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Work With Me: Keynote

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Chris Do
Published
April 20, 2021

Have you ever wondered how Chris Do put together his Keynotes? Chris Do gives us tips and tricks on how to use Keynote.

Read Transcript
And yes, it is trying to like. A little bit more light on me. OK, so what are we doing today? This is a work with me session. This is the very first one that we've done in a really, really long time. I've done this before, but it's been at least two years since the last time I've done this. The hope here is that I'm going to be able to share with you some pretty mundane mechanical things. But even in that, you might see something where like, hey, wait a minute, I didn't know you could do that, or why are you doing this? So the experiment goes something like this. I'll work. I'll talk a little bit. If it turns out that there are a lot of questions while I'm working, I'll just stop working and I'll just answer the questions and show you something because I can always work on this at any time of the day or night, which is typically what happens. And I want to encourage you, if you see something, go ahead and just unmute yourself and just ask away. This is casual. I'm not offended if you guys are out getting a drink or reading a book or doing your own work. And if you catch a glimpse of something that you want me to go deeper on, I'm more than happy to do that. The only thing I ask is, whatever it is, your default mode should be on mute. And that's it. OK, now typically I jam out to very specific music that puts maybe my brainwaves, my beta brainwaves or whatever they're called into that like trance like state. And then I find that I'm in the zone. So step number one, let's find some music. OK, I'm not going to play the music right now because it may mess up our ability to talk to each other. But so this is really unusual. The fact that there are 40 of you watching me while working is unusual. fact that I'm not listening to my Spotify brain music list keynote writing music, right? Any of your cares what that is? If you find me on spotify, I have something specifically called keynote deck writing or something like that. Literally, that's what it's called, and I play that every single time. And I want to tell you that works for me. You want to find what works for you? Ok? because I find that rituals actually puts your brain kind of at ease. So let's say, for example, tomorrow you have a big presentation. like, Oh my god, I haven't finished what it is I'm doing. I got to finish the logo, the website, the brand document. I've got to finish writing the messaging. Try to repeat whatever it is that you did last time that you were successful. And the more times you do that, the more you can relax and lean into. I got this. I've been here before. I got this. And that's what you want to do. So if it's a favorite pair of socks, if you are in sweatpants and a tank top, if you're listening to brain waves or my specific keynote deck writing playlists, that's what you want to do. Put your mind at ease so you can do the good work. Those are some tips now my feet get cold. I know it's kind of weird. I'm sensitive. I would not survive in Sweden and we just wouldn't. So my feet really get really cold, so I'm wearing little booties right now. You've got there so well warned that there's holes in the bottom of these booties. They're like from The North Face. And so that allows my body temperature to regulate better. And that's another thing that I do. But enough talking, I'm going to go ahead and share. I see the chats going here, so I'm going to ask undress, who I think I saw earlier. If there's something particular interesting, hey, a nice hairdo there. Is there something particularly interesting in the chat? Just interrupt me and we can talk. OK this is casual. I want everyone to know this is not like our normal quote unquote protocols. All right, here we go. So I'm sharing with you my keynote right now, which I think you guys can see. So I'm going to give you a really quick intro and back story to all of this. So you understand what's going on. In 2012, I started doing public speaking and keynote was a foreign tool to me. It's not something I use, so I used it like once every six or seven months. And every time I open up, my god, where is this? And I can't bear anything out today. I can use Keynote and I know a lot of keyboard shortcuts. I can fly through this program really fast. I know how to make a presentation from start to finish in a relatively short amount of time. There's only one person I know who's more pro than me, which is Ashley Smithers. If you know Ashley, she's a professional presentation designer. I design presentations for myself. She designs it for ceos, fortune 500 companies, big tech startups, so she knows crazy, crazy shortcuts and weird things that are just not well documented. All right. Does this look familiar to you? If it does, it's because this is, I think, one of the last whiteboard sessions that we did, ok? And there are not that many slides to it because the whole point of the whiteboard is that I'm going to do some of the writing. And so these are just prompts. So if you recognize this, this is how it begins. It looks something like this for the rich designer, poor designer one. I actually made two keynotes, one for the audience to see and one for the whiteboard. I know it's complicated because the whiteboard, I think I can only load 20 or so slides. So the boys have to like, help me edit this stuff down. But this is kind of what it looks like. This is what is considered like table view. I like looking at light table view for a lot of different things because it gives you a storyboard style format and there's some interface things that you can do at the bottom here. You can Zoom in and you can Zoom out. So it helps kind of like, all right, I know what I'm looking at. And if he hit Command Option I, it'll tuck away the pallet on the right. So that's on Mac Command Option I. And if you're on PC. Good luck. I have no idea. Actually, this doesn't work on pc, so it's an option. OK, so that's handy to do so that you don't have to go to the Windows anytime you can learn a keyboard shortcut. I recommend that you do that. All right. So a couple of other things. But the tools your came up. You can rearrange things really quickly, you can just move stuff around like that, you can just drag it. But when I rehearse, instead of going from slide to slide, I look at all the slides and I just scan through and I kind of read through it in my mind, and I'm looking for points where it's awkward because, like many things, stories, sequential design, anything that's linear. You've got to look at flow. So if you have a slide, Eric, what the heck? How did I jump to this? Then you might want to put a transition slide in between and that's critical. So great public speakers, they're able to speak about one topic from one point of the story to the next. And you're just like, it's like a roller coaster ride. You're just there and you're not aware that you're even on a roller coaster. So that's something that I look for in flow. OK so looking for the brakes there? So I'm going go back to Navigator view. Typically, I do not have the show presenter notes up because typically there are no presenter notes, and it just taken away valuable screen real estate. But if you were doing a more buttoned up presentation and it needed to fit a specific timeline and you're nervous about your words, you put your bullet points down here. And when you go to present, you can see all those things and hide that. All right. So the slides here are all driven by. My master slides, so I have a bunch of master slides, and I used to build these one at a time every time. It was a pain in the butt. You definitely don't want to do that. I just realized something. This is not the correct template. But I'm going to fix it because this is all about doing the work together. Ok? I noticed several things. One is the date is wrong, so don't Zoom into that. And if you're thinking about what is this work? let's see here. This should have work, but I don't know why it didn't. Anyways, I got to change this. To 21. I got to change this to 21 now I have this done already in many other templates because I had to deal with that. But since I'm trying to show you something here, I'm in the Master Slide. So you can see that I have a lot of master slides and I don't want to go in and change all those. So the simple thing I'm going to do. I'm going to copy this. I'm going to copy this at the bottom. And I'm going to go in and I'm going to delete these. And just great Grades Copy the whole thing. And just paste it in there. Now, unfortunately, I have to do this manually. And I go through and change all these, so I'll just do that real quick. Now you'll notice you while I'm working here, there are a couple of things that have these picture icons. These are called placeholders. You could do it for text. You could do for images. There's a lot of things you can do it for. There's something that's unique when you do these, when you go and make a new slide from the master. They're placeholders. So you can drag and drop anything in there and we'll swap out. It'll retain the position and the cropping. Super handy. So intuitive. In a way, I wish that other Adobe Creative Cloud software would just handle things like that. And it's one of the reasons I love keynote. So I have to go through and do these for all the dark slides, so typically I have mostly dark slides and I would recommend when you're designing a keynote to use dark slides. I wasn't aware of this before, but when I started to present and speak on a stage, the screen behind you is enormous. It is enormous. And when the screen is bright, guess what happens to everyone's eyes? It's like, wow, it's like shining a light, a flashlight in their eyes. And so a lot of us, like clean white layouts, they're not good for a darkened theater. Very different if we're talking about presenting via Zoom. You don't have to take those into consideration. But what you want to do? There's a really good Ted Talk from a guy who's like death by Powerpoint, and he gives a really good talk. And he has like five or six points that he shares their fairly basic. But they're good and they're good for anyone who is not a designer. And he says he comes up on stage. I am and have always been the presentation. This and he points to this presentation are visual aids. Your Powerpoint, your keynote is not the presentation, you are your performer. Like it or not, that's what you are. You're performing on stage, you're delivering words and you're moving your body. It is a performance. So he said that if the slide is distracting or too bright, that's where people look. They have to decide, am I going to look at you or am I going to look at your visual aids? So that's another reason why he's like, you know, be very mindful of what your presentation looks like from the point of view of the audience and is it going to be detracting from you giving your presentation? I'm not going to do all of these because it's going to be very, very tedious. But you notice, like when I say I cycle through these things. That I have very specific different types of slides, and I've figured out in my life that these are pretty much the ones that I need. Now when you're designing your very first PowerPoint keynote presentation, you're not going to know what your master slides are. So what I recommend is forget the Master Slide. Start with a blank one. So when you open up keynote, let me do this. How do you open up a new one? Just see this one. Oh, OK. It won't show you the new one. Let me just stop the share here. Let me try one more time. this is one. All right. When you opened up a new presentation, this is what it looks like, it's kind of nasty considering this is apple, it's like Apple. Call me. We need to work on this. This is a horrible default presentation template. But when you go to Edit a slide, this is what Apple thinks you need. And this is for people who know nothing about design. Which is a huge portion of the population. So presentation, title, blah blah blah sub. And it's made to function really well. It just doesn't look very good. All right, so that's what you have, so the most important one is this one called blank. What I would do is I would go in and delete every other one. Literally go in, select that and go up to here. I can't delete the title slide because it's reference right now. I'm going to delete all of these. Because I don't want any of these things. And I'd like to start with the clean presentation slide as possible. Now this one has its title here, I'm going to have to delete this one too. But the only way I can delete that is if I create a new slide and switch this slide to. Blank now I can go and edit this master slide, and I'm going to go delete this title slide. Or I'm going to go and change it myself. Either one is OK, but let's just say I'm going to delete it, so I'm going to delete this sucker. I have to choose a different one. Going to choose this. OK, we're done. All right. Delete this. So what I recommend that you do at the very beginning is to figure out your Footer and your header, so I'm going to paste my old one in here, which obviously it's not working. We try again. And I'll tell you why you do this. OK, so going to paste on it, why can't I paste anything in here? Based come on. OK doesn't want to let me paste in here. I can't believe this. I think sometimes when we're on Zoom and sharing screen that things, honey. Yeah, Yeah. OK this is I've never seen this before. Anyways, the foot in the header. So you're going to start out with this text and this is critical here because there's a brand new document and this is your master, right? So it's selected Helvetica Noia. And I use Helvetica now display. Why? because I was giving it. Inexpensive typeface, relatively speaking, unless you buy a font bundle. And I want to switch it to this, and it's point size and all the stuff, I want to make some adjustments here, so I'm going to type in my normal stuff. Let me just reference what I just I normally type. OK, so I usually type in bright. Brought to you by the future. And what else do I do? OK, put a copyright date, so think it's option, see there it is. 2021 the future comma LLC or something like that. So I'm going to select. I don't need to select it, actually. I'm going to go to text. I'm going to make sure it's justified. Lef, I'm going to adjust the lighting here. This is important. And I'll tell you why in a second. And the point size and weight, all that stuff. So I'm going to use Helvetica now display regular. Now, what I want to do is I want to hit Update to the caption. Because every time I use the default. Type, it will set it to this, this is really important as you start, if you start building out your slides based on the caption preset, when you go to update that it'll mess up all the other things, it'll default back to this. It's horrific. So now it's the time to do this. So I'm going to update. OK, so that's my default. And I want to kind of out of the way, and this might be a little bit big, but we'll just work with this for now. OK and what you want to do is you want to fill up the header and the Footer trapping uses the Footer and the header very creatively. He changes the header to be an inside joke. So as you look at his slides, it'll say something else in the top left and it's pretty funny. He's a pretty, he's a pretty good writer. And it captures his personality. So if you have a clearly defined personal brand, you may want to already start to modify some of these things. OK I like having little detail things on the page because it makes the hero slide like just with type look beautiful. So I works a lot with contrast. It needs something big next to something small. It needs something bold next to something light, something textured and something clean or smooth. Lines and extra circles, all those kinds of things. All the rules of textural contrast come into play. So that's really what you want to do. Now, if I were to hit New text again, if I did this right, it says Helvetica now display over here you see this. So it's no longer set to have annoy a regular. And my letting the space between lines is already set. So that's kind of nice. That's what happens. That's what you want to do. So I'm going to finish typing here at 2021. I'm going to highlight this part the 21. And if you hit Command b, it'll make it bold. Another thing that I like about this, that Creative Cloud will not do for reasons I'm sure to have really good reasons, but it's kind of annoying to me. So that makes my life much, much simpler now things work like when you're designing your thing, you won't know what to say, and I'm not telling you to do this exact thing. I'm just saying, this is what I do. And so you're looking for your version of this. All right. And if you're a designer, you know, you'll know what to do if you're not a designer, you'll figure it out. OK, there's a couple of other things I put in here, just because I like the little detail stuff. And so you'll figure it out, you know, whatever it is there, it's done. I realize one other thing this text is set to center vertically. Sometimes you want it to be on the top or on the right and left, things like that. You probably need to change those things as you go. So these kinds of things like, say, for example, what's today, July 14th, 2021 I wouldn't do this because you would use a text thing that would automatically put the date in for you because the changes manually on every slide would kill you, right? So I'm going to just try some other things here, just really simply. Some graphic elements. If you've taken my topography course before, this is going to sound like old news, but. Approximately equals relationship. So when this gets closer to this, these two elements feel like a group and they belong together, whereas this little sucker feels like an orphan to the whole thing. But what you can do is if I add a line to it. Its proximity to these elements tells the viewer, the reader, these things are related. So lines anchor things together. It groups information for you. OK, now they're together, but they're also separate. So if I do this, you'll see. Something happening here. All right. So these things will be grouped together and separated, so this further cements the grouping and the anchoring of these elements. And so now we're starting to do something. I don't know what this looks like yet, but we can continue now when we have a lot of linear elements. I want to have a circular element, and so that's why I do this. Let me go, grab an element here. Any questions so far? I got two funny comments and one question. Can I start with the funny one? Yeah so Irving says, my wife got me Uggs because my feet are always cold. That was very funny. And then Joe luper, I believe. Death by PowerPoint is what we called every presentation in the military. All right. Get into the question, Connor. Ask for the PC crew. What's the best keynote equivalent? A PowerPoint. PowerPoint is actually more ubiquitous than keynote. So it's even more popular, right? So that's kind of what you would want to use, so here's the logo, the future program badge. So there it is. It's enormous. This is created by former pro group member Steve Irwin just as a favor to me. It is such a wonderful job. Because I wanted this official seal looking thing, and in case some of you guys have seen this. It's also the background to our clubhouse moderator badge is literally what it is, right? So I'll talk more about that later. I don't talk about it right now. So the way we see each other. So like when I put this in here, you'll see that it does something. It adds a different thing for our Eye. A different focal point. It's not quite centered, but. And so this is what you're looking for, you're looking for round things next to sharp things, linear things, so and so we create contrasts. So if I select this line. And this line is 4 points, so if I reduce it to two points, that creates contrasts between the four point line and the two point line. I can further increase the contrast by selecting those two things and using dots. So it looks like little perforations and a piece of paper, and that has a nice little visual thing. Oh, it's pretty cool. And so you keep doing this until you get your foot and your head or the way you want. So this isn't centered now, but I'm going to make it centered. It's another thing I like about keynote. It's very smart. So what you want to do is you want to turn on view. I think somewhere near a window, it's a smart guides or something like that. I can't remember where it is. Maybe it's under preferences here. You guys can't see this, but let me see. Go to keynote preferences. Where is it? Going to rulers. And check off all the alignment guides, turn them all on Show Guides at the object center at the edges, relative sizing, the relative spacing used haptic feedback when snapping to guides. OK in case you guys don't have those same options. So when I moved things around, it will tell me, you know, this is a center to the document, dude. That makes sure, like I'm not freaking out. I know this is a center. And so you can keep designing here. Now this little sucker is no longer aligned to that line, so when you move it and it gets close, look what happens. It highlights it. Well OK, I need to add some text. Excuse me. So what I'm going to do is if I option drag something and send a copy, it just if I left. Bring it over here. I must say, you know, funny side joke. Lives up here, you could do these in all caps if you want for more contrast. You can do whatever you want. Now I'm going to then. Duplicate this text, you'll see that there's a bunch of typo over here, none of which I like. And what I do in the very beginning is I delete all of these so that I create my own text presets, my paragraph styles. So if you click on this little thing. And I'm going to go and delete the style. And you can literally go in and do this for every single one. And this is how you begin. And once you have this set up, you would just duplicate this keynote template and it should work. So there's one for attribution. The only one that's living right now is. Caption one. OK, I like tidal and I like tidal small. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to change this the title. And this is a pretty good point size, but of course, again it switches to have Attica Noia. I go to America now, display in some bold where it should be, I'm going to make some adjustments here and I already see that there's too much letting between each line. So I like it nice and tight up there. You don't want it to get into a point when the letters run into each other. This obviously hurts legibility, and that's a problem. So right around six or seven should do the trick. It starts out at eight. OK so I'd work on that now if this is going to be my title, this is the biggest typekit that we're going to be. I want really big type. Maybe even bigger than this. And for display type, you want to make sure you're letting us really tight, so I might even decrease this one more. Now there's a chance that if the letter J appear above the age that they're going to run into each other, I'm going to keep my eye on that. But I like it nice and tight like that. Kind of. If you look at Massimo McNeely, he's going to design his Helvetica really tight. But it takes a keen eye to make sure nothing runs into each other, otherwise you have to like, lay it out a little bit differently. See, right there the lie and the why that's messed up, so maybe just for my sanity, I'll increase it there. OK, there's one other thing that you need to do. If I hit return, I'm like, Hello. Now there's no difference between these two paragraphs. So what I want to do is I want to after paragraph, I want to insert some extra space. So I'll be like, do 60 just enough. So it feels there's a little extra space, but not so much that they're so far apart. So I'm working on what will become the new default for Title. So let's say that's what that is. So now if I select this, I'm going to go to title. I'm going to hit Update. So it makes this now the new default set setting for tidal, and then I would do one for small tidal, et cetera. So I'm going to keep doing this. I'm going to delete the Hello. With this up, and then I'm a duplicate this down. And I'm going to call this one. Title small. Again, I'm going to go through and change the display. Working just fine. I want to see how these two live next to each other. Again, this is maybe a little too tight or too wide for me. So right now, this doesn't look very good and it's OK. I'm just working through this part. So maybe this needs to be a little smaller. Maybe you should not be bold. That's regular and like regular, maybe we do light. OK these two seem to work a lot better. Can you see the difference in size and contrast? These things work really well. OK, so I'm going to go up here and just for now hit Update. So now it inherits those attributes again. OK, we're almost ready to go here. So as you continue to design this, you'll figure out that all right, now I'm ready and I'm using these things. So what I'll do is I'll duplicate this. This might be my title slide template, and I'll just keep working on this. And as I'm working on it, I'm going to make some changes. Totally OK. Now, if you do like five slides and you're like, OK, that kind of feels like everything one slide you're always going to have to build is the quote slide. All right. So I'm going to go here. I'm going to say this is the quote slide. Actually, I have a bunch of things ready to go and it pulls a lit up. You guys can't see this part, but I keep a document using paper Dropbox Paper and it's called quotes, and I'm starting to be a little bit more organized now for my. And it's called quote bucket, and I'm just going to grab one of my favorite quotes. Here we go from Jim Rohn. They're organized by People Now. Now, when I pasted it in here from paper, it's important I don't just take Command V because it'll look like this. Oops but what I want to do is hit Command Option shift v, which pace and matches style at the same time. And it's not a bad looking slide thing here. All right, so this is our quote, template or slide. And here. I know I need a couple of things, one is I want to make sure it's a line to the top. So I'm going to click over here. Otherwise, it looks all right. I want to check for letting you know it's going to run into each other. No, it's fine. And then I'm going to hit text here and. I'm going to put it here. This is based on the caption thing, so it's really small. I want to change this to 48 point now this is light, so therefore this should be light. All right. OK, so this is Jim Rohn. And I like to make it two lines because it looks better. So I will say author, entrepreneur. Something like that. And as I look at this, I think the letting is too far apart, and it's confirmed here because it says this 0.9. I want to reduce this down to say, Chris. Yeah and Emily wants to know the last shortcut that you just use. Um, Command Option should be replaced. Hazmat style. Was that it? Yeah, it's a face in that style. Yeah pace and match style, right? So it's starting to come together here. Right so this I want to make sure it's at the top. Now this one is based on the caption, oh, if I hit Update now, all this will get changed. I don't want to do that. So I'm going to go over here. I'm going to do the carrot thing down, toggle this thing down and hit the plus sign. And I'm going to say author. It's like that. So now I'm going to build up my text presets one by one. So this is starting to look pretty good. It's not bad. You may start to freak out and say, dude, this is too close to the edge for print, it's fine and for most modern screens, it's fine. But if you're living in a country where the projector is a little wonky, what you want to do is you want to inset this in a little bit. It'll look pretty good, but you may want to bring this in as well. So that this doesn't run to the edge. And it's a very simple adjustment then. And you have a little bit more breathing room here. So from a design point of view, I want to make sure I have the maximum screen real estate, so I'll just leave it there. All right. Let's continue on. So I'm going to open up another image here. I have a lot of folders and systems in place that allow me to be able to produce keynote presentations really fast, so I actually have a folder here. This is obviously not Jim roan, this is JK Rowling. I'm going to bring JK in here because she looks so good. Put it in here. And that she's already cut out, and I'll prove it to you, because if I change the background color, you'll see I spend time cutting out every single person. It is a pain in the buttocks. It really is. If you are a nut like me, this is your life. Cutting out images if you're not, you can use, use, remove BG a website. It's pennies per cut out. But the cutout is not perfect. But I'm a nut. I want it to be perfect. I've tested it. It does a pretty good job. It gets you 85% of the way there, and for everybody here who's not a maniacal designer, just use remove BG. Your life is not worth it. OK your life is not worth spending hours cutting in and then repainting the hair, which is literally what I do, and I will show you how to do that in a second. So now I kind of have a template here, but I'm going to switch this back to Black. Think, Alex, not too bad. And she lives in front, if you don't like her living in front, you send her to the back. And so it creates that dimensionality like there's a pane of glass with topography floating on top of her. That's something that you could decide if you want. Now, one thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to do, I'm a selector. I'm going to hit Command. Option shift, I. No command option, no command, shift Command Option. What the hell? Command control high there is. I'm sorry. I Command Option control. I makes her a placeholder image. See that little icon, the picture icon at the bottom command option, control the bottom three left keys on the keyboard. We'll make our placeholders. So now I can go and pick someone else. I can just drop in my friend and see who I want to drop in here. Oh, boy, I have too many options. Marie, for Leo, is that how you say her name? This drop in. And then boom. I need to go back in, this is not this is a PhD. When you when you cut out images via PSD, which is what this is, you're going to have some problems. It leaves a ghosting around it. It's not perfect. If you export it as a PNG, it gets rid of the ghosting. So I've dropped her in now. She looks pretty good. Most of the time because the lighting, the color correction and all that kind of stuff, it's really funky. I just make my images Black and white. So if your image isn't already Black and white, you just go over the image and you just take saturation, you bring the sucker down. And then you solve that problem. But if you click this a little slider switch thing over here, let me bring this over. I don't know if you can see. Can you guys see the levels? Yeah, OK, cool. This is where I'll go in injustice, so I'll bring the exposure down a little bit and bring the midpoint up or down to get more mid tones in there. Right, you can see that suggesting her flesh tones and it's looking a little bit better. And so that's really all you need. I mean, you need love and you need money, but for keynote, that's all you need. OK, so this is starting to look like what I would consider a quote slide. And so I know that there's title slides, there's body slides, there's blank slides and all that kind of stuff, and you'll make all that stuff. And as you do that, what you can do is you can go and select all these things copy, go into your master page, create a new one. Paste it in there. Set it up and title it something. And that's how you build keynote template from scratch. You need to do your color palettes, and so I'll show you how to do your color palettes right now. I'm going to go to New slide. I have colors somewhere. I'm not that organized for this. So let me find my color palette. I know it's part of the styles. What is it, my Instagram carousel clinic? Any other questions so far? I got one from Rachel Black and she asks, does keynote have any kind of balanced, ragged edge option for text? Balance rag text option, what does that balance, ragged edge? No option that I'm aware of. This is how I balance the rag. I do this until it looks good to me. For example, if this said this one's a problem, you see how the rag on the right here, it's starting to create a shape and you want it to be evenly uneven. You want it to go up, down, in and out, up and down, in and out kind of like that. So when it starts to look like this and you want to break up the pattern? You may want to hit a hard return here, so you select the space and you hit Shift Return and then it will force a return there and it'll give you more of an in out, in out thing. I've got a new problem that we have an orphan or a widow, depending on where you're from in America. This is called the widow in Europe, it's called an orphan, it's the same thing, it's to have a hanging word at the bottom. It doesn't look good. So you have to make adjustments there. If I'm writing the copy, I just add another word for more amazing wisdom. Problem solved. This is not a beautiful rag, either, but the other way that you can solve this problem, Rachel, is to continue to adjust this to delete and remove words or just control the line break. This would look better. And you just keep adjusting, that's all you can do if you're really, really. Hung up over typesetting and fine adjustments and letting and kerning or tracking, don't use Keynote. But I think this is a good thing. I think, you know, it was designed. To force you to focus on the big ideas. It doesn't give you those micro adjustments that we're used to in a Creative Cloud suite. It really doesn't, and it just makes designers angry. And I think it's on purpose. Focus on the big idea. I got two more questions for you, Chris. Go ahead. Could you run into copyright issues using other people's always sorry, I skipped corners. So those questions, would you? Where do you grab the photos. And if you don't own them? Where do you credit the photographers? And then I have another question that's very relatable in relation to that. I don't own any of the photos except for the ones that use from shutterstock, which are legitimate. And I guess I have a license to use. I really don't own it either. Most of the images from authors comes from the web, and I spend a lot of time looking for high quality images. Diving sometimes into people's Facebook pages because they're not tagged properly. So Google can't find it. Save, for example, I have beautiful images from Seth Godin. Seth sent me a high Res headshots of him and he said whenever possible, please credit the photographers. I like that. So in each photograph is the name of the photographer. So Jill Greenberg is one of those photographers whenever I use it. I put in her credit because he specifically asked me to and I know who the photographer is. In most cases, I have no idea. I can't credit anybody. There's nothing that I can do there beyond that. So if I credit a photographer, what I would do is something like this, I'll just duplicate this. I will. Then let's see why I won't let me do this. This is curious. Usually all let me rotate this, I don't know why it didn't not letting me do this. I'll rotate it and I'll set a photo by. Jill Greenberg. And then I'll make this sucker really small because I don't want it to be too distracting. Right and I'll just put it over here. Tuck it away. Outline it to that. Oops certainly better lighting for me. OK, I'll do something like that sort of out of the way, and I might even change the transparency down a little bit too, because it's just jumping out. So I've done what I needed to do. I've given credit. That's fine. Issues of copyright. Believe it or not, I've spoken to an IP attorney and my attorney, two different people. And they're saying things like as an educator, one who teaches, which is who I am. If you're using it for critique and and there's something called fair use, which says, I cannot talk about Seth Godin without showing Seth Godin's face. That's a theory. And you can still be sued, but I don't think they're going to sue you. OK, I've made 1,300 videos. I've used all kinds of assets. I use it in educational context. And then the question comes, what if you did this for workshop and you sold the workshop? In the IP, attorney from New York who deals with photographers, she's usually fighting for the rights of photographers. She said it's still OK, you're teaching. Where where it becomes problematic for you is if you're talking about general concepts and you use Tom Cruise's image. Because I'm not talking about Tom Cruise. This is not a quote from Tom Cruise. Now it doesn't fit into fair use anymore. You may be having some issues with copyright infringement. But in all the years that I've done keynote design and presentation and have gone to talks, events, conferences, they use all kinds of imagery. Imagery as memes and everything else, and people have a good laugh. I've never heard of one time when someone was sued. It's a good question. As long as you're a teacher, you can get away with a lot. OK, next question. That's so cool. The next question is from Gabriel is, Chris, do you ever use a grid on your presentation? Very good question, and the answer is I do not. I think if you haven't put in 10,000 hours of design, I would recommend probably a great. You notice that even snapping your grids, I didn't do any of that stuff. And if you probably should use a grid, Ben burns uses a grid. Everybody else I know uses a grid. But I've done enough layouts now where I get a feel for the spacing, the rhythm, the cadence, and then I can work it out. Like, right now, this is not a good layout and I'll tell you why and I'll point it out. OK when you designed for as long as I have 25 plus years, you become just keenly aware and you pick up on these things about spacing. And what you don't want to do is you don't always want to have even rhythm here, right? So you can see they're not exactly the same, but they're very close. And so you want to adjust those spaces. To break them up. And then things will look better or worse, depending on how you do this, right? So when you have a grid, the grid makes you aware of space, the space that you don't see the space between lines. And so that's why you'd want to do that. OK, now somebody might be looking at this thing. Chris, that's a quote, where are the quotes? I don't like putting in quotes because they're a pain in the ass. I'll show you. But this is a stylistic thing versus like, should you do it or shouldn't you do it? To be clear, you should put in quotes and you want to use smart quotes by default because this is a Mac computer. Smart quotes are going to be put in for you automatically. Now you notice it should look like a six, so it should look like 66 and this one should look like 99. Not the mark, which is like a stick of vertical line. Now we put this in all kinds of problems here. Does anybody know what the problems are? Go ahead and yell it out. What is the problem? What happened when I put it in the quote? Go ahead. An indentation on the adult terminology, but your boy who said that, what's your name? James James James, welcome to the call. You mark it. Are you or I don't know what you do? I forget. Financial investment? Yeah, I do. Financial advising. Yeah, it's pretty good that James kind of figured it out, but that's not the correct term. So four points on the board, what is it called? Hello yeah, I hear you. Well, there is a space of about why and that is not correct. Right? there's a space above what I like to do. There that Mark's about why on although a lot of white, Yes. Yes, team thing that you're saying. Yeah, James said the exact same thing. It's up to call margin alignment and getting closer. What's that hanging? Punctuation hanging punctuation. Winner, winner. Chicken dinner. Hanging, punctuation. You want to hang the punctuation outside the paragraph? I'll show you how you can do this. I'm not going to show you the painful way, the painful way is so painful, you will just cry, you just cry. Don't you want to show to you? I'm going to show you the dirty way to do it. OK Hong Kong rules right now. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to cut this thing out. My OCD heart is much better. OK, but what you need to do is now you take this. You just duplicate it over, OK, and you select all and you do quote. This is so dirty, like, Oh my god, I can't believe it. So now I'm going to manually put this sucker over and I'm going to adjust it until it feels OK to me. And now. You've solved a dilemma. There was near crisis. We're going to call the United Nations and call the topography police on you. We have a couple of problems now. I designed this not to accommodate for anything else outside this margin, so now we have a problem where we might want to slide this in just a little bit to line up with that. But now everything else feels funny. So typography is about adjusting things as you add things, so you have to deal with all that stuff. I hope that makes sense. OK that's how you have to do this. I will someday when you guys say, torture us, kill us. This will be like hostel, the horror porn film torture porn. I'll show you how to do this. The most complicated way, and you're like, oh, thank god, you didn't show a sign to do that. It's so painful. OK, this is one of those problems with typography. I mean, they should just add a button right here is just hanging punctuation. Hit that button and it'll be done. Alas it's nowhere to be found. OK that's how you do it, it's really dirty, so if you change the point size, if you move things around, this will no longer match. But right now they do match. All right. A couple of little tricks here from typesetting before I get into color. If you want to call emphasis to something like the word don't, there's a lot of things you can do. I really do wish you could bold it. That helps. You can bolt it and change of color. That helps even more. Like right now, you can't look at anything else but the word wish you can do other things. You can hit Command you, which will underline the bold yellow word. And there's, like many degrees of which you can work on this until it becomes like the most, the strongest contrast that you can do. So underlining helps sometimes, especially if you don't have dissenters. So Command Shift Command you. I'm sorry. So Command B command you. I don't know what strikethrough is. somebody can tell me what strikethrough is where you cross it out. That also helps depending on what you're doing. Anything that creates difference between the texts that are left and to the right will bring it out. A let me undo that, so I can then also, I don't recommend doing this unless you know what you're doing. You can also go all caps. Don't wish. For less change. OK OK, let's get into colors. These are the default colors here. OK sorry, can I ask a question before colors? Yeah is that ok? It's so funny in the chat. Everybody like having a problem with obesity. That's funny. OK, but font size when it comes to sizes, I don't know. Do you say readability or legibility? Either one is fine quality when it comes to that. If you have a really big audience like what's the smallest size you use? If you have a really big audience, I mean, I mean, if you do a presentation and you know, that's going to be like a really big audience there. And people need to see it like from far, far away, like what's the smallest font size you use? I would avoid I would try to make the type as big as possible. OK generally speaking, if you want them to read it, make it big, if you don't care they read it, then it doesn't matter. So this point size down here is 24 points, I believe. Yeah, it is. And that's getting really close to not being something that somebody can read. And I refer to this as mouse type. Yeah and it's not meant to be read. OK, so if it's meant to be read what is the smallest? I would say 30 six, 48 points. OK, Thanks. Yeah, but when I say that, I say that cautiously because look, what happens here? Let's say I put it in a shape behind this. And I'm going to make this not wait, but. They make it yellow. Send us their back. OK, now at some point you can pick a color. That makes 48 point type. Very hard to read, which this is now quite hard to read because of contrast. It's more important that you focus on contrast than any hard rules anally. Because you're right, Chris, you said 48 point work. I'm like, yeah, but then you put this yellow background on it, and now it makes it really hard to read. And you can make you can make adjustments, you know, like our goal. Yeah, it's not as. Well, now that's problematic because there's no contrast, so then what you have to do is you have to go in here and you may have to make this dark. Then it's legible again, so it's always this push and pull between these variables that you're playing around with. OK the mistake that a lot of people make is they put too much copy on a page, and so just make another slide. Let's just say this quote was twice as long. What is my alternative? One, make the point size smaller to edit the quote down. Or three? The preferable option is duplicate this and make it live across two slides. So you break it, and then what I would do is do something like this. And then do the option semi-colon to create what is that called? The three dots, epsilon. I think that's what it's called ellipsis. I think this ellipsis. Yeah, ellipsis. And then that way, then the next slide can finish the idea and close out the quote. And that works to. I want to show you one other typesetting thing here. My template is going to get a little crazy or my layout. Our numbers are amazing use numbers, numbers are beautiful and letters are abstract, but numbers that are even more abstract because they just look like Mark's random marks. Look how gorgeous that looks. And you can use really big numbers. If you wish. So when it comes back to the grid question, if I wasn't paying attention. And I don't know where grids and layouts, I might have put it here. So it's not aligned to this and it's not aligned to this. But I kind of know that that's where it needs to be. And if I don't like the way this looks. It can also stop it over here and just leave this floating, there's a lot of different tricks that we can use. OK any other questions? I think, Anil, you had more questions, but no, no, I'm fine. Thank you so much. And I think like this when I do carousels, but I never thought about it in a Keynote presentation. So thank you. Why? why the difference design is designed, right? I don't know. You know, I'm not there. I don't think about that. So much. But this was really valuable. Thank you. If you guys think those of you that are really into fashion when you put yourself together in the morning for a big presentation, you're designing. You don't want to wear denim on denim, on denim. And if you do, then you need to use different kinds of denim, like salvage denim next to, well, washed denim, and you want to use different textures and patterns. If you're going to wear a polka dot shirt, don't wear a polka dot tie unless the pattern is a different size, because then it looks like all the same or wear polka dot tie. That's a different color or inverted like instead of Black on white, white on Black. I love color blocking and patterns. It's really fun to play with. And so the law of the land in design is contrasts. Contrast is everything. So when you're putting yourself together from a fashion point of view, you're making these conscious and sometimes subconscious decisions. Then when you lay out your room, you're doing the same thing. So the whole point of design is to educate your eye, to be able to pick up on these things so it permeates everything that you do. So even the way you lay out the books on the shelf, you start thinking about contrasts grouping and breaking up groups by subject, by height, by color, et cetera. OK all right, I need to show you one other thing about color, so I need to find this thing. So as I'm doing that, you guys can continue talking. Ashley had this really funny comment, denim on denim, Canadian tuxedo, baby. But those layers? That's what it is. It's a Canadian tuxedo. Beautiful I actually do wear denim on denim because I'm fascinated by Ralph Lauren's line Double RL. If you guys are your fashion people, it's when you look at guys can look it up. Rl RL is the brand. It's denim over the top. But the way they do it. You got to like, buy all the pieces because then it looks right. So I'm a little fascinated by that. And if you are into fashion at all, I highly recommend the Netflix series something on Ralph Lauren. I forget what it's called, but explains the story of how he built his billion fashion empire, it's fascinating because Ralph Lauren is not a designer. He doesn't know. So he does not know how to draw. Still, it's like, how did they even create this fashion designer and brand from him? What he is, and he's innovative. He's a storyteller. Wait, what? Storyteller, in fact. Yeah so he prides himself as a fashionable person, and he would go to thrift stores and buy different pieces of clothing and put himself together like this ensemble, and he'd walk around New York City and people would take notice. Right and. He he was he got his big break. I think it was either Bloomingdale's or Saks Fifth Avenue and they invited him to show his line right. And so normal people just put clothes on a rack. Ralph Lauren went out and did all the shopping and staging. So he created a world for the clothes to live in. And I think he was the first person to do this. And so he would buy like a trunk, like an old, well-worn trunk and put the box there and hang all kinds of accessories and accoutrements, if you will, just objects all over. And he created a story. It was a vignette. So when people walked by, they were just all looking at this like, yes, I want to belong to that. Now here's the key insight into Lauren's genius. He just loves watching movies. He wanted to wear the clothes in the movies. Let's say gone with the wind. He wanted those clothes or the Great Gatsby or whatever the films were of the day, and he couldn't because those were well researched. And there's a wardrobe department and they put it together. So he's like, if I could buy those clothes, I would, and he couldn't. So he just built them. He just made them. Right, so Ralph Lauren is fascinated by a couple of things the Safari. And the Western. And this whole East Coast Hampton lifestyle in the movies that influenced them. And so then I look at his collections and his different lines, I'm like, Wow. It totally makes sense. And throughout the film, four or five people who know Ralph really well said that if he could have gotten a role as wardrobe stylist in the movies, there would be no Ralph Lauren. The fashion line. He didn't have the training. He didn't do that. So he's a curator in the purest sense of the word. He's a curator designer's work around him and he's like, I like that. No, let's go Boulder or whatever, right? So he's really into westerns and America and Americana and Native Americans. And so I'm watching the good, the bad and ugly or fistful of for Clint Eastwood. Now I love Spaghetti Westerns. They're called Spaghetti Westerns. There's a debate about this because Italians revived the Western genre. Sergio Leone. Right, beautiful and Clint Eastwood. He's got a beautiful face. Let's just face it, he just he's incredible just to look at and you're looking at him like, Wow. And so he's wearing what Cowboys wore in the day. A hat, and he's borrowed a lot from, I think, Mexican fashion. The poncho, the scarf and the denim, and then you look at each and every one of the characters like, damn, their sharp looking. Now, as a kid watching these spaghetti westerns, I always thought like, so cool, pull up the gun and shoot the other guy. Oh my God. It's all about that. Now is a 50-year-old man having understood the narrative behind Ralph Lauren. I go in and watch these things. I'm like, Everybody just let me freeze the frame here. The scarf? So I don't know if you've noticed this in the last year or so, a year and a half. You see me wearing my handkerchief tied around my neck because I'm standing there. This is hilarious in front of the TV on Netflix. Look, let me see. It's just how do you do that? Ok? and then the hat. OK, OK. Meanwhile, my wife walks by her. What are you doing? I'm like, nothing. Nothing I'm going to become Ralph Lauren. So you go to the source. I don't want to copy Ralph, I want to copy what Ralph copied. And so if you look at all these amazing movies, you know, like people used to know how to dress in America, they used to know how to dress turn of the century. 1900s you know, or I'm sorry, early part of the 20th century. The way the pants and the hat. They knew how to dress, and Tua looked sharp. That's what I'm going back to. So if you ever see me like Chris thinks he just walked out of a Western. It's true. It's totally true. All right. See what you did there, actually, you took me on a whole tangent. I just wanted. What did you what did you call it last week? The poor man's ascot? Yes, that's what she called it last week. I didn't even know the word Ascot. OK, I'm interviewing Brian Collins. I'm interviewing Brian Collins. He goes, you know, Brian is gay. I mean, he's gay. Can be. He really is. And it wasn't until recently that he started talking about how gay he was because before he like, I think he's gay. You know, my gaydar is not fantastic, but I'm like, I think he's gay. And then he's like, you know, and ask him this very innocent question about, like, what were your parents like? He goes, oh, my parents were very supportive. I have the most amazing mom and dad, and they let their, you know, because I was into fashion and I had to have my Ascot. I'm like Ascot with the fudges and Ascot. It'll go, look this up. He's so fancy back in the day, and then I go online. I'm like Ascot. 400 bucks, $300. Forget that. That's not a lot of that's just a piece of fabric. You kidding me? And so the poor man's Ascot is you take a handkerchief and you just work it. It is working, and that's all you do. There you go. Fashion tips this morning. It's a wild Wednesday. We're talking keynote fashion. Ralph Lauren and Jennifer always going to be my fact checker because she's like, Chris, you misquoted this. This was a memory is a funny thing. It is what I ever wanted to be. And I like the way I remember things, maybe not the way they are. So if you guys watch the Ralph Lauren documentary and you're like, dude, that's not how it went down, like Sue me. I'll give you a full refund for this call. OK all right. So that's how we got it. Finally, watch chef's table. Who who is that, fellas? Hey, fellas, what do you say? I finally watch chef's table. With all the barbecue. Mm-hmm And I finally went ahead in this town. And believe it or not, it's making a bit of a difference. And it's not good barbecue people. OK, opportunity this opportunity. Know that. Thank you. Thank you. I mean, it's beautifully shot, Phyllis. Oh, it is. It's amazing. God, I don't even love barbecue, but I watch it. I'm like, let's go get some barbecue. I'm ready. If I ever come down to l.a., I'll make sure I drop off some ribs at the office. You better, you come by La and you don't. We're going to have problems and have problems. OK Yeah. All right. Where's my color palette here? I think the big takeaway is to watch more media and watch and really pay attention to the details and. Learn from that because you can pick up inspiration from all kinds of areas, not just the industry you're in. So you should look at modern art, look at fashion. I look at all the fashion every season. I looked at the high fashion fashion shows I have, like thousands and thousands of pins on my Pinterest from every season for years and years. And I think that's really how you also get an eye by looking at things all the time. Yes, for sure. So a little embarrassing story here about myself. I grew up in the Valley when I say the valley, Silicon Valley and my parents were immigrants were refugees. So the idea of fashion, architecture, interior design, all these things are none, even in part of the language in the House. And as a boy growing up, I looked at sunset magazine. That was my reference for style, ok? The West Coast living magazine. I would just obsess over these things and look at the molding on the wall, the wallpaper, the curtains. And then they'd look at our house. I'm like, mom, our house does not look anything like this. So I thought there was a type of house that you buy that immigrants like us never get to buy. Because our houses, our homes never looked. And every home of every uncle and aunt looked the same. White walls, standard carpeting, you know, blinds, curtains, nothing fancy. There's no chair rail. There's no wainscoting, nothing. Can you believe that? No crown molding? It's like I lived in this kind of deprived environment, lack of design, lack of topography. And so I would just thumb through these things and just like daydream and became fascinated and I read GQ magazine. You know, I'm a teenager. I don't I can't afford anything in here, but I'm looking at the fashion also because there sometimes naked people and I'm like, wow, this is really great. Sometimes I read the stories, but it's just in the ads and just being immersed in that world. Right? I mean, back then, it's like that was soft porn. It was like, Oh my god, there's naked people in here. This is pretty cool. I'll just look at them like, this is really cool. And then I start to educate my, my sense of design. And so to Jennifer's point. I think all of us on our creative journey, whether you're a designer or not, you need to educate your palate. If you're a chef, you need to taste the flavors in the world. If you're a painter, you need to look at colors and things. So we're all in this process of educating our palate and we want to expand our visual vocabulary. Now there's a difference between just consuming passively and consuming it with intentionality. There's a big difference there. And so you'll notice and I put out this tweet and it's actually a very popular tweet, which I'm going to turn into carousel, which is I thought about this one morning I was taking a shower about how crazy I am obsessing over things, and I just came up to this thing. I put out the tweet. The tweet is something like a designer is someone who pays attention to things more than most people. Now, was it. And that was semi inspired by Seth Godin's line, because when I asked Seth Godin, Seth, what do you do? How do you describe what you do to people? And he says, I pay attention to things. That's it, I pay attention to things like, oh, you're a designer. This works. And so when you're watching, like I said, when I watch a fistful of dollars as a kid, it was all about, Oh man. Clint Eastwood with this squint. And you know, in the soundtrack, the Wallowa that kind of thing. I was like, Oh my god, it's so cool. He's just dripping with cool and he just blows away the bad guys. I'm like, oh, so god, I wasn't looking at the framing. I wasn't looking at the storytelling, the cross-cutting. I wasn't looking at any of that stuff because I wasn't aware. And then as I'm getting older and teaching sequential design, making commercials now I'm paying attention to cuts, edits, framing how they use light to introduce a character sound design the edit, if you will. And then on the third wave of looking at a fistful of dollars because I'm inspired by Ralph Lauren, I'm rewatching it just to study the fashion and the patterning. Amazing so layers. Anyways, let's get back to, you know. Looks like I'm not going to show you a whole lot of keynote today anyway, so here's some colors, and I just pulled this hair on website that has beautiful color combinations, tri tone tri color combinations, right? OK, let's say these are our three brand colors here. What are we going to do? What we need to change our default color palette? You'll see here? The default color palette is it's not bad. Now I want to change it. And the way you change it. You go down here and you click on this thing here, this little thing. The color wheel and you grab the eye dropper and you pick this color and it changes the background color. Can I just interrupt for one quick second? We can barely see the pop-up of the color. Yeah, it's cut off. There's nothing I can do, man. OK, OK. You just have to listen to the words, the sound of my voice. All right. So you guys go over here to the background, you select the color wheel thing, and when you pop this open, you'll see that it brings up a bunch of things and then you grab the eye dropper and then you just color pick it. So far, so good, everyone. So open up your keynote to page 45 and follow along. OK, now. Well, this is the background color, but. I want to be able to save that color for use in the future. So what I do then is I grab this color. And drag it over into the box in which I wanted to replace, and there's a weird like how it syncs up to it, like I want to put it right there. Well, so that becomes my first blue color, and I repeat this process. Pick the yellow color. Shoot pick the color, we'll pick the eyedropper, pick this. That is a really bright, lovely color. So go over here and drag this sucker over and that's your third color. Ok? let's see if I can do it again. Dragged out color over here. OK so typically, what I recommend is you pick just three colors. Look how cool these colors are. As soon as I change it, it's so cool. And they just work well together. OK when you pick these colors, what you want to do is you want to pick 10. And shades. A shade is a darker version of this color, and it is a lighter color. And so at least you have three colors of the pink. Three of the yellow and three of the blue. Does that make sense, everyone? OK and the way that you do that, it's very easy to do because this pink is super intense. It's bold, it's loud. It's punk rock. It's all these things. I love it, but it might be too intense to use all the time. So you need to pick a different shade. OK, so you're going to go into color wheel. You click on that icon and you adjust the sliders. So it's set to RGB sliders and you can use hue saturation sliders, whatever you want. I'm not a color master. That's Greg Gunn's job. But I start sliding these things until I start to get a shade. But I know how to do it with CC and yk sliders, right? I know if I increase black, it'll become darker. And have a decrease, the black, and hopefully if I can just slide this over. And take some of the science out, and let's just say that's my tent. So again, I'll go over here. I'm going to drag this sucker. I'm going to drag it here at the bottom. Shoot, I screwed that one up. And put it over here. All right, there it is. And then I want to do a darker version of this, and I'll just add Black to it. And let me go back to the shoot, sorry, go back to paint color, and I need to make a darker version of this. I'm going back to see him. OK, well, maybe we try HSB so I can just increase the darkness here. OK And then you go over here and you drag this thing down. God dang it. There it is. I heard a keynote, God dang good god, frigging son of a sassafras. All right, whatever. Theoretically, you have three shades here. The main colour, the dark color and the lighter color, the tint and the shade, and you do that for the blue and the yellow. The yellow is going to be hard. That's what you do. So that way you have some variation. So even in one slide, you can use the ultra intense pink. Or the more subdued version of that. And that's how you create the custom pallet. This is not that well known. So this is how you build a custom pallet. Actually, you're going to say something. I was going to say something. Oh, Jennifer, the way I see it, when you do that kind of hoops where you erase the color you just picked, I just think, well, the color. I'm going to pick now is going to be a better color and it will have been meant to be that way. So I just don't worry about it. Yeah, whenever I have to redo something, I'm like, well, I'm going to do it better this time. And the results in the end is going to be better. So I think that just helps with not getting too stressed about that kind of thing. Yeah so here's another trick that you can do, it's not totally accurate, but if I go this fine, bring this open and I changed the transparency of this. I'll get a tent in a shade. And they go up here. And I'll do it usually my things are much more planned out than this, meaning I don't just go Willy nilly like, oh, I'm just design a color palette on the fly. Right but I'm sure you guys aren't judging me, so that's not a perfect way to do it, but that's another way you could I drop that? And, you know, there's something that's very soothing about grids and things like even just looking at this makes me happy. Look, I'm tempted to just put a color block over her face. Just because. You know, it's a tiny note for people, just a tiny note, if you have a client that has to do this in Powerpoint, it will automatically calculate out your hues for you. So when you're putting your default colors and you select your. Your palette, you'll see your 5 to 10 defaults, and then below that you'll see your tins and your shades. Beautiful that's a PowerPoint thing, right? Yeah, Yeah. PowerPoint thing, so I grouped these three things together, and so they become part of my color palette and you might save this somewhere. But something that a lot of people don't always know is that when you select this, you can scale it up and down here. But if you hit command, it'll give you the rotation tool. So I could just rotate it without having to go in and adjust it on the side palette here, right? All right. So I'm just designing whatever, and obviously this needs to be in front of that, so I need to move in front. And there you go. Marie, for Leo. There you go. All right, so that's how you do colors. And so that's the basic part of building a Keynote presentation. So that you get your template in order. Once you do that, your rock and roll in now and I can build a brand new keynote presentation from not from scratch from my template in a matter of four to eight hours for a talk, I'm going to do the next day. But keep in mind, I've been building these presentations for myself for about six years, and I have thousands of assets that can be repurposed. So I go through and I convert everything to transparent P&G. All that stuff. You have a question. Yeah, I just wondered because I've been up onstage several times where I kind of feel shocked when I see my presentation because, Oh my god, I looked amazing at home. And then when you go up on stage and you see how it looks, it can look different when, well, I don't know what that machine called. You know, it's a different it looks different on stage than I do at home. So do you? Yeah, exactly. So it could be like a crazy color out of a sudden. Do you think about using more Black in the colors to not make it that crazy on stage? Or like, do we have to think about something like that? Because I've been there so many times where I'm like, oh, it looks so good at home. And then when you're on stage, you're like, Oh my god, this is crazy. I'm going to throw that question of Ashley because I have probably different response. Ashley, what's your take on that? So my take on that is to one of the largest for color that happens with presenters is that they're using system like values. And we are our projectors are throwing Sar rugby or rugby. So when you're making your colours, make sure that they're accurate to rugby standards because you'll see a huge difference. Talk to people, find out what screen you're going on. Check it on a television, check it on some other monitor other than your Mac if you're using a Mac platform to do your presentations. The second that you go to a pc, a short throw projector, anything that's off that color way, it's going to throw it off. Do your quality control before you get on stage right. Have a list type color photos, links right? Make sure if you have a video that it's linked up or it's native, do everything you can to push for a native your own computer. Um, yeah, that's pretty much the most you can do. Go ahead, Chris. Yeah, thank you very much. And Lee, oddly enough, in the many presentations I've done, I've not had a single problem with color. And I think it's because I work in a high contrast mode in my mind, right? So RGB or c, my k, I know that if it's not enough contrast on this screen and there's colors that I will pick. And it seems like it's not failed me. So far. And now the next presentation I do, it's going to be all jacked. The only time it's jacked is because the typefaces didn't load, and that's why I insist on using my own laptop. And in most places, 90% of the places will accommodate you. Yeah, it's like it's plugging in a cord, right? Just tell us what you've got. Yes, but it stresses people out. So some organizations, once you use the master laptop because they're packed in so tight from presenter to presenter, usually that's where it gets effed up because I'm like, wait, you guys were supposed to load my typeface and you didn't. And now it's all jacked. So usually then that's an opportunity to make fun of the organization while you're presenting live. That's usually what I do. You know, things like that just stress me out totally like, I'm not, I'm not getting so stressed on being on stage having the presentation, but just the fact that the presentation can look really bad just really stresses me out. Like, yeah, you just follow the basic rules of design, high contrast, a lot of negative space and you'll be OK. This relates to something that used to happen to my designers. They would design their storyboards, ok? And then we would go and print, and back in the day, you'd have to take it to a service Bureau. They would print. Each print was like $36. It was a lot. And we're printing 10 12 pages on like, I look at their print, I'm like, dude. Came and read this thing, but it looked good on my screen. I'm like, well, you want to tell that to the printer? Is because they weren't using those basic laws of contrasts. They're talking about like a 5% gray and an 8% gray and thinking that some printer is going to be able to pick up the difference between that. No, if you use Black and white, we're not going to have a problem. If you use 50% grey, 100% gray. It's going to be OK. But they're sitting there like just pixel laughing these things down to that shade and it's like, Oh. You did this take responsibility, so only if you want to, you can share with me some of the slides that got jacked on the presenter. The projector showed to me an almost certain there's something on your end that you need to just drive the contrast. OK, and you'll be all right. Thank you. I go with Black and white. It's easier. Yeah, but then it's all Black and white. I know, I know. So one other thing you guys need to know in the color spectrum, the blue colors are those narrowest and the hardest to reproduce accurately. If you look at the color wheel. And you'll see it, RGB color, will you see that the blue spectrum is the smallest? I don't know why that is. It just is. So shades of teal, turquoise, cyan, all those. Those colors. The spectrum is very small. I just know that from my days of making commercials, ok? Yeah, same for the same goes for type weights. So this is a big one that I'll come across is that a client has a thing on stage and they're like, why can't I see my type? It looked beautiful on my screen and a type weight just on a bigger screen gets lighter. Right is so light, so if you, Chris, does the 1.5 jump, no matter if you have a light copy, it's not going to translate to a big screen as easily, so you might have to pump it up for the screen. Right? it's not. You're not pumping it up for your design sensibilities. You're pumping it up so that your design sensibilities translate to the screen that you're using. OK, I'm going to take a break. I'm going to hit pause share now my. I'm going to share my Photoshop. And then I'm going to open up a pretty good looking man here. He's all right. There we go. Mr George Clooney. OK, I'm going to show you guys how to cut stuff out real quick. OK and the rule of cutting out images is you need the highest, sharpest image possible, ideally one that's not on like you're not standing in front of a tree because it's very hard to cut those things out. It's all doable, but it's just a matter of how much time you want to invest in it. So what you do is hit W for wand and you just hit Select subject and the computer goes to work and it does a pretty good job on first blush. But if you hit for quick mass in Photoshop, you'll see what it's keeping and what it's dropping. So if you Zoom in here, you know it's keeping some things, see that feathered there, but we could do a better job. It's losing a lot of his hair on this side. So all you have to do is just go in and add to that just by dragging over it. Being somewhat conservative with what you drag over, it's losing a chunk of his, I want to make sure I get that a little bit of his brow. But it added a little extra there. I will deal with that later. So when there's not enough contrast and image, it becomes problematic. So you can see it's losing a chunk of his arm, I'm just going to add to it. OK, so I'm just quickly. There's another chunk here for a shirt to that same around. So what I'm doing is once you're zoomed in, if you hit the spacebar on all Adobe apps, it will give you the hand and you could just maneuver. And if you hit Command space, you can Zoom in if you drag to the right and left. So learning these keyboard shortcuts allows you to work much, much faster. So I would make the effort in the beginning. When you're learning tools to learn how to use it properly. Quote unquote. So that. From that point forward, you're not relearning the app. So to subtract things, all you have to do is hold down Option. And to look at the keyboard, make sure I was hitting the right key. OK it's pretty good in what we do is we hit again for quick mask before we had layers and stuff. This is the only way you work with channels. I noticed a little problem here. So I want to go back out and add that. OK, it looks pretty good. Oops it's missing a little bit of his elbow here. OK we got Mr Clooney where we have another problem here. This is why I do quick math just to check these things before we go into. All right. I'm going to grab this chunk to because that is actually part of his hair, I could see that it's confused as to what where his hair ends and begins. A little bit more right here. All right. Quick mess, we're ready to go. And for many people, this is good enough. But we're not many people. We're in St. So let's get into select and mask now you're going to jump into this mode, depending on the image, you can select different colors. I'm going to pick a very bright and contrasting color against this image because I want to see what the mask is doing. You can see here gets real chunky around this edge. Those kinds of things. So the first thing I want to do is I want to resolve any obvious errors, and I can see that for the most part, from this distance, everything looks really good. When I Zoom in, it becomes problematic. And we're going to Zoom all the way in and fix some things. This is the hair or edge refinement tool, refine edge brush and its R So if you don't have that selected, so you're going to just gently go over this area and see if it can help you fine tune the hair. And sometimes it makes it worse, and sometimes it makes it better, not always predictable, and it just depends on what's behind it. So if I brush over here, you're going to see it's going to paint back some of the finer, wispy parts of his hair. And then sometimes it erodes and it's terrible. Right now, it's doing a terrible job for us, where it generally does a pretty good job. It's around the brow line. And if I do this, sometimes it gives me the little hairs. Something like that. But there's a lot of problems over here because it's just not enough information in the original image for it to pull from. I'm going to just try to very gently touch these areas and see if it helps me here. It's not great. So there's a couple of decisions we have to make. We could either paint all this back by hand or just go about our Merry lives. And I'm going to fix these parts here first. OK, now what you can't see me doing is and I could switch my camera, but I'm not going to. I'm going to use a walking pen and tablet. It'd B for Brush. I'm going to go in here and change this. So a couple of keyboard shortcut things that you need to know if you hold on an option control and drag to the left and right, it changes the size of the brush. And then if you do up and down, it changes the hardness of it, left and right size, up and down softness or hardness. So in this case, I want a pretty hard brush because it's a pretty clean edge between these ear in the background. So I'm going to reduce the size holding option, control, control option. OK, so if I painting here it, it adds to it. And if I hold down option, it's an oops, it's not an option. What is it? Control, no. It is option. Yeah, it's option, I didn't hold it out, OK, so now I'm going to just brush away these parts. The chunky nose of his ear. I can see it's a little confused down here by his neck. Because there's like little probably. Hair on the back of his neck that it's confused by. And with each iteration, with each update to Photoshop, this auto masking tools get smarter and smarter using Adobe Sensei or whatever tools that they're developing at Adobe HQ. So I'm going to subtract some of this because I can see some shadowing there. I'm going to go back in and paint this in my hand here. And I'm going to do this, it's not going to be perfect, you guys. But for most people, they're not going to be able to see. The technical parts, I'm going to point out to you in a little bit. Someone to just paint this. We're almost done here. Now you may want to this may wind up being a disaster, but I'm going to just delete these parts. Because it's giving me that weird, shadowy thing. Now, if you put this over a Black image, nobody will know. Now a person will ever know, but you've put it over a red image or some other image that it's brighter in color. You'll start to see those fringing. OK, so I just I'm just reducing this down to a clump. Just as a shape, I'm going to fix it in a little bit. OK, that's pretty good. I Zoom in here, you can see that the t-shirt here on the back is all messed up and I'm just going to quickly fly through this part. I want to fix all the weird smoothing out this whole thing. And if you don't have a lack of tablet. Go buy one. You thought I was going to say something else, huh? Just to note this stuff that presentation designers do all the time, you can't get this level of detail in Keynote. You have to go out. Say, why do you have to go out, what do you mean or what do you have to use photoshop? You have to use Photoshop. Yeah, the auto masking tool is not going to do this. Exactly and the auto masking tool, when you expand it and you go larger, the higher the, the larger your screen, the more this is going to be visible. So you can see here, most people are not going to stress out over this, but like I said, we're not most people, we're insane. And if you get paid the big bucks, as Ashley does, you're going to want to make this really good because she's going to be at CES on 8k monitor and people are going to see this. And then you don't want your client to be like, Yo, what did I pay you for again? Yeah, exactly. When you're doing your presentations, one mistake they'll come to you with the one somebody will come to you with the one mistake they saw on the screen. So this is like their one hour versions of absolute perfection. This is how you get that perfection. All right. So we can see on this bright blue background, we're pretty good. But what you can do is to, as you click on this and you can go into the mask and you just double check, sometimes there's something in the interior of this that it's not visible to you. You can see there's all kinds of weird problems in here. Right, so this is OK, so what I want to do is I want to go and adjust this part just to make sure his brow is good, but the little hairs there. I want to fix all this. Excuse me. So this is not a bad one. As someone who's blonde against a bright background with wispy hair flying all over her face. That would take me a little bit more time. It might take me as much as half an hour to do one image, but I put on my music. I think happy thoughts. What? I'm doing this. You can see there's some problems still here with this neck. I delete this part. Nice, sharp edges there. Now, some people don't like to use this tool at all, and they go in and draw with a pen, and I respect those people that's like next level of insanity for me. If I can get a decent enough result that meets my standards without obsessing over it, it's all day long. That's what I'd do. You guys know what I'm talking about when I say use the pen tool. That's exactly. Or do you mean the pen pen tool or using a Wacom pen tool? No, no. Literally the pen tool. Yeah like the Illustrator. Yeah I mean, that one takes a lot of time. It depends on the kind of thing you're cutting out, I think not. Not so fun for people. No, don't for a tarantula, try. Guys, try doing it, honestly. Try doing a tarantula. And it's true story. I think I was like 22 or something and I thought I had this down, ok? I thought that I was the queen bee of masking. Thought it. And then somebody handed me a tarantula for a large ad and they said, go do this. And the tarantula was what broke me. So try masking a tarantula. And that is like a good practice item. There's so much hair. I've done a flea. I've got actually it took me hours to do it fully. OK I cut out flowers just to practice using the pen tool in Photoshop. I think that's a medium difficulty level. Now if we go Zoom in on this, there's three sliders, there's a couple of sliders here. I need to make you aware if you can change the radius. So if you increase the radius, different things happen. You see here, I'm losing his eye, I'm losing all kinds of things, but I'm also getting finer hair bits here. But I almost never adjust this part because it just makes it worse if I go into smoothing the mask. If we switch over to say the mask, the Black white mode, if I smooth it all the way out, see, just blurs. It all loses all the detail, so clumps it up. You guys can see that. So here it's smooth. OK, if I feather it, it does what you expect it to do. None of these things are good. Every once in a while, I'll smooth that a little bit, I'll increase the contrast for something that doesn't have hair. And the last thing I'll do is I'll shift the edge. So, for example, if I go back to this, if I shift the edge left to right, you'll see it will choke the mat. It'll make the mats erode in. So as I keep choking it, you'll start to erode his face away. And if I expand it, you'll see that it adds to the mask. It's obvious where we have problems here. You see that. So I can see that there must be something here. Whatever race is part, because none of this should be even in the mask to begin with. I can see there's some problems here. Some of the weird things up here. OK, I'm going to go set this back to zero. And that's where we are. OK hit, OK. So and thank you. Back to mouse. All right, so I'm at a mask. Just click on that button, and that gives me a mask examinees, I'm an outer layer. I'm going to pick a really bright color or it's my color. Huh? something, something going on. Then I'm going to send it to the back. So we can see what's going on here. So we have some problems here. We can fix all those things if we want to. We have some problems here. We could fix those as well. But for the most part, if you drop this into keynote the size in which you're going to see George Clooney's face, you're going to be all right. Now, you may have noticed a couple of things. One, I want to pick a photo where he's not cut off anywhere except for his waist. Because I can reposition him anywhere on the keynote and it's going to be fine. Oftentimes when you guys take your portrait, you'll have one side of you cropped, which really severely limits where it can be positioned. OK, so I would want you to change that. There's a couple of things I'm going to do here. I noticed that George has like a kind of weird blemish here and just show you just for a retouching point of view. It's super easy. You just use the Spot Healing Brush here. Scale the sucker down. Just paint right over it. And it should just get rid of it for you. No more weird blemish on his face. So if there's like a freckle mole, a dimple or anything that you want to remove, you can just go in and paint it. There's another little thing here. You just erase those things. You can erase lines. There's a lot of things you can do. We're not going to get into that. OK, so that's the quick retouch there. And you would only want to do this for your own face because you care. It's your face. You do it. And then you'd have a great headshot for you to use. Now Well, we're going to do something. It's kind of strange. I'm going to duplicate this thing. OK. I did not duplicate what am I doing? There we go. And I'm going to delete the mask on the bottom line, so it's going to show me George. And I'm going to do I'm going to change the transparency to like maybe 80% I'll bring them back on top so you can see how much of his hair we've lost. See the difference there. We can see how much hair we've lost. So we're going to go and paint back some of that. This part will be easier to do, and if I ever want to turn it off, I could toggle. So that gives me a little ghost reference onion skin, if you will, to paint back. Now I've created a hairbrush. I'm not going to show you how to do the hair brush because it's just going to be a longer tutorial than I want to. But I'm going to go into my brush palette here. I have my hairbrush set up, and if you want to learn how to do a hairbrush, just watch unmixed and does channel picks imperfect and just type in painting hair, and he'll show you how to do it. I learned how to do this from him. OK, so now that I have my hairbrush, I'm going to paint something here, but I'm going to pick a color by holding down option from the image itself because it's not pure Black. And what I want to do is I want to paint back in here. So I'm going to turn off this bottom thing. I'm going to show you what it looks like. If I paint, it looks something like that. It's not fantastic, but you'll see what I'm doing here in a second. Now I'm going to switch over to my and pin. We Zoom out a little bit and I paint. Notice the difference between the quality of the brush and the hair when I paint with my welcome tablet as opposed to my mouse. You see the difference there. That's why you cannot be a self-respecting designer without a stylist. Because it's pressure sensitive. It creates different marks and the way that the brush is set up. It tunes into. Shit come on. OK, so what I'm going to do is I'm going to go in and paint. Select all delete. OK, I'm going to paint back in some of this hair, so it's combination of painting Black. Right some soft, wispy things and then some white things on top. And the combination and layering of that will eventually create the illusion that's hair that's very soft and this is not a perfect thing. I'm not a professional researcher. I don't want to be. But it's enough for you to get a look. All right, so I'm just showing you like what it might look like. OK, so having done that, I'm going to delete that. Turn this letter back on. I just need to paint in some of this. And since nobody's A/B testing like. The original versus your retouched version. Nobody's going to really care. So I'm going to go pick this. Changed my breast size down a little bit, I'm just going to paint in here. Oops, I messed up there. I need a pick Black here, so I'm just going to paint in and just generally follow the contours of what's happening and where it's like light and wispy. I won't be very light on the touch. OK, so what I'm going to do is I'm just going to paint in some parts. Then I'm going to turn this off. So I can actually see what I'm doing. So we have some hairs that are floating over here. This is the tricky one here. And this one I can paint over George. I can paint under George right now. I'm going to just decide to paint over. I'm going to start with the dark color. So I'll pick something like this and I'll paint around here. I'm going to change my capacity to 100% right now. So I don't know what happened. Sometimes the Wacom pen. It freaks out. It's not always it doesn't always. Can you pick black? Pick Black. There we go. It is always play nice with Photoshop sometimes, and I don't get why. So I'm just going to go in here and paint this stuff, applying using a lot of pressure. So I want to get a shape. And this is like I said, this is literally what I do. On a cold Friday night. All right, so if I turn this off, you can see it's terrible. OK, everybody. You guys can see how bad it is. And now I now have the general shape, I can create a layer underneath. And I turn my opacity up to 100 risen to paint the stuff in. Pick this color. Ashley, is this what you do? What do you have to it is. No, I love doing this. I I, I really do. And if you don't have a sick individual, if you don't have a Wacom tablet as well, you can also but you have an iPad and an Apple pencil, you can take these files, take them to your iPad, do them while you're sitting on the couch, right? You can do it in procreate, you can do it in Photoshop and then you can bring them back. With layers, with layers. Yes nice. Yeah, you can export from procreate to BSD. Yeah so you're not forsaking all of you. OK, so now I'm going to go back on the layer on top. So I wanted to paint underneath because I didn't want to destroy all that stuff, and then I go and pick some of the lighter color hair. And now I'm going to just be a little bit more careful and kind of follow this a little bit and try to build this stuff out. So you have a hairbrush, too. You created, you bought it. You figured it out. I do. I have a hairbrush tools for Photoshop and procreate. I'm finding that, to be honest, the procreate brushes have been their really high quality lately. Yeah, they're beautiful. Something about procreate is actually better for painting than Photoshop. Photoshop is like a retouching program, so it's not perfect. You know, they'll have to figure this stuff out. It looks terrible right now. Maybe I'll make it look good before this is over. I don't know. It's always like the demo that never works out. Start, why can't I get white? Chris, what if you don't I mean, I don't know how to do this, but what if I want to use, you know, I also want to do a presentation? I mean, I can't pay someone to to, you know, put in hours to do this. Why not? Why? what's your question? Well, I mean, like, what is their option? Like an alternative? If you don't know how to do it, pay somebody or ignore it, do it yourself and learn. Those are three options, which one which sounds more appealing to you. I don't know. I have to think about it, not learn it myself anyway, because I would take 10 years. It only take as long as you think it'll take you. I don't think I have the patient or the interest to learn that, to be honest, maybe I need to pay someone. Yeah, Yeah. You know, so this isn't great, guys. I'm telling you right now. And we just sit there and just keep working on it, and eventually it starts going to look like hair. You know, you just layer it dark layer over light layer and you just keep doing it. We're painting on iPad. I've been liking Fresco, actually. Has anyone else tried that go? Yeah Yeah. You know, nobody's trying. They're trying real hard these days because they don't want to cede ground to. Procreate they tried a presentation software to the last or the Adobe MAX we were at a couple of years ago. They had their first round of presentation software going and it's. It's OK. But it's the same thing they're trying to beat keynote and party, which are two already established things, right? Yeah I mean, that money. I like it, that they try. Oh, they do. Yeah, and that's OK, because, well, we'll always we're always going to be attached. Yeah, we're always going to be attached to Adobe. I've started to like Illustrator fry pedal, so a little bit more at a time, I will not work with the pen tool in on an iPad so much because that's frustrating, but it's decent. It's decent for drawing in Illustrator. I think it's pretty good. So I just. So here's just to Build Back on to keynote. Right now I am working on a deck where I've taken very, very, very tiny cells, very tiny cells. And because they were so they're so complicated, I took the picture. I took it into Illustrator on my iPad, read through all the tiny pieces in the cell, and then I was able to take it and export it back into classic Illustrator. So Illustrator for iPad was good for allowing my hands to recreate the item. But going taking it back into Illustrator means that if they say, hey, I want this nanoparticle to be a different color, I can just do like a Select and a universal change on that color, and it affects it as a whole. And then I export it to an SVG, and then I bring it back into my PowerPoint. So and I want to get back to your question. So your question is, I don't want to learn this, so I'll just pay somebody or I won't care about it, right? I just don't want to sound negative. It's like, I just don't know how to do it. And I don't know if that is the best spend time for me to learn how to do it. You know, I really respect people who knows how to do things like this. It's just that I also know how much actually charge for presentation, and that's not my budget know. So I just want to find a. Solution for that. Yeah, so your thing would be don't care about it or pay someone to do it right. This looks terrible. OK, but that's the idea you'd go through and you would design the brushes and all that stuff, and I'll quickly show you how to design the brush. OK, so this is what you do. You go and get a soft brush like this. I need another layer. Sorry so what you do is you just create a bunch of dots. Um, different colored dots. Different sized dots. In different levels of opacity and darkness. Let's just pretend like this is our brush. You would go and take this. I think you just need to select this. And then you go to Edit defined brush, right? I haven't done this in a while, where is it? Do you find brush preset? And you're going to call this new hair. You go, ok? And then you go into these sliders over here, so this is the new hair. So you're going to do shape dynamics. You turn on the shape dynamics. There's a couple of things you need to do. And the shape dynamics is going to be controlled by the pin pressure. See, I just changed it there. Uh, we might want to change the texturing and the transfer, all those kinds of things smoothing, I don't know if I want to do whatever, so the texture, let's see here. I don't know. I'll try it out, so right now, if I were to paint with this. Like, my software's fighting me on some of this stuff. So that looks terrible. So what we want to do is we want to go and adjust the flow in the opacity and all these other kinds of things actually have you have you done these presets on a long time? The presets for Adobe. Yeah nah, man, I'm still use my old ones. Yeah, so I might adjust the opacity jitter. No, that's no good. You can just go in here and just start adjusting these things, and when you're done with this, you want to save this again so that it does something. I think I might have had too many dots. I think if I had fewer dots than the hairbrush would work, but because there's so many of them that when I drag with them, that's what happens. Is it scattering, though one or on? Look at that, I don't want to do that. Is it the feathering? Where's feathering? Roundness, contrast, flip, minimum diameter size shitter. Nope, I don't want to do that. Yeah, somewhere in here, you just keep Messing around with these things. And eventually I'm not a brush expert either. I watched the tutorial. I followed the instructions of the tutorial like a monkey and then I did it. I'm like, great, I got my brushes. I don't need to remember this anymore. Memory purged. Go read a book. Everything's good. So this is kind of what you would do. So I would reduce the size of this. I think I should have had some that were more transparent so that there was greater variation to it. When you start just painting hair and. Kind of it. So I have a few different hairbrushes like. That's one. Small one. They all kind of are the same. That one right there. That's kind of it. I hope that was helpful to some of you. I'm going to save this file and continue work on this at some other time. And that's what you do now. Like I said, we could have stopped just with the Photoshop, the way it was set up and not mess around, which is clump his hair. Life is good. Just move on with your life. Don't stress out over it. It'll be OK. And if you are able to charge a ton of money to do this, you can also hire someone a retoucher. We teachers are kind of expensive. Anybody here retoucher? Anybody work with retoucher? You can still find some can find students to who need the practice, you can find production artists who moonlight. I just Google like moonlighting production artists are. You know, they're usually pretty reasonable. I've got a production artist that I use, and she's $44 an hour. She's been $44 an hour for years. Yeah, and it works for her. Yeah, there's a cap at what hourly rates are for different skill sets. So you're going to hit a ceiling pretty quickly if all you do is fill in the blank. So just keep that in mind. OK, I'm going to close my Photoshop. My Photoshop is a little wonky. Sometimes I'm going to show you now I'm going to close this other thing here. You just save this. Keynote demo. Up OK, I'm going to get into the creative parts, the parts that actually matter. OK, so I'm going to go share the screen again. And then we're going to wrap up, what time is it? OK I don't have that much time left, I probably spend another 15 minutes here with you and then send you on your Merry way. So go back to. Keynote presentation now. That, OK, I'm going to create a blank slide here. Move it to the top. I'm going to drag in some assets that I already have. This was sent to me. Some of you were on this call. Where we were at the office. We're talking about what's our next whiteboard session. And we were taking some notes on the whiteboard, and then Ricky sent this to me. So I'm going to start working on this presentation. Now OK so let me Zoom in so you can see what I'm doing. Right, this. All right. So we're at the office, we're brainstorming topics, so on the left hand side here, if I annotate this. With a pen. OK declined. OK see this area over here. These are topics. This is what we're doing, and then they're like, OK, what topics should we do? And we voted. It was Ricky, Jonah and a handful of people from the pro group, and we want to become a better teacher. You see this. Let's see how many votes I got. We want to understand. Things like cognitive bias, how to make sure it's 10 ways to get more work done, but we want to learn how to be a better teacher, so I'm going to just walk you through it really quickly, then I'm going to make the slides. OK, so this is the book you read a book. You want to be a better teacher, you need to read some books and you may read and then you want to boil it down. So that's what the pot is for. We want to take the key ideas and we want to boil it down to its essence. And so I said, pick a book that you guys have read recently or are familiar with. That's when Ricky said compound effect. I'm not perfect. I'm very familiar with the compound effect, and this is the compound effect. So how do we become a better teacher? First, we have to ask ourselves, what were the big ideas in the compound effect written by Darren hardy? And Ricky starts saying habits, and I said big momentum. And then he looks up on the internet, it's like choice plus behavior plus habit plus compounded equals goals. So how you achieve your goals is through my making the decision, change your behavior, forming the behavior into habit compounded over time equals your goals. He said a couple of other things that you read from the book do more than what you're asked 10% more. And we remember the story of the Magic penny. So we're just doing this mostly from memory. We're doing it from memory, because if you trust your memory, it'll tell you the things that were stickiest to you. And this is your video, so you're going to teach what matters to you. Not literally every idea in the book, just the ones that matter to you. So it's kind of nice just to be able to pull from memory without thinking about too hard. And then what we have to do is we have to figure out how do we teach the concepts from the compound effect of not make it a book preview? And there is a difference between understanding the concepts and doing a book review. And so there's this idea that if you make a small percentage of change, which is the entire concept of thesis of the compound effect, a small thing done consistently over time can be massive. The famous story, the magic penny, which doubles in value every single day. And if you offered somebody, I think $10 million or a magic penny that doubles in value in 30 days every single day compounded which would you pick? Almost everyone picks the $10 million, and it goes on to show you that by day 28, the magic penny gets really close. But by day 30, the magic penny eclipses the $10 million by a good amount. I don't know. I don't remember all the details, but that's the story. And that's OK for now. If I have that and I can remember. But there's this mathematical thing, ok? You and your effort is one. And if you make one small change, a tenth of a percent, so 1.01 to the 365th power. Equals 37.78. So you've turned one into 37. Into 30 seven, but if you take one and you make no change over 365 days, one times, one times, 1 times 1 over 3. And 65 is still one. It's quite interesting to look at this from a math point of view. But if you degrade, if you reassess or regress in your habits and your activities. And you take away 0.01. So now if you were 0.99 instead of one. And you multiply that 365. To 365th power, you wind up with far less than you started. You wind up with 0.03. So in math? Having a 0.01 difference is the difference between having 37. Or 0.0 three? And so this is the idea of the compound effect, so what we want to do is we're looking for examples. We're looking for stories that we can relate. And then we started pulling out some, some interesting things. The name people came up. So he said beeple's this artist and then the guys through this on the whiteboard here. He sold the painting the first 5,000 days for $69.3 million at Christie's. An energy. And so he did this for 13 years every single day without failure. That's how long it took him. I don't think at the beginning or the middle, or even towards the end, he had the intention to sell any of these things because no one would buy a piece of digital art. What he kept doing this over and over again. So we did the math. When you sell something for $69.3 million dollars, how much money do you earn a day if you had worked for 13 years? He makes. He made 13,000 almost 14,000 a day. That number is staggering. Because if you work, say, in the motion industry, you're going to get paid anywhere between 400 to probably $800 a day and you have to show up every day to earn that money. The interesting thing about people is what if people quits one day before the 5,000 days? What if he quits before the NFT thing becomes a thing and somebody else is chasing it and gets that money instead? So this is the best story I can find. Of the compound effect working for you, that it's consistently doing the work every single day. 365 days a year. Over and over again. And according to the book, you don't really see a lot of results. Until you see the results and then the results are overwhelming. I mean, who here would like to make $13,000 a day for 13 years? To me, you remember, like as a kid, you would see the Publishers Clearing House and, you know, like, Oh my god, I'm going to be a winner. And you just start to imagine, like how much money that is per day. This is manifesting your own sweepstakes into existence. That's pretty cool. I like to make that kind of money. And I told the guys, give me a couple of years, we'll be making that money every single day. And we don't need Christie's or any kind of art movement involved. So we're like, let's take a look at the future. So here we are, two, 14. We made a whopping $14,000 that year. Whopping I know it's pretty impressive. That means we earn $30 a day. That's like a lunch. The tip in a very and like to snacks. That's pretty much what you get in Los Angeles. OK so in 2015 we're making progress now. We're up to 45,000. Yeah, you know, not bad. So now we're earning 100. OK, that's lunch and dinner and a little pocket change. Not too bad a day. OK And then we get to this point where we're making $3 million a year. Look at the numbers now. 8,000 a day. It's kind of getting oppressive now. And so if we keep doing this and we get to 6 million. You will be at 16k and this is when the guys heads are like, Oh my god, it's so possible. It is so freaking possible. And look at that. It's so real. So what you need to all think about is what is your goal. So we can work backwards, right? What is your goal? We know what our goal is, and we say, what do we have to do, what? Habit behavior, what choices do we have to make? What do we have to do every single day. And for how long? And unmatched, the guy is picks in perfect, he has three million subscribers. And he said he told the story actually wasn't him, it was actually of another creator. Marcus Brownlee. MCB PhD made 100 videos to earn 1,000 subs. Those are pathetic numbers, but that's what he did. To earn 10 subs per video is brutal, but now he has over three million subs or not, I'm sorry, Marquez Brown has way more than that. That's the compound effect. All right, let me clear this out. So then we oops. OK let me close tools over here now, and so we get into some more things and we're breaking it down in a timeline and all that kind of stuff. And this is really when the keynote whiteboard session now have to sit here and design this part. So typically what we do is we go to the office, we talk about some ideas and then I have to turn this into a whiteboard. So I explained the concept to you, and then I would have to go in and design this, and then I would start going to figure out the title, I don't know what the title is here in. Matt, I'm just going to call it read and teach. That's a terrible title. And eventually, I had to swap out the graphic and all this kind of stuff, which I will, but not right now, so I usually start off with asking some questions. And that's following the formula of how you give a presentation. You ask a lot of what, why, how questions so that the audience starts to lean in and then you tell them whatever the big idea is. And then we go into how to set up the structure about the compounded interest and the things I can draw that's going to take me too long to do right now. But essentially, this is how we do it. Anybody have any questions? Can you do another call about that? Yeah, for sure. I would love to learn that. Yeah if more people are interested, but I guess. Mm-hmm When you do that whiteboard session, do you do it more to get ideas from people or do you do it to try your ideas on people to get their response and see if they get it like the audience will get it? Or like, what's your purpose of doing that whiteboard session from the beginning? I don't fully understand the question. When you create, when you do that whiteboard session with people from the audience, it's kind of a co-creation. Yep do you do it to co-create with people because you want their more their input? Or do you do it more like research for yourself, like I want to, I want to see if they understand it, if they understand my idea before you create the keynote? Yeah so the question I believe that you're asking is why are you doing it live in front of people, right? Yeah like, what is your purpose with that? What do you want to achieve with that? OK so the way that I work is I work better with the problem. So I'm looking for a problem to solve because if I'm alone by myself, none of my ideas are inherently that interesting. And I know things well. I don't know what I know because I've not had to explain it to anybody. And the provocation for the articulation of those ideas comes in the form of a question. So when we sit around, I'm like, what's hot? What does everybody want to know? What do you want to know? Because some part of the audience is you. And then we list a bunch of ideas and then we prioritize. We pick something, and then I ask myself internally really quickly. It's just something I could figure out. So, yes, I can figure it out, we'll do it right then if I can't, I won't understand the problem better, and then I'll go back to the office, to my home office and I'll think about it. I'll read some books or research or watch some videos, and then I'll have to answer. So I'm in constant search for a good problem to solve. The bigger the problem, the deeper the problem, the broader the problem, the bigger the video is going to hit. And so it came to this thing where I think there's this idea that a lot of people want to become teachers to create information products. And so I think, OK, I think there's some interest here. So I'm doing a lot of internal filtering. So I now need to know because it's natural to me. I teach all the time and I'm not literally saying this out loud, but I'm thinking this hey, dummy, what don't you know about this subject? And so then they tell me, like, well, where do we start? What's the last book you read? Your knowledge has to come from somewhere. What do you remember from that? And then it's just a lot of Socratic questions that get me to understand where they're stuck because I don't know where the problem is like right now, if you all ask me like. How do you know how to cut something out, that's the time I have to explain it to you. Why did you pick that typeface? I have to explain it to you. Otherwise, I just think because. That's what you're supposed to do, right? So it's good for all of us to have someone extract the knowledge from us. So I just need someone to ask me a question, that's why I enjoy creating content on social media because ask me a question. Well, that's pretty good. So this is the update. To this monster personal branding thing that I'm building out, and it's freaking awesome, I want to tell you right now, it's so freaking awesome, and I'm so excited to share it with you eventually. And I'm just riffing on this. And so where did I come from? It came from having calls with you and Lily about talking about personal brand with Stephanie and other people like, oh, what are you doing? Like, how did you come up with a loud introvert? It felt right. So this is a series of 100 clubhouse calls distilled into like a framework that's easy to understand, that combines the parts that people responded to and the parts that get stuck on. I'm telling you, I shared some of the fragments of this with someone else like, Oh my god, what is this? Ready I want it now. OK, just relax. I'll do it. So I'm constantly practicing answering question. New idea. New idea. What sticks? What doesn't? And then somewhere in my brain, I start to put these things together, and one day in the shower, they all overlap. And I'm like, oh, I got the next 100. 200,000 idea. Quite literally. So that's what's happening. OK, analyst, so I need someone, anyone who's curious who has a problem, who represents our audience or community. So that's who you talk to. And then by explaining it to them, I make sure. Do you understand this? You have a question, and if they have more questions, I'm like, OK, I'll go deeper here. And in the dialogue, more ideas come out. I love that, and that's it's also the way I do research like myself because I like using the words people say themselves, because when you use them later in your marketing material, for example. They recognize it, and they're like, really drawn to that because it's their own language and their way of, you know. So it's kind of the same things, right? You OK, I get it. I'm also curious about your next product. Yeah, I was probably recognize some things from there. I guess, yeah, there's a bunch, I mean, I talked about comic books and mythology. I talked about the hero's journey. I talked about personal branding story, and I'm putting all those things together. And so there's this thing. I think it's called some topical reading when you read many books on a similar subject to have a point of view, the contrasts, the overlapping ideas. And when you read enough, when you learn enough, eventually the soap bubbles up. And it's to me, it's like oil and you can go make money on that. So what we need to do is we just need to immerse ourselves in a topic enough so that we're informed so that we have a point of view. And then to go and share that with other people as often as you can. And you'll see what sticks. I'm going to get to Rachel one second. I remember doing a very impromptu. Conversation on comic book mythology and pop culture. And Ali, you and others were pulled on stage and I was just having fun with you guys testing your comic book knowledge. But I got a lot of really positive feedback from people in the community pro people like fans saying, god, I was so fun. And so I was thinking, if you're going to do personal branding, if we're going to do anything, why shouldn't we have fun? Why does it have to be so serious? Like Heath ledger, why so serious? Right? we don't have to be, and so that tells me something that I need to bring in some dorky into it. Some of my nerd and my comic book fandom. Mm-hmm And I figured it out. I love that. It's a goofy side, goofy side of crystal. Yes love that. But when you see it in action and you apply it to yourself? You'll see. You understand who you are. Your alter ego. You'll understand the world that you're living in and it's very specific to your story who your allies and sidekicks are. The city in which you live in. That's a character in your world and your arch nemesis. And all these things your iconography, your credo, your individual style, the rituals, the tools that you use. It's pretty good. I'll give you a hint on it right now. OK we all have a hard time telling stories, it's one of the questions I get a lot, which is how to tell a story. And if you research into story story boiled down is conflict with that conflict, there is no story. So when you all tell the story and there's no fricking conflict in it, everybody's doing this. Yeah. When is the story over? Only through conflict can characters progress. No conflict, no story. So if you look at Joseph Campbell's the hero's journey, you can. The points that matter is there's a call to adventure. There is the anxiety of the call, which is something you do not want to do. And then someone helps you to get through. And if you take your individual lives, each and every single one of you and you use that exact same framework to answer three prompts, you start to get a sense of your story. So there's your origin story. It's usually around your creation, your birth for Superman. It was when Krypton exploded and his parents sent him to Earth. For Peter Parker, his origin story was the moment that he was bit by a radioactive spider. So that's your origin story, so sometimes it relates to when you're born. But sometimes it relates to much later in life. And then there's the defining moment each and every one of you has a defining moment the moment that began the journey of who, how you came, who you are. So origin story, the defining moment, so Peter's defining moment was when he could have stopped. The thief who then ultimately killed his uncle Ben, that moment changed his life, so he got his power from the bite of the radioactive spider, but he did not become spider-man in that moment. He became a superpowered MetaHuman. The defining moment it was an Uncle Ben is killed and then he's haunted by the words with great power comes great responsibility. And so then he emerges, having been transformed, so there's a transformative moment. So then he says, from this point forward, I'm going to be a force for good. Each and every one of you hopefully has these three parts to your story, origin story, you're defining moment and your transformative moment. And I'll tell you mine really fast. Just to give you an example. My origin story is in April 30th, 1975 the fall of Saigon. So I write down the words Saigon to Santa Monica. And that encapsulates the origin story, the story of immigrants, refugees, a fish out of water. The stranger comes to town, that's my origin story. My defining moment is when I'm thinking of becoming computer scientists and I meet Dean walker, so I go from data to Dean Walker to design the 3D. Prior to meeting Dean walker, I never knew being a graphic designer was a thing. The moment that I'm transformed is the three J's. Jesse telling me to go do more with my teaching, Jose. The second, j, telling me to go on YouTube and make videos, and that's how I make the jump from being a service company to a product company. So you see that I've sat down and I've mapped out my own story, it's very clear to me and then I'm transformed. So now I'm going from blind to the future, so I'm leaving the ordinary world behind. Into the new world and the three points meeting jean Walker becoming a designer. My parents fleeing Saigon and and Jesse and Jose pushing me allows me to become this person and each time there's resistance. There's resistance in every part of the story. If there's no resistance, there's no conflict. You have a problem. Ok? the story continues, but that's where we stop, and I'll get into this more later on a pro somewhere. So if you can boil your story down into these three parts, your origin story, you're defining moment and the transformative moment you'll be on to something. And what you'll want to do is you want to present your best self. That self is not a good storyteller. The true self says this hurt. I didn't want to do this, and I was too stupid to see it. Other people helped me to see it. And that's how you get through it. So the mentor is the person who helps you cross the threshold. So think about that each and every one of you go back and search it through your memory. What is my origin story? How did I begin the journey to become who I am. And what is my transformative moment to set me off on a course of who I'm going to be? There's a lot more to it, but that's the framework, and I'm getting really close. I've redrawn this diagram. Now like eight times and it's getting closer, so I feel like I'm almost there. OK, now let's go over to Rachel, Rachel. Hi, OK, thank you so much for this on technology, lower my hand. OK this was really cool. First of all, I just want to say I see a few new faces here and Hi to everybody who's new, and I've been part of the group for probably over a year, and I still get nervous every time I raise my hand and ask a question. I just want to say that it never gets old, but it's always a pleasure to be here. So I have a question I don't want to get down in the weeds, but I wanted to ask about imagery that you use in your keynotes because I know that you have a very distinct style, usually aside from like the headshots and like you were talking about lines and circles, but just in terms of the style and picking one that's like cohesive throughout your presentations. Can you talk a little bit about that? Like maybe just give a little bit of an overview and direction for who might be using those to? Rachel, you're a designer, right? Yeah, Yeah. So are you asking on behalf of the group or for you, personally, for me personally? Ok? do you do you have a clear visual style for your website and your identity? Oh, not really, not so much. Here's what we're going to do when we do another work session like this. I want each and every single person to go and find a couple of pieces of design that they love. And you're going to need to find very specific things, it has to have topography in it, the more the better. You should have some graphic elements in it and it probably has to have an image and illustration in some colors. And ideally, what you do is you find a poster. And the best place I know where to find these things is either Behance or Pinterest. And just find one. OK, so if you have a folder of six or seven, that's fine, so for the next time, what we'll do is I'll show you how to deconstruct this. Let me see if I have this thing next to me. Let's see. And I don't see it, but there's a magazine. Called outside its magazine, outdoor living. And there's a really cool layout, an editorial spread, I looked at them like, this is dope. I know exactly what they're doing, and I can deconstruct that for a carousel, for Instagram and say, like, steal this design. This is the typeface. These are the rules. Here's how they're using it. This is the image treatment I can break stuff down. So I can help you break stuff down. I was helping David thewlis figure out his style, and it's really not that hard once I show you how to do it. OK amazing. I would love to see that, Yes. Yes, that would be awesome. So find a piece of design, a book cover, a poster, something that has different media in it, like mixed media because it's going to be rich and it's going to give us all that we need. So how do I want to explain this to you? Imagine that we're going to reconstruct a complex main dish or like an amazing soup. We don't want to just do like a pastry or something very simple because there's not that much we can extract from it. So I want a really rich dish to work with. I'll teach you how to debone the chicken. What ingredients, how to prep. And ultimately, how to construct this thing. So each one of you guys can have a very specific style that is not unique in the world, but unique to you. And so you don't feel like you're a cookie cutter designer. OK like Jennifer has very strong style. The blue hair, the pink shirt, the CG kind of renderings in the background. That's really strong, and that touches of gold, I think if I'm seeing this correctly, so we all need to find our style. OK, so each and every one of you that wants to do this for next time come in with one image, a poster or a book cover something that you just really, really love and think if I can build my entire aesthetic, my visual identity based on this, I'm a happy person. OK and a little pre work for you. Figure out what the typeface is. People ask me this all the time, what typefaces? You know, there's things on the internet. They'll tell you all you have to do is submit a few sample letters. It will tell you literally what the typeface is. You just need a few letters for it to work with, OK. And so go ahead and do that. So you'll want to know that ahead of time. What typeface is this? OK, Rachel, back to you. Is that is that what you're looking for? That's perfect. Yes, I would love that. Sounds fantastic. OK all right. Any other questions before we wrap up here? Now we're good. And how is this for you guys for a work session, I didn't get a lot of work done. Obviously, I got trapped into my own. Let me show you how to do everything. I think next time I'd like to really just work at some point because that's what a work session is. And so then you guys will see things that maybe you'll pick up on like, oh, why did you do that? How do you translate that? OK yeah, it's I think it was awesome. You're so generous, just sharing everything with us and just looking would also be great. I would also like to see how you think, how you really structure the presentation. Like how do you tell the story? The content of it would be awesome to see, how can we do this? Can you, Ali and rachel? Can you guys just keep me honest here? Yeah so Rachel wants to know about style. Emily wants to know about how to construct from ideation, from words into the slides. I have that. I was I had that in the background just to show you guys, too. So I have a very specific process that I go through that's been refined over the last six or seven years building. And at this point, hundreds of presentations I'd be happy to show to you. It was one other thing, Emily, that you asked for that. I can't remember. Earlier no, I don't think so. All right. I don't think so. OK well, I think that's the end of this call. I mean, had stopped on the recording here.

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February 7, 2022
Web Design Critique
Web Design Critique
TheFutur
November 2, 2021
Keynote Tips
Keynote Tips
Chris Do
May 11, 2016
The Metaverse is coming, are you ready?
The Metaverse is coming, are you ready?
TheFutur
March 18, 2022
 Design Sprint
Design Sprint
August 27, 2021
What Are The Differences Between Creative Director vs Art Director
What Are The Differences Between Creative Director vs Art Director
Greg Gunn
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thefutur.com
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