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Find Your Super Power

#
40
Chris Do
Published
March 16, 2017

Chris Do goes through a worksheet with the Pro Group to attain ultimate happiness through finding your superpower.

Read Transcript
Here we go, guys. Welcome to episode 40. This week, we're going to talk about finding your superpower, that's a working title, and I've worked on it in terms of calling it your five power spheres that wasn't that catchy. And then your guide to ultimate happiness that sound a little too self important. So that's how my subhead finding your superpower. And I want to explain a little bit about what this worksheet is and where I'm going with these things. I've been talking to members in the community. There are new materials coming out, and I apologize. There's just so much for me to do. But this is a way for me to share something that I'm doing as a work in progress and also to get your feedback, but also hopefully to benefit the community. OK this is what we are considering a future personal branding self-study worksheet. All right. So I'm going to begin with borrowing a little bit from the book The Power of self confidence by Brian Tracy. It starts by telling you you are extraordinary, and that's just not like a warm and fuzzy, touchy Feely kind of thing. That's actually there's some math behind this. So according to his scientific study, he says there's a $50 billion to one chance that somebody else on this planet has the same unique combination of talents, skills and abilities. But there's a problem to this, all right, and it depends on your ability to identify your areas of greatest strength. So a lot of us are walking around not fully utilizing that unique combination of skills that we're all born with. And that's the goal of this talk today and the exercise. Now, successful people understand their area of excellence, and if properly exploited, would enable you to be, have and do almost anything that you could possibly want. So my guess is with this group, we're all not quite living. To our full potential that we're not doing everything we want to do and we don't have the things we should have. And this is what we're trying to do today. OK there was this study and there's facts and figures, and you can look it up in the book. I'm just going to give you the really short version of it that they studied 500 men and women over the course of 20 years. 83 of those 1,500 people became millionaires. And when interviewing them, they found that there was only one common trait that all of them chose fields they enjoyed. And that's important because they were able to put all their time, their energy, their resources, their passion. The entire heart into becoming very good in that specific area. And coincidentally. None of them set out to make a lot of money and wind up making a lot of money. So I know there's some sensitivity for myself included. You and I talk so much about money. Money is not my goal. Money does not motivate me. It's just a benchmark of where I'm at. Making a difference in the world is what motivates me, and the more that I want that, the more money seems to come to me. And there's a little story here, I didn't know this story, but it's also from the book about the French post-impressionist Paul Gauguin. And his story is quite interesting. He lived with his family in Paris. And you worked at the post office. But at night, he would often frequent cafes where artists were known to hang out the Impressionist of the day, like Claude Monet, and he would sit there and talk to him, he was completely fascinated, but what they do? And then until one day he shocked his coworkers. And his family. He just left them all and moved himself to Tahiti. He left his whole family. He quit his job and moved to Tahiti, where he lived for most of his life after that point. And he started to paint. And these are examples of some of his paintings. And by many, he's regarded as one of the most important painters of the last 300 years. And just to give you a little timetable, go go. Gwen became friends with Van Gogh. And if you look back at the work, you can see how they're influencing each other and dagger as well. So there's some importance in terms of his influences on how he opened the door to what they would consider postmodern art. So when you consciously choose to dwell in your strengths, this is your superpower. OK, so today we're going to spend a little bit of time examining what your superpower could potentially be. And it starts off with this thing, like I mentioned before earlier on that it's about these five power spheres and there's a little diagram in there. And if it looks like sacred geometry, I did my best to try and make it look something like that. And there's just five questions I might ask you today, and we're going to get going in terms of the work. The 5 points are opportunity, skill, happiness, passion and service, and I'll explain what each one of these things mean. Now here's the deal when you have opportunity. Opportunity usually is there's an opportunity to make money or be successful or be famous, and you're skilled at it, but you're missing the passion part. The thing that you really believe in and in Logan's case, it was he was not going to get rich working at the post office. But he had opportunity, he had skill, he could do the job. But the problem was he was not rich, he was just bored. And if you have skill, you're good at doing something and it makes you really happy, but the opportunity in terms of career advancement. A potential income that you can earn if it's not there, then you'll be happy, but you'll be poor. Lastly if there's opportunity. And it makes you really happy, that sounds great, but if you don't have this skill, then it's just a dream. This is if COVID dreamt about being a great painter, but didn't spend the time to learn the craft and actually had no talent, and maybe he was colorblind, I don't know. Then he wouldn't have been the great painter that he became. OK, so here we go. Now we're going to dive in. You guys are going to go ahead and take yourself off mute. And I'm going to ask you guys this question, I'm going to take a minute to kind of figure out what the answers are. So the first thing I want you guys to do, and it's kind of a strange order in the way that I structured this, but you'll see why there is a design to this, ok? Now I want you to just think about this and then think about it for like 30 seconds or so. After I asked you these questions and then you have a question, you can ask me and then don't do anything. Then after the 30 seconds, go ahead and write, I just want you to take a moment to think through and be intentional. All right. What jobs, industries, fields are on the rise and in demand? What's currently trending culturally? Which ones are growing with opportunity? And then I want you to make a list. OK this doesn't necessarily have to do with anything that you're currently investigating at this point in time in your life. If there's a trend in real estate and sustainable architecture, I just want you to write that down if you feel that too be true. This does not have to be limited to things you're already interested in. OK, if there's a trend in nanotechnology, artificial intelligence, as much detail as you can, right? In terms of being very specific with the words, I'd like for you to do that. If there are any questions, please ask me now I'm going to give you guys 30 seconds or so just to think. How general are we speaking here, are we speaking about professions or industries or like like, for example, agriculture as opposed to a hydroponic farmer or I want more specific? Correct so agriculture is too broad. Agriculture is just too broad. Hydroponic agriculture is not as broad. I want it to be more specific because agriculture, as far as I know, is not like what somebody would describe as a trend, ok? It doesn't have to be a job. It just is a field or anything that you can think of, like microbrew coffees. Let's just say that's the trend. OK I don't know yet what the job is, I don't always want to be thinking about jobs, ok? Thanks for that question, Philip. You're welcome. OK, I think that's been about 30 seconds or so. Now I just want you guys to write, write down as many things as you can. Fill up the whole page, if you can. You see that fill up the whole page fill up. That's cute, that's cute. Yeah, Thanks. All right. I'm coming over enough that I can actually still find that funny. I promise that's the last cornball joke I make today or on this call. I just thought. No, no, no. It's all right. You can continue. All right, guys. Write it down, and then I'm going to ask you if you need more time, but. Just so there is a dead air here, I'll just talk a little bit, if it's annoying, I'll stop talking. Right, as many things as you can think of things that you've been looking into or things that have caught your attention. Anything that you're spotting as a trend, Netflix spending billions of dollars acquiring original content. It could be a certain kind of food. Or an allergy or a movement towards eating certain kinds of foods. And I see now that there are 44 participants in this and you guys are joining us late. I will rewind the slide and give everybody else a little bit more time here. Sorry here's the question, you guys, if you're just joining us right now. Day 14, I want you guys to just sit down and write down as many things you can identify as an opportunity. What jobs industry fields are on the rise and in demand? What's trending? Of course, which ones are growing with opportunity? And then just write down as many as you can? All right. And of course, if you're just joining, there are five prompts I'm going to give you guys. And then there's something to do at the end of this. OK now, when we move on, if you want to come back and fill this out a little bit more before the final part of this exercise, that's fine as well. Maybe you're stuck right now. It's 815 by my time. It's kind of early for the brain to be moving like this, but especially if you've been out late night late last night. Here's number two. Here's the second question in the skill. What comes easy or natural for you? What do you do well and feels effortless when you do better than a lot of people? You don't have to be the best in the world. It puts you up into a category, and this has nothing to do with any kind of job. If you love running and you're really good at it, it's effortless for you. Write that down. What are you good at? If you make a mean cocktail, write that down. He doesn't have to be connected to anything that you're doing in terms of how you make a living right now. And this is really important. This is important in that I think we're conditioned to only allow ourselves to do certain kinds of things and consider them worthwhile endeavors while everything else we put into categories as something that we do as a hobby, a leisure activity. So I want to take the labels away from these things and allow you just to write. And make a list of everything you're good at. I'm going to give you a minute or so. Chris, yes, does it emotional content considered a skill? I leave it to each person to define what a skill is and what you're good at. OK OK. I don't want to judge it. It doesn't sound like it would be fun for me, but it can be one for you. Uh-huh OK. If you're a great listener, if you're empathetic and you consider that to be a skill that you do better than a lot of people, I would write that down. Let's not judge anything it doesn't hurt for us to fill up the page, it costs us nothing, but it might cost us something if we leave it off the page. There is no grade, there is no test, is it just for you? Hopefully, this page is filling up with stuff this one might be hard. It's because a lot of times we're not aware of what we're good at, so I just want to take a moment for you guys to dig inside to crawl inside your brain, to really have a good self-assessment and give yourself credit for the things that you're good at. OK here's prop number three, and like I said before, if you want to go back and fill it out, please do so. Happiness what activities, interest, hobbies, events, things make you the happiest? Don't rule anything out, no matter how impractical. The difference between the skill and the happiness a skill are things that you're good at. You may not totally enjoy, but you're good at. Let's say if you're really good at organizing and you do it better than everybody else, but it doesn't really make you happy. That's cool. That goes in the skill category. Happiness is just about you feeling good. You could suck at it. But it makes you feel really good. I'm finding some overlap already. OK, that's nice. It's nice don't get ahead of me, Philip, but that's very nice. If you enjoy cooking gourmet meals and that makes you really happy, do it, write it down. Maybe you're not a world class chef at the moment would just write it down. And at the end of this, I will share with you my answers from these prompts. The five lines means fill up the page. OK question or prop number four. Passion what are you really excited about doing? What could you not live without doing it another way to think about this if money were no object and you inherited millions of dollars? And you're financially set. You have generational wealth. What would you be doing now? Don't worry if there's overlap, you guys. Just fill it out. All right. Oh, go ahead. Um, it's funny because the passion one is basically a summary of the scale, happiness and the so far. Maybe, maybe, yes, I'm trying to figure it out, just do it. If they take the myers-briggs test, the personality test and trying to figure out how to game the questions like, oh, I know where this is going, I want to be a logical person, I don't want to be an emotional person, so I'm going to answer the questions a certain way. Now Don't game it. Just do your best to fill it out. Don't think. Don't judge. Stream of consciousness just right. The things that you feel are appropriate for it and even include a few things you don't think are appropriate. You'll be looking at your sheet right now, so don't worry. You can be a romantic somewhere in there that could be a category, you know, an answer to one of the questions. Here we are. The last slide. The first four questions were all about. This one's a little bit different. Because I think if your life is all about you, that's great. But you haven't really fully tapped into your potential just yet. I'll explain why. Last one is called service. What can you do to help the human condition? What axe can you or do you currently perform that are in the service of others? Make a list. I don't want to get too much into the theory behind this. But helping others, giving joy to others actually gives you happiness as well, creating value for others creates value for you as well. So an important thing that we just don't become one of these modern era industrialists, rape the land, make millions and millions of dollars. And just hoard it all for yourself. What can you do to help the human condition really important? Someone once told me that the thing that separates us from the animals is not an opposable thumb, but our ability to share as human beings from one tribe to the next to share information. Just a thought. You know our. Competitive advantage is the social structure of how our race is kind of built, you can survive because, you know how to get along with people and getting along with people sometimes is also not thinking about yourself all day long. Correct, correct. It's actually something referred to as tit for tat. And that is a mathematical principle to which you are sharing information or doing. It's a reciprocal sort of situation where things things work out positively for everyone involved, provided you just follow along blindly, actually. Yes and in Robert 9's book influence reciprocity is one of the things that bind us together as human beings that we don't like to just take, we want to give back. Yeah and there are studies and stories about that as well. When somebody gives you a meaningless gift. You're much more primed and compelled to return the favor. And we don't totally measure it. You gave me $0.10 worth of value. I will give you $0.10 back. Now there's a feeling of gratitude we want to give back. And I suspect one of the reasons why people give us hundreds of during a live broadcast. When there's nothing in it for them, it's because they feel like they've gotten value. And then they reciprocate. So reciprocity is one of those big ones. OK we're kind of at the end of the first part. Now we're going to put it together. All right. Before we put it together, I just want to take a moment for anybody that wants to share either in the chat window and somebody can read that to me or they can just turn the mic and kind of share so far. How do you feel? You feel weird. You feel like, Wow. Are you anxious? Nervous are you excited or you happy? Does anybody want to share thus far? How just taking a moment and asking yourself these kinds of questions, how does it make you feel? I zygier's, I'm happy about it, it's actually come in a really good time for me. It's exercise. I was trying to figure out the next steps of my career, so it's definitely very helpful. Zach, I have a question for you. First of all, thank you for sharing that. Do you often do this? Do you often sit-in a room kind of quiet and ask yourself these kinds of thoughts like what do you want? What are you good at? Do you ask yourself these kinds of questions? Probably not this specifically. But yeah, I would say every once in a while, I try to figure out, OK, what am I really good at? How do I want to serve the agency I work for? ServSafe myself, serve others? You know, that's kind of what I'm thinking. Yeah, right. When I looked up the definition of imposter syndrome, it's the inability to acknowledge or recognize one's own strength. That's kind of an interesting way of understanding imposter syndrome, right, because a lot of people will say, I have imposter syndrome. And really, it's because you can't see what you're good at. So it's kind of nice if it's not part of your routine already. To spend, I don't know, five, 10 minutes, maybe more every day reflecting on what you're thinking. And to acknowledge what you're good at, to understand what your strengths are. Dwell on your strengths. That's the secret to being self-confident. That's what successful people do. OK anybody else want to share any feeling or anything? Philip was saying that I had feedback. Can you hear me clearly? I can hear you clearly now. Sure OK, good. I'm trying to test out my new yeti, Mike. No yeah, I feel good about it. I've never done it just like this before, but I feel like I do this all the time, journaling and contemplating thinking and try to set aside time to think about these things because like, my greatest fear is wasting my life or doing something that I wasn't really called to do or supposed to do. And so this, I feel, is super helpful to think about it in these five categories. And I see definitely a lot of overlap in some of the categories. But I think now like looking at this, like even from doing the core facilitation process with myself, I can now prioritize some of the things in each one of these categories because like, I'm just brain dumping in each of the five right now and now I could go back and prioritize which ones, which are the best opportunities are the biggest skills that I have and what makes me the most happy or what am I most passionate about? And how can I really serve people and prioritize two or three out of each column and then help formulate a plan? So I feel good about it? Great Thanks for sharing, Sean. And I just want to point something out. If you are new to the group and you don't own core and Sean's talking about something you don't understand, I just want to explain this one little part. Ok? one of the key principles of the core or any kind of strategic framework is translating your feelings into something that's more concrete. The act of writing it down, the act of vocalizing or articulating what it is you're feeling helps to make it concrete. Sometimes you say to your friends, I don't have a good feeling about that guy or that girl. But that good feeling I don't have a good feeling isn't really. Clear it's not very descriptive. So what if your friend were to turn around and say, tell me everything that you're feeling that tells you why this person you don't trust or you don't like and you say, OK, well, when this and this happened, they said this. And then they changed their answer a minute later. So they seem indecisive, so you could write all these things down. So when you're working with your clients and you're asking them one of the many prompts that we give you to ask them to describe your culture? They never think about these things. What you're trying to do is to give them space, to be able to think, reflect and then say what it is they're thinking and then to document it so they feel validated that somebody heard them. OK, so that's great. That's just the first part. So you write down as much as you can, you help them to find the right words, the right words being words that are more specific to describing how they feel. OK, and then the last part of it is, OK, now you've got this incredibly long list of stuff. Well, now you need to prioritize, you need to say, well, what seems to resonate the most with you? What seems to be the most accurate or most important? Let's highlight those. And it's hard to say when you look at a list of 12, 15, 25 words, which one is most important. So exercise teaches you to then just say pick the top five. It's easier, less committal for us just to pick the top five. It feels like we have a lot of choices, a lot of flavors. So we're OK picking five then from the five whittled that field down to three, so we're just trying to eliminate the things that don't seem like the most pertinent or most descriptive of whatever it is we're feeling or is our goal. So you then you go down to 3 and then you go down to say one. So now out of the three. Which one seems? But the most accurate. How do we assign value, do you think to each of the individual underlying lines, is it an emotional gut feeling? Is it an intellectual experience or how do we apply that aspect to things? Are we talking about the core framework or are we talking about the exercise we're doing right now? The exercise we're doing right now start to, OK, well, we're not there yet. We're not there. Hold on. Let let me just read because I pause on this to share with so you're getting ahead of me. All right. Hopefully, I can shed some light on that. If I don't, please ping me again and we'll see. OK, so there's this moment and I've come to realize something in my own life in that I was raised in a particular way to put importance on, quote unquote respectable careers and professions. Being a doctor. An attorney? An engineer, something like that. And so for a long time, I denied who I was. Even when people said, this is what you should do, my high school teacher telling me from graphic design class, it's called commercial art back then or my yearbook class. He said you should think about going into graphic design. It's like, no, I don't know. This is not right for me. When my uncle said, you should consider doing graphic design, you're very talented at doing this thing or friends from school would keep saying it to me. I'm like, no, this is not what I want to do. That's a hobby that's unrealistic, and I don't want to be poor. So I was made to think and trained to think a very particular way. It wasn't until I started to realize that the money part wasn't important. I'm going to do this thing and I don't really care what happens after that. But ultimately, that's what led me to success. Success beyond my wildest dreams. Greater success than anybody else in my family who pursued one of these traditional avenues. So what we want to do right now is to try and connect the dots. We go back in your mind that diagram where everything is overlapping, it's like a crazy, crazy Venn diagram, right? Looks like a star in the center. The more things that we can overlap in terms of opportunity, skill, what makes you happy? Um, how you service others? What you're passionate about, we can connect an overlap with many of these things. I think we're going to find the thing that is the thing that makes us unique the $50 billion to one thing unique set of skills. And it's my theory, and I don't think it's just me. If you're able to connect all five spheres, it means you're not only be successful, but you live a life of purpose. And hopefully achieve the ultimate life work integration, not life work balance, but life work integration circles overlap. The bigger the overlap, the deeper it goes, the better it is for you. Ok? and an important part to this puzzle is how you serve others. What you do for others? Now, if you're working for the church, let's say you for. You've let go a lot of the other things, you're just purely in the service of others. If you do charity work and that's great for your soul and for the human condition, but you're missing certain things. And I'll share a story with you guys. I'm spacing in her name right now. She has an unusual name. But she was a nurse, and she would take care of people with terminal illness, and if anybody knows who I'm talking about, please shout out her name. So she is working in the hospital. She's an Australian nurse, works in a hospital. And she would often get into conversations with the patients, and she would ask them, do you? Do you have any regrets or the things that you wish you could have and should have done? And they would all tell her the overwhelming answer is I wish I had the courage to live the life that made me happy versus the life that other people wanted for me. I wish I had the courage to do that. And she turned that into a book, and she's a well-known writer now. I don't think she's working as a nurse anymore, so she was doing something great for a lot of people, giving them comfort. But then she had a passion for writing, telling stories and sharing this with others. And that's really when she found her superpower. There are many, many stories like this. If you trace it down to people who weren't born into privilege, who are able to succeed in life, they'll tell you they found their unique combination of skills. And it's important for me, personally that you're not only happy, fulfilled and helping others, but you have some kind of sustainable lifestyle that you're not living hand-to-mouth from check to check. OK, so what we want to do now is look for the overlaps and patterns that emerge. You can start to highlight anything that has to overlaps three overlaps, et cetera. And now what I want you to do is go back to category one and see if any of the other four prompts highlights an industry. Or a field that's on the rise. And perhaps. By combining a couple of those things in the first question of opportunity, you may design. Your dream career, your dream job. OK I'm opening it up to Philip. Philip, we're not necessarily ranking these in terms of how important they are. We're looking at how many of them overlap. it's very interesting when you said questions one, two three, there's already overlap, and that's a very good sign, my friend. Good it's a good sign. Now can we make it a full circle, not just a Crescent moon? How many of these things can we overlap now? Are there any questions? Because then I'm going to share with you my answers, and then I would like to invite anybody to share what they came up with. So we can talk about it. Any questions, you guys? Thus far? OK And the reason why I asked you guys, how do you feel is it's just kind of nice from time to time to look at yourself. And for another reason, but to acknowledge what you're good at and what makes you happy and just thinking about that makes you happier. I sometimes forget. That when I say to somebody, a good job, nice, awesome. That things that cost me nothing to do or say can give somebody else a solo much joy. But I'm sometimes accused of being very thrifty with my compliments. But I'm never thrifty with giving myself a compliment. I dwell on my strengths. And I would wish for you guys to be able to do the same. Oh, this little echo there? All right. OK, here are my answers, you guys. So you guys can track along here. I made my list. My skill. I think this is the I don't have this memorized, MySQL is. I am good at designing, telling stories. Persuading others, as I've said many times, I like to argue with people, not argue, but vigorously debate things. I think I'm a good leader. I have skills in business producing videos, directing, making things, teaching. I already mentioned debating, negotiating, critiquing. Hopefully, I spelt that right. And connecting dots, I'm an abstract thinker. I enjoy talking to others. Teaching is another overlap again, I like watching videos. All kinds of pop culture from comic books, skateboards, movies, music, lowbrow, highbrow art, I like it all. I like going to conventions. I really am an electronic geek, geeky kind of guy. I like gadgets. I like building groups and communities, especially in the creative space. I really enjoy playing video games and any kind of game, actually. I like to travel. I like to write I'm not a writer, but I like to write. I like to edit. Enjoy fishing, hiking. I love to be on the water. Water has just magical powers. I like being outdoors. I'd like to take photos. I'm passionate about learning it's really important to me, as I was up to 2:30 last night working on this deck just trying to find cool slides for Gogan. Digging deeper into his life. I like experimenting. I'm OK with making mistakes. I'm passionate about trying things, organizing, optimising, teaching once again. Taking shortcuts. I'll tell you guys, I'm probably pretty lazy person, I work really hard, but I want to take the least number of steps to achieve what I want. I want to do the least for the most. Systematize King building systems around the way I think can do things. And how am I of service to others? Well, I used to teach. I used to teach a small group of people at art center, at Otis, at Cal Arts. Do little workshops. That's how I share what I know. And that's really important to me. OK, so when I go back and I look at my answers from opportunities. Well, entrepreneurship seems to be a thing. The barriers to entry, the ability to crowdsource all those kinds of things, platforms, the market, we seem to be in the perfect time and place like you guys that are alive, that are connected to the internet right now. There is no better time to be alive. Anybody with an idea with the right amount of work, follow through and commitment. Can have their idea launched. That was not so. In the 20s and 30s. Harder to share ideas, hard to connect with people, harder to raise capital. Well, user experience and digital is only going to grow bigger. Motion design, motion design as applies to moving images, not necessarily for TV commercials. So opportunities in the past that have paid dividends for me is in commercial production and post-production, not so much anymore. Branding ever more important? An online education. So let me make this super clear. You guys don't know me, really. Prior to me, being a public person, first through the school and now through the future. And I thought for the longest time, I'm going to retire as a person who runs a full service design, post-production and production agency. That was it. That was it for me. I wasn't thinking about anything else. I was teaching on the side because it made me happy. But the problem with teaching is others would reap the rewards of my efforts and energy. I got paid less money. Than what I paid freelancers who worked for me. So in essence, the school system was saying you're less valuable than the people you hire. And I didn't do it for the money, but after a while, I started thinking, this is kind of an insult. I'm dumping, you know, 15, 18, 19, 20 years of knowledge and experience in the field. And they pay me $45 an hour for the three hours in which I teach. They don't account for the time that I have to take out of my day to plan, to think about it, to review and critique work outside of class. They don't take into account the commitment I've made in terms of even just the commute in and out. And the minute the minute I stopped teaching the faucet turns off. So I said, you know. I want to make a difference in the world, but I don't want to do it against my own self-interest. It seems like I have to make this decision. And they're taking advantage of my desire to help people. That seems strange to me. So when Jose pulled me in to being on camera very reluctantly. I went along just to say, OK, I'll do it with you. I know how to technically produce this thing and we can do it. Get on camera, we're doing our thing. Fast forward three years now, the community has grown. You guys are part of that community and it continues to grow now between the people that are on this call who are able to listen to this later. I really don't see much of a future for me in the service space as blind as much as money as it's generating for us, I just don't even care. Like, I'm dragged into calls again reluctantly now, so now I've flipped over to the other side, whereas I was reluctant to do work for the future. Now I'm reluctant to do work for blind. That's not where my heart is anymore. This is where I'm going all in. Oh, and we lost them. So whoever it was that had the original notice that Chris was running out of battery seems to be the case. Oh boy. All right. This is a unique scenario wants to share. OK, so Chris and I had a conversation last night at great length about moments like this actually where somebody needs to be the ambassador and needs to step up. So I hope you don't mind if I take a moment here to try and fill the void. There we go. Thank you for saving me. Am I back? guys? You're back, you're back. Thanks I can still hear you so you can talk smack about me. No, no, no. We were just I just stepped in and tried to fill the void with something to say, and it was rather brief. So you saved me. I am far too hung over to carry on a conversation at your hand, by the way. Thank you. I'm aware I just have to check focus, so I'm going to stop the share. Let me stop that and go to this. Oh, all right. OK, now I have the deck still open, so I know where I'm supposed to be. That was. There's only a few slides left, really. Some of them are kind of not funny, but OK. So now that I shared with you guys, I hope I was able to complete my thought. Then the story about me switching over or no. Let's take it to the top. O'Brien, where thank you, Ronnie, where is the person? Yes the Australian nurse and you guys should check her out. Yeah, it's called the regrets of the dying or something like that. Pretty awesome. All right. It was a beautiful, tearful moment, and then I was like, oh, nobody can hear me. Great I just had to get something out of my life. OK all right, you guys. And this is when a robot cries. It's just oil, guys. It's not really tears, ok? Does anybody want to share what they might be doing now as opposed to what they have been doing in light of the exercise or any feedback that you guys have? I mean, I would love for you guys to say like, wow, OK, hey, maybe there's this other thing I should be doing with my life instead of doing web design, whatever it is. Maybe I should be doing something else besides logo design. I think the interaction level that draws us all here into this group is reminiscent of our desire to be engaged with our fellow man as opposed to being an order taker or a maker behind the computer screen on the other side of the planet dealing with clients they've never seen. We want that social, personal interaction of sharing and enjoying each other's experience. Um, from my perspective, I feel exactly as, Chris, when he said that he feels that he's transitioning to the future. I've been I was in a band for seven years. I did. Designs, videos and passionate about it, but I just like lost the player for it. I don't feel like asking it to do that anymore, so I switched to doing my thing alone. It sounds like it didn't no longer fulfilled you. Yeah, it was. It felt like I was a tool for them just to use me, and it felt like it. I mean, it felt like I didn't feel good. Hello does anybody else want to share? Yeah, know, I'll go ahead and share Chris. Go ahead, man. So, so my life was basically I was a project planner. I did a lot of strategic mapping, that type of thing, and I was pretty good at it. But it was kind of something that was kind of fell into my lap and I always had this kind of drive to have this creative side. I'm a kind of a free form painter. I like color and I like to really kind of I like to mess up a canvas and then I like to try to fix it. And so for me, I'm going to go ahead and try kind of creative direction to see if I can do that. I don't know what the outcome is going to be, but I know if I don't do it, I'll never have a basis point. I'll never know if I'm actually good at it or if I missed an opportunity. So I threw it like Newcrest. It's like my whole life. Everyone's validated the fact that I'm really good at that stuff and I always try to benchmark myself with the world, and I realize that it's a lot to carry on my shoulder and I haven't really found or kind of like said, OK, well, I'm good at this. I can be. I can be great at this. I know that when I get into that mode where I'm creating things, I'm the world kind of just slips by me and that's all I want to do. And so hopefully I'll have that opportunity to do that. I'll be very excited if I do. I kind of include some folks in on the Facebook page, and I'll just kind of see how that goes. Great, Thanks for sharing, sharing time. Let's do this a little bit more democratically. We have an ability to raise our hands. And so if you just raise your hand, I'll say your name and then you can speak that way. We don't jam all over each other. Ok? and sometimes I think people are very polite and patient, so they wait for the next person. Then before, you know, the call is over. And they didn't get to say anything. Now I think it's Simon who asked this question how can we know we're really good at what we think we are? Simon, can you turn on your audio? Can we have a discussion about this? Hello Hi. Hi hey, it's good to hear your voice. Yeah, finally. So let's talk about this. I mean. What are you not sure about in terms of what you're good at? Well, I always hear feedback that I'm good and graphic design and branding, but at the same time, you go to Behance and you see those rock stars doing amazing, great things. Yeah and I don't know. Maybe I'm not that great. Maybe I am. I don't know. So how do we know for sure? How do for sure? Well, I think if you can just consider yourself maybe top 10% in the world, then I would say you're really good at that. There's things that you can do that I think are very easy for you that doesn't require a lot of effort, and that's what I would put in as good. OK, look, I like skateboarding. I'm not top 10% for sure. So that's not going to be something that is going to make my list in terms of what I'm good at. It would fit into my thing of things that I enjoy. OK things that have passion about, but things that I'm not good at. And that's totally OK. Because if I'm a good designer and I'm passionate and it makes me happy to be around skateboarding, then I might try to focus my energies on designing skateboard graphics or starting a skateboard company or whatever it might be. Mm-hmm well, the great thing about this, according to Brian Tracy, is you don't have to be great at any one thing, it's your unique set. That combination of skills and talents you have. We're just trying to find that. OK OK. All right. Thank you. They're amazing. Designers are amazing painters. And if you look really hard, there's somebody much, much better at doing whatever it is you think you're good at, and I don't think that's the benchmark for being good. Just if you think you're in that top 10 percent, you are good. I mean, if you look around and you and you see that you're like above average, is that what are you saying now? OK, I will take above average. That's fine. OK and you're better than average, then Yes. Let's just put that in. OK, see what overlaps? OK OK, thank you. So the thing that I said at the end that you guys may or may not have lost me in terms of the audio, is that. I now have found the thing that I truly enjoyed, the thing that I can do to help others that I'm good at, that combines a lot of the things. That are overlapping. For example, we produce videos on YouTube, so video is a cornerstone in terms of one of my skills, right? We have access to equipment, we have the resources, the manpower. I know how to do it. I know how to tell stories. I obviously understand post-production editing graphics. I'm able to put all that stuff together. And the bigger we grow as a company, the fancier things get, the more clear they become, the bigger the guests are. And that's really great. I do enjoy teaching for a long time, I didn't like being in front of the camera. I'm comfortable being in front of the camera. Now and it's become easier for me. I like designing decks. Putting slides together. Trying to figure out how to tell a story or explain a concept in a simple form. I like doing that, so I'm putting all these things together. And I'm telling you, and I don't think this is an exaggeration. The future is going to be $100 million company to begin with. OK, that'll be the first round of valuation, because that's not a new benchmark. And I'll tell you something, it's a little story. Some of you guys know this story. Early on, when I was still working with Jose, he and I were talking and I said, I think the company is worth $10 million. He's like, Christo, you're crazy. You are crazy. Based on what I said, based on my belief is what? So I was looking to raise $3 million, $3 million to give somebody 30% of the company. And I offered it up to people at Art Center because they have a ton of extra money and they were looking to invest into something. Is it instead of building your own Ave. room, your video production facility? I already have one. I have everything that we need to tell stories through video to teach the world. And because it's a bureaucratic operation, there's too many people in the decision making process that was never going to materialize, but I said, you guys, I said to them and I'm sure they thought, what a cocky mother effort. Who does he think he is? I said, you guys, the way I see it is, I'm giving you preferred stock in the company because I will be your competitor, so it's better to own a part of your competition. OK and this is the best price you're ever going to see it at. I'm going to give it to you for $3 million and you'll get 30% of the company. It'll be worth a lot more. And, you know, obviously the deal didn't happen, and I'm still trucking along here, and I'm so glad it didn't happen because I think that was too low a valuation. And before you guys fall out of your chair and think he is one crazy guy, which I am a crazy person, I had a meeting with my financial advisor. I meet with him once a quarter to kind of talk about what we're doing. Look at our finances, our projections where we should invest more money, et cetera. And I told them about what we're doing, the numbers that we have and where we're going. And he of all people, because he's a numbers kind of guy. He said, I love it. If you need to raise money for the $100 million, let me know. He didn't even bat an eye last. She didn't even like roll his eyes. Not one bit. He was leaning in saying, this is great. Education is hot. This space is really, really hot. And just where you guys as a benchmark, I want you to know, I think the last time I checked and it's probably worth even more than this. But Linda sold lynda.com to LinkedIn for $1.7 billion. Semmi told me now it's even more than that because they had finalized all the paperwork, and it's actually worth more. 1.7 billion, so me saying $100 million company, that ain't nothing. And I think we do something very unique now, we're not anywhere near where we need to be, but we do something very unique. We teach people the soft skills, communication negotiation mindset. This is what they call evergreen content because it doesn't need to be updated because it's not dependent on Adobe releasing Adobe Illustrator 1.7 or whatever it is. It's not dependent on any of that. They had a hard time teaching the soft skills technical training a little bit easier to teach. This is where I'm focusing all of my energy. OK and like I said before, this is the last job I'm going to have. I don't need another job after this. You there's a whole conversation going on the side here. That better to own your competition thing, I will be busting that out later this afternoon. You, well, good. Oh, yeah, I actually have a unique scenario that will apply to quite well. Beautiful so thank you for that little gold Nugget. Sure now, you know, the funny thing is people at our centers like Chris, you did, you're building and I can see it now and you're pulling in instructors from our staff. Our faculty. The community is growing really fast, and one professor who was a part of the conversation had said to me, our students, watch more of your videos than they do with lynda.com. They all know who you are now. That's pretty cool. You can Pat yourself on the back for that. And by the way. Well, I'm not that flexible, but Yeah. All right, you guys. Does anybody want to share any kind of new discovery about themselves, about overlapping circles? Or maybe this is too fast? This is a self-study worksheet that I will be releasing at some point. OK, is out there for you guys right now. You guys can use it. Try to sit down and think about what this is and map out your future. And it doesn't matter if you're early in your career if you're in your early 20s. Mid-30s, mid 40s or be on. It never hurts to sit down and try to assess where you're going before you put all your time and energy into doing what it is you're going to do. Does anybody have any kind of feedback for me? Yeah, because I got some. Oh, OK. Excellent OK, OK, hold on, I got a cool slide. Hold on. All right. OK you're up next. I can't tell who it is, but you're I can see your hand raised up. You can put your hand out. Let let me share this thing. And then because you guys can see this, what? I'm working on it. I think I have to go like this. Sharing the screen. Now you guys see the Batman. Yeah cool. All right. Now you guys are doing your sharing. And then the feedback. See, I spent time looking for the right slides. So, yeah, Chris, this is actually really kind of affirming for me. I kind of did this exercise in a way with my therapist one time. Oh, excellent. Yeah who are you again? What's your name? Peter Broomfield OK. Hey, Peter. Hey, but yeah, I mean, everything that I have here that's circled is like, it's going towards education. Teaching people I have one of my skills is teaching children. I'm the oldest of nine, so it kind of wow, it comes really natural to me where for other people, it scares the crap out of them? Sure but like so making complex things understandable. And I love crafting beautiful things and I like I'm passionate about design with purpose. So it's really. All of that is kind of leading me towards what I want to do long term, which is. What you're doing with the future and designing design education. I would love to create real change in the education system as a whole, not just for design curriculum, but for grades K through 12 for all subjects making. Just totally revising the way we teach kids. Just because I mean, you look where the US ranks in terms of quality of education, and it's just really depressing. So I would love to. Um, one of my parents is also just helping people become their best selves, and I think that you can achieve that best by helping them when they're young to give them the skills that they need to do that. Great thank you for sharing. Yeah, I think you. Now, I want to say something about this, peter, because we're obviously passionate about similar things. Like, I'm passionate about teaching, I want to make a difference in the world. And I. I'm fired up when I teach you guys haven't seen me crazy yet, if you ever go to one of my classes, should I teach again in the classroom, you will see me go bananas where I'm jumping on the table and it just because I'm super passionate about. I'm trying to get my students to wake up, right? The thing is why it's so important for me right now and in the way that it's manifesting itself currently is because now the effort that I put in equals the results that I get. Versus me working for somebody else in their system and their structure. I was butting heads with everything in that it costs in excess of $20,000 to go to school per semester. That it's here in the United states, and there's a lot of people in the world who need top quality education but don't have access to resources and just they're living in Syria right now. They're just trying to survive. But even in that kind of horrible environment, they're still looking for answers and looking to learn. And that is bananas to me. I want to be able to do something that. They can have access to as well, so I'm trying to figure this whole thing out, right? And I'm in it with you in terms of disrupting education right now. My area of expertise is in design and business and that's what I'm going to focus on. But the model, once it's been built, can be applied to anything. So I want you to think about how you can do what you're doing, but do it on your terms. The way that you want that benefits you and your family. OK anybody else, I have any feedback. Anything that was confusing to you, too many prompts, confusing prompts. Whatever else you guys, you guys can say anything, I'm just going to write it down because you guys are the first group that I've given access to this and I'm going to do a workshop at the studio at some point really soon. And I just want to know if there's anything I can do to improve upon this or something that you liked or think, whatever any kind of feedback in that sense or any other story you want to share. Go ahead. I think the Venn diagram that you put together. Yes the overlapping circle really appeals to our designer sense and the nature of us as creative and visual people. So the more of that and more of that sort of diagram esque visuals will help guide us along the process. Yeah OK. Yeah, I mean. OK well, I'm sorry, I messed up more a visual. OK go ahead, Jared. Faraway, man, hey. So you know, all this stuff is awesome, I love it, and I'm just wondering, like, maybe share more of the grit and the grind because sometimes I think when we see an end product, we're just like, oh, cool, you know, and it's like, you know, a little bit more of like. So I know for me, there's a certain work ethic, I think that you put in and stuff that you do to get stuff to where it's at. And I think there's like instead of going from like a to like am or like t to ask me, it's like a more like an A to B to c, like I woke up at 5:30 AM this is what I did. Here's where it's at. Here's where what I mean. I feel like there's like we see a finished product, but we don't know the grit and the grime. And I think for me personally, I know I've gone soft like the past few months just because of certain things. And I'm like, you know, I set my alarm clock now to 5:30 AM because I know like, I want to get back in the, you know, doing stuff and just like pumping other stuff out and everything. But but I feel like I'm missing a little bit of like that grit and grind, you know what I mean, where I think I might add some value. I know what you mean. Jared, I want to ask you a question. I think what does it look like to you if I'm able to deliver on this request about the a to B to c, et cetera, not just and then z? What does that look like to you? What form does that take? I'm just curious, like where did you like, where did you start? Do you know what I mean? I think like. There's like when you put this together, you know what I mean, like, I know. Oh, I see. Like what was like what was going on? Like, you had this other like, do you know what I mean? I feel like, yeah, more of the steps that were taken, for sure. OK, I get that. You know, I had an interesting conversation with Philip. I oftentimes I don't realize this. I think you guys are in agreement here that I think it's because one of my skills is connecting dots, right? So I think, oh, it's pretty obvious to me. And then when I talk to people like, well, that wasn't obvious to us. So you kind of have to give us the recipe. You can't just say, here's this dish. Everybody knows how to make this, right. And I think you're saying that. Yeah, for sure. OK the difference between going to a restaurant and enjoying a steak as opposed to watching it made on the Food Network or the food channel. I think that's what we need to see. OK so I think also along with steps that we're taking, is steps, do you still have to take? Oh OK. Awesome very good one. Very good one. This is very interesting, you guys. I thank you for the feedback, so while I'm loving it, so let's keep going. I have a little bit of a different perspective on the steps, though. Do it? Well, I think when it comes to steps and I like everything we were talking about today because it's more of high level like this is what your purpose and direction ought to be. The steps to take that you have to take to get there is going to look so different for everybody. And so if I look at the steps that you took, I can't replicate that. I can't replicate your life, experience, your sphere of influence, your unique situation. I have to get the high level view of this is the direction that I'm going and figure out how that looks in my life. so I do appreciate listening to people's stories. So I think like telling your story of how you did that, but also like when I read books and things like that, you have to take it with a grain of salt and apply it to your life and kind of eat the meat, spit out the bones and don't try to copy anybody unnecessarily. I see a lot of people, especially like I'm in different networking groups and things like that, and a lot of people get all hyped up on Grant Cardone or Gary vaynerchuk, and they try to be the next Gary V or the next grant Cardone, and they're trying to do exactly what they do. And it doesn't work for them because everybody's journey is kind of a little bit different. OK, Shawn, thank you for sharing that. 100% agreement with you. And that's why I designed this worksheet. And you're absolutely right. Everybody wants to know how you did it and then they try to do it. But that's not the unique set of skills they're trying to be that the number two in the $50 billion and two. Ahmadinejad did what he did. He grew up in a certain time, he was at a certain place. It worked for him. I think what Jared and Philip are saying are a little bit different. If they're looking at this worksheet as a product and correct me if I'm wrong, you guys, they're not saying like, what steps do you have to take to make this work for you? They're just like, curious, how did I come up with this thing? What am I thinking about this and what else do I need to do to launch this thing more like what? What drove you to come up with this concept? OK, I'm going to share a story with you guys. OK, and we're not going to give you all your a to B step by step recipe here, but I'm going to tell you a story and it's an emotional story. I'm going to warn you guys, OK, so you guys can turn off the camera if you want to. I was speaking at Las Vegas two years ago. I think it was two years ago and I gave this talk and something unusual happened in that. A woman stepped up, you know, there's always a few people hang out and want to talk to you. And she waited for everybody to kind of leave and dissipate, and I'm like packing up. She's like, you know, that was an incredible talk. Something you said really touched me. And I don't want you to think I'm a cripple, but can I buy you dinner? She was really super forward and I was thinking, OK. And so my buddy, I think it was Aaron that was there. The Aaron in this group is like, OK, guys, I'll leave you alone, I'm like, dude. Hold on a second. You got to like, take a picture or something. Because if I wind up dead in a ditch, at least you guys know who to look for because this is really weird. But I said, OK, fine, you're not a creep, oh, fine, look, let's go walk somewhere. And we sat down and she just poured her soul out to me, and she the thing that struck her was about finding. It being congruent with who she is, she is, she's gay and she works for. I don't want to send anybody off the rails here, but she works for a church and she said, I think the person, if she knew I was gay, would not want me to be here. She's very clear about her position on it, and I just feel torn because this is how I make money and it's tear me apart inside. I would just love your help. And that's when we sat down. We started talking about these things that you're good at and what you need to do and what you're passionate about. It's all got to align, and I started to do the sketch on a napkin, if you will, the old cheesy napkin thing, right? And we're just talking. I said. Does this help you? And she goes, this was tremendously helpful to me. And then that night, I'm having dinner with one of my friends, Greg Cupich. He comes, we have a nice dinner and we're talking about something. And coincidentally, he's asking me other kinds of questions. I'm like, Greg, I just worked out this diagram, sit down and let's work on this and I'll share this with you. This was awesome. So my process is really reactive. I'm not sitting around thinking, gosh, I wonder if I can make this weird Venn diagram thing that Philip's going to like because it's graphic. I don't really come from that place. If you guys watch the episodes with Melinda, I have no idea what she's going to ask me and we sit down and we talk and we work through a problem. And if one of my wishes for those of you guys that morbidly curious when I have these three five hour classes that I teach, the students ask me questions that I have no idea what they're going to ask and we diagramming we work it out together in the room, and it's pretty magical. And I wish the camera crew were around back then and had the resources to so that you guys can see this and it's a pretty awesome thing. This is really where it comes from, that's the genesis of it, and so I put it on a napkin, I put it in a sketchbook somewhere, and it goes away, and I don't know if you guys can see my camera. Can you see my camera right now? I'm a not the share for a second, so you guys can see this. If I wait my hand, can you guys see me? Yeah OK, you guys, you see this, we're here, you guys. You see this. This is just me, and I'm going to show you more. You know, this is me just jotting things down. And there's a documentary on Woody Allen, and he has a similar thing. And I like, what a crazy guy. What a crazy guy opens the drawer, his nightstand and he pulls out scraps of paper receipts, anything. And he's writing down story ideas all the time. And that's me. And this is just a small stack of stuff. And behind me is a stack this thick of like random conversations I had with people where then I would document and just put it in a drawer. And then later on, I'm like, you know, I keep hearing the same problem. You know, I keep hearing things like, what is this here? Oh, here's the five power spheres, right? I was just making some notes about it, and you guys can't see it probably out of focus. But you know, and I just keep thinking like, what is this about? And then I'm reading this book, which I told you guys about last week. I think the power of self confidence. Powers of confidence and we're reading in here, and it's just like god, this guy's talking about. Dwelling on your strengths. And talking about how we have this unique combination of skills, and I said, wow, that really aligns with exactly with what I want to talk about. So I haven't done the research and the math and the studies. He's done it. I'm just going to pair what he's saying and jam it into what I'm trying to do. And so I'm up to two, 30 last night, just putting it all together. I already had the workbook done. That's not the problem. It was everything else. Right trying to give you guys a reason to believe me. I just want to say what you just said, there was super, super helpful for me. That was the thing to Sean's point, like, give us the meat, give us the bones, give us the fat, whatever. Let us spit out some people want to chew on the bones. Some people like the fat, like, that's all. But let us decide on what we spit out. That's all I want to say, but perfect that kind of stuff. I think the papers, all that stuff like what it gets, what it takes to kind of get there. Yeah, that helps me. So OK, well, thank you, Jared, and thanks, Phillip and Shawn. Yeah, you're welcome. It's actually almost to what I foresee, actually. Maybe even to sum up, what Jared is looking for is that preface to the book. When you open up the brand gap, they don't just dive right in it. They've got that one opening paragraph that really kind of summarizes why the hell it is. They wrote this book in the first place. Why the hell it is that you put this thing together. And what brought you to this precipice? To share this with us. So excellent. Now, guys, I'll say this and you guys can either think I'm silly for saying this or not, but I am a content creating machine. I just sit down and document process, document process. I'm doing a deck week with you guys, right? Depending on what we talk about. And then I'm doing the show, so I don't have that time to sit back and like, oh, I wonder how I could pack because I really don't know what works, what resonates with people. I really don't. So I'm just jamming stuff out. And when I hear Jared and you say, hey, I want a little bit more, I'm happy to stop, pause and reflect and tell you how I got here. The prologue or the preface? Happy to do that, but I wouldn't do that for every single thing that I'm doing because I just really don't know what's valuable to people. That means I would create one third of the content I'm creating because I just sit down and think and give you guys all the story and you said that was a stinker. Nobody wants a behind the scenes DVD featurette for a movie that sucked. So I'm just out making movies, some of them work will do the behind the scenes featurette as people ask for it. I'm responsive, right? That's what I do. OK I love that expression. Eat the meat, spit out the bones and everybody gets to choose what they know and what. They don't eat anything else about that, you guys. And now I want to end this and then I want to open it up to another thing. Anybody else want to share or say anything, any of the feedback? Yeah, Chris. I thought it was really helpful to see your completed worksheet. OK, great example with the things that you wrote down. It helps give some perspective, and when I saw that I actually wrote down a bunch of things that, like I hadn't even thought of great. I would love to see some of your guys' answers so I can include more examples. And the conclusion that led to right, especially especially if it's different than what you're doing right now. And I'm not expecting miracles in 15, 20 minutes of like doing an unkind online thing, but if later on you guys sit there and reflect on like, Oh my god, something's been staring at me this entire time, I've been denying it, and here it is, and I see an opportunity I can make an app or I can do whatever it is. Let me know, please. Let me know. I would love to include you in there generically or with your name in it. OK love to do that. Thank you for saying that. That was Peter Wright. OK Yes. All right, cool. Anybody else? Then I may have four more bullet points here for you if you want to add anything, otherwise I'm going to end it. Let's roll on. OK, so I just want to say thank you for everybody who tuned in today. Hope you find what we did valuable and I'm going to end the video recording.

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