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2018 Year-End Goals Review

#
84
Chris Do
Published
December 21, 2018

Chris Do hosts a year-end review call with the specific goals individuals set at the beginning of the year.

Read Transcript
This is it, this is episode 84. This is our year end goal review of 2018 it's confusing for some people because here we are in December reviewing our goals for 2018. This is just about accountability. Now what we've seen is there's an attrition rate here because more than half of the people who posted their goals for whatever reason are either no longer part of the group or, I mean, it's sad to me or aren't on the call today. So I'm hoping that in 2019 with a group that we have now, when you guys post this event or comment on this event for 2019, that I'll see you in one year and we'll track how far you've come. Last year in 2017 we had a lot of people post really big, ambitious goals and they were so big that there was like a slim chance of them hitting it and sometimes setting too big of a goal can actually be a detriment to you. And I'll talk about that a little bit. I want to start off with some gratitude, so I'm going to break away from the deck right now. So let me stop sharing here and I'd like you just have three or four people share their wins for the week. What are you grateful for? What are you happy about? Who wants to share something you guys can either raise your hand? There you go. Devon, you're up, man. Awesome I sent him my paperwork to become an LLC. Nice all right. Versus a little proprietor. So for you things official, that's my biggest thing. OK did you do it through legal zoom? No, I did it through a friend who's a CPA, and he set it all up. Oh, that's even better. OK for you, man. Yeah and how long have you been in business for five months? Ok? oh, excellent. Something like that. Yeah, I think you're doing it the way most people do this, where if it's a bootstrap operation, you kind of do everything ad hoc, slightly possibly illegal and you just do what you got to do. Yeah you don't own everything and you just make it work. And then you take steps towards becoming more of a legitimate business every day. So good for you, man. Congrats thank you. OK, now let's go to Darren. I see your hand raise. Yeah, so just this week, I've gotten five new leads for business, and this is awesome because before that, it's been months since I've really had very, very many people look for actually come to me to talk about doing business. So that's been good. Well, fantastic. Congrats on that. Do you know where these leads came from? Like what triggered this? A good portion of them are referrals. so it's been connecting with people, mainly because I've been sharing a lot of my goals for this next year, which is funny that this is about goals, but I've been sharing my goals and what I plan on doing from switching from a day job to doing this full time. And people are like, oh, cool, well, hey, here's somebody that needs help. I'm going to send them your way. Yeah, you would be surprised when you update people on your status. What that does in terms of triggering a response from them. And I think that's where news and newsletters come in, where you can say, I'm making a transition, I'm starting my company, I have capacity. I can take out more clients of x, y and z nature and the people that are in your network that see that, that are good natured people who want to support and see you win. They're going to reach out and refer people. So I encourage you guys to do this on a periodic basis, not to generate news, not to try to make fake transitions. But when you are actually doing something and you're doing more things than you think you are, let people know. Yeah I'll be taking this news also to my newsletter. I've like 600 people on there. I'm writing a year end review saying, hey, I'm actually doing the switch this year, and I'm going to be doing an open call for new business in that too. Mm-hmm so if you guys are going to do a year end recap, may I make this suggestion to all of you, not just darion, is that try to start off with? There's a lot. Lots have happened in my life. Here's what I'm really grateful for, and it culminates with this piece of news. People like to read people being grateful for things. It just reminds you like, wow, this guy's really grounded. He's appreciative of the things he has, and I want to invest it in your story and your character, and I want to see you when. Fantastic and I don't know if you guys know this, but Darren has the distinct honor of being on one of our videos that has over 200,000 views. I critique one of his typography posters, I think, and where I've received more hate on the response. It's you right there in I. Yeah, it is you. Yeah, I have more hate comments on that than any other video produced. I keep thinking about maybe I should take it down, but the views just keep going up and they're not unsubscribing. So there's a lot of people. People keep connecting with me over it too, like, hey, I saw your story and it's great to see that you're from this background and they connect with it. Awesome So like, I'm glad you're a much better designer than Chris, and Chris is a troll. He doesn't know what he's doing. So if you guys want to have a laugh, read those comments. Ok? all right. Priscilla, please, you're up. Next oh, OK, so good morning, all for me, it's not a win, but it's really a gratitude because I always wondered in my career and I have 20 plus years of career, where do all designers go? And I started, you know, big agency in New York, right off from school and and then September 9/11 changed and so forth. But anyway, I recently went back to New York, I kept in touch with a lot of my friends, a little bit scattered all over from this time. And often they are freelancers, which is interesting, and they combined with each other by tools like pairs. And I came back from this trip a little bummed out, thinking, oh, you know, I don't have a partner and what is going to pull me back to the top? And I feel so fortunate for the group and the future because I don't have one partner now. I have like, I don't know how many 47 or more, but I start getting to know people online and that's my gratitude is like now I have more of a goal, I have a plan and it's giving me a little more peace than anxiety I had before. I love that this is just a gratitude. So to be thankful for that, I think it was a good thing. Yeah, I see that there's a bunch of hands raised now, so I'm going to power through everybody. OK, Abby, your next. And then we're going to go to rags and Mariah. Debbie? Debbie, Hello. Debbie, go, yep, yep, I'm here, sorry. Yes hey. So that's a win already. See that? I know. Yes OK, bye. Mine is it's quite a bit similar to Priscilla's in some ways, I guess. Last week, I just had this awful realization that actually, because I live in a very small town in the countryside of the new forest in the UK, I don't see people very often like I'd sit-in my office at home. I, I speak to clients all day. I have peers online that I speak to, but actually people I don't see now, I'm not that much of an extrovert that, you know, I'm not a massive people person anyway. But I just came over really lonely last week and I've actually managed to organize a few people locally to come around and actually work from my dining room. Like once a month. We're going to have a little kind of co-working, and these are people that I've worked with before. And so I just, you know, I've just come back and said, yes, we feel the same. So, yeah, there's gratitude for actually, I'm going to be actually face to face with people more next year, which is really, really good because, right? Yeah, I think anyone who lives in a small town and kind of works remotely, it's sort of get a bit kind of, I don't know, insular. I guess so. Yeah, excellent. I see you online, like so I just assume you're out and about. So it kind of sometimes. But no, it's yeah, it's just going to be nice to actually have people that, you know, they're not in the design industry or anything, but it's just nice to actually have someone you can bounce stuff off or just have a bit of banter with. And, you know, just that kind of toing and froing, which is what I miss about the corporate world. So Yeah. Perfect Abby, I just wanted to ask you a quick question are you using a fancy set up? I'm using the Logitech thing. You know that logitech? Good, Thanks. I've got a bright light to like, burn out the wrinkles. Well, it's working. It's a bit cheaper than B2C. No, I just want to. I want to let you guys know in the Zoom. There's a thing that is just touch up my appearance and I think, do you have AI have that typekit. Yeah so you got all the Fitbit work. All right. Come on. I'm a makeup free today, so you know, OK, let's keep moving on. Thank you very much, rags. You're up next. Thanks, guys. Good to be back and all the new members. It's been almost I mean, I didn't think, I think have not been part of the call for almost to four to five months. It's good to be back on the Wednesdays. I didn't set any goal for 2018 because there was a personal loss at the end of 2017, so I just took it on the Olympic floor as it started out as two box Jan to June and June. Because I think the transformation actually happened during the boot camp. It was a real game changer. Whatever happened after June and to this moment, it's been magical. Thanks to you, Matthew Ben. And also the all good game. I think I've told all the guys in the video above to tell you this. What has happened to me right now is tons of I'm feeling grateful because. The opportunity you give as a part of the weekend to become not totally fearless. I really want to start shouting in this part of the world with my own community here. Fortunately, the last four months to be making the impact with our own agencies and freelancers being before being new fascism came into the design field. So I'm in constant touch with them doing all those things on the Workfront. I actually moved to consulting with all of them. And part of delegation. It's six months since I've actually touched on my work. Nice so every time I get an opportunity, I said, OK, what is it if I can give this outside? How much time I can save and how much I can earn more on this? My thinking than executing. So that's a real shift. And I don't know what I can say. No, but it's a little too early, but I feel like no one foot on the door with Carnegie Mellon University for the work. So let's see, it's going to be a strategy and. Couple of other people to make it look beautiful. Take some. Since at least 2019, there should be a big stuff. Awesome, thank you. Hey, I'm just blown away by your transformation and I am grateful for your testimony and I just want to say something I've seen. You kind of make this arc, and it's just it's wonderful for me to see and hear, and I'm glad to see your face and miss your presence and your warmth and your energy and your positivity on the calls. But there was a good reason why you disappeared for about six months. You were neck deep in work, and I love that you're entering into this more entrepreneurial spirit. And I would encourage you, encourage you this that there are many people in your corner of the world that need to help me help them through you, just to share your teachings, share your learning, share your transformation, do it openly, freely with an open heart, and let's make some positive impact and change in the world and continue down your path. I know great things are in store for you, so I wish you the very best and I'm smiling ear to ear right now. Just hearing your stories. So thank you very much. Thank you. Feeling warm inside right now? OK, let's go to Mariah. Mariah, you're up. And I see two more people raise their hand and let's get going, ok? I am really super duper grateful. It's not necessarily a win, but for my fiancee who is supporting me and the transition from working full time to doing my own thing in the new year. It's super duper scary because we have three kids and they're expensive, but he's totally supportive and I'm really thankful for him and we're getting married in March too. So I've got a ton of stuff going on in the new year, but I'm going to do it and I'm going to crush it, and I join the bootcamp too. So I'm like, super grateful for that, and I just can't wait. Well, awesome. And you busy much, you know, getting married kids and just like, yeah, right? Yeah and then boot camp. Wow all right. And OK, super fantastic. Thanks for keeping that super concise. Let's get somebody else in the door here. I think let's go with Brendan and then Ari. I'll give a quick shout out again to the boot camp that it really has not lost anything yet, Brendan. I just don't want this to turn into commercial, you guys. I didn't ask them to say this. All right. This is not my intent. Now, please continue to extol the virtues of the business account. Yeah, the boot camp definitely has helped out because I was early on in my business and like maybe two or three months and I decided to take the boot camp and it's really set me on the right track. Just recently, I've gotten a lot into Michael. And what he's done with new York, so I sort of wanted to do something like that and my small town in Texas. So I've connected with a bunch of agencies down here and a group of designers to help design like signage and wayfinding for this city. And so we're getting the proposal and everything together, and it's going to be a major project. And like, I wouldn't have had the confidence or the know how to do it if it wasn't for this group and for the boot camp. So that's what I'm extremely grateful for. thank you so much, Brendan. I'm curious, what of Michael beirut? Are you trying to replicate on your end? So the mapping that he did for New York city, the designing a signage identity system for the city, the city doesn't have one. I want to like, you know, like downtown Houston. You know, New York has their iconic look. That's sort of what I want to do down here. I see. So you'll be working with the city and trying to figure that out. Yeah OK. Fantastic I love that. I also like having you on the protocol, as always, kind of bringing in the knowledge and just being able to articulate yourself very clearly. I wonder if some of you guys would benefit a little bit more by producing, dare I say, more content so that people can find out about how smart and talents you all are? So you, especially Brendan, you should be doing this too. Ok? I'm sure a lot of knowledge to the calls and you ask really smart, potent questions, so I encourage you to keep doing that. Thank you, Leslie. OK, Ari, I guess you can do your gratitude and then we'll just transition right into you going into your goal, ok? That's how it's going to work. OK Yeah. Perfect cool. Gratitude stuff, man. There's a lot of things happening this year. I have to be honest, though. All the content that you've been putting out there, it's so much. I'm trying to keep up with it as much as I can, but I try to pick and choose which one that I need to just like, follow through immediately and which one I kind of need. OK, I'll get back to that one later on. Well, great thing is that I'm really grateful for is that we finally get to hire our first full time employee. So that's a big win for me, finally letting go that control and being obsessive, obsessive and perfectionist on my design stuff. So that's a big thing for me to learn in the next year. Other than that, I'm excited for what 2019 will bring. We'll see. Well, look, I know it's tough. It's your first born, OK, it really feels like that sometimes, but that's just a lot of fear that's playing in your head. And the beautiful transformation can happen when you give work to other people and you and you nurture them. And you see them grow. And then you're like, wow, this is what? Why did I wait so long to do this? And I can have a clone of me? And then and then they can bring new things to the table and do things that you weren't able to do. So just I'm going to give you one tip for everybody that's thinking about or in the transition of delegating what you do to somebody else is to realize something, OK, one, you need to have patience. If they were as good as you, they would be and not work for you. That's one of the big lessons I learned from my business coach because I'd come back and say, oh, I'm so frustrated. Like, why can't they just get this? And it's like, whoa, whoa, hold on. So you're expecting to be as good as you and you want to pay them this. Like, how does that work? So you have to give them time and space to do that. And also to realize if you have three people that are 70% as good as you. That's 210% by my math, and that's already 2 times more than you. We just have to realize that there is going to be a skill and efficiency gap between them and you. And that's OK through our direction, through coaching, through mentorship, you can close that gap and reap the benefits of that. The second thing I want to tell you is that the people who come and work for you are not forever. Please don't assume that somebody is going to work for you and they owe you their lives. I look at it as it's a relationship of mutual convenience and benefit. As long as you provide a nurturing learning environment and you pay them a fair wage. And is that as long as they continue to show up and put 100% effort and give you all they've got, that relationship continues. Sometimes the person who works for you outgrows you, and that's totally OK. And then they want to move on. And instead of being bitter about it saying, I taught you everything I knew, you should Pat them on the back and saying, I taught you everything I knew. Congratulations go out in the world and kill it. OK all right. Cool OK, go ahead and share your deck. Right, so let me share or share your screen image. Also, share my screen one second, let me know if you can see my screen, I can see it. OK, cool. So I think earlier this year I started with five goals, so I'm just going to highlight the one that I can achieve that. And then, well, this one is totally, you know, it's not because I'm just going to do that double the revenue to 85 k while not exactly 85 k, I'm getting close to it, so I don't know if I should like completely scratchiness this or not close it. It's like hand grenades. It works. You're good enough. OK yeah, that was exciting for me. And then I host one branding workshop earlier this year. Got a great feedback, but a couple of other people that attended the event basically said that it's a lot for them to handle in one day. So we're collaborating with a few other vendors in the brand industry, and we're going to come up with a half day summit in the next year. So that's going to be something fun to work with. And then vacation, obviously, we finally get to do that after four years not taking a vacation that was a blast. So at least three out of 5 is achieve. That was more than enough for me. Losing the interest of my business. Definitely did not happen. I was hoping it would happen, but I guess I'm going to have to make it a priority in the next year and then publishing it to a design or branding exercise that's going to have to wait. OK so I have two quick things to say then. First of all, thank you for sharing this look, unless there's like a weird lens on your camera. From what I can see waste up. I don't think you have two inches to lose. You have a giant giant hips. I'm like, I'm not seeing it where those two inches are going to come from, so maybe we need to recalibrate that. And one of the things I would suggest possibly is, and frankly, you could probably weigh in here because he's are super fit. Dude, is maybe you can look at like, what is that your BMI like body mass index, or something like that versus just purely inches, you know? I don't know. Maybe it's a different goal. OK next thing is, with your last goal of publishing to design, branding e courses, I think we're going to help you do this because I'm not going to get ahead of myself. But one of the plans is to help everybody teach something that they know. And we're in a package together. It's going to be a multi week protocol kind of thing, ok? And we're going to go through from the outline stage to designing your deck and to presenting and giving you guys tips and coaching you through the entire process. That's what I plan to do. Yeah, I know, Matthew, you shared the exercise PDF thing to kind to share. What can you share to other people like basically the things that you already know? So actually, I'm going through that right now and trying to figure out how do I kind of structure the courses? Yep, OK. And you guys have seen pin to the top of our group is a document I started creating in terms of how we should begin figuring out what it is we're going to teach. OK, OK. So before this call is over, we're going to talk about this and I'm going to give you guys time over the holidays to start thinking about what you're going to do. OK, fantastic. OK and one program we're using to mark this thing up. I've never seen this before. Cloud app. Well, cloud app. Yeah, it's really simple. And the big thing about it that I like is that whenever you took a screenshot, it creates a link that you can share whatever you want to share it online or through a chat and things like that. OK, fantastic. All right. So if you don't mind, stop, share and then Matthew, your next. All right. Let me pull that up. OK can you guys see my screen? Yeah OK. Fantastic so these are my goals that I set out in January. Both personal business and these are where I ended up, so I like to climb. I was trying to climb a V8 Boulder problem and I'm stuck at V7. To be honest, I just I got so busy and I haven't been putting much time into progressing in this sector. And I'm OK with that because my goal changed through the year. Like it did not become a priority. It was something I was aspiring towards. So I'm stuck at V7. Number two Ernie earned 20k of extra income this year through passive income through the future, and I'm pretty much there, depending on how December goes. You know, I will probably get that extra 20 k, so I'm pretty happy about that. Do three speaking engagements. I almost missed this one, but last month I spoke at Seaton in Burbank. Earlier in the year, I spoke at SIGGRAPH in Vancouver, and then at the beginning of the year, I spoke in Fox River out in Michigan. So it was pretty, pretty cool. let's see. Number four, gain 2000 followers on each social platform, and I exceeded that. The biggest growth for me was on Instagram, which at the beginning of the year started. Uh, 3,800 and not $10.4 that is putting content channel, that's all good for me. Produce one piece of content a month. I definitely exceeded that with all the live streams and everything that we did. I couldn't even count anymore how many went out this year. So I'm very happy about that, especially towards the end of the year. We ramped up so quickly. Let's see number six average K views per video content. Yes, I think my lowest viewed stuff is around the maybe 7,000 or 8000, but my highest performing thing was 111,000 views, which is just a design. Design tips video of all the things it's like, we spend a lot of time creating high value content. And then what I think is the lowest value of just me drawing over some people's logos and work is the highest viewed thing this year from the content I created. So it's really bizarre to me, but I guess that's what people want. Number seven create another video course. So obviously we participated in the business boot camp, which is mainly authored by Chris, but I was definitely helping on that. And then one big course that me and Ben have just wrapped up is a project management course, so that should be coming out in January 2019, I believe. And then lastly, traveled to Europe for vacation. Me and my wife wanted to do this, but I think we're going to wait till spring 2019. So most of the stuff, all the important stuff. I feel like have been checked off the list. The two other personal things are suffering, but I feel like I've exceeded all on all the business stuff, so I'm pretty happy about that. good job, Matthew. I like how specific your goals are, and it's one of the key things to hitting your goals. I have a quick question for you on Instagram. What number of followers you need to have to unlock the linking and all the other features that they have. 10,000 There you are. I knew it was K. I wasn't sure. OK, K just for the swipe up feature. It's so silly, but that's all I really wanted. It was like one. It's like a video game. You unlock the achievement that was the achievement to unlock. So I could just get a swipe up so I could push people to links. Yeah, so you guys know what that is. If you exceed 10,000 followers on Instagram, when you make a post, you have the ability to add a link that features not available until you pass K. That means that then you can send them to your page. You could get them to do anything that you want if they swipe up. So that was a key thing, and I'm also really thrilled to see almost everybody in our management team hit those goals too. Because I remember not that long ago, Matthew and I were sitting here and saying, how did we get to 5,000 followers? This is just really hard, like getting your first 500 not that hard. And now we're all like just jamming alone. And I think I think, Matthew, we're going to be able to help you with goal number eight, not goal number one, but goal number eight travel to Europe. Yeah, we're getting asked to speak all over the world, so I'm thinking it's a double. It's a twofer. I would love it if you can cross off another goal and you get to take a little break as well. So that would be fantastic. I'm thinking, definitely that's going to be a goal that you're going to hit Next year, for sure. I mean, the fire man, I'm telling you, man, you know, volunteer for that. I know it's pretty difficult to do those talks all you can it? Yes, OK. But you know, just like everything in life, the more you do something, the easier and the better you get at doing it. Fantastic all right. I think who are we up to next? The next we're up to we have to. I think it's going where are you? You just. Could I say what's next? Um, Philip, are you ready? Yeah, I'm here. All right. Share your screen, buddy. All right. Just sitting here. All right. Screen oh, there you go. It's so here we go. And let me just throw that over there. A month ago. There you go. And once you get it right. Yeah Yeah. Excellent OK. So 2018 was the epic year of failure. And that's like just absolutely crushed, not completing any of my goals whatsoever. And I think there was a bit of an issue with regards to a aspect is that the the aspect of the SMART goals realistic. Some things were particularly outside of my control, some of which were not, some of which were too ambitious. Let's go download. First off, launch the brand. I was in no position to be working whatsoever and at the advice of many medical health professionals, I have just stepped away from working, which is why I'm been on any calls or haven't been as ambitious with some other goals. But we're kind of reworking that now. But yeah, so did not launch the brand and plan to do that. You want to 2019, actually. So I made some strides there. Host the future. Think, of course, this is a concept that I came up with near the end of last year. You had done a class where you actually featured things in the upper left hand corner, and it was a very kind of conceptual sort of working on us rather than working on the business itself. And it kind of struck me as something that was interesting, but I hadn't even had a chance to discuss it with you. So let alone even like. Being ambitious to suggest that, hey, you know, you let me kind of represent in some regards, we're probably a little bit outside of my. Like my name, right? It's something that I had said go for that I was excited about, but at the same time was something that was within my reach necessarily. The implant surgery success also entirely outside of my control. The I did have the implant surgery on my my, my dental work. But unfortunately the implants failed through no fault of my own and no fault of the doctors are will not. But shit happens. How could I control that right? So implant surgery is going to go down again in February. But whether or not it's entirely 100% successful is not something I can. It's specific. It's measurable. You know, it's achievable or realistic. It's all those sorts of things put down by time. But it's not within my sphere of control And letting go of what's within my control, and that's not something I've had to really learn this year. Hey let me interject here because I would hate to have the entire length of your call being like all about failures. Yeah, absolutely. The reason why I invited you to say this is because I love the transparency. I love the honesty. And I know by reading some of your posts online that not everybody in your network supports you being so open and transparent. But I appreciate it. And what? I'd like for you to go down that list and tell us what you learned. Just go real quick and tell us what you learned so that we can. We can pull away some positivity and life lessons from this. OK OK. Sure I think the one thing I had to have learned and most significantly, was reassessing my goals as I go through. So just kind of set a path and stick to it as if that's how you plan to stick to it. This is not the movie layer cake. It does not work out exactly as planned. And when it goes sideways and shit hits the fan and things are and life itself happens, right? Was it John Lennon said that life is what happens when you're busy making plans. And so life happened. And I set goals at a time in which perhaps I was not in my right mind. And or was it? Tim minchin has something. I think goals and opinions are very similar, and they say that goals opinions are the Obama. This opinions are like assholes because everyone has one. But I think what's really important is where opinions and goals differ from assholes is that you should review yours regularly and closely and thoroughly because I should have done the same. I should have gotten like the one and gone, whoops, what was I thinking? And reassessed at that time and just being just accepting that shit happens. Yeah and and strive for it and pushing forward is what really counts in the whole thing. You know what I really like about your thing? Not only are you specific about your goal, but you're also finding the my time. So you see, like you guys as an example. One, two three four. And like, he's super, super specific. So what we need to do is to have a realistic frame of mind to kind of like, all right, this is what I can honestly think I can achieve based on previous things. And I think had Philip minded his own goals for quarter one, that would have pushed him, propelled them to quarter two, and then therefore he has momentum and he'll be able to do whatever he wants in quarter 3 and four. So I think his observation of not just setting a goal and forgetting like Ron Popeil might suggest is you have to mind your goals, you have to keep track of it. And that's the beautiful part. Do you have a peak performance partner? Not this time. No, actually. No, I don't. OK, so I'm going to say that moving into 2019, it's important that you guys make your goal, share it with your peak performance partner and check on them at least once a month, because then you have to course correct. If you need to make sales or get that site launch, it might require additional help from somebody else, but you need to reprioritize. OK, so I was listening to something from Tony Robbins about when you feel overwhelmed. Overwhelmed is a signal to your brain to say, prioritize, prioritize. Pick one thing to just do that. And that's all it is. OK thank you for doing that. And OK, guys, I think that's it for people who are going to share their goals, right? I think that's it. OK, so if you don't mind it hit stop share for me, Philip. And then I'm going to go back and share my deck, and then we're going to talk a little bit here. Where's my dick? Various OK, now I feel like it's relevant that we talk about this right now. OK too big. I feel like it's relevant that we talk about this, because we're going to have all of you, everybody that's in this group and who's going to be watching this call later to set your goals for 2019? Again, a lot of people make this mistake. Their one year goals are too big. Their 10 year goals are too small. Let's let's recalibrate. OK and the way that we do this is I'm going to talk to you guys a little bit more about the Dan Sullivan question and ask you guys what it is that you want. The problem is when we're sitting here kind of just looking into the future without a clear thought in our head, a concrete goal, it can be very hard for us to figure it out. So we start writing stuff. And it feels really good in the moment. And for some people, the little dopamine hit that you get in terms of just saying or writing your goal down is enough for you, but that's obviously not enough for me. You have to work towards your goal and you have to be able to achieve that. So the Dan Sullivan question is something like this. All right. It's if we were having this discussion three years from today and you were looking back over those three years, what has to have happened in your life, both personally and professionally for you to feel happy with your progress now? I was reading Blair and his book, pricing creativity. He says this is the most perfect question. If you ask your clients this, you can get so much information from them. OK, so at this point in time, I suggest you guys screen capture this and memorize this. It's not that many words to memorize. So if we're having this discussion three years from today and you're looking back over those three years, what has to have happened in your life, both personally and professionally for you to feel happy with your progress? So I'm going to cue you guys up. I'm going to talk for a little bit, but actually, I want you to start thinking about this. So if you need to just to me out and start thinking about this, so we're now, I think, 2019 20 the end of 2021. Wow 2021. We're going to have the three year reunion, all of us. When we get together, we're going to be some amazing place at some lodge somewhere. And I'm inviting you to come on stage to share how far you've come. What story are you going to tell us? What has happened? Three years from now. 1920, so end of December. 2021 What has happened? And I don't want you just to focus solely on the professional part. We also have to find the personal stuff. Are you married? Do you have kids? Have you gone somewhere? Have you done something? As a personal goal or as. And the professional, what's happened? OK, are you guys all thinking about that because it's going to be very important for us to proceed with the rest of this? You need to know this, ok? And the reason why. This question is really, really good. It's because of a couple of things. First of all, when you look forward into the future and you say three years, it's a finite amount of time, something that is kind of distant in the horizon, but not so far off on the horizon that you can't see it. And it puts you in a few positive future state of mind so that you don't have to worry about what's happened today. Like, for example, if a client isn't paying you today or you're having some point of struggle or discomfort or whatever is going on in your personal life, you don't have to think about that right now. So put yourself in a positive state of MIND Project forward into Three years into the future, three years from today. What's happened? And then it allows you the ability to look back and map out. The different arcs that you've had to go through in order to achieve that. Now, Dan Sullivan in his book, he says when he asks a client this question and they can't answer it, he doesn't take them on as a client. If they challenge him, he doesn't take them on as a client. If they can't clearly describe it, he doesn't take them on as a client because it's like I cannot help somebody who doesn't know what they want. OK I hope I gave you guys enough time to start thinking about that. Now there is this thing I called a focus sheet, and I've added this additional page to it the Dan Sullivan question. OK so you would write down your professional goal and your personal goal and you write that down. I mean, you don't need this worksheet to do this. You can just write it on whatever software you have or tools you have in front of you. Just write them down. What's happened in three years professionally and personally? And one of the things that we need to do is we need to figure out what our success metrics look like. Because oftentimes, if you tell me what your personal goals are like, I'm much happier, I'm financially independent. Well, then we have to translate those things into success metrics. So when you say much happier, we kind of have figure it out, what's going to be the driver of being happier? Is it finishing a degree? Is it reading 20 books on your to read list? So we have to translate translate those into success metrics, ok? And that's what the second row is for is to make sure you make those measurable. They're really working on this, thinking about it, Yeah. Three years from now. OK all right, so one of the things that we always struggle with is when we ask people to write their goals, they write some really abstract things like, I can't figure it out. So one of those things is we have to have clear goals in order if we want to get those results. So if you say I want to be happier. Well, that's kind of up to you to figure out. So some days you could feel like you're happy and some days not, and so you never know if you can reach that goal. So what we have to do is use the SMART goals technique, which I've talked about many times before, which is an acronym for specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time bound. OK and I'm going, I'm going to go through this really fast, you guys. And of course, you can review this later if it's confusing to you. You can also look it up and you can just type in what our SMART goals and you'll see a couple of different explanations on this. Probably the most important one is specific. It needs to be clear and specific. And Jim Rohn talks about this, he says everybody wants to be more efficient. He said you shouldn't strive to be more efficient. You should strive to have clearer goals. Efficiency is a byproduct of you having clear goals. If you think back 24 hours ago, what did you accomplish? And those of you guys that finished a lot of things, if you accomplish lots of things, chances are you had a pretty clear idea of what you wanted to do that day. If you're getting married, if you're planning a picnic, if you're doing anything or planning a party, you get very specific as to what you need to do in order for the party to come to, to happen to materialize. But we don't govern our own lives and our goals that way. So here are some sample questions that help you get specific. What do I want to accomplish? Why is this so important? Who is involved? Where is it located? Which resources or limits are involved? Next, measurable. How much, how many, how will I know when it's accomplished? So these two go hand in hand, it's specific and measurable and allows you to assess your progress along the way. And there's something really cool is when you can check something off the list, even though your goal may have 10 components to it. If you're three through 10, it'll push you to get past the breaking point. And finish out your goal. So it needs to be measurable. Is it attainable? This is where I think a lot of people screw up where their goals are just too big. And then you almost give up as soon as you finish writing it because, you know, inside you're not going to be able to do it. It's not realistic. Mine would be, oh, become a supermodel. All right, that's not going to happen. So it needs to be attainable, and we have to find that balance between something that's too hard and too easy. And that's the challenge now most of you in this group will set goals that are too hard because your entrepreneurs, you're driven, you're motivated and they get that. So what I ask you is to give yourself a little permission to pull back just slightly. So if you want to do 3x revenue and you realistically think you can do it, set your goal a 2 and 1/2. And then when you hit the 2 and a half, now you define it as a stretch goal. How far past 2 and 1/2 times revenue can you go? Relevant, this one means that the goal has to be important to you. If I give you a goal to accomplish. You may or may not feel connected to that like I've been screaming guys, make content, put yourself out there. Don't worry about being perfect. Well, if it doesn't resonate, if it's not relevant to you, you're not going to do it. OK and I think yesterday, Janelle talked about this, I forgot the word that she used, but she talked about the condition, the environment in which you're in, and I obviously don't know every environment, obviously, that you guys are in. So you need to make sure is this the right time to have the right resources? Is this the time and moment for me to do this, ok? And last but not least, it's bound by time, just like when Philip was talking about it. Quarter one, quarter two. So six weeks, six months from now, what's going to happen? We need to tie it to time. OK so here we are again, smart, specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and time bound. The two, most are the three most important ones are specific, measurable and time bound. If you stick to those three, you're going to be good. Since you are writing your own goal, it's going to be relevant to you. Unless unless you're writing it on behalf of that voice inside your head, that sounds like your parents. That's the case. Just do a quick check with yourself like this is so important to me. Was it really important to me to get my degree? Was that somebody else's goal? Specific, measurable and time bound. That's it. OK I don't need to give you guys this example. OK, so there's a. There's a. A technique or word that I've been introduced to in the last few years, it's called scaffolding, I'm going to talk about that in a second. But you guys, hopefully I've done enough talking to give you guys time to write things down because what I'd like for you to do is the end of this call at around 10 o'clock ish that you're going to post a graphic. Declaring what your 2019 goals are? OK and if you guys need a little bit more time, you have some questions, just ask me. Wait until I create the event for 2000 and 19 December. Now, as you can see, if you read through the post on this event, people are like, shouldn't this be in january? I'm like, no, because we're already setting the time in December of 2019 to have this conversation. We're setting the goal now. So you know, you're going to be accountable 12 months from today. OK scaffolding, the way scaffolding works is this and I love this, this idea, and I'm all about this, and it seems so freaking obvious that you're like, dude, you're not telling me anything new here. So people describe scaffolding also as chunking, which is take any goal, anything that you want to accomplish and you just break it down into three to five steps. You have a clear milestone, and you just break it down into three or five steps now, those three or five steps can have additional subsets or some steps. I'm sorry. But this works for just about every single thing. Like, if you want to build a car, you kind of figure out the five most important components that make a car a car and then you break those things down. You keep breaking them down until you can actually do something about it. OK so inside the focus sheet, you have goals and commitment, right? So what we do is then we take our three year goal. And all the things I have has to happen for you to be able to get there and you break that down to three-year-old into a one year goal. So for the purpose of the 2019 goal, we're going to discard year two and three. You know what they are, but we don't need to focus on those, we're just going to focus on year one. OK and just like the way Philip did it, he had a 12 month goal And then he broke it down into four quarters, so every three months he knows where he's supposed to be. And you have to make an assessment and an adjustment along the way. So ideally, what would happen is at the end of each quarter, you guys would update your goals to the event and say, look, I've done this, I need more help here. I can see now I'm going to have a problem in Q4. I need help. I need to modify it, or I'm blowing past all my goals, and I set the bar too low. So then update a post to that and just keep commenting on your own thread. OK so you take the three year goal down to one year goal and the one year goal into quarters. And one thing that I've added in there is what will you do to celebrate your accomplishment? I want you to be able to realize this goal in your head and to visualize it as clearly as possible and to reward yourself at the completion of each goal. It doesn't have to be big. It could be small. So if you hit all your quarter one goals, what would you do when you go to disneyland? Will you go on a three day vacation trip somewhere or whatever it is that you want whenever it feels like it's going to push you to do it? And then to actually celebrate and do it. You might buy yourself that lens that you want or that camera or whatever it is. Tie each goal to reward. The last part, the last two parts is to make a commitment here is that you need to tell your most trusted people, family, friends, whatever peer group, what your goals are. You mean you need to make a public declaration. So what I would advise you to do is only declare one goals. Publicly, this is what I'm going to do. They'll hold you accountable. And then actually want you to sign it yourself to make it official, so there's the act in the ceremony of signing something that I think hardwired into our body and our mind and our spirit that we're going to do it because our word means something to us. OK all right. So again, the overview is we have the year goal, which is outside an onion, and we're going to keep peeling away at it until we get into the day so year, month. Week and then day, so the focus she talks about this, OK, so what you do is you transfer all your quarter one goals here and you're going to break it down into individual monthly goals, your first 30 days, your second 30 days, et cetera. A president when they're elected into office, they talk about the first 100 days. Sound familiar? They have to have a blueprint, a map. OK so we're chunking down now to the day. So the daily focus sheet is a piece of paper that you can copy and just have an infinite supply of these things, miscarry green, who's part of this group, uses his swears by it and is able to achieve a lot of her goals by focusing. So I love the focus sheet in a way that you become your own boss. Like, you don't work for anybody, you work for yourself, so you need to be accountable to yourself. OK, so it begins with a gratitude. What are you grateful for today? And it asks you just three things. What do you need to accomplish today and has a little bubble like a Scantron tests or something? You just check that off when you crush that. I've shared with you before there are days that I get overwhelmed, I feel like I can't do anything because my nerves are all bound, really tight. I take a deep breath, I just write down my goals, what I need to do that day, and then I just start moving through it. It's pretty interesting like I can switch my brain from the leader to the servant and serve myself. So the leader says these are the three goals, and then I switch over to serve them like, yes, boss, I'm going to get this thing done and I just attack it. And every time something pulls me away from achieving one of these three things, I discipline myself say, stop, focus on this. So don't check your email. Don't comment on YouTube. Don't respond to that request for something. Just do these three things today. And an additional organizational tool is to cluster your activity, so if you have to do a bunch of calls or emails or you have to go out and do stuff like buy things in order for you to achieve what you need to do. So we're in a cluster of those things together to make it more efficient, so we don't have to do as much context switching. The context switching is a productivity killer. And what I mean by that is like, you're in the middle of writing a proposal, then you check your email and then your partner calls you and it's like, what have I done today? And then it's already eight PM. And then lastly, this whole assessment thing that Philip talked about is built into the focus sheet, the end of each day, you need to do a reflection. Think about what did you do today? What did you learn? What could you do better and to think about that? And that's your prompt for setting your goal for the next day. Here's what I need to do for the next day. So if you do this at the beginning and end of your day, I think you're going to do really well. OK that's it for my deck. That's all I wanted to talk about in terms of goal setting. So I'm going to create an event. Now I would love for you guys to talk and we can chat about whatever it is that we just went over, guys. Anybody or nobody, it's fine. I'm going to go on Facebook right now. Mcreight an event? OK I actually ended up purchasing something called the full focus plan or whatever, which uses a very similar layout to that. It's a printed piece that's broken down by quarters, and it does. It's the template for the sheets are almost identical in some regards. It came in really handy actually for the first little while. But then, as I mentioned, plans changed. But so but no, it's staying on top of it and staying diligent with it, I think is the key thing, right? If you don't, if you don't use it, it won't work, right? Mm-hmm Philip, do you have a link to that thing? I think I have. I think one of those companies sent us several of these books, and you're right, when I ripped it open and I looked at it, I'm like, wow, OK, maybe I don't need to make this thing. That's why I never wound up making this product because it's really done. I use a bullet journal, which is also quite working for me. Mm-hmm I think Matthew is a fan of the bullet journal to. Or was? Yeah, I stopped using it, but I used it for a few months, pretty solid at the end of last year, in the beginning this year. And the daily self-reflection was the thing that was the most helpful. Basically, just looking at what were the many wins that I could reflect on today and be grateful for? And then also what is something that I could improve? Like, what did I not do? Well, what did I not handle? Well so those were the two things that I think were great. The most important thing for me was just the reflection because I wasn't doing a lot of reflection in the past. It's like I could do gold setting, but there's no daily reflection. That was powerful for me. Yes OK, ladies and gentlemen. Dated already December 18th, which is a Wednesday next year, 2019 the 2019 year in goal review is up, so as soon as you're ready, make a graphic and throw it on there. It just have to be pretty could just be Helvetica. You can screen captures simple text document. It just really matter. It's the idea of writing it. I like having a little checkboxes next to it so that you can just like, yep, I hit that. Ok? and of course, you don't have to do it right now. I would love for you to do it by the end of the call, but you can't at least do it before the end of this week. That's your homework, ok? Any of us have any questions. Yes, I do. So the focus workbook I have doesn't have the last sheet. OK have an updated one. Someone must I must. I tweak things from time to time. So what I'll do is I'll upload it to this event as soon as we're done with this call. OK OK. Yeah and then just selfishly, could you show me the screen with the specifics again? Yes thank you. Please what do you want me to share the specifics like the smart, smart, measurable? Yes, exactly. This thing are here. Yes, but like the specific, there we go. You ready? Yeah screencap. OK, I'll just cycle through them so you can see them. You can look this up up, but here we go ready. So I'm going to advance. Well, I'm all set, so I don't want to. All right, thank you. All right. Well, we can keep talking. Anybody else? OK go ahead, Alex, hey, what's up, man? What's up? How are you doing, man? I'm always. I'm always afraid to talk because I got, I'm afraid to, like, hijack the conversation inside, man. All right, cool. Like snakes on a plane. Take it away. So I wanted to say thank you for having the open house. It was a lot of fun. And anyone out there who is like, afraid to participate like, I'm some nobody, dude, that just works at Costco. You know, like, you know, I'm a big fan of this. I went to school for animation. I'm trying to get it together, you know, because I want to, you know, I want to play with the big boys. You know, I want to. I want to be up there with it, with everyone else, you know, and accomplish my goals and accomplish what I wanted to accomplish when I initially went out to school. So all of you guys were too shy or just not willing to participate. This space is for that, you know, and everyone that I met at the future was freaking cool. Even like the behinds, the people behind the scenes, people I spent some time getting to know Stewart. Cool Yeah. We hit it off talking about film and stuff, and I was going to do like a little review about the whole thing. I still probably should do it. The whole idea is for us to get things going. And there were people that I was talking with two of the people that were at the table. Derek is part of the group, one of the guys who is part of this future group, and he does trailers. So if he gets an opportunity to see what's up, that'd be cool. But there was a couple of other guys there that they won prizes. One of them won the legal kit. And the other guy wanted to win without pity manifesto. And we were all at the same table, you know, so I was like, hey, this is cool. Like, this is a good sign, you know? But I guess that's all I wanted to say is like, we should try to be more just open because I think that's going to cause us to want to participate more, especially when that network is embracing us. You know, and I think the community is part of the reason why we're connecting online. A lot of us are introverts. We spend a lot of time by ourselves doing the work disconnected from people, you know, and this is a way for us to connect or reconnect with the kind of people that share our values. So, yeah, I'm just very grateful to you. And at the same time, I'm looking forward to the changes that I'm setting out for myself and excited to get this going. And if anyone else you know, has goals that they want to achieve, like let's do it together, you know, in this coming year and let's collaborate or let's bounce off one another. Let's link to our ideas. You know, let's just. Participate also in our communities, because I also think like where we are rooted, that's the place where we're actually where we actually are in real space. And I think that it's necessary to. Try to try to participate. I didn't catch his name, but the guy who lives in Houston trying to do the wayfinding, it's like if we participate in our communities, we probably I would assume I haven't done it myself, but would feel more accomplished for having participated in a way that we are just proud of ourselves for, like making this area little better, you know? Or so anyway, I think that was Brendan that you were referring to, if I remember. OK, cool. A couple of things, Alex. I mean, I just appreciate that you made the trek from Arizona. Las Vegas, Vegas, Las Vegas, you came out from Las Vegas and I know that your animation, I think you need to connect with Marvin from this group. Do you know, marvin? I do not know. He runs a motion design firm in the Philippines called simply simply, Matthew, help me out there. Yeah, I think it's simply a Design Studio. I think simple. It's plainly simple, plainly simple, plain listing. OK, there we go. We should know what's happened. Well, Matthew, we're human beings. We know this by now, plainly simple. And they do a great job. And it would be great if you just built a relationship with him to kind of follow in his steps because he is where you want to be. I think cool. I mean, not doing animation work, right? And I always love hearing your voice. I'm glad that you're back, that you're here and that you had a good time. I thought you were going to make a little joke and a little stab or jab. That means, like, everybody's cool, even Chris. But you didn't go. You know what, people? Oh, you and I and even Matthew, but I didn't get to talk to you that much, but you just like radiate with like positive energy. It's really just nice to be around that, you know, and I'm not saying that pretentiously or anything like that. You guys are just could tell genuinely that you guys are there to help. So don't be shy, everybody just get out of it. And you know, before the party was even over, people were asking me, so when's the next party? It only took 23 years to have this party. It won't take us 23 years to have another one. I think we're going to have more of these things. Where do kicking around some themes or ideas for our next party and you guys are automatically invited so. And like I said before, if you guys find me, if you make your way to Santa Monica or wherever I happen to be, I owe each and every one of you guys lunch. And let's do that. OK, I want to honor that to each and every person. I do want to apologize to Derek. I think Derek showed up at our office yesterday because I was not clear about an event. And it was a live stream. You guys, if you don't see an event, right notification from us, there's no place to show up. OK so I apologize for that. I think Derek came to our office yesterday when Janelle was talking about what is it called learning design, like how to make knowledge products and launch an online learning course. I'm going to have her on as a regular guest. So if you guys, we need to tap into our brain. And what she's doing as a coach and someone who teaches this for a living? OK I also want to let you guys know of a couple of things that are coming up. We're going to be having a fireside chat like full theme fireside chat after hours. You guys can come so you're encouraged to come dress up as if we're outdoors and camping. So if you got your flannel shirt or whatever shirt you're going to wear and your beanie, I'm going to set up a tent at the office. And it's going to be fully steamed out, I'm going to have somebody play guitar and we're just going to talk, and so we'll have on the projection screen like the great outdoors. So we try to do this with Joshua Tree didn't work out. So we'll just do the digital urban version of this. So anybody that wants to attend that event, when that happens, just let me know and show up for that, ok? I also plan on doing some logo design workshops that will be either free or very low price, and it'll be on the weekend. So it'll be like almost a full day. I'm going to give you guys a logo to work on and you bring your laptops, you work and I'll watch your work and teach and we try to help you become better at local design. So for people who are interested in that, just look out for that. What else we got? OK Matthew, is there anything that you want to talk about before I launch into my last little bit? Yes, go ahead. I saw that Finn was saying in terms of the daily to 2 and just staying focused, she has a hard time of ignoring the little things like responding to an email or, you know, like tackling something that comes to mind because she'll forget to do it. And I'm a person who's very similar to you, Finn, where, you know, I see something. I don't want to react to it right away. It's a fire. I've got to put it out, fire, I've got to put it out. But what I've been trying to get a lot more better at is that when something comes up, I just added to do list. So I keep a weekly to do list that's always going. And I always add it there because I know that. Is it important right now? I always think about that first. No, it's not important. So I'm going to add that to do list. So I don't have to say for people who like to multitask or get tempted by multitasking because it feels like every single occurrence or event that comes up in your day seems important. It's really not. And especially if you're understanding what your weekly goals are, your monthly goals are, your quarterly goals are, then you can put a lot of things in perspective in terms of how do you measure? Is this worth responding to right now? So I have a very long to-do list. Some things are just really low priority and they're just cooking there and I can see them every week, but I try to prioritize all the ones that I have to get done this week. Another thing that can really help out is determining what your flow is, so I believe in I forget what name of the book is. It probably is flow, but determining a situation where you can produce the most amount of work, like within yourself, it's just like sitting in a quiet room with no music on if you work the best that way. Try to force yourself to do that. If you're listening to music or a podcast or something like really helps you sort of sit down and get the work done, then just keep forcing yourself to do that. Yeah, I agree, and one thing that I'm going to try and implement more this year, and I'm totally inspired by Mr Ben burns at the office, he's definitely a guy who's a constant improver and always looking for new things to try and getting very tactical. What he's done is he's taken up his week, Monday through Friday, and he's blocked it out in a way that he's only taking client meetings on certain days. I believe it's Tuesdays and Thursdays. Then he has a making day, which is, I believe, Monday or it's three Mondays. His meeting dates, Wednesdays, his making dates and Friday, I think is left open. So what happens is he set up an automated his entire life in terms of calendar. So he has a calendar link that will go out to anybody that emails him. It's like, oh, you want to chat here, pick a time. And the only times available are on those days, Tuesdays and Thursdays. The rest of the time, he can focus on managing and meetings on Monday, Wednesdays, totally uninterrupted, just making pure focus. And then Friday, it's his flexible day. So by breaking it up that way, I thought that was very inspiring because I didn't think to do that before. I'm just breaking up my day like, you know, I'm going to answer emails in the morning and then I'm going to go to the office and manage the team. And check in on stuff, make stuff in the afternoon and then check in again at the end of the day. But even that feels like it's like it's stop and go for me. It keeps pulling away my attention here and there, versus just like having this big, uninterrupted flow of time flow. Like, I want to try that this coming year and maybe even some of the days working completely from home because my home office is very quiet now and I could really focus and get a lot more work done here uninterrupted. That could be your making day, Matthew. That could be my making day. Exactly so what you're talking about is, I think Ben's pretty good at that kind of military like this is what we're doing, and I think it's just minimizing context switching. That's just not that kills you. That's why, like, I can't get anything done at the office, even though I'm there eight, nine hours a day, nothing gets done because every time I sit down, somebody is coming at me and ask me some question and I'm like typing like this and staring at my screen. They're like, hey, are you focused on something like I was? I wasn't here. You did that. Oh, this isn't important. Like, well, turn around, just walk out the door. It's not important. Don't talk to me right now. Send it to me. Email, I'll deal with it. Yeah OK. Another tip from Timothy Ferriss is to only check your email once a day. And you can send an auto respond thing to say that if it's urgent, please call me on my cell and he doesn't give the cell phone number because if you knew him and it was urgent, you would already have it. And I'm starting to do that now, too. So I only check my emails twice a day at the beginning, at the end, and hopefully at some point, just once a day. Little productivity hacks here. OK anything else you guys want to talk about? Yes, sorry. And it feels like as soon as the opening came. Gotcha well, all right. My big problem is I'm a night owl, but I have a family, and so I'm just I'm not functioning in the morning and I really want to switch this around. Does anybody else have advice or that issue? Do you wake up early to or no? Well, I have two kids have to be get out of school, you know, bus and, you know, so I have to get out. But I'm like a zombie and I would like to switch this, but I'm so much more productive when it's dark out. There's no noise. I just, I don't know. It's just my thing. I have no problems staying up until 3:00 in the morning. But when the alarm rings at seven, it's very hard. Yeah, well, that's because you've only slept for four hours. I have very much the same issue with regards to maintaining a regular sleep wake cycle. I can't say I have any solutions per say, but it's something I've been looking at. Maybe we should chat about it a little bit more and see what you've tried thus far and compare notes, perhaps. Yeah OK, so who's got a similar situation where there's something compelling them to get up in the morning? And then it's not until the very late hours of the day that they actually can focus and concentrate if somebody else has something like that. Well, and the reality is business gets done during daytime, not nighttime. So I feel like I need to be more productive during the day. I need to switch that. Mm-hmm And when you say more productive, what is it that you want to accomplish during the day that you're not able to do right now? Well, sometimes I have a project and I will just push it behind, push it off because the other thing and that everything is done during the day, then at night I just sit down and I bang it out in an hour or two. Mm-hmm I mean, I don't know even the Leafs or something, I don't know. OK anybody have a good solution for this? Are you able to break it down into smaller pieces like do just a small piece and a small piece throughout the day? And then, you know? Do you think there's something about I just immersed myself in a project and we'll just, you know, do it for a few hours. I can't like do a little bit here, then stop, then go back. I mean, I can't. And I think this has been the hardest thing for motherhood is the fact that suddenly, once we brought that baby home, there was interrupted time all the time I was interrupted and I was like, oh, my goodness, like, how am I going to function like that? And I think that's why I shifted to being a night out, because that's when I'm not interrupted. the aren't you having a baby soon, brendan? Yes, I am, I will soon experience that you've been going. OK all right, Thanks. Go ahead. I want to share for the night, though. Last week I've been doing this for 13 years and I told in 2016 I decided what is the one thing people working with me or the clients would like to change? So I just complaining that, no, you are working on tonight and you have to wait in the morning. This all I got. Let me change that and see how would you be? So ever since 2015 16, beginning in America, only allies are now completely switched it. It was difficult for at least 30 days after that. It's pretty good today. I can't go beyond and. In difficult. OK, so I was clear. Maybe there's a little ambient noise rags, what did you do differently to switch it around like that? I just did a self-analysis, I said, what is the one thing people would like you to change in your behavior or your working style? What what is the one thing they complain about? When I look, when I looked around, they said, no, you're always not available in the winter. I see so. Mm-hmm So I thought, probably if I could change that. What impact you could have on me? So I didn't deserve to be the opposite, right? So you were talking about had an internal habit that you wanted to change, so you motivated yourself by visioning, like, how could I improve myself? So then you made that big switch and then Priscilla as a stay at home. I mean, she's working from home and she has kids, kids or kid Priscilla. Two, OK, so she has two kids, Oh my God. OK, that's a lot of work. All right. So then she has to attend to the needs of her children and being that they're small people, they don't have any respect for boundaries and all that kind of stuff. So she's trying to get stuff done and she's getting interrupted. It's almost as if she were at the office with us every day. You know, it's like mom and mom, mom. It's like, what? So I have a thought or a question. Do you have any assistance from your husband or somebody else who can help look after the kids during the day? Well, OK, the kids, well, things are shifting now. The kids are at school, they're 6 and 10, they're at school. But I also noticed that because I'm shifting my life right now, and this is how I end up in this group because I had a crazy client, I would go in their office and then they got she got laid off and I was like, thank you, the universe. This is the time for me to actually make this shift. So this process right now. But what I'm noticing is my work time has shrunk to six hours a day because before I had a help at home and it was a disaster, and I decided, especially at this age, that kids need us at home. So anyway, my time's shift to six hours a day and I really need to be productive doing this six hours. But there is always somehow something in any way I somehow more creative as well at night. So I would this is one of my goals to shift this, and I think so that I can be functioning as a functioning professional and a functioning mother. Yeah so I've been thinking about this too. I have an experiment for you to try. Do you work on the weekends? But it's no OK. I mean, when I have to when I have to. Yes, but when I can avoid it, yes, I mean, I don't. Yeah OK. So during the weekday, Monday through Friday, there's many things that are asking you for your time, right? So you're kind of divided all over the place, but on the weekend, it's like it's just your time. And do you have a partner that can look after the kids or do you have a. Yeah, we do. OK I'd like to try an experiment with you and see if it works ok? I used to believe the same thing. I used to believe I was more productive. Like, can't just work any other time except for when it's dark. And what I soon realized just for me, was that it was because it was lack of interruption. Yes, lack of distractions. Because it's dark. Nothing is happening. Everybody is quiet and you can just focus so you need uninterrupted focus time. So I'm just curious if you can try this to see if it's a night or a daytime thing. It's to say on Saturday or Sunday, whatever day it is that you're just going to be in your office and for everybody just to treat it like you're not there to do, not enter and see what happens. To see if it's a matter of light and darkness or just interruption. My suspicion is it's people are interrupting you way too much. I think so. Yeah, Yeah. And or you feel like you have to do something for somebody else. So Saturdays or Sundays is just mommy time and your partner needs to take care of the kids, take them out to the park, do whatever you got to do. And you also have to say to yourself, I will not feel guilty that I'm not part of that. That's the other problem, too. My wife has this a lot, which is wherever my kids are. If they're not with her, she has guilt and it just rides all over and she can't be where she's at. Like, literally like my parents are looking after the kids and we would go to see a movie as soon as the movie started. We've got to go home like, no, no, we don't. We can enjoy this moment. We go to dinner, we can. We can stroll around, we can. We can shop if we can do. And she's like, no, I'm like, honey, you need to kind of realize it's OK, right? So giving yourself that permission not to feel guilty. And I think parents obviously suffer from this. But even women have this even more than men because culturally, like it's put in your brain, like you're responsible all the time. Mm-hmm Right so I think just give yourself some room and see what happens, ok? Yeah and then report back to us and see if it's working or not. I will. I will. OK I think Darian is the one that also works at night. Is that right? He also gets up really early. A crazy schedule. That's how I deal with it as I get up really, really early. But what's the way to go to bed? Sometimes I'm bad and I stay up too late, but I try and be in bed between 10:00 and 10:30. Wow five. I've gotten to where I'm getting up. Yeah, that's the rag schedule right there. Get up early. Go to bed by 10:00 PM. It took time, though, to transition my body to be OK with that. It's not instantaneous. You've got to be really disciplined for a while. Yeah, I think, he said. It's painful for about 30 days. Yeah, that's about right, right? OK all right. OK, thank you for sharing that. And now I'd like to just take, take control back and talk a little bit about what we're planning to do. This is the last call. Guys, this is it. So I want to say, first of all, I'm grateful for all of you for tuning in, for being a part of this group, for participating, for supporting each other, for being so open and generous with your time, information and resources. I'm just I was just talking to a friend and he asked me how many people are in this group? I said almost 200 and. I don't take it for granted. I don't, so I'm very appreciative, you guys, I want to wish everybody, I'm not ending the call. I'm just saying this part before I forget to wish you guys all happy holidays and happy new year. And we'll see you in 2018. Now we have a little moment here to figure out what we're going to do. Ok? I would like to help coach each and every one of you guys to become a content producer. What you do with what you produce at the end of this is up to you. You could deliver a Ted Talk. You could just do a workshop as many people are doing already. You can create an e like online learning course. You could do anything, you could write articles for your blog and do whatever. You can create a video and post on a YouTube. And it was scary, but you could do that. So what we need to do is figure out what it is that you're going to teach. And when I talked to Janelle, she said, just go with a small product, a tiny product works better than a big thing. We've done this experiment before with all of you. Like a bunch of you guys worked on a daily skateboard challenge and you were very were able to do it. And it wasn't going to take away all of your time. Some of you guys decided to do this survival kit, and as far as I can tell, only one person, Melinda and Anthony actually finished it. So that tells you something about our nature that we want everything to be perfect and super big and ambitious. But the people who do small things are actually the ones who get things done. OK, so what we need to do is either figure out who your audience is and what do they want to accomplish. Something that we talked about yesterday on that live stream was people aren't running away from a problem. They're running towards a solution. So instead of focusing on their problem, like how do they want to be transformed, what kind of change do they want to have in their life and where do they want to go? And there's a good chance you already know the answer to that. OK there's a couple of ways to do this, let's just say you're relatively new, you're in your early 20s, you just finished school, never went to school and you're feeling like, gosh, I have a massive dose of imposter syndrome right now. What is it that I can talk about? So here's the cool part. I'm going to give you guys these side little trick hack here. OK just pick up a book and read it. And then transform that book into your voice. I did not invent the smart goals, I did not invent the focus sheet, I just sat around, collected things that I'm influenced by and distill it into the things that I love like super simple, straightforward, extremely easy to do, but hopefully it has high results. I'm trading your time from researching, from reading books, putting it together in exchange for money. That's all I'm doing, so if I read a book and I love it like pricing, creativity or a bunch of these other books, I'm going to be reading books on positioning, on marketing and branding. I read all the time, so take one of those things. Read it just trash the book. Highlight it, put notes in it. Draw all over it. Tear out pages and put it into a notebook. Do whatever you got to do. And you know who's done this really well is Francis Ford Coppola when he went to direct godfather. He literally took every single page of the novel, cut it out into strips, paste it into his giant binder and wrote all kinds of notes like wardrobe lighting, little notes for the actors. And he did this and he brought this to set every single day. I know that we sometimes look at books as these precious things that were never supposed to deface. But this is where I encourage you. I mean, the book is only like 20 bucks, probably maybe a little bit more that you can buy two copies if you care, like you have to have a pristine copy for your library, but to use it for what it's meant to be, which is a learning tool. Tear it apart, break it down. And then if you see a meme on the internet that reinforces something or a cool quote. Print that out. Take that in there now, you can do this all digitally, of course, whatever works for you, you do, and all you need to do is take that and you need to distill that down. So if a book takes 10 hours to read, if you can create 15 minute talk about that. You've helped somebody because you've saved them whatever time that they're going to read the book, but you have to be a really good storyteller and a person who can condense complex things into really simple ideas. And the next step we'll talk about later, but so you have nothing that how to teach if you feel like I don't have any experience or knowledge or who am I to teach anybody anything? Just find a book that you've been dying to read. Read it over the holidays and start to attack and break it down. Then we're going to get into an outline, and then we're going to get into your keynote. I'm going to teach you how to design your slides, when to get more nitty gritty than we've ever gotten on anything. And then you're going to record a video and you can do presentation and we're going to critique it like we did on the sales call. OK, we're going to do coaching here. So I'm going to teach you how to be more present and to more camera friendly. Some of you may need some gear, but it's not going to be this giant list of things. Now, if you're in a cluster like where there's a bunch of pro members, you can just pull your resources and you can crew for each other. So one person will operate the camera in the boom and the lights, and you swap out and you can help each other. And I think that's a strength of community. Now, if you're in some place, that's quite remote. We'll have to figure out something else to do to help you, ok? But I think Avi was using Abby was using what is that called? I forget the Logitech camera. Those things are pretty decent. They're decent. You know, as long as you get good lighting. That's it. OK, so you guys are ready to do this challenge with me. We're all going to create a knowledge product at the end. We don't know what we're going to do with it. But I help you with the heavy lifting. So we're going to do it together. OK, so you guys start thinking, start working, start researching and start reading and let's make something together. No surprise, you will bring it on. Yes you ready, Rachel. You know, we're going to talk about. I'm working on it. OK Yeah. To hear what you, what you teach and how you break it down so I can sort through the ideas and figure out which one will translate best. Yes, but yeah, I busy brain. Yeah you know, what's really cool is that if you do enough research? Had enough information gathering that in and of itself is going to be valuable to people. That's true. Yeah first, I have a question. Yes so I have an idea about knowledge myself, but I think it's very niche and very far away from the audience I want to reach basically because of language. I'm thinking of product in Greek, and I'm not sure that's going to help me like long term. Yeah, that may not like so you want to create a product to teach people greed. No, I want to create a product to teach people design in Greek because they're not enough good books in Greek. Wow, OK. This was pretty much my challenge while I was studying design, I was really confused because all the good books were in English and it didn't like it didn't feel like any of my professors did actually anything that I was happy with. OK, I like that you're bringing your background into this. I'm just wondering when you make it in Greek, you limit your audience to like a very small group of people. And that's why I'm asking you. Yeah, I would prefer you do something that has some chance of broader appeal. Because if you capture every Greek designer in the world, that might not even be that many. I don't know, I'm just guessing. OK Yeah. You like this whole Greek thing, I mean, think about another angle that you can bring into it, maybe about Greek philosophy, culture and how it's influenced. I don't know. Just think about that. What was really cool is this is that I find that the influencers, the authors that I love and respect, they have a way of making you understand a word in a context you've never thought about before. When we had Jonathan stark on the show. Emerg Jonathan, what's up with freelancers, you know, he said. Let me tell you where the word freelance comes from, like, whoa, OK. All right, let's talk about it. You know, he said, OK, free. Let's just move that aside and a Lance. The root of that word comes from a hired Lance like a mercenary, a hired gun. And a mercenary somebody who does a job and they don't really. They're not that concerned about the morality or the ethics of it. And all of a sudden, he put a really negative tone or attachment or concept onto the word freelance. So he's basically saying you're a hired gun. And you don't care what you do, and no creative person I know would describe themselves that way. All right. And Doyle young, who is, I think, a high school dropout, but a master lettering artist who passed the way he used to teach at Art Center. Told young he has the documenter and, Linda, that you guys can watch or LinkedIn Learning. And he has some fascination with words, so he has this giant dictionary that has the root meaning of words, right? And he's like the word nostalgia. Like, people use it, but they use it incorrectly. Nostalgia means homesick. So when you say something that's nostalgic because it reminds you of home. And I was like, oh, OK, that's where nostalgia comes from. All right. So I think maybe, jimi, that you could do something like that, where you're going to talk about design concepts and tell people like where these things come from. And help me understand it in a new way. Maybe I don't know. Who knows? OK somebody was going to say something. I thought I saw a flash. No, I have a question, if I can. Mm-hmm um, so I do post-production film and part of what I do is color, color grading, and I think there is a lot of similitude with identity and branding in design and color for film. And I was wondering if you had any recommendation of the use of color in identity in your work as a designer. Books or anything that could be inspiring because I feel like there's a lot of concepts that I can translate. Some I can't, but I'd be interested to hear. So you're a color correction artist. Is that right? Yeah, I mean, I do I manage the entire post-production thing, so I also edit and finish pretty much everything. But yeah, my I really love color and I really think that color is bringing, you know, identity to TV shows or films, but like Game of Thrones or Blade Runner or whatever. And so I'm trying to explore color correction from the design perspective because I think that hasn't been done before. Yeah, OK. There's two books written by Sean Adams that takes on color as it relates to design and psychology, I would suggest that you look that up. He's the graduate chair at art center, and I haven't picked up the book, but I saw that he did a book launch. So Sean Adams and. He does something on color theory. Color theory can be very abstract for people to understand it's and It's a question that we get asked a lot. So how do you see your name? Is that hydrogen? Yeah, it's hadrian, I mean. OK, Adrian, it's something that our audience or community desperately want. I've written something unfortunate or I haven't written something. I have a commission somebody to write something on color theory, but it describes it in a very kind of like historical, theoretical thing. If you can make it a little bit more tangible for people and make it more like an application or context to talk about colour, I think it's going to be quite successful. And now I've gone to a few color correcting workshops where they talk about this in depth and it gets really technical and geeky. And if you can find that bridge, I think you're going to do well with what it is you're trying to do. Adrian? yeah, I think what they don't but usually cover is don't know how to do is talk about story. And I think there is ways to tell a story with colors. And as long as you keep it to whatever story or goals that you have, I think there's an interesting way and creative way to talk about it. And so I'm excited to explore that next year. I keep you posted. Yeah, and I think if you took like a normal stock photo. And you started to correct it and say, look, if we do this, what feeling do you get from it? You know, by bringing the weights down and putting yellow into the whites, then now it feels old and it feels vintage. And that might create a feeling of memory or loss or something sweeter from a more innocent time. And then if you do this color correction, it says this and to kind of not only talk about the theory, the application, but also some technical things that you can do in Photoshop or in Premiere or whatever. I think that would be very useful. Yeah, I was thinking of doing that with robots in movies and then show different versions of the same shot and maybe talk about that. Yeah all right. Thanks cool. Anybody else? Going once, twice, I have another question if I'm not taking too much time far away. So the biggest fear for me, the thing that stops me from doing condom production is I feel that most people I'm connected to in social media and anything appears so pretty much I feel that I'm going to look obnoxious just because I'm saying things. A lot of people who are already connected with me in social media already know or already have been taught, or I don't know how to tackle this. OK let's not worry too much about what other people feel. I think it's good for you to have the practice of being able to teach something. And to distill what you've learned into a product. And how they want to react to that, that's their problem. OK, but I don't want that to be the thing that prevents you from doing something. If that were the case, you guys will not be here, I would not be here because I would be too afraid to make something right. So another thing that you can think about is sometimes your fear of what people think and if it prevents you from doing what it is you're supposed to do. You are then robbing people of the gift that you have to give them. Meaning that you might have something that's going to help somebody, but you deny them that gift because you're afraid of being judged. And we don't want to do that. It just. It's like. For a lot of people, they won't hire some because if, gosh, what do I have to offer this person, they're not going to want to come to my home studio. They're not going to want to do this task. This task is really boring. My response to that is, well, you've made that decision for that person. And that's not fair, is it? That's not even right. If you presented, like, come to my home office, I have these tasks for you to do. This is what I can afford to pay you. Let them make that decision if they see more in it than you do. I'm losing my voice here. OK, so let's make that determination at a time. All right. Anybody else? Yeah, I'd like to say something about that. When I was talking to Stuart, we were talking about YouTube content and we had this conversation with some other guy who went to UCLA for film and stuff. And we're talking about the difference between the quality of film production and the quality of YouTube content and whatnot. Anyway, what we took from that or what I took from that. And well, what Stewart was trying to tell me was that whenever you do content, it's never going to be perfect. You guys had hard deadlines that you guys are trying to meet, right? And so you have to get that content out. And even though you guys as a future are constantly like trying to put out the best work, all you can do is meet the deadline right and do your best to meet that deadline and to get something out there. That's as that's to your best ability. So all of us, while we're holding ourselves back. Those of us that do, we aren't practicing enough as we just put work out and meet our own deadlines, then we'll improve in our process. We'll find that flow and then we'll finally get the audience that we actually want to reach by constantly putting work out there. So we're forcing ourselves into a situation where we're constantly just making work. That's what I think my solution is going to be, so if that helps anybody like that's whatever is holding you guys back, it could just be that we're not putting in the work and just accepting it as it is, whether it's not as good as we want it to be or if it's even better than that. It doesn't really matter as long as we're just constantly putting it out because we're going to get better. And then as we gather more content, we're just going to have more to share. And all of it will just, I think, grow organically. Mm-hmm Guy Kawasaki talks about this, and he says that you must launch, you must launch your product and it's OK for your product to launch with elements of creepiness in it. It says the iPhone didn't do a lot of things, but they launched anyways. And then at some point, it becomes a thing that is supposed to be, but it's not on launch day. All right, guys. I think that's it. I wish you the very best and go ahead and start working on defining your goals for 2019. OK I don't see you guys online. I'm not going to be doing the protocol until the new year, but that doesn't mean I'm disappearing. That's it, guys. I'm wrapping up the call, so. Feliz Navidad. Happy Hanukkah. Whatever it is, you celebrate.

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