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The Futur Content Creation Process Breakdown Pt.2

#
91
Matthew Encina
Published
December 3, 2018

The biggest tip I have for all of you guys is to slow down, just slow down your thoughts and slow down your words. Chris does this all the time. If you watch them on the Livestream, he's not quick to answer. Sometimes he will be very quiet.

Read Transcript
So, yeah, just so we have context today, we're going to be talking about content creation. I'm Matthew insein, I'm the chief content officer over at the future. I'm also a creative director at blind and I've been running the content team now for the past year and a half or so. And my responsibilities really are to direct the team, figure out the content planning of what we have going on. Work with sponsors, potential sponsors and get some sponsors on board for our material. And also review a lot of the educational stuff that we put out. So our goal today really is just to talk about and answer your guys' questions that you had sent over previously about content creation. So I sought it out and I scraped all the stuff from Facebook. I did the ones that were upvoted the most at any time and feel free to interrupt me. You guys, if you have any questions. I mean, the group is fairly small, so I think we can have a good discussion around this. But I want to start with Anthony's question here. Anthony banks, his question is, Anthony, are you on? Oh, it's not on man people asking questions and not even showing up. But I know. All right. So I'm going to answer, I'm going to ask and answer his question anyway, because I think there was more than one person who upvoted this thing. So Anthony banks asks, I'd love your insights on low tech live streaming like Instagram or Facebook. I feel like I have a handle on producing content the traditional way, but I'd like to hear from your experience with creating more frequent, less produced spontaneous content, tips and techniques for handling questions in that live audience element. So we do a lot of live streaming over at the future, and the one thing I will say and I encourage you guys all to do this is that live streaming is incredibly liberating. I know that sounds kind of crazy, but the idea that you can't edit it, you can't perfect it. That's the liberating part. Whereas if you're doing pre-recorded content, it is sometimes paralyzing like I was just mentioning a few minutes ago when I'm talking about my own pre-recorded content. There's this striving for perfection. And that can be paralyzing sometimes versus if you just turn on the camera. If you go low tech and it's live and you're unapologetic about that, it's incredibly liberating. So that takes it out of the way because you can't edit it personally. I like doing Instagram streaming. I don't do it a whole lot. But the thing about it is because it's just on your cell phone. It's super low tech expectations already really low. So if it all sucks, no big deal, you could always delete it and it only lasts for 24 hours anyway. So I'm curious how many of you guys have done Instagram Live streaming? You can comment or just jump on, but I was going to say, like, I like it because it's very conversational because you could bring somebody online very easily. And you can just have a conversation. I've seen Melinda, do this quite a bit on her own. Instagram Chris is starting to do it, and it's super chill just because you're just having a conversation with somebody. It's really good practice for speaking, and it's very forgiving. So that's personally why I like Instagram streaming. But we also do obviously a lot of Facebook and YouTube streaming, and our YouTube streaming is a little bit more high tech, a little bit more high fidelity, and we can get into that because I think there were some questions around that specifically, Peter was asking. But I wanted to move to this next question here or next part of Anthony's question, which is how do you handle live questions? How do you handle the audience? And I'm assuming I mean, he's not on here right now, but I'm assuming the reason why he's asking is because. And I was this way, too is like, what if somebody asks you something that you don't know? Won't you look like a fool? And I'm just assuming this is what he's thinking because I've had the same fears, right? And maybe somebody can bring up a challenge here, but how do you handle life questions? And the biggest tip I have for all of you guys is to slow down, just slow down your thoughts and slow down your words. I think that's the biggest thing for me when I get really excited like we are right now. My words per minute seemed to rise up just because I have so much energy. I'm so excited to share this with you guys, and hopefully my brain is in sync with my mouth. The problem is, if somebody throws you a curveball and you don't know the answer to that, you have to do a couple of things. First, be transparent. Say, you know what, I don't know if I have the best answer for that, especially if you don't have it right off the tip of your tongue. You could also be very transparent. It's like, you know what? Let me also take a moment to process this because you ask a very good question, and it's going to take me a little time to process it. So give me a second. Chris does this all the time. If you watch them on the Livestream, he's not quick to answer. Sometimes he will be very quiet. And actually, it makes the other person a little uncomfortable because they're trying to fill the dead space. But Chris is not like that. He won't say like, you know, and he won't try and talk his way through something as he's trying to process the thought. He processes the thought first before it comes out of his mouth. So he's really good at that, and that's something that I've had to adopt myself. So if you don't have the answer to something, be transparent, give yourself time and slow down your words because your brain moves a lot faster than your mouth. And sometimes it takes a while for this to get processed before it comes out properly. Here and then the last tip in terms of the audience, when you're dealing with a live audience, I think it's very important to call them out, shout them out. If they have questions, call them out by name, say like, hey Mary, that was such a great question. Or, hey, bob, Bob has a question in the comment section below. That way, it feels like you're including them, and it doesn't feel like you're just talking to somebody else or just talking to the screen without any engagement. The more you call out the people in the chat or anybody who's tuned in the better it feels. It feels more like a much more engaging experience, and the barriers are down now. I'm connected with you, the audience and the audience is connected with the maker or the speaker who's behind the camera. So I think that's very important. So let me pause there, because those were three things that I talked about, about being very liberated when you do live streaming because it removes perfection. We also talked about how do you handle life's questions, be transparent, slowing down. And then lastly, to make sure you engage with your audience. So let me pause there if somebody wants to come on and ask any follow up questions on those. I've got a I've got a question. It's a technical question. I was I really enjoyed Christmas live stream was Bonnie on Instagram and the Livestream on Instagram and was top to bottom. But I noticed Christmas video super high quality, great sound and it in his home studio. Do you know anything about his technical setup? Was it all done from his iPhone or does he have a mic connected to his iPhone and/or does he have a camera connected to his iphone? How did he do that Instagram Livestream that day? Right I would probably have to follow up with Chris on the exact specs, but I know that we have all the gear to make your little iPhone maximize in terms of its output. So if you go to our YouTube stream, there was our YouTube channel. There was a video called The studio tour or the future party studio tour. He did it all with his iPhone and what he had was a rig on there. And he had a mic that was attached and that was all on his iPhone. Even though it was low light, the quality was really good. I was very surprised that they were able to run a whole live stream on YouTube through his cell phone over Wi-Fi. So my assumption is that he used similar gear. A high quality connection through Wi-Fi. An attached microphone like a small video mic from road, probably. And some kind of rig either to Mount it on a little tripod or something like that. But yeah, like if you I think the most important thing, regardless of what camera you have, whether it's just your cell phone or not. I think the most important thing is connection and lighting. If I turned off all of my lights right now and just use this very poor available light right now, everything is going to get very grainy. It's going to look so ugly. It doesn't matter what camera, really, it's going to look very bad. But if I have all these big lights that I'm blasting right now, even on the cheapest phone, it's going to look amazing. So lighting, I think, is something that is very important, and all of you guys, if you're looking to stream, just go next to a window and use the best soft box available, which is the sun. Matthew, how are you doing? Yeah hey, what's up? Doesn't make a big difference from your experience if you show your face or just screen the screen basically like your software. Yeah or maybe putting the small box on the corner. Do you see a lot of difference? What do you recommend there? Yeah so here's my take on that, and I feel like people get bored just looking at a static image. So as long as something is moving on screen, it's a little bit more engaging. So for YouTube, it's a little different. YouTube people are there that kind of will sit back, and it's more of a passive experience where they'll spend 5 to 10 minutes on a video if it's really good. The thing is, with other platforms, for instance, like Facebook and Instagram, you probably have 1.5 seconds before somebody is going to swipe past you. So with that, I always tell my team if we're doing any kind of cut Downs for Instagram or Facebook, something has to be moving right away. We cannot start on a static screen because somebody is going to think that's just an image, it's not a video, and they're going to scroll right past it. So something has to be moving right away so that it will give me a reason to park and watch more than three seconds. And then I'm right. So that's really important to me. I just think about user behavior on all the different platforms, YouTube, it's not as important, but I tell this guys the same thing. Try and start on a face. Try and start on something that's moving, and let's not try and start on a graphic or something that's still OK. Awesome Thank you. Yeah, you're welcome. I might have another one, if I may. Yeah, so actually, it's pretty much what I thought, especially since our last live stream because there were a couple of questions when I was going through the comments that we couldn't answer during the live stream. So I was wondering if there would be a way to answer that. And I don't know how to reach out, especially to those people that put in specific questions during our live stream. However, I would love to answer them, but I don't know first how to reach them, like how to specifically answer the questions of each one. And second, what do you think would be the best, best platform to do that? Would it be like an offline recording on that I put on youtube? Or would it be like a Livestream thing or was there? What do you reckon? I see to answer the questions that have followed up from a Livestream that you've done so in the comments you have or during the Livestream that we didn't have time to answer because there were a couple of. Oh, Gotcha. Yeah, so what you could do is you could do a follow up live stream where you just screencap all of the questions or copy all the questions and just go in order, just like I'm doing right now, where I've already scraped YouTube. And I'm looking for the questions, I'm just trying to answer them in order or what I felt the most confident or most valuable to answer. There's other things you can do as well if you want to answer them. You could do an. Chris used to do this back in the day on Twitter, where it's like, OK, for the next hour, I'm going to be answering your questions and then you could start seeing some of the questions first. Like so and so Peter asked this question, and here's my answer. Right so that's another way you can do it where you can take that offline. You could just record it in that live stream. And just like you're reading the answer, you'll see there's a video that came out today on our channel about project management that was just answering a question that we got on Instagram that we were answering on a webcast, and we cut that down and then made that a YouTube video. And we're just answering a question because we thought it was a very common question that we saw. So there are ways you just scrape it. You could follow up. The cool thing that I've heard, and I don't I haven't tried this yet. But on YouTube, on the platform, which you could do, is if there's a comment in the comment section of your video, you could reply with a story. You could reply with a video. That's what I was told from our YouTube rep, but I haven't tried it before, so I don't know how that works, but I'm sure like if somebody had left a comment there, you could just reply with the story and it will show up in your story. And I don't know if they get notified, but that's very interesting. And I know they're evolving the platform because while YouTube is a very powerful platform, it hosts all of the videos in the world and it's the number two search engine in the world. It's not that great for community where I feel like things like Facebook and Instagram. The community is much stronger there. There's a lot more discussion going on versus YouTube. Things tend to get lost and you don't have full-on conversations, at least from my perception or my pov, right? Cool thank you. Cool can I ask another question? Yeah OK. While I'm doing I'm like, I'm setting up my page where I'm going to try to do a lot of tutorials and things like that. What what kind of style of videos do you recommend I do to attract my clients? I know if I do tutorials on how to do things in 3D animation. Like how to use a software. I'm going to attract a lot of different audience who may want to learn the software. Who could be potential competitors. What kind of work do you recommend doing if you're trying to attract clients. So specific to an animation studio? Mm-hmm So let me ask you, what do you what do you think the type of content you could put out there that would attract clients? So my theory is I want to show tutorials of how knowledgeable I am in animation and how animation can be used for marketing and then demonstrate my skills in the software of how I know all these different techniques and get amazing results. Hi quality results can be taken, for example, like a Nike commercial, then taking a segment of that commercial and breaking down how it's made to prove my ability, basically. But my question is probably I'm thinking like, are these potential clients even going to come and watch these videos? Are they even looking for these type of videos? They part of that audience, right? That's a good question. Do you think they are? I think some studios might. Probably you know, let's say a marketing person is looking to recruit an animator. They may look at Instagram. They may look at sometimes YouTube. But I feel like it might be a small percentage. But this is my guess because I haven't gone through it. Yeah, my perception is the same way because what you described is taking a commercial, breaking it down, and that shows that you can be analytical about something. But even if you were to recreate a bit, it almost feels like a tutorial again. Right so I think there was something that you said earlier that actually is a bit insightful, which is showing results. So not necessarily like, hey, I did this little thing and that now here's the result, but talk about the results in terms of the business, in terms of the client, in terms of the marketing power, the Roi on what it does. So you could do a case study where you say, here's a project that I worked on for a client. Here is the challenge. Here were the insights that we gained in the process, and here were the results. And that's any kind of measurable things that you can mention, so if you look at season one and two of the future, which was known as the school back then, Chris and Josie, they did a lot of breakdowns of projects. We talked about strategy very deeply. Here was this client. Here was their challenges. Here were the users and the insights that we gain from them. Here's what the output look like. Here's the style scapes. Here's the brand identity and then here with some of the copy. So they did a very thorough breakdown in a series of episodes that showed their expertise in that field. But what was very important there is that they showed how it's going to impact the business, not what. What are the pretty executables that we made from it? That was not. And did that lead to leads, did that generate leads for you guys? Yes Yes. Almost the last maybe two years or three years that we've been operating blind. A lot of the leads have come through the content we've made through the future like our last couple of clients. Ben is on the line, but one of the last clients. We just finished up with when they jumped on the call, you know, we were talking. And then after he emailed and said, you know, I didn't want to say this on the call, but I was kind of fangirling a little bit because, you know, we're talking to you guys at the future and like, whoa, what the hell? Yeah, I found you guys through the channel. And then when we went to go do a strategy session for them, we flew out to Texas and we brought a bunch of future swag for them. So it was like super cool that they found us through older videos. And because Chris had started putting out this content early on many years ago, and it's gained so much traction within the design community, the reason why we were brought in there was because this particular person on the team was the design lead. He was looking at our content to learn more. And he brought he talked to the c-suite at his company. And say, hey, we need to bring these guys in because they're experts at strategy. Awesome that's yeah, that's called inbound marketing, right, because we're not going out to them. They came to us because we planted a lot of seeds that showcase our expertise. So tutorials are still not bad. Like, I think it's good to show that you can do that. But the more you can talk about results and how it's impactful to the types of clients you want to attract, those are going to be more valuable. Awesome Thank you so much, Matthew. I kind of want to weigh in on. Oh, you got a little echo there, Ben. How's this better? Yeah, Yeah. All right. I think I believe that if you're creating social media content to attract clients, you're doing it wrong. I think that the social media should all about should be all about providing value to somebody. And you can engineer that content to attract a certain audience. You have no control over the audience that you actually end up attracting. Like, you know, stuff I'm looking at you. You're a very nice looking guy. Right? you could just attract a whole slew of people who just want to look at your face. It's true. You know, you have no control over that. And I think if you watch that first season of the future. You can see Josie talking about strategy, almost smell the desperation or smell the salesman in him that's trying to pull in a client for strategy. It was only when we stopped trying to engineer our content to attract a specific client that are channels exploded and that we actually started getting leads in. So I think that the motivation has to be providing value, and even if you're doing tutorials in a space or sharing your workflow or something like that, where you're attracting junior designers. Mm-hmm You're building an audience and the audience size is what matters. And having that community that you can tap into. You know, I think about people like Von gleicher, you know, Von has built an incredible audience just from, you know, him sharing his tips and tactics on learning Illustrator and things like that. And he gets work from that. But that's not the purpose of why he's doing it. He's doing it to teach. He's doing it to educate. And that's why he's so successful. And I think that we can attribute it a lot of our success to that, too. So I think if you just kind of reframe and share what you're passionate about. Be transparent about what you're doing in the day and instead of trying to use social media as a sales tactic, use it as more of like a documentary of what you're doing and how you're doing it, and just hope to build that audience from the ground up. Mm-hmm Awesome I really appreciate that. I guess I was just trying to find the balance between because I love 3D and I love teaching it, and especially when somebody somebody's asking a certain thing. I would love to dive in and show all my techniques. I'm not afraid to showcase what I know. I guess I was trying to find the equalizer or balance in between doing the business part and the personal and the passion. But right, I see what you're saying. Are you're saying like if you do it, all business is going to come off sales and it's not going to get you. Thank you. Thanks for bringing us back. And that's a good point, and I wanted to cite a few more examples on that because over the years that we've run blind, we've actually brought in specialists that we followed through YouTube tutorials, right? For instance, like there was a couple of years ago, it wasn't video co-pilot, it was somebody else from red giant who makes these plug-ins for After Effects. They always make tutorials. And so we knew this guy by name because we saw all of his tutorials, so we brought him in to help us work on a project. same recently. There's this 3D guy. David, are you. Really amazing at 3D and octane? I've head em up a couple of times for projects. We never sync on it. But the thing is because he put himself out there and I could see his process. I know he's an expert at 3D and he's one of the first people I might call for a very particular problem that I saw that he solves elsewhere, so I wouldn't discount the tutorial stuff, especially if you're working with clients to do that type of stuff. OK awesome, thank you, guys so much. Cool So let me jump for it a little bit, since that was content related and you were asking about what kind of content to make. Angel Acevedo, are you on here? Yeah, you're on here. So you had a question. As far as video content goes, what are the best outline and script practices to create a lean and informative video? And it's funny that you ask that because I think two days ago, I just wrote this out for the crew. So I think there are four things that I look for, namely three things, and that's the overview when you start. Three to five steps to break down whatever you're trying to teach, and then the last one is an outro. So let me break each of those three things down, so in the overview, you want to do these things, you want to start with a cold open, basically giving people either a hook or whatever the drama is about the video, if it's just more of a vlog style thing. But if you're trying to educate somebody, you have to tell somebody within 5 to 10 seconds. What this video is about and Mathew and Tina in this video, I'm going to teach you guys about project management and how to break your projects down. Simple, is that right? You just break it down, give it to them right away. Because the thing is, the way people use YouTube is just in time education. I just need to find the answer to my question. Remember, it's the number two search engine in the world. The other thing people go to YouTube for is entertainment, but we play in the education space and delivering value. So I want to focus on that next. After you tell them the overview of like, what the video is going to be about, the next part of the overview is to show them or tell them what they're going to receive from the video. What kind of value are they going to get? So if it's a tutorial, you might show them the end result. The end result is going to look like this, and I'm going to show you how to go from A to z. So you know what result you're going to get out of that video? The other thing you could do is like if you're trying to teach them a concept you could say at the end of this video, you're going to be able to. So you're making a promise to them. So people within the first 10 to 15 seconds know who you are, what the video is about. And what they might achieve if they're going to invest the next 10 minutes with you. Right and then after you have that kind of cold open there, I think it's important to introduce yourself, Chris mentioned this to us maybe halfway through last year, and he's like, you know, we get a lot of new faces on the channel and I like that. But the thing is, people need to get familiar with you. Even if you've been on the channel for a long time, it's really important to reintroduce yourself. So if you look on my personal channel, what I tried to do in all of my videos or will be doing is constantly reinforcing who I am and Matthew and Cena. I've been a creative professional for 15 years and I like to design right and make content. Right think about like, what are the how should you frame yourself, what is your little bio? That's going to be important to frame you as an expert in delivering this content for this video. You don't have to give your whole resume of all the things you've done right. Otherwise we would be there for five minutes if I listed off every project and award. I have one that doesn't make any sense. Just give them the brief overview and just curate what it is that you're trying to tell them and frame yourself in a way that's going to help reinforce why you might be the expert on that subject. Lastly, as part of the overview, you want to tell them, why is this important? So sometimes you can do some kind of anecdotal story or you can give them a reason why learning this information is going to be impactful for them. So you could say something, you know, maybe you have clients that don't pay on time. Maybe you have clients who don't. So in this video, I'm going to teach you guys how to get over that and learning how to talk to clients in this way is going to help you solve that issue. So giving them the reason why. So this is all in the overview. Hopefully, this has. Can lean in at that point once I know what it is, I'm going to get from this video. Who you are and why you should listen to you and why this is important. Those things are very important to cover in your overview when you start. Now that you have a clear concept that you're going to teach them through this video, just break it down in 3 to five steps, Chris has been reinforcing this a lot recently on the protocols. But think about it as a recipe. Recipes are the same way when you take a recipe in a book and me and Ben like to cook. I don't how many of you guys like to cook, but recipes are great because they show you what the final image is going to look like. And it looks beautiful. It's like, Oh my gosh, I'm going to make that amazing, perfect steak with asparagus on the side. There's that image that looks delicious. I want to make that thing. What are the three to five steps that I need to take to make that thing? And it's so easy to replicate. Right, so if you follow any recipe, it's very easy to replicate, so think about the thing you're trying to teach. If it's a concept that maybe you've been innately doing or it's kind of second nature to you think. Pause for a second if you had to teach that to somebody like we were just talking to Mustafa, like if he has to teach a particular effect in after effects, what are the three to five steps that somebody needs to know? Try not to go more than that, because then it gets very, very complicated. Just think about the big steps. Somebody needs to do to get to the result. So that's how you break that down. So that's the meat of your content, right? You have your overview, then you have the meat of the content three to five steps or things that they need to know in order to accomplish the result that you promised at the beginning. Lastly, you want to do the video outro, the video outro you. It's nice to recap whatever ideas you taught them in the video, and if it's nice, if you could do this, if you can give them something to act on, it's even better. So Ben had a little series A while ago or the past couple of months, the future challenge series where he'll teach you a concept or he'll bring up the pain point and then he'll give you a challenge. OK, this week I want you guys to call 30 people, just do 30 cold calls and tell me the results. Why that's awesome is because you are empowering somebody to achieve a small win. So now there's a reason for them to come back to you, too, because not only have you given them this concept, which might be a little loose, you've given them something to act on. If you give them something very concrete to act on that they can do and you know, they're going to receive a little result or a little whim. They're most likely to come back to you and say, hey, I tried that thing that you did or you told me to do. And you know what? I got two clients from that. I got two clients on the call who wanted to speak to me. That also drives up engagement if Ben does this all the time. If you have more questions about this, put it in the comment section below. So there's a little call to action. So in either case, just try and give them something to do. Don't make it completely passive where you're just another textbook, you're just another video on YouTube. Try and engage them and pull them in and have them give a reason to stay with you and to continue this journey with you. And then I think with the outro, it's also important to tell them what to do. Like comment, subscribe. I know it sounds kind of ridiculous, but people won't do that unless you ask them. I even do this in my blog articles. If you value this piece of content, do me a favor. Give it a thumbs up and share this with somebody because it really helps me out, and it helps me to continue to make valuable content like this for you. Right, and so if you do that little thing because it costs nothing to give a like, it costs nothing to give a share. But if you say that, that's going to be very helpful for you and they got some value out of the piece of content you just gave, then they're mostly more likely to reciprocate and do that very small favor for you. OK, so that was the outline for how we make most of our content. Start with the overview, then give them the 3 to five steps on how to accomplish what it is you're trying to teach them. And then with the outro, try to do a recap, give them something to act on and make sure to give them the call to action. One another way to look at this? Is called the CAR method CIR concept action result. So if you structure your videos like that concept action result, that's another way to look at it. It's the same it's the same information, but this is something that I learned because I'm taking a course about creating video courses, and this is something that I picked up from there. So let me pause there because I know that's a big thing. Hopefully, I was able to break that down for you guys in a clear way. But let me know if you have follow up questions there. This is great, thank you so much. I love the fact that you used the recipe just to even answer this question. It was very matter. I love it. Thank you so much. Right it was just three steps. I told you, here's the concept. Here's how you do it. Here's the three steps on how you do it. And then I give you a recap of that at the end of a call to action. Love it. Thank you so much, and I appreciate it. Yeah oh, Matthew, I got a question. Yeah so it's about blind versus the future. So you guys are from what I see. You guys are posting more and more and working more on the future and the Academy and whatnot. So are you guys, are you guys planning on moving away from blind and just on the future? Is that what you guys are planning for? Yeah, I will answer that, but I also want to pause right there and just say that if anyone has more questions about creating content in terms of the outline and what to produce there, I want to cue you up and make sure that I answer any other questions on this before we move on. So to answer your question sinica, yes, we are focusing 100% on the future and we're not really doing any client work anymore. Most of the client works, we're turning down or giving them some astronomical price to push them away. But sometimes even with the astronomical prices, they say, yeah, let's keep talking and we're like, are you? Are you sure we're like doubling our prices or tripling our prices and they still want to get on a call? Or like, what the heck? These guys are crazy. We don't want to do this work. So it's funny. The more you don't want it, the more they want you, right? It's like the very attractive girl or man that you're trying to go after. The more you chase that person, the more they. You know. Right, but that's and then it makes you lean in more right and you get more and more desperate, but the more you chill and like, I don't need you, then the more they lean in. Right? so that's the result of that. But we are really focusing on the future. Go ahead, Robert. Absolutely I can. Absolutely second that with what you said, but also like I had it in the past, like when, when, for example, if there's a project inquiry and you're not really into doing that, you're kind of like, yeah, I'd like to, but I would not die to do that. And then you just, you know, just raise the price and you just go like, mentally like, OK, so if they go ahead for that price, I will do that for that price, but they probably won't. And then they come back and say, all right, let's go. And then you'll be like, OK, well, so I guess we're doing this. Hey, we got a guest host there. Oh, that's so cute. I have a question for everybody. Hi, Christine, and what are you saying? Ben, I have a question for everybody. How many of you guys don't feel like experts? Can you raise your hand? I'm in gallery view so I can see everybody. And how many people like? Does it feel weird to get in front of the camera because you don't feel like you're an expert about anything? Yeah, so is it a good percentage of you guys? That's OK, that's OK. I still don't feel like an expert. And one of the things that I've done that helps me with camera presence and helps me with getting in front of people. Is by literally being OK with not being an expert, but just accepting that I'm going to kind of screw up on camera or that I'm not as smooth as Mr Matthew and Cena. And that's a big hurdle that I had to overcome. But when we're looking at structuring the content around somebody, that's not going to be an expert level speaker like crystal. The format that I like is looking at it as a challenge action and resolution. So if I'm the. Oh, I think we lost you. Because, oh, there we go. Let me just turn this off. I'm not dipping in and out again. OK, so if I'm the hero of the story, what I want to do is give myself a challenge to accomplish and see if I can do it. You can. You can look at this through like a creative lens, like, Oh man, I have to do a logo for a client. I don't know if I'm going to be able to get this done. And so inherently, there's a story there because there's a challenge. There's a gap between where the hero, which is you, where you want to be and where you are currently. And so instead of looking at it as more of an educational space, if you don't feel like an expert, take the people on the journey with you. And so, you know, like take them into the presentations by telling them the story afterwards. Bring them with you as you're experimenting. Share your crisis of what does Chris call it? Your the Dark Knight of creative crisis or something like that? I know there are those struggles because not only are you going to be seen as an expert, because win or lose, you're showing that you have a process and you're showing that you can tackle this stuff. But you're also going to be seen as more of a human and you'll have a more engaging story and people are going to be entertained by that stuff better. You'll also get a lot more empathy because you're showing your faults and you're showing the things that you suck at. And I think that's a if you don't already feel like an expert, it's a better way to approach content until you really feel confident in front of the camera. Mm-hmm That's straight out of Russell Brand essence.com secrets, and I feel like we've been blasting that book for the past three months on the Facebook group. So if you haven't yet, pick up that book. If you're interested at all remotely in marketing or funnels or anything like that, that book is gold. So examples of that, if you are subscribed to our email list, you'll see emails come out from us that are very much like this. Like Ben does a lot of these where it's like he drops you right into the drama. He's like, here, I hit a wall. And then he walks you through some of the challenges he faced. The epiphany. He had come to and now that he's come to a solution, he is providing that to you in terms of a product that we sell. So that's pretty much the basic formula of how we structure a lot of our marketing stuff. But bringing somebody along for the ride is an easy way to make content, especially if you're just learning. If you subscribe to Melinda's newsletter, that's all she does. She doesn't try to be an expert at all in anything. Yet people lean in because she's so transparent about her story. Each week is almost like a fail. Here's what I failed at. Here's what I suck at. I shot high, and here's how I failed. But here's what I learned. So taking you along that journey, you get more and more enrolled because you could resonate with that. A lot of people, they look up to Chris, but they can't relate to Chris. Like, dude, I don't run an agency. I'm not making millions of dollars. They're not billing millions of dollars. Like, you're ridiculous, man, that would never apply to me. We get so many of those comments in YouTube that would never work for me. But as soon as we have somebody who's in a developing country and say, you know, I used to charge $300 for my services, now I'm charging $15,000 for my services because I took this mental block out of the way. Then somebody in a developing country could relate to that person, that attractive character, as Russell Brunson refers to them. So you're right, Ben's really good at that. Being very transparent. There's lots of examples out there of let me take you along for the ride. Another person who's very prolific at this is Tim Ferriss. So if any of you guys are familiar with Tim ferriss, that's his whole thing. He's not an expert at anything. He's like, I'm going to be a Guinea pig for the next three months, and I'm going to learn how to get into jujitsu, or I'm going to work with this chess master and learn how to play chess like him. So he's just taking all along for the ride at every step of the way, and he's just sharing the lessons he's learned. And that's a great way to engage people and to be relatable. And I think the key here is timing and pacing. So what you don't want to do is to just have a meandering look at something where it's like, you know, an hour or two of you just kind of like playing around an Illustrator with no drama, right? You really want to look for that story. And if you're looking at how can I tell this in a really engaging story in eight minutes, six of those minutes is probably going to be struggling. And so the tendency for people who are not as confident, which is, you know, all me is, you know, you're going to want to share those wins. But really, that should only be that last minute. That should only be that last little bit where the story resolves and the bulk of it needs to be the challenge and needs to be that transparent feeling or struggling. That's what makes a great story. So I have a question, which is kind of in this line, so you have some taking tons of notes, so you have a time frame, right? And we're talking about content creation. There has to be some sort of calendar or I would think so. I like what Ben just said about Tim, you know, or it can't be just this meandering thing, but I'm also thinking it can't be a three month meandering. Let me take you on the jujitsu journey. You know, like you kind of have to do the journey and then come back and maybe you've filmed things while you were doing it. And then you cut back. But it's kind of like you're in magazine world. You work six months in advance. It's kind of like that. But that can be overwhelming when you're trying to still run a firm and you're doing whatever other side gigs you're doing. So can you talk about the scheduling part and because then you don't want it to be irrelevant when it actually comes out? Right? right. So I wouldn't focus on that. And I think we opened up on that earlier about the perfection, right? So we have a series that we've been filming at the future where we're taking on client all the way from the first meeting through strategy, through the branding process, through creating their website and a bunch of deliverables to eventually their brand relaunch. And we've been shooting that for the past year has not seen the light of day. Yeah, it's going to be so good though, guys. Oh my God. No, I don't hype it up. Yes Yeah. Yeah, it's going to be all right. But I mean, it's overwhelming because we have hundreds of hours of footage that we have to sort through and that we're trying to figure it out. And it is overwhelming. So I do not suggest starting that way. Absolutely do not. So if you're going along for this journey, what I recommend. Is just sharing once a week, start with that. And all I want you to do if you're doing this reflective process, let's say if you're not the expert and you're taking somebody along for the journey, this is the reason why I post in the group every week or it's a tradition that's been kept on is the, you know, Friday winds or weekend winds. What I want you guys to do is be very reflective about what it is that happened this week. What can you be grateful for? What were your wins? If you flip that, think about what it is. What did I learn this week and share that with somebody? I'm challenging everybody who's currently taking the business boot camp this season to be documenting their process because I know every week we're dropping freaking mind bombs, right? And it's very difficult to apply sometimes. But what I'm having them all do is try to document their process and share what it is that they've learned. Because what I know is when you share what you learn, you're more likely to absorb and master that information. If you guys are familiar with the learning pyramid and the different styles of learning at the very bottom. Lecture is or reading a book you'll retain about 5% or 10% of that information very low as you move up to more active styles of learning, like, let's say, a video, you'll learn you'll retain 15% of that information. If you practice it, you learn 40% to 50% of that information. But at the very top, if you are teaching that information, you're going to retain 90% of that information. And I've seen this over and over again. That's why Chris sounds so smart is because he reads a book today and he's going to teach it to you tomorrow. His goal is to learn, to teach. And if you guys get into that habit where you're just reflecting on what it is that you're doing and teach somebody just one bite-size thing and you start developing that habit, you guys are going to be like content monsters and you guys are just going to be able to generate tons and tons of content. And I told this to and Tina, when they were visiting us last year because they had the same thing. It's like, you know, I want it to be perfect. And we got to shoot this and we're shooting on the red camera like all this stuff is like, no, no, no, no, stop, stop, go live. Just teach one thing and then cut out it. We'll take all the pressure off of you, and all you're doing is teaching something that's very, very bite-size. And then if you start doing this once a week, just start doing it every other day and then once a day, if you see a lot of our stories like mine too, I try to teach stuff on my stories because I'm trying to experiment and see what people actually respond to. So this is a way as a test bed for me to figure out, well, should I invest in long form content for this? Should I actually spend the time to produce a nicer piece of content around this? So one example was I remember one day frank, she had sent me a message and he's like, hey man, how do you network online? I'm like constantly deeming people, I'm getting no responses. How do you do it? So I was like, oh, that's a great question. Let me think about that. And then I broke down my recipe water to the 3 to five steps, and I think it's still on my profile. So I went on my Instagram Live that live stream, but just did stories and was recording some videos. And I told them all the steps that I did gave some examples, and I put that out there on Instagram. It got such a huge response, like so many DMs back that I decided to do a whole protocol on that. So the following week or two weeks after I did a protocol on that and I think it's called networking online, I cut that protocol down and it's called networking online on the YouTube channel. And then I also use that as part of a talk. So when I gave a talk in the Philippines at the end of 2017 part of what I taught there was based off of this Instagram story that I experimented with first. So a small bite size of teaching one thing and then I realized how valuable that content was, and I started double Downing on that and expanding and making that a really solid piece of content that's going to exist on our channel, in the group and wherever else it's going to go. So, Dan, I don't know if that helped answer your question, but my goal for all of you guys is not to look at what we do where we're currently at. And try to just emulate that and compare your journey to our end or our middle or wherever the heck we're at. If you're just starting, just start and try and do something bite, Lo fi. Don't worry about the technology. Just get reflective. Start teaching and take people along for the journey. That helps a lot. Thank you. Mm-hmm I don't know anybody caught that really simple style escape I did yesterday, but I just did a time lapse of what I was already doing, so I just turned it on. It ran for two hours and I chopped it up in Premiere. It took me like 45 minutes, added some music in that sitting at like 400 interactions on Facebook right now, and 3,500 reach. And it grew my little page by almost 40 likes. So it was literally like, no effort at all. Yes and you guys are already doing this. So just record your screen and do something with it. Absolutely I want a plus 1 that because first of all, that was a dope piece of content because people like seeing the speed design people love. People get mesmerized, mesmerized when they see something go from beginning to end. Because you're leaning in the whole time, it's like, oh, is he going to complete it? Where is this going to end? And you keep leaning in because you want to see where it goes, especially if it's related to you or you do something like that. If you'll see some of the tutorials that we've released on the Academy recently, I experimented with one where I was just recording myself for two hours in the morning, designing a thumbnail for the future. And then after I just sped that up 10,000% or something like that, 5,000% And then I just recorded Vo over it. It's kind of like the director's commentary on your own work. So as I was watching it in premiere, I was just recording my video. So here was my concept. Here was what I started with. As you can see, I was struggling here. I picked all of these stock images and then you can see here, I started experimenting with this. I didn't like that. And eventually I found this. Here is my epiphany. And then everything was smooth sailing from there, right? And then you could see the final result in the end. So the cool thing about that is that follows the structure that Ben was talking about earlier. Because I'm telling you what it is I'm trying to accomplish. You'll see all the challenges I had along the way, but you'll see I eventually got to the result. And something like that is very nice because some of the comments were saying, it's like, oh, it's nice to know that you make mistakes too. Or you kind of wander around when you're trying to figure out what it is you're trying to design. So that makes me a little bit more human. So that's a really good tip by Michael, just record your screen. And if you want to, you could talk over it or just show that. I'm sure that there's tons of things that you guys do that you take for granted, but that other people would find insanely valuable, like the one productivity hack I have for email, which is like, you know, using email inbox as Mike to do list and keeping inbox 0 at sea. Happy, you guys are already leaning in. You're like, oh, what is this? Tell me about it. And this is just something I do every day. This is a very simple thing that like, it's the way I file my emails. But even small things that you do on a daily basis and you take for granted, somebody's going to find value in and by recording your screen, you may bring those to light. Mm-hmm Can I ask a question? I have this so about the thing that Ben talks about, about transparency and being open, taking people with you in the journey, I feel that that's a good strategy if your aim is to pivot into a content business. But I have. Some anxiety about this actually working, if your primary goal is to stay in service business that just reaches out and has an audience. Right, so if you follow what's the name Gary at all, he's like all companies have to be content companies nowadays. All companies, regardless of what you sell, if you sell doggie poop bags, you have to be a content company. That's his that's his POV. And the reason why is like, what's going to make you stand out in the market? Why would I work with you as a graphic designer versus somebody else as a graphic designer? If I look at across behance, everybody's work looks the same. I know there's hundreds of people that can do the work that I'm looking for. So what's going to be the difference between designer and designer b? If they're looking at competitors like, let's say, as blind as a studio, there's hundreds of other studios that do very competent work that looks just like ours. So why is somebody reaching out to us? Over the internet. Well, because they found us on all the different pieces of content we put out there, all the Evergreen content we put out there, the blogs, the videos. That's why we get these fan girl moments. I'm not saying that this is, you know, that we have the magic formula to figure that out, but I'm just sharing what's worked for us and the POV of somebody else who's very prolific in the industry, right? He's a content monster, but he has his own company, which is vaynermedia, which we still don't really know much about because the lens is always on TV. But he is the top of the funnel and clients who are CMOs at companies they lean in because they're like, dude, I want this because I like what he's saying. Look at all the views that he's getting and all the engagement on all of this stuff. He knows what he's doing on a personal level. I can't even imagine what would happen if I hired his company or hired him as a consultant. That would blow my company up. I that's my reservation like I really don't as a member of the audience, I really cannot relate with Gary at all. And the main thing that brought me to the future is that actually, Chris has this history and experience with blind, and it's a real thing. And I can relate to. That's much more being a content driven, I would say. Right, but how would about Chris if he didn't have content? That's absolutely fair because I enjoy the future as a member of the audience, and I can relate to that. I'm just I'm just trying to. To to say that while Chris has this experience, people can I think that if I show my journey and my inexperience and I, I'm trying to be more transparent anyway, this is something I'm working on at the moment, but I have this anxiety that this will actually bring a bit of the sort of challenge to my potential clients in that regard. Am I making sense? I was following you until the conclusion of that. So so basically, I'm thinking that that's sharing this journey of me trying to get better at lots of things might be possible clients that while Chris doesn't have this because he already had lots of experience before he started doing content creation. Mm-hmm So I'm still trying to follow, so your concern is how you come off to clients. Pretty much. Yeah, I'm thinking that if I shared more and more and more of this, I'm putting a seed of doubt in mind. Just just share it and just be yourself, dude, that's all you can be. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, I think I'm doing this. I'm doing lots of sharing, but I just, you know, not a constant piece of stress in my mind. Is this the right way to go forward? You won't know until you try. You just have to put stuff out there, experiment and see what works like you've seen over the past few years. At the future, we've evolved pretty dramatically, so much so that we've had to split up our channel into two separate channels because, you know, we started off sharing some strategy stuff. Then we got really heavy into design and then all the typography stuff on our channel blew up. It was crazy, like how many people came to our channel just for the design stuff, and I'm like, whoa, that's crazy. And then we did some money stuff that money talk, pricing creativity, whatever it was with junk that has like 1.3 million views now or 1.2 million views, something ridiculous. So we saw like we were experimenting with all kinds of subjects and we started to see a splinter last year and the splinter was, you know, we have this people who are still at the beginning of the ladder. And they're trying to figure out how to become a creative professional where we have creative professionals who already signed on and they need the high level stuff. Negotiation business. So that's why we split up the channel. And then there's everything in between that no longer sees the light of day. Right there was a couple of episodes that Ben and Stewart had done on the channel, or it was the movie poster design critique. We wanted to experiment with some stuff. Some of it tracks well, some of it didn't anything that isn't tracking well on our channel. I've curated and hidden all of those videos. So the beautiful thing about the internet and things like that is you can hide or delete stuff. And you could cure it after the fact, like my Instagram, I curated all the time, like I will post a bunch of stuff. And then after maybe a few months, it's like, you know, that doesn't look great, doesn't represent me anymore. I'm going to archive all of this stuff and hide it. So I think the whole point is you have to experiment and you won't know because there's no magic formula for anyone like we're sharing a lot of our experiences, what's worked for us, but it's not like we knew this to begin with. We didn't know what all the steps were, and we're just learning along the way. And we're trying to implement as quickly as we learned something new. That's why in the past few months, you've seen a dramatic shift in the channel 2 is because we all read Russell Brunson's secrets. That's why our email formats have changed. That's why the way we do webinars, which we never did webinars before. That's why it changed. And we're just experimenting with stuff to see if it works. So I wouldn't look at one or two points of data and come to a conclusion from that, you need to look at hundreds of points of data. Look what other people are doing, study and just implement an experiment and don't get locked into one way. Because even though I'm sharing formats with you guys, as soon as everybody does this format, it becomes stale. Right? Casey Neistat 10 million subs. How many Casey Neistat esque bloggers are out there? 100 some of them have made it like Peter McKinnon. Others have not. It's like, OK, it's another nice step fan boy. And now it's like anybody that does a format like that, they get clowned on because they're doing neistat style and it just it becomes the norm. So then you find other people who are doing things that are completely wacky and off the wall like Captain disillusionment. You should watch that guy. He's so weird. He's this visual effects guy, and he teaches you about visual effects. But he's in a costume. He has face paint on something so ridiculous. It might not be your flavor, but that's OK. He's experimenting. Same with Gary V. Even though he's not your cup of tea. That's fine, but to a large of his 90% male audience of 18 to 20 for like he's speaking for them and they're enrolled in what he's saying because he's like, grind it out, work hard, don't take vacations, work on the weekends like he just has the same message over and over again, and that speaks to a certain audience. So it's not going to be the same for everybody. Everybody has their own unique voice, perspective and culture for where they come from. By putting that out there, sharing and experimenting, you'll realize that there's an audience out there that's just like you and is going to resonate with what you have to share. So don't edit yourself. Editing yourself too much is the thing that's going to make you inauthentic and relatable to no one. I have a follow up question, if I may. Yeah and I think maybe it's a different way to say what Dimitri was asking is I feel like maybe some of us are feeling a little bit schizophrenic in the sense that we have this company that provides services that we want to promote. And then there is us and our personality and our way of viewing the world. And it, it seems sometimes hard to figure out how to align those two. It's one persona which makes a little bit more sense for the future because they're directly business models directly to make content. And so I think this is what I'm a little bit wrestling to in terms of this holistic strategy online. It's like, OK, what? Who's speaking? Is it me or is it my company or is it what my company? I want my company to be in like five years, if that makes sense. Yeah, I think you should speak from your own voice, and I want to share a story that Chris had brought up to me with at lunch. Maybe two weeks ago, we were having lunch and he had mentioned he's like, why do you think it is that, you know, five years ago, six years ago when we were building our social media accounts for blind? Why do you think we got such low engagement? And, you know, we were talking through it, and I came to the conclusion, it's like because we're trying to talk like a company with no personality. We were trying to show the work. We weren't trying to provide any value or teach anything to anybody. Then came in the future, we're all we were trying to do is provide value, just trying to teach stuff, and eventually those things started to align where if you look at the past couple of years, from the post from blind, then we started to be a little bit more transparent about our process. Here's here's the work we did for Anime Expo. Here are some of the insights that we learned. And then here's the result. But even so, I don't think that we mastered that. I'm not saying that we have mastered that for blind at all, especially because we have been leaving that behind because of our efforts on the future. But I think you should speak from your own voice. And the reason why I say that is because when we tried to speak as a company before and we didn't really know what our voice was as blind, it was very bland and we look like every other company out there. But as soon as Chris started speaking on his own behalf, on his channel, on his Twitter and LinkedIn, like people started coming to the company. As a result of Chris's thought leadership and his POV on stuff, so he was a lot because he was not under the umbrella of the company or wasn't so worried about how it might affect the company. He was just open about sharing his POV and his perspective, and he brought an audience in because he was able to talk unfiltered. So if we're one man band focusing on all the channels that have our names, rather than the channels that have our company names and work that first because it's just too much for one person otherwise to be like growing both accounts at the same time. Right? or if your company, just speak as yourself. That's totally fine. Because, again, like I'll go back to our emails, and even though you'll get an email from the future, it will say, hey, this is Ben from the future, and he's talking as himself. Or Chris will do the same thing, hey, this is Chris from the future. He's talking as himself. So I don't think that you have to necessarily look at it either. Or I think if you embrace who you are and you are your company, then you could speak from that voice. And I see this too in a lot of the emails I get. For instance, I use the service called frame to review videos and I get emails from Emery from frame io, and he gives us insights and shares what's going on with the company. A lot of tech companies, you'll see a lot of that, like the founders or the CTO. They'll send you direct messages through email and it's like, hey, this is so-and-so from this tech company. And you know, we had all these learnings from last year, and it's very personal and it's not like they're trying to put this front. think whenever there's a front, then that goes right to your spam. You're like, oh, this is another newsletter gone? Thank you. Yeah, quick question. Sorry when you guys create all these content on social media, I know you guys had blind, not the future. Did you guys purposely in the beginning separate the two? Or should you always present like when you create a channel, create that channel connected back to your company? For example, my company picks emotion, but the channel that I created is called moose 4D because I'm teaching cinema for the. I just keep my channel connected back to my company, or it's OK to separate the two. I, you know, I don't have a strong opinion either way. Obviously, the more things overlap and align with each other, the better, right? As much as your efforts. You can do where you're doing one effort and it's going to touch three different touch points. It's those are the things that I like to capture the momentum that you're going for. So let me try and put it in a different way. So I made this video about a desk tour of my office right on top of that because I already wrote out the script. I just turned that script into a blog post that same blog post. I cut out each of those sections and I made a kit for me to gain some affiliate money. So I put descriptions for each of the things that I did in there. So it was one effort, one big effort, and I chopped it up. And it's bringing in all kinds of different traffic or revenue for me on a lot of different avenues. So as much as you can stack your efforts, if you're doing one big effort, try and have it touch a lot of different things. So if you're making a piece of content, you could at the end push it to a course you're teaching or your company, like if you're interested in learning more about this. Sign up for my newsletter at here and then you can own that audience, right? Because when you're on YouTube or putting content out there, you're just influencing. But until you own the audience, until you have their email, you can't really do much with that, right? So it's really important, at least if you follow the Russell Brunson method, that you need to capture emails because you own that traffic. Once you capture that. So that was a long, kind of watery way to answer your question because I don't know that. I don't think that we necessarily thought about that up front. I think Chris was just experimenting with the school in the future as a different entity, and it just happened to be talking about all the stuff we did at blind. So whether that's the same channel or not, I think it's really up to you. That's just how we did it. Awesome Thank you so much. I have a question, I got a question. Let's give our enemies a spot here. I think he hasn't. He hasn't jumped in. So anyway, if you want to go first? Sure so similar to the kind of questions that were discussed a couple of minutes back about owning a YouTube channel under a brand at a client like within as a studio, I wanted to ask regarding what advice would you give for somebody who's like a traditional career track? I'm a designer in a big tech firm and eventually down the line three or four years down the line. Yes, I might have something on my own studio and something like that. So what would you say about content creation strategy for somebody who's like an in-house, like a UX designer, right? You know, and like the kind of legal ramifications that of like, you can't talk about your work and stuff like that. So you always are in the hunt of content that can consistently bring in the views. Yeah, that's a good question. I would just say talk about whatever you're passionate about, and there's a lot of examples that I've seen on YouTube. I can't remember their names at the moment, but they work at Google, they work at YouTube, and they have their own channels and they're just sharing their personal life, things that they're passionate about, and sometimes that's completely separate from what they do as a profession. They mentioned that it's like, hey, I'm a UX designer over at Google, but at home I like to work on my workspace. You know, I like to make it really beautiful, and I like to optimize my setup. So that's just something that they're building because they're passionate about talking about it. If you look at me like same thing, I have my personal channel and it's kind of related to the future, but not really. And I'm still trying to figure out what my content is there, but I'm just trying to talk about stuff that's a little bit more personal to me. But I couldn't necessarily talk about on the channel or doesn't feel right for it to sit there. So I'm just building stuff that speaks to me and just sharing what's on the top of my mind right now. And if you look at all of my blogs, it's kind of the same thing or anything that I write on, medium, whatever I've been thinking about at work, or sometimes it's not even at work. I write about that and make a piece of content. So for those of you guys who are in house somewhere again, just be reflective and talk about what you want to talk about. And you know, if you're under NDAs for certain things, you can just obscure as much as possible and just talk about stuff around it, right? Scratch around the itch, but don't scratch on the thing. So I don't know if that helps, but I've seen plenty of examples of people who do work in house and they are just sharing their journey. One example Charlie Marie if you look up Charlie Marie TV, she works in-house at a tech company. She doesn't really talk about her job at all, but she shares lots of stuff about design. Her process and web design look her up. She would be a good example to study, but there's lots of people out there who just have their personal channels that are tangentially related, but it's not directly related. They're not trying to teach you exactly what they're doing at work day to day. Another great example of guys, which is totally unrelated to what we do, which sometimes helps, right, is Becky and Chris. So Becky and Chris is a couple. They've logged all their personal stuff is very personal. It's about their house and stuff. But what you need to pay attention to is Chris's other channel called Dr. John and Dr. Chris. And they are radiologists, and it's some of the most entertaining content that I've ever seen about radiology and living that radiology life. And so they're both employees, and you care about them because you're attached to their characters. And I think that if I'm giving my personal opinion in the future as a whole because we are so many people, I think it's tough for people to figure out like, who's the hero here? Who can I align to? And they're either drawn to Chris or Matthew or myself. Whereas you see this, like Dr. John, Dr. Chris is two dudes, both radiologists. They're very, very similar. You're just drawn to that character. And so just be yourself. I think Michael Dishman just said something about that in the chat. Just be unapologetically you. Mm-hmm Yeah, that's a good example, too. Yeah, Chris and Becky's awesome. And it's very different from there, from the main channel to this one. Very different flavors. Same person. But they're sharing different aspects of their life. And I think Chris had talked about this on a YouTube episode or maybe even in the group where if you look at yourself, you are a spectrum of light. All right. If you're fully yourself, it's white light. But if you split that up as a spectrum, there's all kinds of shades red, blue, green, orange, yellow and sometimes in different settings. You're going to show certain colors or you're going to show your red and yellow in client meetings. You're going to show your blue and green when you're at home with your family, and the more and more. You can get comfortable with showing the entire spectrum to somebody or a good amount of that spectrum. The more you are yourself, the more people can relate to you, and the more you'll feel comfortable in your own skin and all the situations. So lots, lots of ways to look at this, but I think for a lot of you, just start, just put yourself out there and don't try and edit yourself. Because the more you edit yourself, the more bland you're going to be, and the more you're just going to join the masses of the hundreds of thousands of hundreds of millions of other YouTube accounts there that are making content that's only getting 14 views, it's because they're trying to be like everybody else. They're all trying to be like Casey Neistat or whoever else they're trying to emulate. OK, another good idea, my friend who does social media talks about it, but she was saying to create series. So I think a person does that well as well. Patterson, like he does pimp my logo and I'm obsessed with that one, and it's funny and Will's very engaging. And just like a guy that seems like, oh, you want to go get coffee with him? And he establishes that trust. So you're like, oh, he seems approachable. I want him to pimp my logo. I don't feel like he would be rude to me or my company. So I was thinking, like for branding, for example, it could be something like. Like, I don't know, like, you know, those shows where they would reduce somebody like in fashion and they redo their whole look and something of that nature. That's what I was thinking would be really cool. So anyway, my friend told me that series do really, really well with people and it gauges them a lot more and keeps them coming back to your channel. So that's another good idea, right? Yeah and yeah, will Patterson is an interesting person to look at because he's our competition, but he's also a friend and people some audience will resonate with will more than Chris and vice versa. Because will he doesn't own a studio. I mean, not like Chris, though, is right. They have very different stories. They have very different personalities and ways of talking to you and giving you information. Will is more of like a buddy. Like, I'll put my arm around you. Chris is more authoritative. Like, dude, you're doing it wrong, and I need to kick you in the butt because you're not listening, you're stubborn. So I'm going to give you the cold, hard truth. And a lot of people do like that because the honesty and directness are the things that make Chris stand out. So everybody has their own POV. Everybody has their own perspective and ways of speaking, and you'll find that there's an audience for what it is that you do if you're very authentic with who you are. OK, I've got a question about starting. I really want to start, I want to get in front of the camera, but every time I've tried it, I do really well speaking to people. So what's your age with them? And I thought, well, I know what I'm talking about, but the minute I get in front of the camera and the cameras, no one else in the room. Yeah, I forget my words. I took like things like go up and down, and I completely forget what I want to say. Yeah, I'm so happy. Tips for. Getting started because it's like looking down the barrel of a gun. Yes, I know exactly what you mean. So I have a quick tip that I could share with you guys is very tactical. So all you need is a post-it note and a pen, and then you're just going to write. Bullet points for the things that you're going to say, like, let's say, You're going to shoot this in short bursts, right? So I'm going to say there's three things I want to talk about in this video. All you do is you take this thing and then you stick it onto your lens and then you have a quick reference. So you don't need a crazy teleprompter or something like that. Just put bullet points. Don't try and write out everything that you're doing. Just write like, what is the one key phrase that I need to remember when I'm trying to describe this to somebody? So this is the cheapest way you can do it. I do this all the time. Everybody laughs at me and they're like, what are you doing? It's like, oh, this is my cheap teleprompter right here. Sometimes I'll write the three points that I want to discuss to somebody. And I just stick this right on the camera. And yeah, like, it gets a little tricky. The closer you put it to the lens, the better. But you don't want to be reading off of that thing. That's why I'm not encouraging you guys to write out full scripts. But if you just put just the bullet points, you have it for a quick reference. If your eye line deviates for a second, it's OK. And then you can look back up. I got something very similar to that I do because I draw a face and it feels like I'm talking to a person, not on camera. And I put a person in mind actually instead of this, and I feel like I'm explaining to them and it comes off a lot more natural. Mm-hmm Just make a hole in one of the guys and let the display come through that. Yeah I mean, if I can chime in as well with some of my experience, I mean, I've just recently started doing this like I did two tours in the past and stuff, but not so much with my face. And what I learned, for example, is sometimes I don't know who said that. Maybe it was Chris or something like you need like three takes, usually the third take if you like, do it not live but scripted, then they usually just take is like the one that is good. Sometimes it even takes 10 takes for me. But one thing I also learned was like, just like, although it sounds stupid, just like smile for a couple of seconds before you start to build up the energy and like the because you're like, so anxious to start, you like you forget to smile. And what I do like I go like, yeah, and then I don't know. And then you start it and you start and you start with that energy and that helps me to ease in like the very first couple of difficult seconds when beginning. So maybe that will help you as well, because I mean, you have a nice smile. And if you open up, then this will resonate with people, you know, like smiling and making a joke. Or I don't know, like not a bad joke, but you know, just like being authentic and sympathetic, you know? Yeah, no. That's one thing to editing. You can edit the shit out of it. So don't just sit there and talk and talk, and I do it all the time where I'm like, OK, so I'm going to do it. No, I just wait and I go, OK, so I'm going to. No OK, so and then I have UMS and Oz and all kinds of crap in there. Just cut it all out. It sounds great after you cut it all out and you'll sound a lot better when you watch it back then you think you do because your heart's pounding, you think you sound weird, but you don't sound that weird. And actually, it's a good tip with the cutting, because at first I was like, so like trying to do it professionally without having like doing more stuff like that. And no one gives a damn because you can just do jump cuts all the way. You know, if you look at cases or Peter McKinnon's videos, it's like jump cuts every time, right? And you kind of used to it right. They've ignored all the film rules and it's just like, OK, they can't speak in a complete sentence, ever, but that's OK because I get the message by the end of it. But yeah, I think your tip is really good, right? And just getting comfortable with yourself, not taking yourself too seriously. Because I've seen this, a lot of people on the channel for us, like I'm going to put I'm going to call out Ricky here, Ricky. He's one of our editors. And last year we challenged everybody to make their own video. So they go through the process of authoring their own video and see what that looks like. And he's this very personal guy like likes to laugh a lot, has so much personality, and as soon as he made his video, he was like a robot. Because he was trying so hard to be educational and try to follow our form and factor that we tried to put him in and he wasn't so much himself versus somebody like Aaron. If you look at his video, he was very much himself. And that wasn't the same way over time. Like at the beginning, he wasn't that way, but over the years that he's been with us, he's developed his own personality and flavor. And so much of that is coming through with the editing style. If you look at all the future Academy stuff, that's mostly all Aaron. But in terms of the flavor and style of those things, those are more like cut, cut, cut, funny, goofy things in there, and it has more of a friendly personality versus what Chris has set the foundation for in the primary channel. So you'll see this if you could just get comfortable with yourself, like if you smile like all these things are going to help. It also helps if you do have somebody in the room. We do this all the time when we're recording intros and outros for our videos. Sometimes I will write a script for Chris and he will read it off of a teleprompter. In it, it's a little stiff. It's always a little stiff. But after we go through that process, Chris just freestyles it because he has it in his brain already. I was like, so Chris, tell me, like, what are we going to learn from this video? And then he'll just he'll just freestyle that and he'll just answer it because he's already gone through the process of reading off of the script. He knows what it is. I want him to say, and he's just going to say it the way that he wants to say it. So, like Robert said, sometimes you have to do a couple of takes, but it's nice to have somebody there to prompt you. Or you can even write a bunch of questions using these little post-it notes. You can put the little outline. You can have a whole board behind the camera asking you all of these questions as prompts and then you're just answering it. So what would I do if a client asked me this? Well, if a client asked me this, I would say a B and c, right? So you can just have prompts for yourself. All of that is very helpful if you're just getting started. I have a question. I don't know if you guys can hear me. Yeah, we can hear you. Oh, awesome. This is my first pro call. So this is really dope. Welcome welcome. We should have done that at the very beginning. My bad? Hello Hi. How's everybody doing? Ok? good. My question is so quick context. My my business partner and I were really doing a lot of content that was primarily vlog based that were entertainment based, and then we transitioned into business. And for me, my natural state is just always like high charisma, high enthusiasm. We transitioned into business. I started becoming fearful of the dichotomy between presenting yourself professionally and present yourself as an influencer on camera. And I know that the beacon, the various beacons of light that are my spectrum, that there is a serious part and there's a charismatic part. Where do you find the balance to not position yourself incorrectly online against your business to where clients are now worried that maybe you're not to be taken seriously to handle projects that they write from a high level standpoint? Well, you know, I do want to reinforce that. Try not to edit yourself so much, right? Because that's where you're going to come off stiff. But then the other part of that is no one can argue with results. One thing that we say all the time blind is that, look, we take our work very seriously, but we don't take ourselves seriously. so you'll see the culture around. Blind is very fun. It's friendly and it's very inviting. And we like to joke around and we like to have fun. But when it's time to work, we work and the results are in the results. You cannot argue with the facts. So you could still be very charismatic and then just share the results. It's like you could make be making jokes. Yeah, but we made $10 million for this client as a return on building this website for them, right? We don't want to hear that right. If you look at a lot of these like business channels, they're very charismatic, like Dan Locke is one, Gary V is one who's that guy who wrote 10x the 10x rule. The real estate guy. Great Grant Cardone Yeah. Like, yeah, you might not like all of these guys, but it's OK, but you could. You can't argue that one. They have results, at least that they're proclaiming, but two, they're also very charismatic. So I don't think that those two things are separate. I think they can be the same thing if you allow it to be. And again, people can't argue with results. And I would much rather have to work with somebody who has a personality, rather than somebody that's super stiff and robotic. Hey, man, do you believe that there's a difference between personal brand and then company branding? Yeah, yeah, absolutely, but sometimes they align, so Chris's personal brand aligns with the future parts of my personal brand. A lot of my personal brand aligns with the future, but not all of it. Right, same with Ben. Like, there's a good portion of his personal brand that aligns with the future, and there's part of it that has nothing to do with the future. So it's OK. There's lots of overlap. Got it. I got a question for you. Why do you feel like you need to be serious? Why do I feel like I need to be serious? Probably because I mean, I'm younger and this wasn't what I set out to do academically. So I'm like, I'm a communication master student versus now I'm designing video space. And the people that we're dealing with are white collar elder white men. It's a smaller, it's a smaller community. Everyone kind of knows everyone. So when you come in literally labeled as the hipster that may come across as somebody that won't be able to be diligent enough to take on a project for a company that's worth $90 million in profit. That's that's been in this rural area since I was like 19 something. I'm just giving a very specific example to a client that we're working with right now, right? Do you think do you think that client is a good fit? You know, to be honest with you about right now, right now, fit is not trumping cash flow, to be fairly honest and to put it all on the table. Like I wanted, I want to say, like I would rather go. We're about an hour and a half from New Orleans, so I would rather go down to New Orleans and find places that are right fit because we're like me and my business partner. We also enjoy music and we the space that we want to live in is to give value through content creation and not a lot of business understand that. And sometimes there's friction. But right now? Fit isn't trumping being in the money. You know what I mean? You got to pay the Bills. I'm not telling you to go fire your clients, right? But I also want to make sure that you're aware that maybe that you're trying to fit a mold that doesn't fit you. And so maybe, maybe the type of clients that you should be after are not 75-year-old white dudes in a rural area. You know, maybe, maybe you need to go after a hipster company. You know, I look at facts, right? I hate these guys, right? But fuck terry, they are an Instagram account. It's literally fuck g. J.r.r why they have 14 million followers and they're a meme account. And all they do is repost means I can't stand them. They're the guys behind fire. I don't like them at all. But they have clients that represent what they're putting out into the world. And so because they're so successful at viral content, it's so successful. It means and all that kind of crap. There the money comes to them because they're positioned in a way that reflects who they are and reflects what kind of client they want to bring in. So I would encourage you to just again, unapologetically, unapologetically embrace who you are. Just be. And look for those clients who align is trying to fit in that mold. It's going to kill you. Yeah and I think we're just trying to paint this pie in the sky idea where as much as your life aligns on top of each other, the more you're going to be happy, the more you're going to be productive, and the more you're going to get a lot of momentum for every effort that you do. I understand where it sounds like you're at right now. Those feels like different things, and that's OK because there's companies out there where, like 90% of the work they do never sees the light of day. It's all behind closed doors, and they only show the coolest stuff that they actually do because that's where they want to go. That's what they're aspiring to be, and they're inching towards that right. But the money says otherwise, and that's OK. But ideally, where we would all like to be is that we're just doing one effort and it's capturing everything it it's allowing me to tickle all of my like personal things that I want to do in my life. But it's also allowing me to make money, gain clients that respect me for the person and personality that I am. So the more you start to put that out there, the more those things are going to start aligning. But if you keep those things separate and they're going to stay separate, and maybe that's OK. But for us, I think where we want to be is just working less and that the personal stuff blends so well with the professional stuff and there's number line anymore. But just kind of to reiterate what they were talking about Von gleicher, Klitschko has a two year degree. That's it. He has a two year degree. And he teaches, goes around and teaches at tons of universities, I don't think it has to be what you studied. It's what you're passionate about, what you're studying. Now that you're going on this, you got to it's I think of it as a bra. It's a bra that you put on, you know, you want one that support you. And so that's what this is. This is you. It doesn't matter. It's what you're doing right now, what you're learning today that matters. You know what I mean? And I'm in mobile, so we're close. Hey, you guys need to connect? Cool all right. Was that helpful? Or at least give you a little perspective on at least our POV on that? Yeah, I mean, it definitely did. And it's I firmly believe in things kind of compounding the people that you guys are referencing. The analogies are just speaking to me, because it's what I believe, but it's hearing it again from outside of just static videos that I watch of you guys. But hearing it in a dialogue fashion is just pretty reaffirming, for sure. Sweet all right. Cool well, we have about 20 minutes left on this call, and I know there was a handful of questions about more technical and tactical stuff, and I'm happy to go there. But I really love where this conversation is at, and it's mostly about content getting started and how to position yourself. So if there's more follow UPS here, I'm happy to spend the last 20 minutes going down this rabbit hole and answering any more questions while we're still hot on this. Otherwise we can shift and we could talk about some tactical stuff and tackle that. So it's up to you guys if anybody has a question. Everybody chimed in, love it, good. You see the action there, that was a call to action, and I'm engaging the audience and bringing you guys in. So let's start with Rachel because Rachel hasn't been on yet. What's up, rachel? I really hesitated to ask this, so I just chose to goes to show how it is. I do have some mindset stuff. Uh, I. Oh, goodness. It's it is hard to say all that. I was home schooled, all for my whole school when it came time to finish up my high school and actually get a certificate that said, yay, you know, x. I was already working and where I grew up in a rural area, they only had the test like once a month or something. So I procrastinated it forever. Never actually got something that said, hey, you finished high school, then I. Wasn't sure about going to college. Eventually, I went to go and try to go to community college, but I wasn't with my parents anymore and get financing, and it was this weird thing and I couldn't go. So I just put it off again, and I've just self-education the whole time and whatever I wanted to learn. And so anyway, I know a lot of stuff, but I've never had any validation of that I know stuff, and it's hard for me to share that about my background. As as you can tell. And I've questioned whether I should be transparent about the fact that I've had obstacles, but I've learned what I need to anyway and just push through it all. Or if people are going to like, it's just kind of like, they're just going to be like, oh, you're cute. School of the Hard Knocks. That's your story. That's your story. That's Ben burns. That's his attractive character for the future. Write me and Chris. We went to art center, we went to a private institution. And that's we bring that kind of professionalism with us. Ben self-taught didn't go to school for design. Learn by getting punched in the face. Write and learn. Learn the hard way. So that's your story. And a lot of people can embrace and engage with that. So I would not look at that as something to be shameful of, but something to be proud of. It's like, look, I didn't need to spend $200,000 on private education to learn what I learned. I actually did it the smart way because I cobbled together all these different pieces and I was very resourceful about figuring and navigating my own way. So instead of somebody having to tell me what to do, I figured it out myself. So to me, that's a powerful story. Another person who talks about this, Gary some people hate him, but he's like, look, I was a PhD student in school. Here's my report card. I suck F school. I'm telling all of you guys, your kids don't have to go to school. There's no point in that. If they could pick up a phone and learn how to market. They already can start working and be killing it. Right now, this is the best time to live more than ever. So everybody has this story where they feel like the external validation of the prestige of going to a private college or whatever education or job validates them. But that's not the case. Your own personal experiences and culture and everything that makes you you is a thing that people are going to tune into and is your personal story that no one else can tell. But yeah, I sense. I think another thing I struggle with as well is that I learn really quickly, it's even hard for me to say that because it sounds arrogant to me. No, I embrace it. But like. And oh, it just totally it totally hits it right on the head as far as exactly where my insecurities lie of just being like someone being like, oh, whatever, you're just cocky, arrogant, like, no, there's nothing about you that's arrogant. You seem like like, super humble, and it's super easy to super easy to talk to you. So don't even don't even go there. Just the fact that you think that is like just another layer of humbleness that you're right. You just keep doing that. It's you're good. Yeah, I think what? You should totally embrace that. I totally agree with Michael's assessment of you. I don't read you as cocky at all. If if I set you next to Chris, I could tell who's the cocky bastard? Right? so I wouldn't worry about that at all. What I'd actually like you to do is spend some time after this and as an exercise, just write down a couple of things and one column talk about who you are, all the things that make you, you, your culture where you grew up, your education, all the things that make you you, that no one else can say, right? That's this is my Rachel column. And then there's another column that is just all your brag bank, basically everything that you've accomplished throughout your life. Look at your early period. Look at a high school, look at your non education, all the jobs you've done, any accolades like anything you feel proud about, but maybe are a little afraid to share. Write all of those down. And then in the combination of those two things is your story of who you are. Here's who I am, here's where I came from and all of these things, I accomplished that in spite of that, and here I am today in front of you and I'm able to share what it is that I've learned in my way, right? Because there's plenty of people who are similar to you who will resonate with your story. But how do you make that attractive? Do you feel like Ben is an attractive character? Like, do you do you resonate with them? I'm just saying that's what I said that I saw on the future Academy's episode with Ben on the brand attribute. And one of the remark Chris made of him was self-made and he was talking about made this self-made achievement known on this score. So it's not right. So I'm not sure which video you were referring to. But one of the band's attributes is that he has self-made, right, that he's self-taught. Yes and are you asking how do you make that look attractive? Exactly I would say that why does it matter how you learn something? Isn't it? The results are the thing that matter. If I hired you and you had 10 years of education, but you aren't able to get me results. Why would I hire you? Versus if I hired somebody like Rachel, who, let's say, didn't go to college at all but is able to get real results for my business? Wouldn't I rather hire her? Yeah, I know, but how do you make that attractive on the paper? Hey, Mr. Go ahead. You fill in here, that's your side. So my most my most successful pieces of content, my most high performing emails, every single thing that I've done that has actually worked, that is netted me personal gain and the future revenue. Every single thing has been an absolute and utter failure. And I've just shown a light on that. So you don't have to put a spin on it, it can be just one of those things that hey guys, I had 53 clients and I was making $3 an hour. Mm-hmm That's not attractive. Nobody wants to hear that. It's what comes after. It's like, here's what I learned. And you know, this is the journey. But shining a light on your failures and shining a light on what you feel like is failure can attract people. That's what we're talking about the attractive character. It's not putting a Polish or a gloss on something that you are ashamed about. It's attracting like people. You know, we don't care that Casey Neistat didn't go to film school. We don't care that, you know, he was a 16-year-old dad. These are all just parts of his story that we align ourselves to because I could have seen myself as a 16-year-old dad. You know, that's just. And that could have happened, right, and so we're looking for those aspects of humanity that we can align ourselves to. That's what it means to be an attractive character. Yes and I want to say to you, it's like, look, I'm here on this call giving you guys business advice. When I was out of college, I opened my own business for two years and I had to close it because I failed. I didn't know what I was doing, and I'm pretty open about that. I've said that several times on the channel, and that's not something to boast about, especially having a channel about business, creative business and teaching you guys. So I embrace that. It's like, look, I didn't know anything about running a business, but here I am still today and I've learned so much since then, and that was me a decade ago. That was a long time ago. My immature self, I've grown since then, and here's what I've learned. So I think for both of our stories, you'll see that it's like you don't have to shy away from that. What's wrong with that? Because guys are still listening to me regardless? Me and Ben. If you feel like our content is not valuable, you wouldn't be here. Hate Russia, right? I have a follow up question. I think it comes back to Dmitri. The question is it's probably better to shut to embrace it once you got out of it. And you have a success rather than talking about it when you're going through it. Mm-hmm Yeah, I just had a quick question. Just your opinion. What if some of the more impressive things that you've done in your life that when you say to people one on one, they're really wowed by it, but it's super, it's actually kind of super shady. How would you, how would you what would you be your advice on that? I think I know where this is coming from. Look, back in the day, I used to scam a bunch of people to get their money right, did a bunch of shady things, and I found a bunch of back doors online to get people money or advertising from that. Look, I know that super shady and I've learned since then I've grown since then. But here are a couple of things that I've learned. I've changed, but here's what I learned from that experience x, y and z. So you could just embrace that and say, hey, I did some shady stuff in the past. And I think being transparent and open about that diffuses it. They can no longer hold that over your head. They can't say, oh, by the way, I discovered some dirt on you, right? Like anybody who tries to hide their past or the shady stuff they've done. Those are the people that eventually get found out. And then once it's brought to light, then they look like a criminal because they were trying to hide it the whole time. But if you embrace that and say, hey, I've learned something from that experience, yeah, I know I sucked. Or maybe I was a bad human being at that point. Here's what I've learned from that. So I think the more you can embrace your fault, the less that somebody could use that against you. So that would just be my opinion on that. Can I add to what you're saying, matthew? Yeah you want to basically sum it up is you have to take it and and embrace it and frame the narrative how you want it to be. So that someone else doesn't reframe it for you later. Mm-hmm Basically, howard? Absolutely And if you can say what you learned from it and how it will benefit the person you're talking to, then that's like the cherry on top, right? I mean, it's just it's just life. So Brendan and the comments that Jordan belfort's a great example of this. There's a whole movie about him, right? And now he's out there speaking, giving advice, and people lean in to learn from all of his, from all of his failures, but all the things that he's learned along the way. Another example of this is the movie Catch Me If You Can. It's about somebody who is a con artist who figured out how to make fake checks and scam the entire banking system. But as a result of that, they learned so much from that process. So, you know, these are all just different examples of shady stories, right? And things that have been brought to light. But because you, you learn about those things, those get diffused and you can no longer hold that over that person's head. I don't think so. Yeah, I mean, that's just my POV on that. But your example was wildly accurate, is that what have done the same thing then? No OK, so you're just OK. So I don't know if that helps, but I mean, I think the more that you just unpack that stuff and just embrace it, then no one can use any dirt on you anymore because you've accepted that at that point. OK, so we got 10 minutes left. What do you guys want to talk about? I get quickly. OK, go ahead. I just want to reiterate that I met Rachel in the business boot camp and had to do. I had a client and she was the only choice that I picked for doing the branding with this client just because of who she was during the calls in the business boot camp in the fall and there was no other choice. OK, and I had established trust with him and the least amount of risk. So he trusted me and I trusted Rachel to do that. It may still work out. We're not sure about what that's going to. What's that going to look like in a month or so? But she was the only choice because I didn't care about pedigree. She was capable, and that's all I care about. That's it. You know, and you know, it's the old Dave Ramsey thing where, you know, pedigree doesn't matter if you can go out, kill something, drag it back to the cave. That's all I care about. Mm-hmm You know, and she was sharp in the business boot camp, and I didn't have to go to anybody else for that branding strategy. Yeah, that's definitely that's a great point, that's fantastic, and I mean, things like this are our coaching calls like, this is great, because everybody can be themselves right. We know we're in a safe space and everybody is sharing some fantastic stories about themselves, all of their concerns, all the things that they are afraid about. And like, maybe a lot of this stuff doesn't see the light of day and doesn't go out publicly, but you'll see here by just being open with each other. I feel like I get to know all of you guys a little bit better, and I'm leaned in a little bit more about your personal stories from an Amish. I realize he works in house at a tech company, and he's struggling with how to share his personal brand outside of that. And that's a real struggle, but maybe that's a piece of content right there. Same with Rachel. It's like, look, I have no external validation and I don't feel like I have the authority to speak and teach somebody what I know. Yet we have examples like Mr. Ben burns that say the opposite. So all of these things, I think, are really good examples of how just being yourself allows us all to get a little bit more involved in your story. So what you could do right after this call, maybe this is homework. You jump off this call and you make a piece of content. Maybe it's just an Instagram story that you hop on. It's like, you know what? I don't know what I'm doing. And then here's my goal over the next couple of weeks, or you could turn around and say, like, hey, I just jumped on this call with Matthew and Ben at the future, and I've been thinking about starting my own content channel. I didn't know these things, but today I learned one two three. So already, if you just take what you've learned today or take any insights that you've gained from these conversations and share that with somebody, I'm pretty sure you're going to start your journey. This is step one on developing content that you can teach somebody something and you can also share your POV on it. So this is the easiest thing you can do if you just regurgitate everything that was said on this call in a bit-sized way to somebody else, you already step one on creating content. Hi, Martin. Hey, what's up? This is my first Groupon. Welcome. Thank you. I have a lot of stuff with me, I have around more than 50 blogs that have been unpublished. I have a website for that one. I have been quite dry on it. So can you give me some that I can basically write about food history? Mm-hmm So you have a blog that you run and you're just not getting a whole lot of traffic on it. Yeah, that's very true. Or is it that or you just run out of things to say it's what actually, I have written it and I haven't published it. I have a lot of content that I didn't publish it because just getting 100 people a day wasn't good enough for me. I see. And are you publishing this on your own website or are you going to publishing platform like medium? Oh, no. I use media, but I'm doing it now on my own website. OK is there a reason why you moved over? I didn't like the way people used to comment on things because they didn't know about stuff and they say, no, no, no, no. This stuff comes from this. I've done my research very, very thorough. I know what comes from me and I had, even with the TV channel owners debate about it. I didn't like the way people used to distort history. Yeah, you know, I feel like we can go super deep on this thing. All I would say, at least for me in terms of man, yeah, I'm not. I'm not the expert to be talking about blogs like I rarely write like I'll probably make three or four pieces of blog content a year. So I can't really say much about that, and I've been wanting to chime in here, but maybe this is best reserved for a follow up, either on a separate call or in the Facebook group. So if you post what it is, your challenge is. And then some of the things that you're struggling with. I know there is a few people in the group that actually do run and blog pretty consistently. So post that there I feel like the collective knowledge will have a better answer than anything that I can give you right now. And can you tell me, can I convert those into videos, will that be good because I got the point that you have to have as many touchpoint as possible? I have a script ready. I have right up ready. Look, can I create more and more touch points with, let's say, how I created the video with went? Yes Yeah. I mean, if you already have momentum on something, try and use that one piece of momentum for a lot of things, like I said. Earlier in the call, I made this, I wrote this script for a video about remodeling my office. I made that as a video. I made that as a blog post, and then I also use the descriptions in there in my kit for my affiliate link. So I mean, if you have one effort, you have already done the work and it takes very little to just turn it into reformat it for other things to make it appropriate for that platform and audience. Go ahead and do it because the more you put out there, the more likely people are going to come to you. But at the same time, I don't want you to spread yourself too thin and lose focus. Just because you make one piece of content doesn't mean it has to go on all five of your channels. All right, especially if that's going to take time away from you making the next piece, if you just get it out on one of your platforms that you really want to focus on and get the most engagement on. Just post it there and then move on. So we have a finite amount of time in the day, maximize where you can, but just be realistic about not spreading yourself too thin and also figure out what you enjoy doing because living in the results is it? Well, if you're focused on how many people see your content and the subscribers and the views and all this kind of stuff, you're going to fail every time because that's totally the wrong motivation, right? It keeps coming back to this. Don't be motivated to sell clients. Don't be motivated to get views, share what you love and do what you love. So if you love writing, just keep writing. If you really like making videos and you like seeing yourself on the screen, do that and be OK with getting three views on a piece of content. Mm-hmm That's OK. Just be consistent for years, and this is coming from the worst because I'm like the worst at being consistent. But consistency matters. I want to post somebody something in the chat because this is really cool. There's a YouTube channel called NCBI. HD guy's name is I think it's Marquez. He just interviewed Bill gates, bill gates, and I just posted his first YouTube video ever when he was a kid. It looks like he's sitting at his dining room table or like in a closet or something, and he's revealed he's reviewing a HP pavilion media center remote only because now this guy's camera presence, even today, is super awkward. He's not a very like, he's everything scripted. It's not like he's this media Darling like that or Peter McKinnon. He doesn't have that magnetic camera attraction. But throughout the years, he's been so consistent with his content that he's interviewed Elon musk, Bill Gaetz. Just check it out if you want to be inspired. Go watch this 13-year-old kid talk about a remote, right? They're building those 2009. So that's 10 years ago. So he's been at it for 10 years, and I'm sure his first video got 10 views. His mom is grandma and his cousins. You know, everybody has a start and you have to start, otherwise you can't just jump to the middle or end and assume that just because you've done it the way somebody else has done it, that you're going to have the same success. It's the wrong way to think. It's like you really have to be passionate about doing it, sharing your own truth, your own voice, your own pov, and be persistent at it and develop your own voice. The more you try to emulate other people. So much, the more you be more formulaic, the less likely people are going to be enrolled with who you are as a person, and you might end up hating the monster that you create. Hey, Ben, did you have to find that like unlisted or is it still listed on his channel? I think it's still listed. Yeah, that's awesome, like I am going to keep all my shitty stuff, even it has nothing to do with what I'm doing now. I'm just keeping it all because, you know, why not? God, look at my first love. It's funny. Watch those. Those are horrible. There's like a 4 minute time lapse of me driving. Yeah, he's got his montage in there. All right. So we are at the end of this call. Thank you so much for everyone joining. If this is I mean, I know we focus mostly about content getting started and structures for that. Hopefully, this conversation was very engaging for you guys. If we want to do a follow up on this, let me know. In the Facebook group, I have a bunch of technical stuff that I could share with you that I know Dave Coe had asked. Unfortunately, we didn't get to there only because the conversation was so engaging today. And hopefully what we've shared today will unlock some of the barriers that some of you guys had. And I encourage all of you guys right after this call to make your first piece of content, it could just be an Instagram story. Tell somebody about your journey, where you are and what you're trying to do or to share what it is. One thing that you learned from today's call, and you'll be surprised because somebody will engage with that. Somebody will find that interesting. And even if somebody doesn't just keep doing it, just keep building. And you can be like Marcus Brown and go from being a 13-year-old kid talking about his remote to interviewing Bill Gaetz if you're really persistent at it. Well, that's it today, guys, we will see you online on the Facebook group and next week on the next call. Bye, guys. See? thanks, guys. Thank you. Thank you, Matthew. Hey, guys.

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