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How to Gain Clarity Through Articulation

#
120
Chris Do
Published
June 17, 2020

Journaling is so important. We need to ask ourselves questions. Why aren't I accomplishing the goals I set for myself? Why do I feel like I have a bunch of goals? What's it going to take for me before I hire somebody? What are the conditions that have to be met for me to hire somebody? Commit yourself. Make it your intention to find out what it is that, you know.

Read Transcript
I don't know if it's all about the question and all these things. My theory is this is that. While we're in our own world, it's just us. We are having all kinds of crazy thoughts. And the thoughts are amorphous. They take the shape of feelings and emotions and kind of gut instinct. Sometimes there's a word in there our limbic brain is working or moving through life, just an emotional, irrational creature. When somebody bumps into us like Dave, hey, what's going on? Yeah, so I got this question. Why do you think that or why do you say that? And in that moment, Dave has to then translate all that chemical stuff that's going on in his brain, his heart. He has to say something. And when he says it, it becomes real. It takes a definite form and a shape. Now Prior to that, those thoughts change all the time. And it's pretty good that happens naturally because I'm sure we're not always the Saints that we are when we were in front of people like we have crazy kinds of impulses, thoughts, desires that we don't act upon. But when somebody forces us to articulate that, to commit it to some form, in Word or in writing, or something else. Then it becomes real. And that's the first time. We know what we're thinking. That's why I put that quote out there, I forget who wrote it, but it's like the reason why I write is to know what I'm thinking about what a mind bomb that was. I thought, I know what I'm thinking, therefore I'm writing. It's the opposite. You write to know what you think because otherwise it's a chemical soup and it's all crazy up there. So when we have the luxury of having another person ask us questions and it's important for me otherwise, I'm not sitting around talking to myself. That would be a form of insanity. OK, so here's what we do. If we're just here by ourselves, what we should do is get out a piece of paper. And this is why journaling is so important. Ask ourselves a question. Why aren't I accomplishing the goals I set for myself? Jason's like, why do I feel like I have a bunch of goals? I'm getting nowhere. Is going to ask, what's it going to take for me before I hire somebody? What are the conditions that have to be met for me to hire somebody? Lauren's going to write something like, how or what do I need to do to attract clients that are going to pay me 20 to 30 thousand? Who are these people? Write it down. I know you wrote it, and it feels weird that if you knew it. Why don't you just think it and do it? But now you've made it real. And then tell yourself what the heck? Why aren't I doing that or what are the reasons that's why lists are so powerful? You took a big problem. You organize in your mind. You created some kind of hierarchy and you put it in sequence and then you wrote it down when boom, boom, boom, boom. And then you look at that piece of paper and like, Oh my god, who's the genius who wrote this? Oh, it was me. And it's like for the first time, you see your thoughts. You don't need a whole group of people to tell you what to do. That's why a lot of the teachers who give you prompts to think about. And then you answer them. What do you who do you ascribe is to doing the work and the value? You give the credit to the teacher who asked the question. But what did the teacher do except for to make a thought real, to make it concrete in front of you? You're the person who gave it value, but you give the credit away because you didn't do it by yourself. This is a really powerful thing, guys. Sit down. Ask yourself some questions and frame the question carefully. Try to strip out judgment and make sure you box yourself in so that whatever you put down is close to the kind of solution that you're looking for. It's like a problem will define as like half the solution, something like that. This is where the magic comes in. And there's some crazy, introspective questions that you can ask yourself, what is it that I don't know about this thing? What kind of question is that? What is it that I don't know what the thing is like if I knew, then I would, and then I'll sit here like, wait a minute. I don't know this, I don't know this, so now you're recognizing what you thought was the unknown unknowns, but now you've made the unknowns known. It's crazy stuff. Now I'll give you one or two examples here in real life, this is what was happened as I'm sweating here. What I won't do for you guys. Late night. OK a student said something to me like, wow, did you see this person's work and being the hater I was on? Yeah what show it to me? They showed me this work is early on in my career. I'm probably four years out of school and feeling the burn out, feeling inferior to all these young people doing great work. And they showed me this work and I looked at it. And in my mind, I was like, that's pretty dope. My external mind was like, hey, let's whatever. I just said that like, you just played it out like whatever. And I asked the person who's watching it? What do you like about this person's work? What is it that's so intriguing to you? And I said, you know, it's so fluid, like how one shot becomes another shot and there are no edits. I'm like, oh, that's all that really what you see? And so I remember saying to that person next week, I'll teach you how to do that. And at that point, I had no clue, and even I wasn't even aware of this thing. It just so happened that I was called in for jury duty and I go to jury duty and, you know, there's a lot of sitting around and waiting. I just sat down and I replayed in my mind, how do you make edits that are seamless? And I wrote down six or seven things and became the blueprint for what I lectured on for 4 and 1/2 years about how to create seamless transitions when designing sequences. I did it so well that people started calling us. Our firm, our motion Design Studio. And saying. Yeah, we want you to think about this, and we don't want any edit points like the kind of stuff that you guys do. So I'd even know that this is something I knew until somebody had asked me that question. And this has happened over and over again. If some of you guys have taken the business boot camp, the Socratic six was on a plane trip. A short plane trip from Madrid and Madrid from Dublin to Madrid is a very short flight. I was just thinking people were always wondering how the heck do I overcome objections? I sat down and made a list. I'm like, oh, they're there. I think there are six of them. And that was draft number one. So you guys ask yourself a question now if that feels wholly unnatural to you. Guess what? You have a group of 300 people who are already asking questions all the time. Twitter is asking an infinite number of questions. So is Cora. You guys go to Cora asking questions. Commit yourself. Make it your intention to find out what it is that, you know. You'll be surprised. So the real problem is just coming up with a prop. What's a good question to answer? You have a lot of help because Google exists. With that, I'm going to pause, give you guys time to reflect and respond. Just to add to that, I think there's a psychological trick you can use where you address yourself in the third person. So you emotionally detach yourself from. You know, talking to yourself so you don't so you're stepping outside of yourself to talk to yourself, and maybe that's a good approach for the asking yourself questions. Excellent excellent suggestions. Our suggestion. Anybody else? If you haven't done so already, I highly recommend you make writing as part of your daily or semi daily habit. It could be writing a tweet. That's enough, you can start there. I like small commitments, things that I know I can do that don't scare me. And then that tweet can turn into a shorter paragraph or two.

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