am a independent filmmaker in South Mississippi. Basically my company helps brands tell their story through film. And I also do YouTube where I teach other creatives, how to basically, be more comfortable with the camera, on camera, and to help their clients achieve their goals and to help the actual filmmaker be a better version of themselves, so...

Chris :
What's the name of your company? Did you ever say?

Mo:
My technical name of my company is Beauty is Veiled, but I'm in transition at the moment because it originally was wedding films and wedding photography...

Chris :
Is gone. It's gone. It's gone. Yeah. Okay. You're in transition right now. Which camera? That one. There you go. Go

Rodrigo:
My intro again. I wouldn't even try. Rodrigo Tasca I am a filmmaker entrepreneur based in South Florida. I shoot content for corporate brands and local businesses. Then my agency is tasked with studios and also have a small dedicated YouTube channel that I pretty much teach everything I learned from Chris. So...

Chris :
Thanks very much. You guys did a great job...

Rodrigo:
I'll.

Chris :
...go ahead.

Mo:
Before we can tell you, I would just like to point out this one comment that just said they liked my hat. Thank you so much. You know, you know, I said,

Chris :
you guys need to stop reading the comments. I look, I'll tell you. I mean, it's great that you're reading the comments, but not if you can be present to what's going on, and sometimes you can become a little bit ruled by what's happening in the mob. I can do that. I can walk and chew gum at the same time. I encourage you to actually just think about what is being said and try to figure out what the next thing you want to talk about. Now, if you're wondering how the heck you can be a part of this conversation, the truth is you can't.
This is kind of an invite only thing. These are friends from the pro group, but that's coincidental. I have real relationships with these fine people who are in front of me. And it begins with just like how strangers do things. We get to know each other and eventually it escalates to something like this. And originally it was planned to be a giant pro meetup. But of course, that didn't happen. But these guys went through ahead, went through with a plan and went out here to risk my life by giving me Corona. So we got that part. [crosstalk 01:09:31] So we got, we got, we've been quarantined and things have been mostly good. I'm glad you guys liked this format. If you like it and this gets enough views, we'll continue to do it. Historically speaking, we do the after hours on my personal channel, which has like very few followers.
And then we do the cut downs for the main channel, but Jona's like, we haven't done this in a while, maybe people will miss it. Maybe they'll like it and they need to be reintroduced to the concept. So if you like it, be sure you hit that like button and let people know, drop a comment, having a comment inside the video. Once it's aired actually helps a lot with the algorithm saying that somehow this is engaging with people and you might want to see more of this. Okay? Now, moving on. I want to say something, as I told Moe, to stop reading the chats, you still in the chats,

Mo:
I was reading while you were reading the chats, but I'm doing a job.

Chris :
I'm doing a job. Your job is to be here, okay.

Mo:
I don't want to be vague. If this is something that.

Chris :
you're still vague. It's okay. No, we know you're vague. That's all right. We're not ready to go there, but I do want to say something.
This is an emotional thing for me. I'm going to say it. I have two boys and I'm taken care of, and my wife, who's my partner in life and business. And I often dream of this wonderful dream. And we talk about dreams and goals and plans. I hope that one day that this company, this organization that we have called the future becomes so successful. They have more money than God, because what I would love to do is to have these kinds of conversations in deep, meaningful, prolonged ways of with young people, people who need some help and some guidance to be the parent figure that they don't have, whether you want to call me mom or dad, I don't really care. But just to bring those people in and say, "you know what? You have a place to live. We can learn together for at least a period of time."
Cause I'm not also about just enablement. I'm about empowerment to bring people together, especially in far away cities and places that these kinds of opportunities don't exist. I'm doing the best that I can to be the father to you guys out there. The ones that we all wish we could have had, I'm trying to be that person myself. And I'm sure my kids are rolling their eyes right now saying dad, you're not that you're not that kind of father to us. So well better some than none. Right?

Rodrigo:
Burn.

Chris :
Okay. Now Mo and Chris and, and Rodrigo, I want to ask you this question. The question is, is, is, are you the best person in your town that does what you do? Are you the best person in your city that does what you do in the state, in the country, in the world? My ambition is to be world-class whether I fail or make it doesn't matter to me, but that is my ambition to be the best in the world.
I know I have a long ways to go and whatever I do, if I can't be that, if there's no path for me moving forward, I quit. I choose something else. Period. My son loves to play video games. It's all he does in his free time. I don't like it because he's not very good. I just asked him, can you do this professionally? Is this what you want to do? Because I will support you 100%. And he knows it. He used to speak with a little bit of a lisp beside, in my, in my mind. He's still that little boy, even though he's not, he's like, "Dad, I can't do it." I'm like, "okay. Then time for us to move on."

Mo:
It's not funny Rick. Don't laugh at the...

Chris :
Time for us to move on. Right? I love the kid to death, but he knows it. Yeah, because he's just not that brilliant at strategy.
He keeps running into the same spot and getting murdered. I don't understand it. Amy tell him to take the other path and he gets the victory and he's like, that was luck. I'm like, it's not luck. It's a plan of a strategy, my friend. Okay. He doesn't have the Twitch factor. He just doesn't have the cold-blooded killer video game instincts. He does it. He's all sweaty. So that's true either God or you don't. I don't think he has it. He has other skills. The other people will be happy to have. So Mo I think you're vague. That's fine. Let's move on. Who else has got something?

Mo:
I'm not trying to be vague.

Chris :
I know.

Rodrigo:
I mean, it's not vague. Cause like, in my situation I got into video because it was very passionate about it. I was at a place where I hated what I was doing, I was literally going into work, like feeling like my soul is getting sucked out of me. And I bought a camera and I'd wake up early work on that stuff, go to work, get out, work on video stuff, go to my job, repeat and through a plane. And it's like, just working with you, it's more of just like self discovery stuff of like, I was very happy with the video stuff, but then eventually the video stuff became a full-time job and then a dealt with dealing with clients to a point now that like, I won't take on jobs from clients for photo stuff, because I feel like that's the last creative outlet I have for me. And it's one of those things I feel like, is there more out there that I'm not doing now that it can be more passionate about it because they don't have the same flame that I had for video when I started.
I still love video, I'd rather do what I'm doing today with video, did anything else? I couldn't do a nine to five job, but like, but at the same time, I'm like, is there something more and bigger out there? And it's, I don't want to feel like I'm not happy with what it have. I feel very fortunate to be in America and you know what I mean? And just to have the opportunities to have, but it always, every time I would talk with you, it makes me think of like, am I going to be doing more?

Greg:
I feel that everything you just said.

Chris Franklin:
I feel that. Everything you just said.

Chris :
Good. And the answer is yes, of course, you studied cinematography as a self-taught person. You bought a camera and we know this, having a camera does not make you a cinematographer. Having a camera does not make you a storyteller. The storyteller finds the tools and makes the story. So, you may or may not have it within your heart, your body and your mind and soul and spirit that you want to be an incredible storyteller, to connect people with their emotions and to illuminate stories that people are ignoring. And if you look at yourself like that, how could you not be inspired by that? But I think what happens is after you gain a certain level of proficiency, not even mastery, just proficiency is you start to think about getting paid for that thing, that spark, that it was the origin of this thing has somehow disappeared in the grind itself. And you've lost your way. And I think that's what it is.
So, when I got out of school, I felt like I was pretty top of my class for graphic design, and that was not going to sustain me. I knew enough about myself and I had the awareness to say, "I'm going to get bored with this really fast." I need to find something else. I got into motion graphics, which is still a new and emerging field. And I knew that it had a lot of complexities to it. Animation, photography, illustration, visual effects, acting, editing, directing cinematography. So many things that would take a person, a lifetime just to learn one of those columns. I'm like, this is going to keep me busy for a while. And when you get good enough, then you say, "well, you know, instead of working with small time, locals, TV spots, I want to work with national TV spots."
Okay, now I've done that, I don't want to just work for any national TV spot. I want to work for the best in class. I don't want to work for Podunk car maker, I want world-class car maker. I don't want to work for just cat food, I want to make the best cat food commercials and you just keep going and going. It's like, I haven't worked with that agency. I have a work for that brand or that client. We haven't worked with those superstars. Let's go there. And that can keep you busy for 20 years, because that's the drive.
And when you feel like you've hit some kind of ceiling, you add something new to that, and you continue to explore. You keep challenging yourself, you move that mile marker away. Some people who've attended some of my talks. There's this one ad that I referenced, and this is the power of art, I think.
It is an ad, but it's art and it's for Nike. It's a double page spread. And I saw it in a magazine that features the best ads in the world. And what it had was, it had his street and it almost felt like one point perspective finishing point where the street kind of just undulated. It was like a San Francisco street, where to go up and down. And you can see from the point of view, the camera all the way into the horizon, one really long street. And you saw the buildings flanking from left and right is kind of an urban thing. And then the copy read, something like just to the mailbox, just to the car, just to the end of the street.

Chris Franklin:
Dang.

Chris :
Just to this, just to that. And it kept going and kept going and going. That's how I see my life. So if you just say to yourself, and I think I'm not a sports athletic person, I see this thing, it just hits me right here. And it's like, that's what it means to be super passionate about something in your life that you set a goal. And when you get to that goal, you're not saying like, I'm going to run to the end of that, that into the horizon. I'm not going to run a 10 kilometers. I'm just going to get to the next mile marker. I'm just going to keep going and keep going. I don't know when I'm going to stop. I'm just going to keep going.
And this is me in 1995 saying, just get a school, just start a company. Just try to get a client, just get a few freelancers working for you. Just learn how to bid just, and it just keeps going and going. So, the reason why you don't wake up and show up anymore is because you got to that marker to the car, the third goal in, and you're like, I'm done.

Chris Franklin:
That's what it is.

Chris :
I'm done. [crosstalk 01:18:54] That's what separates-

Chris Franklin:
Looking way too far ahead and then being upset that you only made it to the mailbox.

Chris :
That could be one explanation.

Speaker 1:
Yeah, I get, I get that question a lot from people and they're like, Oh, so what's next for you? And I was like, Oh, I'm just kind of enjoying the place that I got to.

Chris :
Yeah. You know what happens there? Is people like me, younger and older than you just keep going. And then the problem is time, as the song goes is not on your side. The more obligations you have, the less your body complies with your mind. Trust me, I know, trust me, I know. The harder it is for you to do what it is you want to do. I'm going to butcher the expression, but like beauty and youth is wasted on the young. It really is, because you don't know what to do with it. You do dumb, stupid things. Thinking you have all of your life. And now I'm looking right at Ricky, right? He's trying to make eye contact with me, but he knows what I'm talking about. Yeah. That's what I'm hoping you will get focused, but I don't want the lens.
You know what I'm saying? That's what you want. So when I look at my two boys and they're very different, one doesn't really need a lot of motivation. He already knows what he wants to do in his life. And the other one, like you seem to exhibit talents in this thing, do you like this thing? He's like, "yeah," well, let's work on this thing. Instead of the other thing that you don't like. And so we take them out of school and we put him in an art school. So I was thinking if I could do my life all over again, I would want to be in your shoes right now, young man, a father who just supports me, who just gives me whatever I need to do, pursue my, my goal, my dreams who wants me to be the best version of myself, not out of pressure and obligation, but just because of joy.
And I'm just looking at that little dude. I'm like, come on, dude. I can't open any more doors for you right now. You got to walk through that door. So I look at you, I look at you and I look at you and everybody else that's watching this. I want that for you too, but I can't want it more for you than you want it for you, I can't. It's Like that expression goes, you can't hire someone to do the pushups for you. You got to do the work and it starts by being clear with what you want from your life. That's where it begins. I think it's going to be time for us to start wrapping this up. I'm starting to feel that, I think we have a couple more comments probably that we need to sort through here. And I'll give you guys some time to kind of formulate your last questions or final thoughts.
You don't have to ask another question. You can summarize. You can, perform a haiku, you can do whatever you want to do, but I'm going to scan the comments. Okay? That's good. Ricky. Thanks. Ricky says, :you guys think about what your takeaways, what you got from this conversation or a plan of action?" Let's figure it out. Alex is saying to himself, "God, the dumb things, I've done. Dumb things. I've done 10 to 15 years ago." It's true, we all do those things and we'll all move on our own timeline. So, don't be too hard on yourself. Oh, okay. Jennifer has an issue with me. Let's talk about this. Let me read this to make sure I understand it. Let's go. Okay. Here we go. So Jennifer Granger is saying, "the issue I have is Chris, you're projecting your worldview on others rather than being curious. Others where the level of success is enough."
100% guilty. I got no issues with your observation or my observation, these friends of mine who have gathered around here. I hope that they're coming here, because they need to get past whatever challenge barrier the gate. They need to get unstuck. And I assume they show up because they want to hear what my worldview is. And this is all, this is, you're exactly right. This is my worldview. This is what I want. This is what I want for myself. So, when I say success leaves clues, sometimes they're hard to figure out. And sometimes success just tells you exactly what to do. It's just up to you, if you want to pick up those clues or not. So, obviously what I'm saying is not for everyone. I don't believe it's for everyone, I don't think everyone's capable of hearing this. I don't think everyone wants this. And that's totally okay. The beautiful thing about this fabric of society that we have is we all get to be who we want to be. We all get to achieve what we want to achieve and that's amazing. Plain and simple. There we go. [inaudible 01:23:14]
Oh, Greg, Greg Gun. One of the teams when, when one of your team members is in the house, you got to address that. So double G is he's known around the way.

Mo:
G-G.

Chris :
Double G, Greg, Gregory Gun.
Gregory Gunn says, "do you think struggle is an inherent part of personal growth versus having unconditional support?" That's a deep question from double G right there. Let me just tell you right now, it's a puzzle within a riddle within something else right? [inaudible 01:23:44]
Yeah. I don't think these are mutually exclusive things, Greg, that you can have unconditional support while struggling. And those are ideally what you would have, that you would have a support network of friends and parents and family who support you unconditionally while giving you space to suffer, because your dream is big. And I think if you don't struggle somewhat, you're not pushing yourself far enough. That would just be my take. That's my worldview, Jennifer. Obviously, if you're not struggling and you're feeling great and just rock starring it and out right now, more power to you, more power to you. I struggle, I struggle every day. I try to pretend that it's easy, but it's a struggle. Oh, okay. Jennifer saying, "PS, I still love you." Thank you, Jennifer. That's important to me. Okay. Tim's in the house, Tim. What's up? [crosstalk 01:24:37] And they're having private conversations.

Mo:
We have some pros in the house yo.

Chris :
We do have pros.

Mo:
Pros have shown up, like Melinda, David Coe.

Chris :
Oh, what does Melinda say?

Mo:
Melinda just led everybody to my Instagram so they can tell me I'm more vague.

Chris :
I see, please, everybody do me a favor and go to, at (@) what is it, at (@) Mocks Media.

Mo:
No at (@) Moisma.

Chris :
Oh at (@) Moisma, go there and let them know how vague or clear he's been in his conversation.

Mo:
So clear.

Chris :
Drop him a, slip in the DMs and give them a message. Okay.

Mo:
Slide in the DMs yo.

Chris :
Anything else? Did I give you enough time to, to think, to contemplate, to reflect?

Rodrigo:
Yeah, I got mine.

Chris :
All right, here we go. All right, go ahead.

Rodrigo:
I think the big one for me is kind of matter of that's how it worked out for you, but it was realizing that, you know, your plans for that compound and the things you want to do. Didn't come from 10 years ago. Maybe it did, but I guess it's more of understanding that this is kind of like a [inaudible 00:10:32]. Like you talk about that it's going to come into steps, but I need to figure out what the next step of what I want to achieve. And then from there, the next thing could potentially come to me. And the other things you said was about, imagine the person that I look up to and then visualize the steps that they took to get to where they're at. Kind of like the success leaves clues is what really resonated with me.

Chris :
Fantastic summary, very succinct. Well done. All right, Chris, you're up,

Chris Franklin:
I'm in a very similar boat to Drigo basically when it comes to vision visualizing and goal setting, making it strategic, making it tangible, making it to the point to where I can basically physically see it. And it's for me and it's what I'm meant to do, because I do feel like I'm in the correct area. I feel like I'm passionate about what I do. And I feel like, I'm in my right spot. I just have to see the trajectory of how far I can go in my field.
When it comes to questions, I need to learn to ask better questions, more thought out questions, because there are answers that I want to find. And the question is the first step to getting those things. And of course, as Drigo says, success leaves clues, studying the people in my area. Because I'm in a small town, not necessarily like super small, but it's not LA. So there is a part of me that is comfortable being among the better in videographers in my town, but it stopped there for a second. And so it's just pushing past that and going further.

Chris :
There's something about you, Chris, that I think once you found your voice and your path that I think you're onto something, you shared some videos earlier on, I made some comments about the Playboy filter and you removed it promptly, at the prime a miss filter, because it has a certain look and I see you delivering things. I'm like, "who is this guy? Who is this guy? Where did he come from?" This guy who shows up on camera that smooth with that kind of Southern thing you got going, it's very nice and I like him. And I think you're going to give hope to a lot of people who were exactly where you were just a couple of years ago. And I think that's a really beautiful thing that you're doing. I think for you, what I would try to do is to set my bar pretty high and keep climbing that to say, somebody like me can attain the heights that I'm able to attain and you're going to empower so many people.
We talk about representation and inclusion. And sometimes I don't fully get that, but I start to understand it now, like when we see somebody who looks like us, like some skinny Brazilian first-generation immigrant, then we know we can do it. Some vegan guy, right, we know that somebody has done it. So we have a template to follow, right? Because when we say success leaves clues and it's Jim Roan, not Drigo who said that, success leaves clues is apparently the person who's leaving the clues has to look like us and sound like us for us to pick them up. Because what happens is we go through this kind of exceptional mindset, which is they can do it, except I'm not like that.

Chris Franklin:
Right, right, right, right.

Chris :
She was able to do that, because that's her story and her narrative. And it's really crazy to me, but this is how a lot of people think. So, the casting of that person who's going to leave clues for us, has to almost be a mirror image of our life story. So, what can we learn about this is just by you being you. And there are a hundred thousand people, a million people just like you, her waiting for you to become their role model. And that's who you can be.
We also realized that we need to tell our story so that they can say, that sounds like my story. So all of you guys, what we've done today, except for Mo, is to review who we are to be specific, to talk about where we come from, because that story is what galvanizes people to say. Yes, I can too. So for you, I think you still have miles to go where you can be. And I'm looking forward to that day when you're like Joe smooth doing your thing, and you've got your own catchphrases and you've got all the gear that you could ever dream of in your life. And that's what I want for you, because... And I'm saying this, Jennifer, it's not what I want because this is what I see what he wants. And we spent enough time knowing that's where it's going. And sometimes you just need another human being to see that sparkle in your eye and say, "you see my dream too?"

Chris Franklin:
Big facts.

Chris :
That's it. You want to say something? No. Okay. Let's move on to Mr. Vague, Mo Ismael.

Mo:
Why do you like picking on me? I've not been vague.

Chris :
It's fun, that's why.

Mo:
I've been so emotional... No, but my two things are, I like the Nike ad that you said, which I think shifted my perspective a little bit, because I do look at the end of the street versus just to the mailbox. And then I go into shitting on myself. So I think that was a big perspective shift. Just recognizing that it's one step at a time. And then the what's the emotion behind the, 'I could be doing more.' Is it excited, eager, or is a judgmental. And unfortunately I fall under the judgmental voice right now and hearing the way you said it. And even the way you said it via your inflection made me realize that I could be saying the same thing, but it have completely different consequences. So those were the two biggest ones for me.

Chris :
Well, apparently your cousin's in the chat because your cousins like, "Mo you was very clear."

Mo:
Let's go. I appreciate that. Thank you.

Chris :
Coming from Ciran that you can send the Venmo check to Ciran right now. Let me see if I can add a few more comments that this conversation, and then we're done. We're going to wrap up today. I have a board meeting to go to. People are... Deniya saying she likes the small group setting. Now you guys can read the chats if you want.

Chris Franklin:
I have PTSD now.

Chris :
Do you?

Mo:
No one wants to get picked on. Like me.

Chris :
Did you read something, did you read something?
Okay, let me see if there's anything else and we'll get out of here.

Rodrigo:
Chris, are you a big fish in a small pond or a small fish in a big pond?

Chris :
Kind of guy?

Rodrigo:
Yeah.

Chris :
I'm a small fish in a big pond. I said, I want to be world-class. That's a pretty big pond.

Mo:
Giant pond.

Chris :
Yeah. And I always thought that it would be better to be a small fish in a big pond, because the fish can grow. Big fish in a small pond, that's kind of it.
Jay Kingman, what's up? Saying... "Loving the format tonight. Nice deep chats." Maybe we'll change after. And I was the deep chats. What do you think about that?

Chris Franklin:
Deep chats, ladies and gentlemen. Welcome you too deep chats [crosstalk 01:32:19]

Chris :
Well, hold on everybody quiet while the guy with the deepest voice, say that, go ahead,

Chris Franklin:
Ladies and gentlemen, we'd like to welcome you to deep chats here at the future.

Chris :
And I want you to do that, but without smiling don't be all comical about it. Go ahead, try it again.

Chris Franklin:
Ladies and gentlemen, we'd like to welcome you to deep chats here at the future, send in your questions and they might get noticed.

Chris :
Beautiful! Good job, dude. You got to put that deep voice to work for. You see Harvey for voice acting. You got to use what your mama gave you. That's the way it is.

Chris Franklin:
It's my future side passion one day is going to be-

Mo:
Just voiceover acting with your deep voice.

Chris Franklin:
[crosstalk 01:32:57] the Lion King five, Mufasa returns.

Chris :
I love it. I think what we need you to do is... Jack is asking where can I find that Nike ad, Jack I promise you I've been looking for Nike ad, I cannot find it. So, it's not easy to find, I'm pretty good at sleuthing around on the Googles, but I've rebuilt the ad in my mind. And you guys understand the concept, right? And I've shared it in a talk before. So that's where you can find it now, living on in my mind and my decks. Okay. You want me to pick on some other people? I see that. Okay.
I think what we need to do is we need to wrap this up because I want to drag it on and kill all the energy and the good vibes that we have. Okay? So, on behalf of my team, which is Jonah and Ricky, who aren't on camera today. And typically, they are on camera holding the mics with me, but we're out of microphones, apparently they can't do it. And then of course the three people, the gentlemen in front of me, Melinda we miss you. [crosstalk 01:33:52] I don't know this year. We miss you. That's all right, she don't want to get what we got. So, once again to my left is Mo Ismael, you can follow them on Instagram at Moismy?

Mo:
Moisma.

Chris :
And this is Chris Franklin, Chris Franklin. Where can people find you on Insta?

Chris Franklin:
Instagram at Chris Franklin, Jr. Or YouTube at Chris Franklin, Jr.

Chris :
Franklin Jr. With a C Chris Franklin Jr. Jr. Okay. And then last but not least Rodrigo Tasca, where can people find you?

Rodrigo:
You can find me on the gram, Drigo_who or on YouTube, Rodrigo Tasca.

Chris :
And also on Tinder. No?

Rodrigo:
No. I am taken off the market. [crosstalk 01:34:36].

Chris :
Dang dude. You and Ricky, you guys had all done, huh? Update that status. Okay.

Mo:
Ricky, he called you young and beautiful earlier and a very back handed way, but it was dope.

Chris :
All right, everybody. Thanks very much for hanging out with us on this very real, raw, deep philosophical unvarnished version of The Futur. This is after hours. I'm your host, Chris Do and I will see you in the future.

Greg:
Thanks for joining us this time. If you haven't already, subscribe to our show on your favorite podcasting app and get a new insightful episode from us every week, The Futur podcast is hosted by Chris Do and produced by me, Greg Gunn. Thank you to Anthony Borrow for editing and mixing this episode. And thank you to Adam Sanborne for our intro music. If you enjoyed this episode, do us a favor by rating and reviewing our show on Apple podcasts. It'll help us grow the show and make future episodes that much better. Have a question for Chris or me, head over to thefutur.com/hey Chris, and ask away. We read every submission and we just might answer yours in a later episode. If you'd like to support the show and invest in yourself while you're at it, visit thefutur.com. You'll find video courses, digital products, and a bunch of helpful resources about design and creative business. Thanks again for listening. And we'll see you next time.

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