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Vitals Case Study only

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8
Chris Do
Published
October 19, 2016

Chris Do leads a keynote spotlighting a case study presented by Aaron Pierson.

Read Transcript
All right. I believe this is episode number eight in the sequencing of things, even though it's not technically number eight. We're way past eight at this point. And today we're going to have a discussion with Aaron Pearson. He's going to go over the vitals case study and he's going to show, I guess, it's kind of up to the group and up to Aaron, but I'm going to turn it over to him momentarily. He's going to go over his deck and he's got a couple of decks, I think, and how to respond to different situations. And I recently learned like he used to do cold calling as a job out of a call center and anybody has built for that is a different kind of beast altogether. And he was a beast most yesterday because or maybe it was yesterday, the day before, but I called him. This is Chris, dude. Happy to talk to you, but I'm in beast mode right now. I got 100 calls to make today and it's on my list. I got to generate sales and I love hearing things like that. And I want to give you guys a little bit more of a primer on Aaron before he takes over the show. The way I met Aaron is actually through YouTube. And he was doing his own YouTube channel, and he reached out and said, you know, I really enjoy your show. I find it to be valuable. And I want to help you guys. And we talked and I didn't know what to do with his advice at first and on a different conversation, I'll tell you what he told me. We met up in Las Vegas. He drove out from Arizona to Las Vegas to see me speak at Nab. And there we really connected kind of doing that first time face to face. We chatted. We had breakfast together, and since then we've been talking. He's joined the group. He's running core. But here's what really impresses me about Aaron is that during our conversations, I would just give him like one or two pieces of information, like one or two little nuggets. He would say, OK, Chris, stop. That's enough. I'm going to go and apply this right now. That's it. So for three or four days later, he'd come back. He's like, Oh my god, dude, I blew my client's mind away, and I don't even know what I'm doing. And there is that fearlessness. And that makes him, I think, an ideal student. Like, I don't want to call you a student per say, but just that kind of mentality like I want to learn, I want to soak in. I don't want to overthink anything and I don't need every step spelled out. I don't need a through Z. Just give me big ideas because I'll figure it out. And I love that because he doesn't go. don't think he goes away and thinks I'm going to do this perfectly. I just need to do it and see what happens. And then I can go back and say, look, oh, this happened. What should I do? How should I respond to that? And so he's been killing it. So he joined the group and he had asked me, Chris, what kid should I buy? I'm interested. I'm in man. And I had told him, and you can back me up on this. I said, do not buy any kid. I forbid you to buy a kit. I want you to spend time with the group and see what's going on before you do anything. So he know, he's a really patient guy who waited three days and he bought a kit anyways, but that part didn't follow directions. OK, so now he's in. So what you're seeing here is a guy who has had the kit, not that long. So how long have you since you bought the kit that you kind of transformed and rolled it into what you do, aaron? Probably two or three months, max? Yeah, probably at max, I was thinking like a month and a half, but you're probably right, two to three months and you've redone your website. You've meaning that you built a new website, a new brand and you've done the position. You've decided also at least on this one website, to be hyper focused. So you're doing everything according to the playbook, things that I've asked everybody to do. Think about your dream client, think about what you're strong and just go after them all in. And that's what he's done. I wouldn't say these guys are my dream client, but it was a niche that we already had a really good portfolio in a body of work in. So we wanted to leverage that to get a runway, to get our dream client. So that's we're in like leverage runway mode and then go for dream client. OK, well, sometimes the dream clients, the guys that can pay you so you can go do your dream. Yeah, right. That's not bad. I just want you guys to remember that and know that sometimes it's a very popular sentiment for us to be pitting ourselves against the client. And that's one way to look at it. I have an alternative way. It's like you have to love your clients, otherwise you're not going to do well. OK anyways, I just want to remind everybody, please wear your headset and turn on your camera and participate. Put your mic on mute unless you have something to say. Otherwise we get too much background noise. And now I'm going to turn it over to Erin. I'm going to figure out how to do this. Remember the stuff here, and I have to promote you now. Sorry, guys. Give me one second. I had to promote Aaron. It's been a little while since I've done this. And if not, I'm going to have to. Where is it? I think that's like to you. They promote. I promoted you, Erin. OK OK, now I can share. Yeah, sure. And you. So there is a little icon finding it, ok? I'm sorry to see something happen there is your desktop, dude. All right, sweet. So all right, so I want to give you guys a couple of options. I have a few decks that I want to show you. I didn't brand it. I mean, this is my client. I'm not afraid of you guys, you know, stealing my clients. But I want to give you guys like an honest and real case study or experience. So I've got three different decks that I want to go over that kind of cover three different scenarios that I think are pretty common for anybody in the creative industry. One, this is an actual proposal that includes a website in video production, which is what they initially reached out to us about. And then we added strategy to it. We added the discovery and then the other deck is just the brand discovery and then the other deck is somebody who can't afford really our services. So I came up with a creative way to package in strategy and some of the executables. So there are three different scenarios. The decks are very similar, so I'm going to kind of blow through them. I also have our website pulled up because I want to share with you guys the user journey that we created based on our own discovery process, which we found has been working really well for us. I also use this case study of our own website in my actual pitch when I'm doing a call. Now, one thing I want to tell you guys like this is what's working for me. I'm not saying this is right. This is just kind of my way of taking everything that Chris has taught, taught us and the conversations that we have and just applying it immediately into the group. So I want to give you guys the option. Do you want me to pitch you guys as if you were a client without any commentary? Or do you want me to pitch with a little bit of commentary? And you know, we can kind of ask, you guys can ask questions as we go along, I'll give you guys the option. Or is there a third option that you guys prefer? This is really about Aaron sharing what he's done, what he's learned and showing you how he's done it. I think narration would be great. Yeah, OK, cool. I mean, yeah, this deck that we're looking at right now. I went to their office yesterday and picked up a down payment for $8,500. And then we also I sold another brand discovery yesterday for $5,000 off of one of these decks that we're going to go over right now. That's just brand discovery. No, no creative execution at all. So cool. First, I will. Well, then I'll just go right in. So one thing that I like to do because it's really simple as I try to brand this cover page and let me see if I can actually go to present mode here. So you don't have to see all the misspellings. So I brand the cover page. I give it their logo. Like, this is a picture that we took while we were out there. You can also pull photos from their website. I really think that, like making these presentations personal is really important. Now what you're seeing here would be technically the second, the second engagement or like personal touch that I would have with this customer or potential customer first would be somewhat of a discovery call where I ask some questions kind of get a pulse on what they're looking for, what are they struggling with, where they're currently at in their business? And then I say, all right, let's do a second call. I need you in front of a computer and we're going to do a joined out session or GoToWebinar whatever you prefer. Hey, I got a question. We're going to have to interrupt you several times because there's parts here that you're doing that may be natural and intuitive to you, but I want to give everybody an opportunity to talk about it. Yes when you're on that first call and this is the critical first call, because if you screw up the first call, there is no second meeting. So let's not move so fast. So the first call? Are you doing it in person? Is it literally on the phone cold calling? Give us a little context and give us a little example of the dialogue. Yeah so let me even take a step back. How do I get the business? So I haven't figured out a way to predictably get business right now. A lot of this is based off of referrals. A lot of it's based off of like client relationships and really just referrals and really exhausting our network. We did a launch and it gained a lot of traction. We did some PR. I write for the Huffington Post and a few other big publications. I'm also a bestselling author, so I leveraged a lot of what I do, a lot of the content that I create that I give away for free to help educate people as a means to generate business and generate calls. So this the first call is literally just I call it a discovery call because I asked them questions. I'm like, all right, so tell me about your business. Now I chose to specifically focus on the real estate industry, and I'm not talking about realtors. I'm talking about real estate brokerages. So underneath a brokerage, they have agents. And that's where a lot of my experience is, is helping brokers grow, helping them build a culture that's contagious, you know, helping them find disruptive ways to position themselves and just ways to really differentiate themselves overall in the marketplace. So like, I know that a broker is my ideal client. A real estate agent is not. They can't afford our services. They don't get it. They just don't get it. So, you know, when I'm on a call with them, I just ask them, well, how many agents are you at? What are your goals? You know what? What is your current revenue like? Where are you trying to get like, what is your really your big goal? And even in this proposal, you'll hear me say everything we do is about trying to ascertain and get you to this one goal. We are not a web development company. We are not even really a creative agency. You know, we are a strategic partner. We're a company that focuses on high level strategy to help you achieve whatever this goal is. So every single creative executable is going to help you achieve that goal. Whether it's a website, a website is just a means to getting you closer to that goal. If we discover that, that's the solution, right? If it's a video, then it's a video. If it's a podcast, it's whatever. Whatever it is, that's to me right now, that's irrelevant when I need to position myself, as is the person that is going to help them put together a strategy that's going to help them align with their customers better. And a lot of the language that you'll hear me say to you is language that I've literally stolen right from Chris. It's stuff that he talks about on the phone. My decks are very similar. Like, I am not reinventing the wheel, I'm just taking it and spinning it off into my own, you know, my own, my own thing. But to answer your question directly, it's like the call is just me kind of asking questions, getting a pulse on what they think they need and just kind of listening. I don't give them any sort of advice as far as, oh, maybe you should do this, or maybe you should do that on the first call. Like, I don't do any of that. I say, well, you know, let me take some of this information that I've got. Let's schedule another call and I do some things to like, you know, build authority and let them know like, I'm the shit. You know, I talk about the fact that I'm a best selling author and whatever I may come off as. There is an arrogance and confidence, right, and some people think I'm really arrogant. You know, for clients, I come off as confident because I have social proof. I have amazing case studies. I've worked with amazing clients and all of us have, you know, it's just leveraging that in a way that people like, OK, this guy knows what he's talking about. And that's what I try to establish on that first call is that I am the authority that I know more than them. I'm smarter than them. Ultimately, if they work with me, I can help them. And that's what I'm trying to establish that. Answer your question. I did. And the one thing I want to just clarify is these are warm leads. These are not cold leads, right? Correct Yeah. You guys understand that term like cold and warm leads, the cold is a complete stranger. You don't know nothing about you. They don't even know why they're talking to you. A warm lead is, hey, Bobby. You know, Mary told me to reach out to you or I see that you and I are engaging on Facebook or LinkedIn. I just want to follow up. That would be considered a warm lead. And so he's doing a lot of content marketing by providing value out there to help build up that warm lead. And he's doing it in a lot of different ways. So so far, so good. Now, Albert, I'm sure you have a couple of questions. Here is how on the phone I thought I heard him earlier. Yeah, Yeah. No, I'm tracking, you know, every school, huh? Is it really cool? Yeah all right. Let's let's keep rolling then, man. Yeah, so and you just brought up a really good point. Part of my business model, like I would say, if I were to break my day up into percentages, I really focus only on three things. I have a team, I have an art director. My other partner, I'm pretty sure is on the call. My our chief technical officer. You know, this new agency is a new partnership. I usually am like a solo consultant that works with a bunch of subs, but part like if I were to break my day up into percentages, you know, I would say right into thirds like a third of it is all about building my brand. So creating content, providing value to the marketplace, podcasts, books on Amazon, blog posts, any sort of like artifact that somebody can learn from and get value from. I spend a tremendous amount of time creating very similar to what Chris is doing here with the school. I mean, he's got the YouTube channel. You now have a podcast. I mean, this is stuff that builds value. So when you do get on that call, you know, they kind of already like invested. They're like, wow, I've already gotten value from this. I mean, if this is what it's free content's like, I can't imagine what his paid contents like. And that's the mindset I want to get these people into. The other percentage of my day is making sure that the quality of work that's coming out of our agency is at the highest level possible because if we're not performing at the level in which I'm selling it, we're not going to continue to be in business. And the third and most important thing is bringing in revenue. I try not to manage projects anymore. My new position now is less of a creative director and more of, you know, the brand builder and the guy that brings in revenue. And that's really what I'm trying to focus on because it's what I'm good at. Like, the more you do creative, the easier it is to sell it. The more you do strategy, the easier it is to sell it. So just because I do it so much and I've done a lot of it for free, I've done a lot of it with friends and other people that own businesses like a lot of this stuff just kind of comes naturally because it's repetitive. I'm practicing it a lot. I talk about it. I actually have two sales calls after we're done with this today. So and that's the way I like it, man. I need to be pitching people constantly without revenue. I don't have a business, I have a hobby, and I don't want to make this into a hobby. I'm trying to make this into a business. So in the last 48 hours or since Monday, I mean, we have 22,000 worth of receivables. And I don't say that to brag. I say it because it requires a lot of work. And like, if you're not spending enough time during the day working on generating revenue or bringing in revenue, you're going to have those peaks and valleys right that we have in our businesses. So like for me, I just I need to spend a considerable amount of time every single day bringing in revenue or doing revenue generating activities. So I was there, there was three of them. There was building your brand, biz dev. And what was the third one bringing in revenue? Like, they're all equally important, and some days I just focus on only bringing in revenue like the last two days, that's all I've been focusing on is like being on my LinkedIn, reaching out to contacts, making phone calls. When I used to work at a call center, I remember making over 200 calls a day. So I'm like, well, if I could do that when I was, you know, 17 years old, like I could at least make 100 calls today, and some of them are cold. Like, you know, I've converted cold leads before, but because I'm doing so much free content creation like out on the internet, people email me, Oh man, thank you so much for that article or that podcast was great, like humanizing my brand. I never even thought about that right? I respond. I engage. I open up a dialogue. I humanize my brand personally. Like people can reach out to me and I don't. I don't try to come off as like, OK, I'm a content creator. I'm too busy for you. Like everybody is a potential opportunity or a potential referral. And if I have the hint at all that like, there's somebody that's someone important, they go into our HubSpot account. We use the HubSpot CRM, which is the free one. I think one of the people in the group, I don't know if it was Ben or somebody else had mentioned it, and we looked into it and it's frickin' radical. It's so cool, you know, is not the next call, but the phone call. It's going to be all about HubSpot and CRM. Shawn Henry, he's a certified HubSpot guy. Ben burns is a big HubSpot believer, and he's been doing it. And maybe there's a couple of others. So those people will be co-hosting the call with me, and I think we'll learn a lot by listening to those guys. Nice. Yeah. Really, what you're doing is you're transitioning your role from being a creative director, kind of overseeing the creative direction of a project to the biz dev guy, the executive producer. If you're in the motion design industry, you're out there hustling and this is all about hustle and you can see it. You can hear in his voice and he's built for this. He's a machine. All right. Let's move on. All right. So let's go. I'm going to I'm going to present it like this. So I can see the next slide. So you're going to have to see like, you know, this underlying, but whatever. Don't worry about it. So, OK, I'm going. I'm just going to start. This is an agency proposal. These guys, we've already done a video production for them that was, I don't know, roughly $5,000. They came back and I said, OK, well, you know, like what's next? Like, you know, there's so many things that we can do for you guys. And I looked at their website and they mentioned that they needed a website done. So I said, listen, you know, we're starting a new agency and I gave him my business card that I showed them the new website. I'm like, we're really trying to align with people just like you like. This company totally gets it. I even wrote an article about them in the Huffington Post about how companies like them are terrifying real estate dinosaurs. Like this old adage of like, you know, having to wear a tie and like, you know, to be a realtor is almost like you're putting yourself at the same level as like a used car salesman, right? And we're trying to change the way that people perceive realtors and the real estate industry as a whole. And this company is extremely progressive. So I approached them with an idea I had not met them before we had known each other because of online engagement. You know, I like their posts, they like my post. And one day I said, listen, I want to come in and talk to you guys and they knew who I was. I have a reputation in Phoenix for doing this in real estate, and that's how that relationship really started. So I put together this deck and this was actually like the first iteration of this whole deck. So I'm just going to start, I'm just going to start pitching it. So obviously cover page custom branded when I go through this presentation with them, I want them to feel like they like this is really for them. It's not just something that we threw together or a template or anything like that. So a nice background image, I threw their logo up there. We've got our icon up on the top, so I'll just get started. So first I start talking about listing brands themselves, and this is kind of my branding philosophy. You know, you cannot just tell people what they are. Brands need to be experienced. So ultimately, at the end of the day, like our primary focus is that we help companies evolve their brands into experiences that connect them with their customers and meaningful ways. And that is what we do. We are not a, you know, an executable company. We don't want to position ourselves like that. Our case studies are designed to show growth. So our goal is to identify your goal. And once we identify your goal and figure out what it is, you're really trying to achieve. We then come up with creative solutions together on how we can achieve that. So if that's a website, that's a website, if it's a video, it's a video. OK, but ultimately, what we're trying to do is we're trying to create experiences to help connect you with your customer or with your avatar or whatever that is. Next, I go over our primary objectives and our strategic objectives. This is really important. This is identifying the needs and wants of what they mentioned on the phone. So on the first call, I listen really carefully and. Some of these things are in here, and then some of the things that I'm proposing are up here. So first, I want to facilitate an actual brand audit process now for companies that are currently in existence. I need to get a baseline of where they're at, what's their social engagement, what's their revenue, internal and external, what's their onboarding process like? I want to know as much about this company as possible so that I can ultimately help them more. The way I describe this is like, you are renting me as a business partner without giving me any equity in your company. So you can have me. Yeah, obviously it's going to cost money, but you can have me and my team of other bad asses for, you know, for for, for whatever the cost is. But first, the brand audit is really designed to give us a pulse on where you guys are at next. We want to facilitate a brand discovery process. This is affirmative. This is where do you want to be? What are you trying to achieve? You know, how do you want to sound? How do you want to look? What type of culture do you want to have? What what do you want people saying about you when you're not around right? The discovery process is also going to allow us to find executables. So other primary objectives, you know, develop a website, blah blah blah. This is where you can kind of put your own thing in here. Create tangible and intangible assets to help the promotional growth of your company. Create a culture video identifying relating to your core values, belief and culture within your organization. Now, strategically, our objectives are to facilitate a brand discovery that ultimately creates. And I don't read these like verbatim. I just highlight and talk about them. No one wants to sit through like a PowerPoint read along. So ideally, this is something that they would read when I send this to them. After I do this live call and I go through the whole process, you know, streamlined your digital user journey to ensure your brand resonates at each point of contact, reinforce brand messaging, so on and so forth. I really talk on each one of these, but the goal is to show them that we care about that. We have primary objectives and we have strategic objectives. That's the goal in this. It builds value. So one thing that's really unique about us that's different than any other company, is that we set up systems to communicate and collaborate with you. So like we use trello, our clients that are our high profile clients, we ask them to use Trello because it's an organized way of doing it. But the big thing is we want them to feel like we are a natural extension of their team. Again, it's that adage of like renting us as a business partner. Right? one thing that's unique about us is that if you need anything, we're literally either a phone call or an email away. We have a 30 minute response time. So I discovered that one of our big clients, I said, I said to him and I used to work with him in house. I would go to his office on a consulting basis and work in house, and I said, Joshua, dude, like, what? What would it take to get you to sign on with us? And he's like, well, you know, I'm so big. I need somebody in house. I'm like, well, what if it was like, we're in house, but we're not in house like, you know, my partner aiden, who's on the screen right now. And I sometimes we sit on Google Hangouts all day long. It's like we're sitting next to each other, you know, but we're not so like, why can't I provide that same type of level of service to my customer if it's important to them, if they're paying me $10,000 a month on a retainer? I will do that, you know, or we will be available to do something like that now. We may not be able to fix their problem within 30 minutes, but we will definitely respond and it will. It'll be added to our queue. So I want to give them the feeling that, listen, we're a direct extension of your team. We are a part of your team. We're just a phone call away. That's one thing that really differentiates us from others. So how do we do it? Well, it all starts in our process like the way that we provide results for the clients. And at this point, I've talked about some of the results that we've provided for our clients. The way we do this is through a three step process. First, we start with a brand audit and essentially we check your vitals and that's hence the name vitals agency. We're checking your vitals. Where are you at? What's working, what's not working? What are your numbers? You know, what are your processes? What systems and technology do you use to help streamline the process? You know, I want to know as much as I can about the way that they run their business, so I can help either find areas for growth and opportunity or, you know, find ways to help them save money by exiting out, you know, systems that are not needed. So many companies in real estate, they're set up on like brokerages, they're paying like five or six different companies, anywhere from $100 a month to $1,000 a month using systems and technology. And the thing is, is that they're not using any one particular. So the best system that the best system out there is the one that you use, right? So if we can save you money by exiting out some of those systems and allowing you to use one system, you're going to be way more efficient. Your revenue is going to go up. Everyone on the team is going to be on the same page. There's going to be no confusion. So I want to know those things right now. I'm talking about getting into their business. I'm not talking about building a website, I'm talking about their business model and that's where I'm able to sell. And that's how I think, how I'm able to sell the strategy. Number two, we do the brand discovery. So you know, the brand discovery, let's see, brand inventory, we perform. OK, so it's broken down into three parts. We perform ideal client profiling, brand attributes and three category goals and prioritization. Now, the three category goals and prioritization is where we discover the actual creative executables that are needed. But we look at three main areas. All right, so we look at revenue. What potential revenue streams do you have in your business? What are you leveraging and maybe what are you not leveraging, right? Like what where is your ability to earn? And we want to know every single variable or option within that. Next, we look at efficiency. We, you know, evaluate your systems. What are you using? And lastly, we look at awareness. How are you marketing yourself? How are you generating business? How are you keeping people, you know, continuing to come to your site and or, you know, generating leads on your website or getting email addresses, whatever it is that they're trying to do, getting new agents to sign up with them. We look at all three of those things. It's extremely important. And then we prioritize what's most important and we have a system to do that. This is what I tell them, because you guys are familiar with core. We have a system to do that where it's a basic numbering system, you know, desirability and attainability. How much do you desire. This thing and is it attainable? Can you afford it? Do you have the time, the output to actually fulfill on it, if you could? And based on those two aspects of each one of these goals, we're able to identify which ones we need to target first in phase one and then we can determine which ones we need to target in phase two or on an ongoing retainer basis, because this is where I slip in the podcast or content. Creation or a few other things that we can do for an ongoing retainer basis. Step three we do creative execution. So now that we've done the audit, we know where you're at, we've done the discovery, we know where you want to go now. We need to create that right. We need to. We need to fill in the gaps and create the digital assets that will help you achieve your goal. And this is our three step process. This is how we've taken a company from 50 agents to 350 agents in less than two years. This is how I have helped this company. The same company I just mentioned, reach fortune 500 twice, right? They were in the Inc 500 list, twice in the last two years in the magazine. So we provide results, right? And the way we do it is through this process. If you want a website like if that's all you want and I tell them, I'd be happy to refer you to somebody else that just will provide you a website. We provide results. That's what we do. We don't provide. We don't provide necessarily creative services. That's a means to an end. So let's go a little bit deeper. Let's talk about the brand on it. The brand audit consists of four different things we have internal and external, offline and online. So on an internal audit basis, we'll look at and this is pertaining to real estate. Specifically, we'll look at your current agent base. I want to look at your annual revenue. I want to see the number of agents that you have versus number of active agents. 1% of agents worldwide do 99% of the business, so 99% of agents don't do anything. They don't do enough business. You know, they're there, maybe soccer moms or something that just sell a home once a year for a little commissioner, they help their friends out. There's a very small percentage of agents that are actually active. So a lot of what we do to when we work with these people is we turn a lot of those inactive agents into producers and there's systems and ways in which we do that. So I know this business very well. That's why we're targeting them, right? That's why this deck is literally designed for them, because I know the broker's pain points. I've been working in the industry long enough. We do a culture assessment, you know, and with a culture assessment like I will literally interview agents that are with their brokerage and say, hey, what do you think of this? Like, you know, what's your experience been? I'll even interview agents that have left their company and gone to another one. Why'd you leave? You know, I want to know. I want to know what these other people are saying, because what you might perceive and what other people are saying are two different things, and we need to get the truth. We need to really understand our user right. And the best way to do that is to actually talk to them. We evaluate your systems and technology. We evaluate your training and your recruitment. How do you train your agents? How do you recruit them? What is the onboarding process right? If I can automate the onboarding process and take out the human element, but still, have you know, a humanized approach to this? Not only will I save you time and money, but ultimately, you're going to be working more efficiently. It's going to make things a lot easier. The external audit, you know, instead of, you know, the identity design, the collateral the business systems, a website audit, a copy audit, what type of language? How are you speaking to these people on your website? We do a social media audit. We also do a reach assessment. So what is your engagement like, right? Like, you know, if you post something, if you post a video, how many views does it get? How many comments does it get? I want to know, and there are some cool tools out there like buzz Sumo. I think that we've talked about this on another call that we use. There's a few other ones. I can send you guys some links afterwards of some of the stuff that we use for the external audit when it comes to like website and social media, excuse me, audits that we use just to gather some, some rough information. Now, step two, we do the brand discovery. This may look familiar. We're halfway through the deck and you've been doing all the talking, so I need time for people to process and ask any kind of questions. So I think, OK, this is an educational webinar. You're not pitching us because none of us are brokers. All right, so that's all right. All right. All right. Let's let's just open it up. Anybody have any kind of questions to this? So far, no, it's cool just to see him do his thing without interrupting, because I kind of get the gist, like if he was talking to someone, I mean, his users, like he's doing business development like, you know? Yeah, hardcore, it's awesome. He is doing hardcore business stuff. Steve tharp, you had something you say. Yeah, when you were talking about creative services as a means to an end, when you're going in there and you're pitching this, you know, obviously they're going to want these creative services. Do you act as a mediator of that or do you refer that off to other people? Well, that's a good question. We do offer creative services internally. So between the art director. My my partners and I, we offer creative services, but we also work with subs. So I have positioned myself in a way to say, listen, I'm almost like a general contractor to creative services. My job is to make sure that the quality of work is good, but more importantly, that's it's aligning with your goal and you know, ultimately your customer. So like, that's what I care about. I care about your growing your business. I don't care if the color is green or you're yellow, right? Me personally, and now and I'm a designer, I went to design school. But I know that these people don't like they don't. A lot of them don't value that, that creativity. What they're looking for is someone that really can get deep into their business and like, find areas for growth and opportunity. That's like one of my favorite phrases. And it's not about reinventing the wheel, maybe complementing what they're currently doing. You know, if I can find ways to complement what you're currently doing and help you grow your business through creative or design thinking. As Chris would say, then, then we're winning. But ultimately, if I'm not creating something that's in line with consumer behavior, both of us have failed. So to me, the most important thing is alignment. I always approach it coming into like that. When people say they want a website, I sometimes ask why or what's wrong with your current website or tell me more about your business, because that's really I think when people are saying, I want a website, what they're saying is, I want to grow my business. I think a website is going to help me get more business. But the truth is like the website is a means to an end. Now, of course, our websites are going to look beautiful and the user journey is going to be incredible. And all that stuff like that is a given. But I don't care how pretty it looks, if it's not performing or doing what it's supposed to do, then we failed as a team and you and I are a team where we're going into, you know, a partnership, right? I want them to think of me almost as somebody would think of an attorney. If these guys are thinking about doing outdoor advertising with, you know, whatever clear channel or whatever outdoor advertising you guys have out there, I want them to call me and say, hey, Aaron, I'm thinking about doing this man. What do you think about that? So if I position myself early on as a, as a, as a consultant, that's how our relationship continues is that I'm a consultant, I am a trusted advisor and the creative part, I'll look at it and say, no, this is not good, right? You can't use this. This is not in alignment. And it just looks like you're communicating to the wrong person. I'll tell them that from a creative standpoint. But I mean, when people say they want a website, what they're really saying is, I want more business. So I think that they're asking the wrong question. I think they're assuming they need a website, but they're there. Really don't know. Sure Yeah. Hey, Steve, I love the question, and I like the fact that you even ask the question because it almost sounds sounded like during the pitch. He didn't want to do that work, right? Yeah, that's kind of the vibe that I got from him, right? Yeah you know, that's a very strategic thing that he's doing. Of course, he wants to do the work. That's where he gets the rest of the money. But what he's saying and what I will help articulate because Aaron is kind of full bore sell mode right now is that. He knows they're talking to other people, so he wants to differentiate himself as far away from those other people as possible. So he's like, oh, if you want that gun, I'll give you a number. Like, I'm not even afraid of you calling them because I'm way ahead of this thing. I'm automatically puts everybody else who's having this conversation was with the client at a disadvantage. You have to remember you're not the only person they're talking to. They're considering many other people. Mm-hmm OK and so he's purposely doing that to say, like, yeah, I'll even hire those people if necessary. My game is so on point. I don't even talk about that anymore, because that's like first year. That's that's a mute point. You're right. Yeah, you're totally right. All these subconscious things to kind of diss the other company. That's really what he's doing. Of course, he's going to pick up all of this work. And of course he's going to do it all in charge or whatever, but he's got his cell at a strategic level. I mean, he is almost an. Martinez going to back me up. He is almost doing every single thing that we are doing just in a Aaron Pearson style. But everything that I've been teaching Alan and some of the other guys that I'm talking to is exactly the same focus on the business goal. Move away from the designer because the designers easily replace. All right, I'm going to turn you back on unless there's another question, so from time to time, I may interrupt, so look for me waving my hand here and I can't hold onto me open. Let me open this up over here. This is really helpful for me, and I appreciate you going through this. But going back to how you're developing the business and how you even got this referral is based off of content that you generated because you're basically setting yourself apart as an expert in the industry. And they have seen I probably podcasts or books or anything like that. I was just wondering the content that you're creating to set yourself apart as the expert? Is it geared towards the your clients or is it geared towards creative people in the creative industry? It's all branding related. So I consider myself like a brand strategist, so like my book. Spending like a boss know this is brand dominance, how to create a disruptive social brand. This is a number one bestseller on Amazon is about how to achieve brand dominance and how to create a disruptive social brand. I have another book out that's like podcasting essentials and and that includes, you know, the equipment that I use and strategies for getting on the front page of iTunes and all sorts of other stuff. But everything's branding related. My podcast is called branding like a boss. I'm actually breathing. Abbreviating the like a boss into branding lab, and season two is coming out pretty soon. So I just continued last. Yeah, because like a boss is cool too. But now people are using it like all the time. So I'm like, well, it's La b, so I'll just, yeah, do that. I like it. But yeah, did that answer your question? All my content that I create is typically branding related and related, talking to the client, not to designers of how to do technique or anything like that. Correct yeah, this is all for people that want to build a brand. So companies that want to build a brand now a designer could pick this up and use this as a selling tool. Designers could use my digital course. You know, I have a $200 course online that I also monetize off of. I have a few different streams of passive income from all this content creation. That's something that if somebody wanted to build a brand, they would buy it. If a designer wants to use that to sell branding services, they would buy that. So like, it works both ways. Got it. But here's the thing, man, this that thing isn't for everybody, like I'm extremely extroverted, it's easy for me to get in front of a mic and a camera and make a video, you know, like, it works really well for me. I can't say that like, everyone can adopt it, but I think it's worth trying. You know, if you're not extroverted, writing a book is great. You can do it on Amazon. You can self-publish for nothing like this book to print. A proof of it costs like $3 right? And then to put it up on Amazon is free. You just got to just got to take the time to like, learn how to do it. To hit bestseller status. I have another strategy guide that I'm putting together for that, because any one of you that write a book can get bestseller fairly easily. If you're leveraging the Amazon platform, but that's another conversation. And then you have that, you know? But I remember Chris saying a long time ago, he's never gotten a job because of awards, right? And I don't know if I've ever really gotten a job or, you know, gotten a big deal because of this. But I'll tell you what, it's one of the best business cards ever. When I'm pitching a client, I give him a $20,000 proposal. I'll send him a book, you know, with a business card inside of it, and it gives them my philosophies and, you know, my core values and what I believe and what I want for my customers and it helps. This thing is the coolest business card. I want to add something hold on. OK I'm not as fit as some of you guys, but I'm more fit than a lot of you guys, but I'm going to run in the Spartan race this weekend. And Lo and behold, something comes in the mail and check it out. It's a Spartan fit book, and I was like, what? All right, fine. And it's like, you know, it says it's $24 and establishes the credentials of the CEO. You can't believe like he's like, he's running ultra marathon. He's done an iron man, he's done all sorts of things all within one week. It's really about establishing who he is and getting you to believe in the organization. This is the why. Right? so what Aaron is saying, it cost him $4 to create his own version of this. And so he just sends it out. Now this is a little bit more polished and you know, it's hard cover, but the idea is the same. So be thinking about this, guys, because there's a lot of people in this group that are introverted that cannot talk and sell like the way Aaron sells, use whatever tools and gifts that you already have. And true, the reason why I was asking the question, too, because both you and Chris are creating content as ways of getting your name out there. Chris, your content is more geared towards the design age, the design industry. So you're talking to people like us, but it's setting yourself apart as an expert. So clients are picking up on that content and seeing that you're qualified to work with their brand and you're creating content, but it's more geared towards the end user of how to build the brand. So it's the same kind of strategy. So it's similar to different. Yeah, somebody eating cutting something on a plate and you guys have great content. You guys could create content for whatever. I mean, if you create apps, you know, talk about like, you know, you can create a guide on how to, you know, wireframe an app right with a whiteboard or like, I don't know, disruptive, you know, the top five disruptive app ideas of 2016 or something like that to give people other ideas or inspiration. I mean, this could be a this could be a deck, you know, like I could use. Instead of creating a book, I could have created a deck, right and put it online somewhere. The idea is just to provide value as much as possible up front, constantly. And I actually got so burned out on the podcast, I was like, how do I end this thing? So I decided to call it season one, and now I'm starting season two because everyone's like emailing me and saying, I want you to come back like, we need more. We want you to come back. So, you know, they asked, I'm going to deliver, and I've actually got a really cool plan for season two also. So I'm going to get back into this because I know, I have a 9:30 pitch. So OK, next we. OK so step one is brand audit, and I'm going based off of my process. Step one is brand out, so I talk a little bit about that. Step number two is the brand discovery. This looks very similar. You guys should, you know, I could go into this, but essentially we identify user profiles, user stories, actually the journey. Yeah, this is core. Yeah, 100% core right here. And you know, the brand discovery process covers six areas and is conducted in your office by our leadership team. We do this in person. OK, in person is key. That's the key to building more value. That's the key to being like, Oh man, I want this internet sensation in my office. I'm not an internet sensation, but I'm an entertainer. OK, I want this internet taner to come in my office. I want to see this dude right. Like all I see is, you know, I see his post, I see his podcast and see all this stuff like, yeah, you know, I'll pay, I'll pay money to have them come. So I think that this is like a huge value is doing it, doing it like this. Now I have a client in New Zealand that we're going to have to do this digitally, and I'm trying to figure out the best way to do it, to give them the best experience. I've done some digitally, but I prefer to do them in person. It's way more value. So this process is conducted in a two day period, four hours each day, totaling eight hours of brain discovery. This is the second step of our vitals process. We do like two or three people from the team who's asking the question, you know, just my finger covered them like this. You do that in person with a couple of people from your team. Yeah so ideally it would be Mo who is on this call, Mauricio Chavez and then eight in. So it'd be this gentleman and this gentleman, we do them and the roles are OK, technology. OK, Gotcha. Yeah, we both tag team it. You know, it's a tag team effort. We've we've actually experimented conducting core, but we've added a lot of our own stuff to core. So like I was doing things similar to core before I bought it. Then when I bought it, I just added it and rolled it in and it was extremely complementary. In fact, out of all the things. This is my personal opinion. All the things that core provides, I think the brand attributes is the least important. Even though I thought it was the coolest thing at first, I was like, oh, that's the coolest thing, right? Like, and I get it. It's really important, but all I really care about is the customer and aligning with them and then creating creative executables through the goals and prioritization that's like, really important. The brand attributes allow me to come up with the right copy and for us to really, you know, find their voice right. But I don't use it for the, you know, we serve blank to blank like it's cool, but you could spend, you know, two hours doing that when I could talk two hours more about your customer. So that's just me personally. But I think the deck is frickin' amazing. And yeah, we've been rocking it. So step two is brand discovery. And I talk about this, you know, listen, we don't claim to have all the answers, ok? We listen, learn, discover. Our solutions are tailored to target your audience, so I will never come to you and say, you need to do this. I don't work and operate out of theory, right? The things that we execute are tactical. They're strategic. There's meaning behind it. There's a reason why we do what we do. And I don't have the answers. I've actually I just sold a discovery and told them, I don't even know what we're going to do for you after that. I have no idea. I said, how is that? You know, I'm selling you something you don't even know, like, and they're like, well, how much is it going to cost? I don't know. know, I said, I said, but I'll keep it between this price point if we're talking about just building a website. How about that? I said at the max, amount of money you might spend is 10k, and we're talking about like a three page website, OK, but the maximum amount of money you'll spend. So I said, don't think of this as a $5,000 discovery. Think of this as a $10,000 investment and starting to partner with us. So next step through creative execution. Now this is an actual project, right? So this is all the stuff that we're selling. This is all the stuff that they're getting for, and I'm getting to the price because I haven't talked about the price yet, but this is all the stuff. They're getting a front end website, training and consulting when we build a website. We do WordPress video training. This is something that our clients like a lot. So if they want to know how to update post, if they want to know how to add images or whatever, as long as it doesn't exceed an hour worth of videos, we will do it. So we like making these videos. We try to encourage them to train somebody in their office to make their site dynamic, to add blogs, to continue to add content and build the site up as much as possible. And we provide them the know how to do it through recorded training sessions and we'll do them live and record them. Or we'll just record them and put them up on Google drive, and they can have them for whenever they want. Video production, you a culture. Video now here's a strategy. I want you guys to know this amount of work really isn't that much work. OK, we itemize it out to build value, to show them, wow, there's each one of these is a step, right? Like every single one of these is a step. Every single one of these is like an itemized list is like an itemization, and there's almost like there's a cost evaluated with each one of these. So like, at database creation like that pretty much happens when you upload your WordPress site to a hosting account. You know, if you're familiar with that, right? Like, but we itemized it out because we're trying to build value. It's not really lying, I guess, but it's more like we're just building value. It's happening, even if it only takes a second. I try to put it in there. You know my question, Erin, on this because you told them we really find out what exactly we're doing after core. So this itemized scope is just tentative. So, so check this out. So that example, I'll show you another deck in a second that is that we're like, I don't know what we're doing afterwards. These guys said, we need a website, and I said, we don't build websites. I mean, we build a website as a mean to as a means to an end, right? But they wanted this in the proposal, so it allowed me to pad and add more. This is a $17,000 proposal, right? So I was I had to do what they ask in this respect, but I had to build value in step one too, because all they wanted was three. Does that answer your question? Yeah they also talk about video production. I sold them that on top. So I said, listen, I said, you know, because we do pretty damn good videos like they're very emotionally connected with whatever audience. So like video production is something I really enjoy doing. And I said, you know, one thing that you guys need to have on your About page is a culture video. So we really want to showcase the culture because in real estate, what real estate is lacking is an interesting culture. Most of the stigma is that they're all used car salesmen. So we're going to break that by showing somebody a picture is worth a thousand words. A video is worth a thousand pictures. Ok? think of that. So video to me, is one of the best mediums for creating an emotional connection with your target audience. The website is just a place to display it, so I did sell them on that. Like, that's something that they wanted. These guys love. Video so the first project I did with them was actually a video. It was a Drunk History parody. You guys know what Drunk History is. Yeah, OK, so it was a Drunk History parody, one of their taglines is and this is how cool this company is. Their tagline is legally selling joint since 2007. Right? so I did a Drunk History parody of with weed, ok? And like this guy's first home buying experience, it was pretty funny. So they're progressive. They're willing to do, you know, crazy out of the box things. And you know, this culture video is not going to be like funny. It's not supposed to be like that. It's really supposed to impact the person that wants to get into the industry and is looking for the right brokerage to team up with because agents. They need a leader. They need someone that can train them. But they also want to, like, feel like they're a part of a community. And that's what we're trying to build and portray. So I know that that's a weakness within the industry. So I'm leveraging that here. So if you know weaknesses in whatever industries you guys are working in, you know, leverage it, come up with a solution beforehand and maybe you can talk to them about it. But I mentioned it. I said, you know, how does the culture video sound like, you know, we really want to change the stigma. They agreed. So there was a little bit of probing. There was a little bit of a suggestion only because I knew that it was something they would probably go for. And then, Yeah. Sorry, I didn't mean to interrupt. No, it's OK. So when you itemize your scope like this and I've done it kind of both ways. One of the most common objections that I've had to overcome is, OK, what can we do with the budget if we take out the word presence, training and keyword optimization because my cousin does that? Mm-hmm Yeah, that's a great question. It happens all the time. Here's my trick. I don't put a number to each line item. We've got before in the past. And then we're then we're literally looking at each line item like, OK, how are we going to fulfill this thing, right? This is a big line item, and I don't do that. I just say, listen, this isn't like those things are included. Those are things that we write. We're going to do them anyways. The big chunk, and I'll get to this in the end, and I describe what it is they're paying for is they're not paying for the website, they're paying for the strategy. They're paying, paying for the business development. That's what they're paying for. They're paying for us to help them achieve that goal. And this is what it's going to do it. And unfortunately, like this is our minimum level of engagement. That's a Chris Doe right there. This is my minimum level of engagement, unfortunately, like if you know, if and if you're not able to participate at this level, listen, it's not a problem at all. I'd be happy to refer you to somebody that'll just build you a website. I have no problem doing that. Like we're not and I don't say we're not hungry, but in a nice way. I say, like, we're extremely busy, we're extremely selective on who we take on. As a client. We only work with 10 people, you know, and every quarter is a little bit different. So, you know, right now we do have availability to work with you, but it has to be, you know, at a certain level because if I say Yes to you at a low level, I'm saying no to somebody else that really needs this and understands the value that we're providing, right? So for every yes, I say no to somebody else and yeah, you've got to pay to play. You know what? The funny thing is, Aaron has yet to read the win without pitching manifesto, so he's getting the third hand knowledge because I read the book and then I pass it on to Aaron. It's hilarious. He bought the book and then he left it at the beach or something like that. But here's the key concept here. You notice how many times in engagement in the speech process he's tried to kill the job. Blair ends killed the job 3 times. It's your job to try and kill the job and walk away from it Three times and then end any kind of resistance. He does the old retreat and follow. He retreats to see if the client will follow. If you want a website, I got people to refer to. If you want that, then we're not. If you want to just pay that, we're not. So he's always retreating to get them to engage more. All right. He's not pushing, he's not chasing. Then he's using the old Emily minimum level of engagement. I've been taking notes on this deck, so I will provide this deck to you guys at some point. Shannon, this is Ali. You mentioned something. One of our posts that what you said, wait till you hear this story. I took it off the table. Was it pretty much what you just said right now? that how you went? No, this was after that. After that, we had another call because this is not a contract. This is a presentation that I send to them. Then then we do another conversation and I say, OK, listen, I need to hear from you within a week. We have a few other projects lined up. I don't want, you know, I create a sense of urgency and a little bit of scarcity and let them know like, listen, if you're really serious about this, we need to do this before we go and do a brand audit in New York or in Portland. I mean, I travel all the time doing this shit. So like I need to know, I actually do need to know. It's not even like a lie. It's like you need to tell me before I go to New York, you need to tell me before I go to New Zealand or London or whatever, you know, like I need to know. And yeah, I try my best to create that, but it's on the phone call. They said, you know, we really just I don't think we need the brand discovery. The woman, actually the sorts of husband and wife, owner jk as Jason and Kay as Kayla. Kayla is like, listen here and this brand audit scares the shit out of me. I just feel like I'm going to be standing out in a crowded room naked. It totally exposed. And I said, it's not like I'm going to be running through, you know, rummaging through paperwork. I said, this is exciting, like, this is fun like this. You are going to get so much from this you don't even know. And I said, and your revenue, I said, most of the stuff is public information. Anyways, if I got on armless, which I mean, because they're a real estate company like, they have to put their numbers up. I said, if I got on there, I can figure out what all your agents production is anyways. I could figure out your revenue without us going through and doing this. I said, but really what you're doing is you're renting me as a business partner. And I keep going back to this idea of like, you know, that's what you're doing. You want me, you want my strategy, you want my knowledge and my experience. This is how you're going to get it. Then I answer your question. Yeah, the story that you took it off the table, Yeah. Yeah, I mean, yeah, so Oh yeah, so long story short, I they wanted to x those things out. I said no. I said, you know, I just want to help you guys. You're right on the brink of really doing something amazing, I said, but I'd be happy to refer you to somebody if you don't want to align with us, like and that's totally fine. Like, there's no hard feelings. You know, we can still chat and interview each other on live feeds and stuff like that. But like, yeah, I just said, I just said no. And I think they respected that. But, Yeah. Thanks that's my story, I mean, that's really it, and I and and it's not that like and I have taken it away a few times in this presentation, but they. But when it came down to them signing, they're like, you know, can we just do the website? It's just we're not a web development company. You know, you would be totally under utilizing us. You know, it would. It would be. It'd be like going to a dentist to have brain surgery, right? We don't do that. All right. So the next slide, I get what you're saying. You know what I'm saying? Yeah, dude, it's like going to neural psychology or something and having to file your fingernails or something or whatever. Yeah, it's just totally like you're totally under utilizing us. That's not the type of work that we do. And the other thing is, that's not the type of stuff we want to put in our portfolio. We don't want to be like, oh, look at all the cool websites we designed. We want to be like, hey, we took this company from this to this in one year, you know, and then I want to write an article about it on ink, right? Because I'll feature them like, I can do that. Not everybody can do that. But like, that's the kind of stuff that I want to do, and that's where a lot of the value comes from. So hey, mindful of the time you said you have a call at 9:30, so what time do you have to wrap up here? I do. I got to wrap up here. I'll let you know. I'll let you know. Yeah, like 20 minutes. Yeah I mean, I can manage your time in case there's more interesting dialogue versus going through the deck kind of thing. Yeah, but how do the decks different differentiate from each other? Well, one's just so. One is this is an actual proposal, which is the whole case study, which kind of prompted this call. The next is just the discovery deck. And then the other one is like this weird hybrid of a guy who can't afford discovery but wants a website. So I found a way to add discovery and a website for lesson or for 5,000. So you wanted to say about the last three pages and before, yeah, I'll do it really quick. Then I just do a little culture video slide. I give them two examples of videos that we've done. I go over the price. I let them know that, you know, this is how we do our above figures divided into two payments. This project right here is phase one of getting them onto a $10,000 a month retainer. So that is our main focus is 10 clients $10,000 a month. That's our focus. And then the last page is our leadership team. These these are my partners. These are the people that you would be working with. You can reach out to them if you have any questions at all. Blah, blah blah. OK next is my discovery deck, and this is very similar a lot of the same slides, so I don't need to go over every single one. Same quotes our process in the discovery. That's just the discovery. Eight in the process. I mean, this is core. Again, it's the same, the same information that I did. I throw the agenda in there because I want them to know that it's extremely organized. This is a very interactive process. This is done live. We don't mess around. Here's our fee payment schedule. Here is our leadership team. Ok? now, one thing I do say is like after the brand discovery process is completed, please allow two weeks for your brand discovery decks PDF to be generated. So that's part of what they get is that as well? So this one, I just sold one of these yesterday and it's out in Portland. So I'm taking a little bit. I mean, whatever, dude. If I can do a discovery with somebody for 5,000 spend a couple dollars on a plane ticket to go build value and essentially turn that into a $20,000 project, because I earn that, I'll do it like. To me, this is not a loss at all. This is a huge win. So next was this guy and this one's I'll do this really quick because it's the same deck, but he's like, man, I really want a website and you know, he's all over the place. He's actually a real estate agent who I said I don't like to work with, but he has money. He's a really he's a big top producer. And so I tried to find a way to add some strategy to it. And again, same slides. Primary objective, strategic objective. Our process, I just cut it down to brand discovery and creative execution. I avoided the brand audit because he's trying to build a new thing. He doesn't need an audit. He doesn't have anything to audit his audit to zero. His baseline is nothing, right? And here's an itemization of scope. We're doing a front end web development, a little bit of identity design, logo business card. I like to include tangible assets sometimes, so I include 1,000 business cards printed with the business card design so that they actually get something tangible. They tend to really like that. Email signature design. I have a whole podcast episode about why an email signature is important and how to use it as a call to action. So I pitch that for a minute. We don't have to go into that. You can listen to the episode. Social media graphics three platforms lead magnet design is a must. Every single person that we talked to generating leads is there. Number one is our number one goal. They want email addresses. They needs are equity. All of this work 5 grand. Oh my God. And we'll do a call after this about what? Yes, Chris, that's all I'm like. Shouldn't there be another zero? doing a lot of work. It looks like a lot of work. It looks, it looks like a lot of work. But dude, like this is you've got to like for me, I'm telling you and maybe you guys, you know, you guys might hate because like, I don't I hope I'm not devaluing what you guys do. But this is a realtor that does not want to spend a lot of money, but I know I can get him for at least 5,000. And to me, when you're looking for revenue and your own a business, it's my obligation to my employees to make sure that I can pay them every Friday. So if that means that what? I know how long this is going to take because I've done it a million times and I know that we can do this in less than a week's worth of time because he doesn't value these things like other clients do, like a broker does, he just doesn't value them, right? What he values is, is the strategic partnership, you know, your client's really well. You know that this dude which you don't love, but you'll do the job if he's got 5 k. So what I would suggest, Aaron, is you just pull some of the scope back. You're doing too much. There's too much in here. All right. We'll talk later. Ok? all right. Actually, the very important thing that I'm thinking about already, it's like, how does he? He's obviously this guy is working hard. He's like, got it all. Like, really, he's this guy, the broker or Aaron, Aaron, Aaron. And my one, I'm wondering, how does he start getting blind level engagements or at least split the difference and move towards that? I mean, is it just like, is it different clients like because you could do the same work and definitely charge more? Is a different kind of client, and if used in front of a different client. That's right. OK, so we can talk about that on another call. I mean, plotting to move to Los Angeles and we got other things that we're not yet ready to kind of surface right now. OK so part of this is the market that you're in. If you I the same. That was my next question. Where is he? Where are you at here? I hate this market, man. I'm in Phoenix. So like I said at the beginning, Paul, this is a runway to get to our ideal client. This is not our ideal client. This is an industry that we had an amazing body of work in that we are going to just rape and pillage, OK, until we get to the place that we want to be at. So like, this is just a means to an end. And you know what? 5,000 I mean, this is done. You know what I'm saying? So like, it's and it's not to devalue because I hate that I have an episode on that, too. Nobody at least, I'm going to say this. I am. There's no judgment here. You're a business owner. You got to do what you got to do relative to your market. When we're saying, that's a lot, that's a lot of work for this amount of money, someone is going to say, that's a lot of money for this kind of work. It's all we're at all. Nobody's here to kind of judge, OK, I want to be clear about that. Yeah, no. And it's all good. I think you make three of these deliverables disappear and you charge the same amount and nobody would bat an eyelash. Now what Aaron is doing is he servicing the real estate market and he and I are talking about this. And the funny thing is there's a guy that I've been talking to in New York. I said, go after the real estate and he's starting to close real estate jobs. He has no experience doing it. So real estate is one of these spaces where they need stuff all the time and the level the bar is really low. The amount of innovation is like nothing. So anybody that comes in and tries to do something different, it's going to stand out. If we're doing this exact same thing for La brokerages, he would add, you know, maybe three or four times the amount, not quite. Add another zero, but, you know, three x, maybe four x, but also costs three 4x to live here, too. So that's kind of, yeah, there's a shift there. Yeah, that's Yeah. All right. So I just want this is the one thing to highlight really quick, and then we'll open it up for questions altogether. So because he can't afford discovery and I'm not going to do a huge discovery process with him, I positioned it as too one. Our brand discovery calls where I do like a mini core, where it's mostly just listening to him and asking him questions about his customer and then putting that into a deck just while I'm on the phone with him. So it's like essentially two hours of invested time. This is subbed. You know, all the identity design stuff is subbed out. I get business cards super cheap because I have an agency account. This is stuff that we can do pretty quickly. Like I said, so like, but I have to sell strategy no matter what happens in any part of the lifecycle of my project like strategy is what we do. This is just a means to an end. So, OK, I got a question for you, dude. Yeah when you say that, I always have to sell strategy. How long have you taken that position that you always have to sell strategy? Well, since so the first company I owned, I sold a few years ago, and even back then it was always about it was always about strategy. So it was always that even when I was in design school, I had a company and, you know, but I even though I was doing business cards and like logo design and things like that, I didn't sell like the logo design, their business card. What I sold was like an interaction between a customer, between my customer and then their potential customers. So a business card is not to me, it's not a design, it's not a card. It's a touchpoint for that, for my customer to have with their customer. So anything you have or create, you can sell it as strategy. It doesn't matter if you create apps, you can say, I don't I don't create apps. I create experiences for people on their mobile device, right? That's strategy. It's just spinning it off into strategy and not an asset. OK, so how long since the beginning forever, dude? Yeah how many years? Roughly three since 2003 so. Yeah OK. Is there a difference in the way you sell strategy as you understand it today versus then? Or is it has always been the same? Oh yeah, it's totally evolved. I mean, absolutely. Yeah, it's totally evolved. I mean, since I've joined, you know, school and core and been engaging with you, it has evolved every single week. It seems like it evolves. And when it does evolve, I immediately put it into a deck or I add it to my pitch. See, I just want to practice this pitch. I want to be doing this pitch as much as humanly possible. So that I master it. I don't want to be good at it. I want to be fricking great at it, right? I want to master it. And I do talk fast. And, you know, like the way I presented it to you guys is very similar to the way I present it to them. I'm very passionate about what I do that shows through not only in my work, but in the way that I communicate to people. And I think they get excited, you know? But I also they also get kind of put in their place a little bit. They're like, oh, OK, Yeah. And so once you make all these assets, what are you after? It's all done. What are you charging on the monthly basis after that point? What are you selling them on? So a lot of what I'm selling them on is content creation and distribution and syndication. So like, for example, one of the real estate brokerages, we started a podcast and it was a way for them to train their agents to keep their agents inspired. You know, that was one thing that we did in a podcast. You know, if it's a video podcast, it just depends. How many days is it? Is it seven days a week like one guy? We had seven days a week. It was 100,000 a year, you know, so it was a couple of thousand hours a week, but his shows were like anywhere from an hour long to 20 minutes long. It really just depended. But we would do the video production. We would then strip the audio and then upload that as a podcast, and then we would transcribe the podcast. And now he had a blog content. So from one medium of content creation, which is video, we were able to then strip it down for all three mediums. And then what we do is we would, you know, publish that, refine it, syndicate it, iTunes, stitcher, Google play, YouTube, their blog, whatever, and manage all that for them. So ideally, they would come into my studio. I have a studio in Phoenix is five different video. There's video studios and then audio recording booths in here, and they would come in like once a month and we would record all their content for that entire month and one day. And then our job would be to distribute that out every day or every once a week or whatever that is. So that's a huge part of our business model is like people would come here and then create a ton of content in one day and then we release it once. Now that's one thing, you know, some of it may be ongoing ours. Some of it may be consulting and coaching. Some of it may be, you know, training their agents. Some of it may be like building a back office, like a proprietary system. So like we've done back office training platforms where they have to log like their agents would log in. And then there's videos that we would create on how to write a contract in real estate or how to deal with spuds or work the MLS or build a WordPress site or I don't really whatever you'd like. Our goal is to really just get so involved in their business that they couldn't imagine going to somebody else. Like first, they'd have to explain everything that we've done, which is it would take them days, you know, and then but we're like, yeah, that's kind of one of the big things that we provide on an ongoing basis is content creation and distribution. Cool Thanks for sharing that. Mm-hmm And for 5,001 on my customers off you what I said for 5,000 like what you were doing before, I might actually have my customers just say, you know what? Just go to Aaron because we'll do. We don't want those man. That's that's I mean, that's an agent. And you know what? The only reason and I'll go a little bit deeper in that story. That guy was a referral from jc, so I felt obligated to kind of give him a proposal and not just pawn him off to somebody else. But I mean, honestly, yeah, I guess if you really want to, I'll just, I mean, sub it out. We work with a lot of subs, so like it's not uncommon, there's only three of us in the company, but our ability and our output is a lot because one of them, which is aiden, he's our project manager. He runs. He manages all of our projects, all of our subs and everything else. So I don't have to worry about that. I'll have to worry about bringing revenue in the business. So you're kind of like, position yourself like, we're not you're not a designer, so to speak. Or, you know, you seem like you want to position stuff more as a strategist. But what is your kind of go to? I mean, you went to art school, your design, your designer right at harvard? Yeah, Yeah. I mean, I've won awards for design. Like I love design. Absolutely I love typography. That's what I mean. I wouldn't even know that, which is not. Yeah, because people don't get it. Do we want them to feel like design is the most important thing in the world? And we want to talk about learning and tracking and you know, and all this stuff that's like so important, but they don't get it, and they never will. They still think that, you know, the Dallas cowboys, blue is an attractive color, you know, to paint their walls. And it's like, maybe I don't know whatever, but like, there are certain things that they just they just don't get and they don't value. But I think what they really care about is growing their business, and we do that through design thinking, I just don't have to tell them everything that we do. You know, they're just like, well, that looks so awesome. It's like, yeah, because we're fucking designers. Of course, it's going to look awesome, but like, like, does it do what it's supposed to do? Right, right? Well, times that we got, I got seven minutes. That was awesome. I'm literally going to get off the call and just repeat everything I just said. Well rehearsed then. Yeah yeah, guys, it is a question coming in from Sean. What time do you show them the rape and pillaging slide to rape and pillage inside, man? You know what? I'm working on that, you know, it's I'm saying, I say that because it's really what I want to do to this industry. I'm not very interested in it. I just unfortunately know so much about it because I've had so much experience in it. But it's not my passion. Like, I applied for a job working for a Volvo ocean racing. I wanted to be an uber, which is an onboard reporter, which you pretty much sail around the world with Volvo and all. There are different sailboats, and it's literally around the world for like 13 months creating content, videos, photographs, writing, writing content like that to me. Like Chris asked a couple of months ago on the group, what is your perfect day look like? My perfect day looks like being in another country or another place. I've never been with a camera in my hand. That is a perfect day to me. And if I can make money doing it, that's what I want to do. So that's my goal, right? That's that's my goal, and I need a runway to get there. So yeah, I'm going to I'm just going to hammer this market as much as I can because it's just where my reputation is right now. I'm just leveraging the things that I know as much as I can. Any other questions for Mr pearson? Hey, this is scary. Gary, you have to turn to the camera. Hey just getting it out. So if you have, you do this proposal. Where you're doing the priorities to figure out the scope, do you then have a third meeting to go over those goat pages and the price pages? No, we FedEx them a contract with our seal of approval. We actually have a nice little seal. It's another touch point. We FedEx them a contractor. We send a career over with a contract, also with signed NDAs. They're really worried about us sharing their trade secrets that aren't really that secret, but we send them over one anyways. And then I call them, and I'll either meet them at their office or they can just send it back. But at this point, they're the ball's in their court. They're either going to go for it or they're not. But either way, I'm talking to five other people in the next day, so I'm not going to let get me down. When you're doing the prioritization right where you're trying to figure out what the execution part. And you don't have that ahead of time. That's what you're finding out in this discovery phase. You won't have those slides are. Are they in there? Do you do another third meeting with them to go over that, to go over the price and stuff? No, no, what I mean, what I showed you is the exact process, this initial process, if you've been on the whole time. So like this is all I do on that call. Is this the goals and prioritization is done in the actual discovery, but I have to do like for this person, I had to do a little bit of discovery with them on the phone because they came to me with a need here. And we need a new website. So then OK, they need a new website, but what do they really need? They need, you know, step one and two of my process. More so, but I have to build in the website because that's what they contact me for. Did that answer your question? Yes, thank you. OK it's really great to see the energy that you put into all this, and it really sounds like, I think for me, it's like I'm dealing with cold leads. Mostly, I don't get that it leads, you know, it's like you have a whole system in place that it's already feeding you warmer leads and that is a whole other. I mean, that's probably a huge part also. I mean, obviously, you're an amazing spokesman, but and this is probably a discussion for another call. But could you maybe tell us in a few minutes like maybe your process of how you just generate warm leads based on all of the content you create? I'm still working on it, dude. It's so difficult. I mean, if you go to my website, which my primary website, it might look weird on this aspect ratio because I'm on a 27 inch monitor, but on. This is how I generate leads. Aaron Pierce. Com is where my podcast is hosted, so this is my the site I was just on was our agency site. This is my website. This is where you can learn about me. You can look at listen to my podcast. You can see all my products, my best selling books, my online course. Look at my work consulting or hire me to speak. And I didn't even talk about the user journey. That was one thing I wanted to show you guys on the website because I created a user journey that was extremely intentional for this industry. But I mean, this is how I capture leads people. Subscribe to my unofficial official newsletter. I have a free brand audit mini course, which is on a pop up on the individual episodes. Let me see if I can go down here. I'm a professional failure. This is the season finale of season one. So if you go here, so this right here, this little pop up, check out our free brand audit mini course. This this is something that generates leads and it's really just, you know, it builds my list. It allows me to build my list. I do email marketing, so I nurture that list. I send them updates. When I travel, I send them, hey, this is where I'm going. You know, if you want to do a meet up, let me know. I mean that is I could talk about that for hours. Like I could give you guys names. I feel like there's a huge lever that we didn't even talk about, which is like really giving a lot of this momentum, which is awesome. Yeah I mean, here's the thing I have not mastered the predictability of generating leads. I'm working on that like I want to know. I want to know, how can I leverage LinkedIn to get more leads? Like, right now, I'm just very reactive. I have a lot of momentum going around my personal brand, around Aaron Pearson and everything that I'm doing. And dude, I just get people on the phone as quick as possible. If I can get somebody on the phone or meet them in person, preferably meet them in person and they have a need or want. There is some possibility that we're going to do something together, or they're either going to refer me business or we're going to do business. It's very yeah, it's just I don't know. My closing ratios are pretty high if I have somebody with a want or a need. Well, OK, go ahead. It's time, Chris Tye. Yeah, it's time to go. He knows his own time. I'm just going to say this out. We can all talk about how to get these leads, but I'm pretty sure you guys are not selling the way Aaron is selling or not all of you guys, some of you guys are. And how absolutely not. We're not. No so let's focus on what we heard and saw and how you could use that versus like adding another layer of stuff because it's a tendency to add lots of stuff on top of what we already have to do. So look at his deck, look at how he's selling, how he's talking about his work, how he's applying. Basically, almost All the principles we've been talking about in this group in the last couple of months. Master that do that and up your content marketing game. OK because I have a quick question. OK, go ahead. Who is it? It's John. Hey, Aaron, what's up? What's up, dude? Yeah so hey, man, I would say content creation is your main thing. But my question was, you know, how long have you been doing content creation? The content creation, so for me personally, building my personal brand has probably only been within like the last year. Before then I spent time building other people's brands and then I dedicated at the beginning of this year, I kind of dedicated myself to those three things that I told you earlier on building my personal brand. Making sure the quality of work coming from us is at the utmost level, the highest level possible. And bringing in revenue. So building the brand is something huge. Where's my camera? See this right here. This is my next digital product, my next digital course. It's a personal branding course. Again, it's not for designers, it's for anyone who wants to build a personal brand or build authority. So like, I am constantly working on the next way that I can provide value to the internet. You know, I don't care who, you know, if they have, if they have questions about branding, hopefully they can read my book. You know, if they wanted to try to conduct their own brand audit, they can take my free mini course, if they want guides or checklists on how to start a podcast and how to dominate iTunes. I got it right. And then every time I do something I try to like, catalog it like this right here is an artifact. What we're doing right now is providing this is a value to Chris. Chris can use this content that we're doing right now. All your questions and leverage it. So any opportunity you can, you can take to leverage whatever you're doing and provide value to somebody else. Do it. You know, I should be recording my sales calls. I should be recording my sales calls and doing something with them. You know, I'd have to bleep things out, but again, it's content. I'm spending the time doing it. Why not share it and leverage it? Are you just I mean, just echo Al UK on time, dude. It's 932. I mean, yeah, mau mau, can you unmute yourself? I know you're on here. I don't know what the deal is with our appointment, but let me know. I see him on here. Is there? Yeah, yeah, here. How you doing, guys? Hey, man, good. What's up? This is my business partner, Mo. How are you guys? Nice to meet you. I'm good to meet you. Yeah could you give me your let me mute you, dude. Hold on. I want to meet and blown is now. There we go. Go ahead. Uh, Yeah. Do you want me to try to push it back or push it back a little bit? I mean, power, if you think it won't. Yeah, take him off, dude, like, yeah, that's fine. I don't mind staying on here. I'm sure he'll be OK if we push it out a half hour. All right. Right you know, that'll give us a little bit more time. And if we have a few minutes, I would like to show you guys the user journey because if you guys want to stay on and see that, because that's part of my pitch is that we create a user journey for them. OK, let's go back vitals. So all real estate, all these people care about is what's the end result like? They're like this. I saw this project that you did and I love, like, I love what you did, and they just want to see the end result like they don't care about. You know how that happened, necessarily. They want to see the results. So we were very intentional when creating our website to show two main things. They can either look at our work, which is the end result of what we provide our customers, or they can look at our process. And I go through this with people on our sales call the only take an hour because I talk so fast. And then I let them ask as many questions as they want. I'll stand with them as long as I need. So the journey is this home page. They're going to go to our work now. When they go to our work, they are going to see companies that they know. We're in the real estate industry, like in this real estate industry, these two companies right here are one of the top technology companies within the real estate industry. So I've done video production and brand development for both of these companies conversion and big purple dots. So as soon as they see those, it's like validation, boom. They're like, Oh man, we're talking to the guy that works with conversion. We're talking to the guy that we're big purple dot like conversion has, you know, almost 100,000 users big purple dots of CRM for real estate. It is automation and text message marketing and all sorts of stuff for the agent. They have like over 200,000 users, so the videos that we make for them and the stuff that we do is seen by, you know, probably every realtor in the United States and outside. So on our work page, we immediately look like the least risky option, right? This is what Chris says. We look like the least risky option. So we talk a little bit about conversion. If they want to go deeper, they can view the project OK. And on the project page, we actually ripped this and we did. We ripped this design from tbwa, which is like one of the agencies that I absolutely love and admire, not necessarily design, but I really liked the layout. I liked the way they had their button and the way they showcased this right here. This is tbwa portfolio page. This was our inspiration. I printed it up. I put it on my wall and we designed based off. No need to reinvent the wheel, right? Like, I just wanted this website up because I'm trying to generate revenue. So I can get to my goals, which are being in another country with the camera in my hand. So on this page, I talk a little bit about the customer story. You know, the portfolio isn't just an image, it's not just like we go into a little bit of the treatment, the brand treatment, right? So we wrote all this content for each one of our customers. This is another sales video that we did. We also did all the back office training videos. So when somebody logs into their platform, these videos here walk them through how to use their platform. Step one you know, if you're a realtor, go here, do this, do that, and these are all motion graphic stuff. Chris, you might dig that. And then I shot and produced these videos here. So if you want to see some of our video work, these are pretty cool. So our user journey is step one. They want to see the end result. You know, let's look at the work. Let's look at the body of work. And step two in the user journey is, you know, what makes us unique. So how do we produce this? Like, how do we get to this end result? Well, it all starts with our process, right? We create contagious cultures for brokerages, so our process is the same. This is the same information in my deck, right? This is the same thing. I just copied and pasted it, but it's I'm showing them that there was intention behind the way that we did. This step one is a brand audit. We do the brand discovery, then we do creative execution. What's next in the user journey as well? You want to work with us, you know, all this discovery form. So this discovery form then takes them to this lead capture, which gives us some information. And prompts us to schedule a call. And that is our user journey. Now that's not all that our website is, but that's the journey. That's the journey that I want them to go from A to B. And this is the same thing that I want to create for you or from my clients, right? I want to create a journey. So what is your ultimate goal? My ultimate goal is to get people to fill out this form so that I can get on the phone with them and have a conversation about their business, about their goals, about their needs and their wants. Now, if they want to know more, we have a menu. You can look at our culture, right? You can see who we are. Our company is that we're a New York based company. This this whole company was conceived out in New York when we were doing a branding workshop. Here's our leadership team. I have a couple of quotes here from. Aiden, you know, you think having a professional brand strategy is expensive, try not having one. You know, so each one of these are just whatever kind of quotes is just nice design, but it gives them an idea of our culture. Actually, when we get together in the next few months, we're going to shoot our own culture. Video because we do so much video production, I think it's silly. We don't have any on our own site. But yeah, so I mean, our sites design, I think it's designed beautifully. There's not tons of chunky content. It's just very assertive, very to the point. You know, everything we want them to do is really just fill out that discovery. We also have a blog which we do work like we create content. This isn't like, you know, we don't just have a blog with like a post from, you know, months ago, like, this is stuff that we actually work on. So five common real estate broker branding mistakes, you know, and this is all about real estate related stuff. We do have a lead magnet here. This actually needs to come off the site. But yeah, so you know, and this content here, this blog post will syndicate onto on to LinkedIn pulse. I may even repurpose some of this content for Huffington Post because I contribute to these other articles. The reason I got these contributors statuses because I wrote a book, so these things kind of feed into each other, right? And then I have to manage leveraging them as much as possible. But you know, the site, the user journey is what I wanted to show you. You know, it's like essentially a three step process. It's our work, our process and then getting them to fill out the discovery form if they want to know more. They can. But it's not part of the journey. Because it's not important. They don't care. I mean, they might not care about the blog. They might not care about our culture. Somebody might. But I know that all they care about is the end result. How do I get more business? How do I get more real estate agents? Well, here's an example of what we've done for other people and have helped them grow their business. And the way we've done it is by our process. And the way to get to the process is to first schedule a call. So that's our journey. It's like super simple, but they love it. And then they look at the site and we're like, oh, we love the site. We want to do something similar. How much does it cost? Like, hold up? So that's what I wanted to show, you guys. Was I a mute the whole time? No, you weren't. OK, good. All right. Erin, I want to thank you for your time, this is awesome, Ashley, you did me a solid because I'm still, as you guys can see, I'm still recovering from whatever I got. I think I might have bronchitis or something. I'm going to go see a doctor, but I actually want to transition a little bit. We're usually in the off the official record kind of thing like really, we're programmed to do an hour and a half and the conversations could be a little bit more casual and less structured. So I'm going to demote you for a SEC. Yeah, let me do that. Other stuff. All right. So you guys all want to get back into sharing something with you. Where are we? Have you used fuse before, aaron? No oh, OK. You jumped into it pretty quick. Yes, just one webinar program another. It's not gigantically different, right? Yeah, OK. I miss. All right. So I took some notes, guys. So let me just do the quick recap here. And maybe it's not exactly great, but at least then you have some version of this. In case you weren't able to take notes as fast as Aaron was talking. So as he was talking, here's what I put down. So anybody still in the call content marketing and build warm leads and referrals, establish expertise, have social proof, he wrote articles for Huffington Post. He wrote a podcast guide, authored books, case study. It puts him above the clients, which is where you want to be. And he said something I can't reiterate enough is don't give any advice, stay in the diagnostic phase. And he said that very clearly. If you listen back to the call, he said that loud and clear focus on the client objectives, not deliverables or executables in Aaron's language. What he was doing was which he kind of glossed over. But he and I have talked about this before. He's using the old Trojan horse thing, which is a gift that's not really a gift. Where he said, you know, I want to interview you. I like what you guys are doing. You're very disruptive brand in the way you guys don't wear suits and ties. I like that. Maybe we'll write a HuffPost article. And then so that seems like, oh, that's a great PR opportunity. And then he just pivoted right to. Well, now I can help you with this thing I've established. I'm professional. I know how to get things done and get you exposure. Is that kind of it in a nutshell, aaron? Yeah the Huffpost article was not really meant to do that, but it did tip the scale in our favor for sure. That was a strategic plan, then. Absolutely yeah, it works. It can't work. That's how you can actually turn a cold lead into a very hot lead. And I like the terminology he used and used it quite often, which is just like, you're leasing a partner and you don't have to give me equity. So you get all the upside of someone who really cares about your business with none of the downside. You don't have to live with me. You don't have to actually give me a cut from here and out, and it's really trying to get them to frame. And he's used a couple of pretty good metaphors too, like the contractor and I'll hire the subs and I'll make sure it goes well, that kind of thing. So that was really good. And he says, do it in person, if possible, whenever possible. My only one comment to that is I like that. I would just want you to make them pay for it because I want them to pay for pure strategy. Everything else is on top. A lot of high end consultants and strategists, you've got not only have to pay for it, but you have to pay for a first class flight plus their spouse, plus first rate to hotel accommodations. And that's how they do it. That's how you get them committed to believing that you're the expert. They've gone through all the, you know, the your checklist of what they have to do in order to bring you in. So just to recap here at minimum level of engagement. A retreat and follow listen to the old shows archives killed engagement three times, he's done that expertly. Regardless of how these leads came in, he's doing the playbook exactly as prescribed, and I think that's why he's getting the results he's getting. OK, we're ready. Did the q&a? I think Kerry had questions about cold calling techniques, but we're way deep into this thing to even broach that.

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