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Responding Lack Of Experience

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72
Chris Do
Published
November 11, 2017

Chris Do has an open discussion with the group about responding when a client tells you that you don't have much experience.

Read Transcript
All right, so I want to throw it out to you guys. I don't want anybody that was in the business boot camp to answer first. Everybody else is eligible to answer this question. So here's the setup you're talking to a client. It's in an industry that you're not that familiar with. So if you're in hospitality space, this is tech. If you're in tech. This is by biomedicine or something, or I don't know whatever it is, biotech, different kind of tech. Or it's in real estate development. So they're going to say to you, I'm concerned because you don't have any experience doing what it is that we do. How do you respond to that? Who wants to try? All right. OK, Andrew. Far away. What makes you say that? You have your portfolio says that I shouldn't be the other person, I'm going to be the worst opponent to play against. We need somebody else to play because you may have a really hard time with me. Somebody else, please. How about rachel? You beat the other person. OK, you're in a quiet room, right? Yeah all right. You guys do battle. Ok? Oh boy. Yeah, you could do it. It's easier to play the client. I promise you much easier than the vendor, I promise you. Just channel your client. I'll give you a minute to kind of get in character. OK OK. Let me know when you're ready. OK OK. This is like a casting call. We're doing casting right here for the next movie, the client starring Andrew and Rachel. All right, Andrew, I'm a little concerned that you don't have enough experience in our industry. OK what makes you think that, rachel? The projects you've displayed in your portfolio say that to me, and I just am concerned you're going to get a little lost. OK, so we work across various different industries and there are crossovers between most of them. What are the things that would concern you the most within what you see? I worry you're not going to understand our customers, ok? Do your customers consume other things or just your sales? I'm sorry, I don't understand your question. So do you have customers, are your customers and exclusively your customers? Are they also customers and in other sectors? Oh, I see. Well, yeah, of course they're consumers of other things. OK so the psychology behind consumers very often the same across different sectors, and that's what we try to look at. Do you have do you have any insights that are specific to your industry that say that we could use for that? Yes, we do. We have a document of insights that we use for our marketing. So with that and with the psychology that we're going to apply to it, is there anything that's really specific to your sector that doesn't apply to sectors that we have worked in? I feel like we're dancing around my question and my concern. So I'd like to kind of bring us back around to that. Your experience just does not correlate with our industry, and I'm worried about working with you. OK and yet you've sought us out. So what made you what made you consider us in the first place? OK, OK, I'll jump in here. Thank you, Chris. It's getting awkward, it got confusing. It got all kinds of place. OK, excellent. Thank you, both of you guys. Thank you very much. All right now, boot campers, bring yourself online. Anybody that take the boot camp have an observation or analysis of what went down. We're not. I know there's some of you in this call. I don't want to volunteer you. OK, I made some notes, though. I'll give you two more seconds for volunteer to step up. OK before I say anything, Rachel, I want you to write down two emotions that you felt. Just write that down. OK, I'm going to see if I feel the same as you or not. And Andrew, before I give you a breakdown, how did you feel during this questioning process and knowing that there are 36 people looking at you? I felt I'm actually quite sticky because I'm sweating, but but I feel more and more comfortable talking like that. And I think I'm still a good way of getting it, getting it right. But I feel more comfortable. And I think I'm getting closer towards it. OK, I'm going to ask you guys in the chat bot chat box to type in the word me. If you felt like you, you are Andrew, like you would get stuck to and it got it gets difficult for you as well so that I can say, OK, OK, and everybody that type me. Would you like to give us your alternative approach, like what you would have done differently? Sure where is the router? We're in the master bedroom. Joel, you're killing us, Joel. Mute that guy, Rachel. I know I thought, I have a couple of things. OK OK, hold on. Hold on. I heard a female voice first and then we'll cut to you, Phillip. I think it was me. Katie Yeah. Hey, Katie. OK, so they could say. I may be wrong, but let's examine the facts and then just lay it all down. OK, what is a fact mission do for you? Well, whatever they're concerned about, they could, they could just clarify it and then keep asking why and why and why. If you are confused and then eventually, normally that would be my approach. OK and have you done this before? No, but I've read about it. I'm a really good cook, too. I've never cooked any cookbooks. OK this is going to be excellent. Then what I'll do is I won't tell Andrew how to fix this problem, but I will give you observations I have. And then, Katie, you will do it. OK OK. OK and you're going to do with Rachel again. OK so, OK, so you guys just get ready for this. This could be wildly entertaining if nothing else, hopefully at the same time. OK, here's the thing I notice that only two questions in Andrew started to justify or to say what he thought immediately. And I'll tell you what that question was. So first, he's like, well, why do you say that? Well, the answer to that question is obvious. So it's one of these questions like if you're an attorney and you're interrogating or questioning your client, do not ask a question that you don't already know the answer to that's going to be in your favor. So think about that by saying, why do you say that? It tells me the client. It's obvious that you don't see what I see. This is a problem already. We work on cars, you work on bicycles and you can't see that. That's different. That's a problem. So asking an open-ended why question like that can lead you down many dark roads. And that's why I felt Andrew's second question was a little confusing. He started to talk about his cross platform experience. He's already justifying himself right away, so it's going to become very obvious to the client because I see you do not know what I do, and you're trying to say an Apple is like a banana because it's in the same fruit family. And I'm telling you right now it's not. So now you've asked an open ended question that you don't know the answer to that. You don't know it's going to be a positive answer for you. And to your second question is only going to make me dig into my position even more without any real clarity. Here's a question that you can ask that he eventually got to. So he started asking questions about consumer psychology, and I was like, where are we going with this? And it's very interesting because Rachel probably is the best kind of client, you're going to have. She called you out on it right away. Some clients will let you kill yourself, hang yourself by the rope. You know, it's like. Where's Andrew going with this? I don't I'm not talking about consumer psychology. So the first thing he was talking about is cross-platform experience. The second thing is he's going to try to demonstrate why he does what he does, why he does what he and why it's effective. And she can see right through it. She's like and she literally said, I feel like you're dancing. I want to take us back to what my original question was. So at this point, you've got to feel like, Oh my god, this is not going well, this call is spiraling out of control. If I had a chance of establishing expertise and build trust, I'm starting to lose it because the client just called me out on it. That's when Andrew starts to get really moist. OK all right now, Philip, what did you want to say and then Katie is going to do role play with me or not? I was thinking that something along the lines of I would have responded, yes, although we haven't worked with businesses in your industry. We worked with other businesses. And surely you know your business better than we do. And that's why we're going to work together on the process with strategy together. You know, your business better than we do. But of course, we worked in other industries. And we can adapt utilizing your knowledge that package that Rachel mentioned she has in order to make sure we target the right objectives. There are some parts on what you say is good in some parts of what you say. It sounds like justification once again, like I said to you before, I can't lose an argument if I never have a position. So every time you have a position, I'm going to hear that I'm going to attack you on it. Don't give me anything to work with now, you know, we've had this call before when we talk about the whole. Thank you for smoking scene, right? You guys remember how that thing went. So many need a refresher. Well, OK. I'm not hearing anything, so it's fine. OK, somebody says yes, Peter says Yes. OK, now the dad's a lobbyist for the tobacco, alcohol industry, whatever. And his kids bothered by the fact that what is it? It's your job. He's like, I help people to win arguments. So he goes into it because he's a lobbyist, he said. Let's say you and I are having a debate about the best flavor of ice cream. Let's say you like chocolate, you like chocolate. He's like, yeah, it's like, OK, and I'll take the position of vanilla, ok? So then he asks them, so what's the best flavor of ice cream? He says chocolate. He goes, you're sure it's chocolate chocolate above all else. Nothing else can compete with chocolate, right? And he says, yes, the trap has been sprung. Since, well, I believe in choice. I don't believe that there should be just one flavor of ice cream. It's un-american, actually. So what you're saying is un-american, and the kid says that's not fair. He goes, exactly. You see how that works, guys. He never says, well, you know, chocolate compared to vanilla, vanilla has 76% approval rating and more people prefer vanilla, and that's why it's listed number one. And we believe that vanilla is a better flavor. That's what you guys are doing. Let's try again. Let's rewind the tape. I know there's a whole bunch of new people in the group, but I was hoping that some not older people and people who have been in the group longer. Would be able to easily deal with this objection. It's going to be one of the top three objections you're going to hear every single time you get on the phone, for sure. If you're moving at any kind of growth pattern, you're going to bump into new kinds of clients where you have no right talking to them based on your experience. So you don't know how to overcome this objection and the number two objection, or maybe the number one objection is it's too much money. If you can't handle these two, you're just. You're risking everything. So we've got to be able to overcome these two objections, so let's get back into it. So Rachel, bring yourself online, Katie. Let's rock and roll. OK, so we'll start it with. Take it from the top and give your objection. Rachel so, Katie, I'm worried that you don't have any experience in our particular industry. OK, so let's examine the facts. What are you specifically worried about, which issues? I'm worried you won't understand our customers. I'm worried you won't understand our product and how to connect the two. Well, if we can go over your goals and talk about your brand in detail, then I can use those strengths to create my brand. Use my strengths with your concerns and create a brand for branding. I don't know your answer. I don't know. I'd like a specific example, please. It like a specific example. You can make something up, Rachel. OK, I guess I'm confused exactly what you want an example of, like, for example, if you're like Pepsi and I don't know, like the top demographic or something. OK so originally, let's see, I'll help you out. Thank you. You work on beauty products. We're an automotive company. What else do I need to explain to you about it? OK, Rachel. OK, so what I do, I take like the authenticity and the point of difference for each brand, and then I utilize that to make it there, like make it their main point of their story. So they come across like authentic. That's what I do. OK all right. We'll cut the scene here. Dirty, bloody. You know, I like to watch a lot of movies. When you when you walk into the room and there's plastic all over the floor and you're meeting with the boss people, it's going to happen. It's a crime scene in progress and you don't know that you're the guy that's going to get whacked. OK so I liked what Katie said at the beginning. I want to ask them lots of questions about what's going on with them. Two questions in. She's already going through her process, and she also just committed the same crime that Andrew committed, which was she asked the question only to get abused because the question is going to point out what she doesn't know. So right now, we're going into this thing, and I think what's happening is we're closing our eyes and we're kind of just reaching out like hoping we grab something like, is this a person? No, I'm sorry. Is this person now? I think we have to be more strategic. Does anybody have an idea or a thought here? Can I try 100 percent, you can try and try. I hope so. Spread those wings and fly many. All right, Rachel, this is Rachel's third time now. OK, now I also want you to write down your emotions. Two emotions when Katie to. Write those down, we're going to go back and compare each time. OK all right, now I'm going to warn you, since this is Rachel's third time she's pissed off right now and you're in for a world of hurt. You don't have enough experience now. She's like, you don't have any experience. You see that little shift there, you guys. OK, let's do it. So it's all you start. You start surfacing. I'm nervous, too, ok? I'm worried you don't have enough experience in our industry. I agree. Maybe I don't have the experience that you might be looking for. But may I ask why you came to us? Because obviously, we don't have the experience that you're looking for. I've seen some work that you've done with some of your other clients in the industries that you do work in. And I have liked the results that you've gotten. I'm just worried that you can't apply it in my industry. Um, yeah, well, if you're really worried about that, if we can deliver, then you are more than welcome to Find another studio that maybe are more aligned with your experience and your vision, but when you found them? And maybe I can help you out with that. But if you want to stay with us, then we can learn a lot from you too. So it's your call, actually. Yes, very interesting. Um, can I help you with anything else? Chris, my brain is going blank. OK OK, OK, that's fine. That's fine. We'll break scene here. Chris, can I ask something? Yes, of course. Let me actually just turn on the camera, dude, Lucy. I bet you're the guy with a fancy camera now. Is this better? Because I'm on the road with the camera? No, I'm on the road, but I really want to ask a question because I am going through this right now. So the biggest challenge that I think I'm going to be facing is the fact that my entire portfolio has been commercial shoots, meaning that we do one shoot that's focused on one product or service. And I really want to specialize into series video production series as well as photography series. And I can tell you right now that the objection that's going to come is that people are going to tell me, you don't have the portfolio that shows that. So how do you think it's a good way to approach? Would I have to be like, I understand that we don't have a portal for you in that particular area. That's where we want to target. But I see great value with your brand and I'm willing to do something that's low risk. You know, let's just say a shorter, a shorter series of three episodes or something so that it's low risk for you and we still get to show you what we can do. Is that a good way to approach it or am I undermining myself? Well, let me ask you some questions, because you're kind of not asking a question specifically about what we're doing. You're just asking a question about what is, what your problem is, ok? It's a topic, but we're not. So I'm going to ask you just hold on to that, ok? Sure no problem. OK, you hang out for a little bit? Yes yes, good. That was interesting. You walked around your car, you went right back into your car. I thought he was going somewhere. It was very loud outside with the train. I see. I see. OK, so just sit tight. All right, I'll circle back to you, Lucy. All right. Sit down. OK, so capturing the moment here, why did Rachel get stuck? What happened? And I don't know how to say your name, your name for a Vietnamese person who is used to one syllable. Is it utter sexy cat? How do you say your name? That's my full name. You can call me. Try tayari cry. Yeah are you allowed? Are you able to change your name in the description so that it's a little easier for me to figure this thing out? Yes, I will. OK, thank you. Yeah yay. All right. Maybe for a dummy like me. OK all right. What happened here? Why is it when Terry said what she said? Rachel's just like. What happened? Maybe they were set up for confrontation or a back and forth, and Atari basically said the scene is like, hey, you came to us. It's just not going to work out. I can help you find something else. So got diffused. that's one way of looking at it. No, that's a good way of looking at it. So out of mesh, the psychologist or I forget what you call your what? He'll he'll break down what's happening inside our brain. This is very good. All right. I'm going to give you the full detailed breakdown right now. But before I do that, so I'm like pulling out Ryan Seacrest here, American idol, before we do that. Rachel, tell us your emotions. The two words that you wrote down when Andrew was doing it, when Katie was doing it, and when Tori was doing it. OK I'm sorry, guys. With Andrew, I felt confused and then frustrated with Katie. I got confused and annoyed. OK and with tori, I was kind of coming off, like you said, a little annoyed with other people. But ultimately, I was intrigued and deflated. Deflated, yeah, like I couldn't like it was hard to like you said, it was hard to like, carry on with the objection, wear with the others, it was much easier to just kind of like, you haven't moved me. Like, I still have the same objection that I had, even though they had a lot of words and they kept trying to come at it from another angle. I was still in the same position. OK, excellent. OK, here's the full breakdown. Ready well, it's hard that you must be watching our videos for paying attention to what we're doing because the first thing she did was she embraced whatever it is that, Rachel said. It's like, you're right, we don't have that kind of experience. Rachel now has to stop in her tracks because Rachel was prepared to tell her everything that she doesn't know. And then this she was building a bridge, and though she was asking pretty much the same question everybody else was asking. She limited the kind of answers. As to what Rachel could say by saying, I agree, we don't have the experience that you're talking about, but I'm still curious, why are you talking to us then? That seems like a very subtle thing to be able to say that at the very beginning and our tone in the way that she said it seemed like, yeah, you know, hey, work together, not work together, I don't know whatever. I don't care. I'm going to wash my hair later and feed a cat. Yeah, I know there's $300,000 on the line, but whatever. So now, Rachel is like, OK, I'll tell you what, I like you. And then she's like, if you feel like you need that kind of person. You need to work with that kind of person. So now Rachel is out of options. She can't tell her anymore, you don't know Jack about cars, your beauty company, because she really took that away from her. This is like eight mile M&M. You know, we've talked about this, you take all the things that the other person can attack you during a battle and you take it away because you say it first. You just say it first. OK, let me give you guys some strategies here. OK and, Rachel, bring yourself online, I'm going to ask you this question as if I were the person, so you don't have enough experience, right? So I'm going to ask you the first question here and now you'll notice how directed my questions are going to be. Let me ask you a quick question, Rachel. Mm-hmm Do you want to do more of the same or you want to do something different? We want to do something different. So do you think working with the same people doing the same thing, getting the same results for the same competitors? We'll get you a different result or the same result. And the same result. What do you think you should do then? Explore different options. I'm glad you're saying that because we are that different option. OK, I'm going to stop it right there. So my line of questioning is very directed. Now, usually when clients talk, they talk for a long time. You don't have experience what concern Chris. You do commercials and when you make music videos or we do films and you do broadcast work. You do single spots. And we want a series. You do short form. We want long form Whatever it is, they talk for a while. It gives you a lot of opportunity to hear what they're thinking. And if you're not ready to respond, ask them another question about what they're thinking. And to hear that one thing now, you need to remember this. Almost everybody that's calling you is looking for change. You just have to know that. Why else are they calling you? They didn't call you yesterday because whatever happened to them before isn't working now. So if they're a lower management person, middle management, their boss has told them find me better options, the last people are terrible. I'm tired of working with them or the last people are getting really comfortable doing what they do. We don't feel there's any more innovation or their rates are too high. We need to work with somebody new. Everybody is coming to you is looking for change. It's your duty just to give them the information they need so that they can make the decision not to convince them. You see, like how by framing the question with do you want to be I didn't say like this because it can be kind of insulting. I was looking for the right words. Do you want to do more of the same. Or do you want to do something different? What do you think any rational person is going to say to that question? We want to be the same. We don't want to innovate. We love being exactly where we are. Who's going to say that? So here's what I want you guys to do for your homework, whether or anybody else, the next time the clients bring up an objection that you don't have enough expertise or experience in a particular field. Just ask them very politely. Are you happy with what you have? Do you want to do more of the same. Or do you want to do something different? Do you think? Doing everything that you're doing now that you're going to get a different result. And say with a smile. Always say bad things with a smile. It changes how the words come out of your mouth. Even if they cannot see you. So you see, you guys are busy trying to figure out 17 different moves to get yourself to a checkmate position. When you can just deal with one. Now, has anybody tried that question or that response back to the client and gotten a different result? Anybody? Yes. Go on, rags. I just like this thing with a different approach. I took one off the Socratic six. Yes I don't know what that is, right, but I used a challenging inverse logic for the same where they said, you don't have the experience, so I started the conversation with you. Even before going there, I would like to ask you, have you had any bad experience of shooting somebody before without experience and having an issue? OK OK. The problem there is that could have a really bad experience. Yeah so if they say no or something, but generally we don't have trust on people who don't have experience. I can challenge the logic of that thing by saying, do you think people with experience cannot fail? No there's a drop. You're asking me now if it's wrong. Yeah, I put this question to them saying that do you think people with experience in the same industry, do you think they can succeed with the project or fail? Well, I don't know. So you like both your questions are a little kind of open ended. It can be very problematic for you. Well, I actually I purposely to open a question because just trying to use the idea with that, I got your hands on the client. Yeah, agreed. And it actually moved into the part of your thinking like that. Do you want to change. Or do you want to do the same thing, right? Let it let it go. Because why it was an open ended question was I tried to mix this framework and also a topic from Dan Sullivan, who says, always ask open ended questions. OK. Yeah always open ended questions are potentially good for discovery, not so necessarily good for overcoming an objection. OK, so like Dan Sullivan is telling you to ask a really broad, open ended question. So that you can dig and find out what the problem is? So when you're doing discovery, yes, that's the kind of question you want to ask. Not a Yes or no close question, right? But when somebody gave me a very specific objection, you need to start to put that puppy to bed and you cannot spend 20 minutes trying to dance around this thing because you're going to get a person feeling frustrated, possibly annoyed. Yeah your approach was pretty much the bullseye. So I'm trying to find the least number of steps. So I can move on to the next objection because I know, one is not going to be enough. OK OK. And here's where an open ended question will really work. I was trying to onboard a client. And they just kept asking me so many questions, right? And I did the best answer every one of their questions. Now their questions weren't so much objections, but just more like. Help me understand what you do. Right? so I talk them all through. OK, so now, 10 minutes into the call, I'm like looking at my clock or watch and saying, thinking to myself is a waste of time. I got to get off this call. So this person is super indecisive. The amount of money is too much for I don't know what it is. I've got to get off the call. So I just say, hey, Mr client, I'm so sorry. It sounds to me like you have a lot of reservation, can you just tell me what your top three objections are, why you don't want to move forward? He took a deep breath and said, you know what? You're right. I don't have any objections, let's do this. OK sometimes I got to just get to that point. Yeah, because we're dancing a little bit too much. But you can usually only do that with decision makers, you can't do that with middle management because their job is to break you down. And your job is not to let it break you down. So in my mind, now this might sound a little strange to you guys. Is I automatically think or assume whatever they're going to say is absurd. I try to give little validity to anything that they say in my mind, because this is how I have to think about this, because I also believe that the best thing they can do is to hire us to give us all their money so that we can help them because I believe in what we do. So much. I don't think it's snake oil. And so it's almost as if I have to help them come to the right decision because working with somebody else, they're going to waste so much money. They're going to waste so much time and they're not going to get the results that they want to get. And so I think sometimes you guys look at what the client is going to say is an objection as this is real, this is truth. So the incident somebody says to me, you're not an expert. I'm like, well, what do experts get you? Well, they get you the same results. They are also well known in your industry, so I suppose your competitors work with them to. So everybody's working with the same people yet, you're trying to differentiate, you're trying to grow. That doesn't make any sense in my mind. OK OK. And when we lead into the Book Review lecture, I'm about to give you guys, you know something. To make a quantum leap forward. Discomfort is the precursor to that. Yep if you want to innovate, you have to leave the familiar, the safe, the known and go towards the unknown if you want to innovate, I'm not saying every company wants to do that. Well, all right. OK yeah, you're welcome. All right. And a mesh psychologically, what's happening? Psychologically, what's happening, I shouldn't say it like that. Give me your two cents dude, every time I say that you get all tight on me. No in the context of what the conversation was between Dalia and Rachel, or just whatever you want. What are you saying? What's happening? I think what this is like. I'm just going to say it, I'm like Oprah and you're like doctor, whatever his name is, Dr. Phil. So we just kind of how you doctor a doctor. What do you think about the situation? There's a lot of layers here to kind of catch up on, so. Go ahead. I'll start with the most recent thing you said because I identified it very closely to that point, which is being uncomfortable, is the precursor for change or doing something different. And when you're trying to deconstruct this between a client and a really defensive position, I think you have to kind of empathize with their discomfort. And we talked about this previously and you've talked about this time again. It's like, where do you what do you do with Billy to be able to empathize with them and get them to realize that their discomfort is going to be solved with your solution? So there is alignment. That's my two cents, I guess. OK, thank you. Just making some quick notes here. All right. Any questions about what we just did before I talk to Lucy and then we're going to jump into our deck because I do have to end our call promptly today. OK lucy? Yes, sir. All right. Here we go. All right. What do you do, lucy? So we do. Recently, I rebranded a sub brand under big That's just going to focus on production, work, photography and video, and I wanted to special, yes, I want you to answer me that question like, I'm a prospective client. All right. New at a networking function. I just asked you straight up, what do you do? We we do photo and video production, and we specialize in series production, particularly. Is that true? Is that true? Yes, it's true. I thought you just told me you're not known for doing series. Well, we haven't done series in. Well, are we talking as a client or as Chris Doe just told you what we're doing? Oh my God. Well, we haven't. We have. Doctor on this one. All right. He's just lying to me. No, it's not what you do. I said pretend like I'm a client. We just met at a networking function and I asked you, I leaned over the table, you look like an interesting guy. Tell me what you do. Don't lie to me. So we do photo and video production, and we're trying to focus our efforts to specialize in video series and photo series. OK all right. I'm going to tell you what's wrong already. OK, everybody that's watching right now. And if you're watching this later on a replay. Now I'm going to give you a second to think about it, either think about it or write it down. What is wrong with what morsi said, and I'm sure he said this 1,000 times already, so tomorrow will be a new day for morsi, everybody. You ready? Is that enough time for you to think tarry? You got it. Nod your head like you got it. OK, now as you got I was giving her enough time, ok? Tara's got it. OK, here's the problem. You told me what you do. Did you tell me that because I ask you, what do you do? Your response should be what it is that you do for your client. You should not talk about yourself. OK you have to tell me how it's beneficial to me in one sentence. The second problem is. You are more than what you make. And what you're doing is just describing to people what you make. So I'm labeling myself instead of telling them what they need to hear in terms of solutions. Yeah, so the example would be if somebody asked me, what do you do? Oh, I build websites, I make apps. That's kind of the equivalent to what you said. Yes whereas the other answer could be. I help clients build sites that perform twice as I convert at 2 times. I help clients build sites that rank in the top 10 organic search through Google. It's always a customer benefit. If you read Russell, what's this dude's name? Grabbed the guy's name already. Um, the guy who wrote story brand. I'll check it out. Yeah, I have it, it's sitting right here, just I'm blanking on his name right now because I wasn't prepared to talk about that particular book. Donald miller, Donald miller, he says that you're not supposed to be the expert. You're not supposed to be the hero, not the expert. You're not supposed to be the hero. The client's the hero. You're the guide. Sherman OK, so be the guide. So a better way to twist this would be we help brands showcase their products or services in the best light, and in doing so, we help them reach the target, their target audience better and connect with them on a deeper level. Would that be a better way to say what I do? Yeah, you're getting better. It's going to take some time to write this and you're going to want to sit down and write and think through this, right? So you're going to not you're not going to want to talk about features which what you're doing, you're going to talk about benefits. So make a long list of benefits like how do we improve the lives of our clients? And just pick the top two and bring those together. You could simply say we help our clients tell their stories through photography and video. You know, talk about series. Or you could just say through moving images and moving is a play on word like images that are static, but move you emotionally or moving images as in motion graphics and video. It would fit perfectly to right. So again, the question that somebody is going to ask you is what do you do? You should have a pretty good response to that. So let's everybody change or at least work on doing a better job of describing what we do. You don't need to tell me your aspirations in life like, oh, when we want to look forward to this in the future, it's like, I don't care. It's like saying, well, we're a $200,000 company in the future, we want to be a $20 million company. Why are you talking about yourself? And helped write his whole philosophy is this is that our brains? I mean, it's not his philosophy. This is just how we're wired is normally defaulting to calorie preservation. The more thinking we have to do, the more calories we burn. And we're still not evolved enough as human beings to realize that food is plentiful. That's why when you sit through a lecture, your brain goes to sleep because you're realizing a Tiger is not going to kill me. I don't have to find a mate. Brain goes off. But when I talk about and what's in it for you, my brain is going to turn on. Make it easy. Don't talk about too many things. OK, Gotcha. All right. And realize I think you're telling stories.

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