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How To Create Instagram Carousels Part 2

#
163
Chris Do
Published
June 24, 2021

This is a breakdown of Carousel's secrets part 2. There aren't many secrets, but for those who haven't done this before or are having trouble figuring out the game, there are a few. You could find it to be really useful as part of the series on assisting you in generating leads, which is extremely crucial for us and our businesses.

Read Transcript
Hey OK, so get going. I'm good, we're going to get we're going to get going here and then we're going to say Hello to everybody that's new or newish to the group at the end of this call, and I'm going to jump in here. I won't let you guys know that you don't have to panic. If you didn't do the work, it's totally OK. This this group is all about you doing what you need to do in the time that you have, so don't feel pressured. I'd love for you to participate and join with us, but that's not always possible, and that's totally OK. So let me share this desktop. There we go. And jump into it here. OK, you guys are seeing my screen right, says carousel secrets 163. Great here we go, so this is the second part to this Instagram workshop thing that we're doing, mostly to teach you guys how to write carousels or slide decks or presentations. The things that we talk about on this call are broadly applicable to many, many different things, and it is in some ways connected to the previous workshop in air quotes when we were talking about creating content like video content. And last week, we talked about these two concepts upcycling and writing, and we didn't have much time to write or research or anything like that. So we're to spend a little bit of time this week on the writing part and as quick recap. Last week's homework. You were supposed to write three carousels on topics or a topic that interests you. And here are some examples. Now I gave you guys a glimpse of how I do it on paper, which is a Dropbox app or a division of Dropbox. And I love paper because it's not complicated. You can write, and the formatting is super simple. And I discovered one little thing that helped, and I want to share that with you. So here's what screenshot of my paper document looks like. And you'll see I've added numbers and not just bullet points, but numbers, and this is what I'm going to suggest that you do, so you start to think in terms of slides. Of course, you could do this in any program, simple text or text edit. If you guys like notion, I know a lot of the future folks love notion. I like notion too. It's a little complicated for me, for just writing. So here it is. And the reason why I do this is because I start to get a feel for the rhythm. We talked about that slippery slide where you want the reader to flow from slide to slide. So here you can see that I'm going to have a little bit of a problem. Because I only have 10 slides, but the headline when the client says would make my 11 slide, so I now need to budget my words carefully. OK and I also want to let you guys know that the reason why I like working this way is because oftentimes if I start on keynote, which is often the case, I get obsessed over the typesetting or I start looking for images on slide three, not realizing, do I have a story? Do I have enough that's going on? So I'm going to show you a couple more that are in progress. These are not done by any stretch of the imagination. I still need to work on these because this one only has four bullet points or four things four slides, plus my headline slide, which makes five. But this is how I work, and I have this repository and I keep my little ideas here, and I'm saving myself a step because I used to just write it in a notebook and sketched out thumbnails, but then I'd have to go and find them and dig them up. And things don't always translate on the thumbnail because the space in which I can write and draw on, it's very finite and it doesn't allow me to really find the right phrasing. So here's one that if you're following me on Instagram, you see that posted recently, fonts are like friends. This one is very close to being done. So at this point, I feel like this is pretty good. And you'll notice from last week because there's a couple of people who were trying to help me out, Chris, those especially who designed one. Now you can see that the writing evolves. It changes because as I get into, I'm like, I just where can I go with this? OK, so today we're going to work on this together for a little bit because we didn't get a real opportunity to do this last time. So the thing that you want to do as we break out into little groups here is to make sure that the headline grabs your attention. And usually, if you say it simply with simple words with the fewest number of words that usually works. And you want to provoke somebody to stop scrolling on the Instagram feed, that's really, really important because if you don't have them there, there's no point. If you lose them in that first slide, they're not going to swipe through and you want to keep it to one idea per slide. You want to get that smooth flow going. And this is a real balance between being too information heavy or dense and/or having just platitudes, empty platitudes, which are just things that everybody already knows. So you've got to find that balance, and that's a little bit of the art, and that's what we want to look for in the breakout session, where you can give somebody critical feedback now. It's really weird. I feel like at the ends of the spectrum, if you were to go on one side where it's nothing new, it just feels empty. And on the other side of the spectrum, it's super dense. It feels like we're reading a little mini novel. It seems like there's this really strong polarity that people tend to hit one side or the other that can't straddle it. They can't go in between. It's really weird because I get a lot of posts sent to me submissions where it's just, it's empty. It's like, I already know this. People have been talking about this forever. Why are you sending this to me? I don't say it in that tone, obviously, or people recently read a book or watch the video and transcribe the entire video or book. And it's like by the second slide, it's so dense. I just I'm not really motivated to continue. So we've got to find that balance, that's the art of writing, OK, and a good rule of thumb that is this new novel or is it helpful to somebody, hopefully the person I intend to speak to and that's really critical. So what I'm going to do is we're going to split into groups of three. And this is going to take 15 minutes and hopefully somebody in that group has written something and we'll see. And if not, just use the time to write something because we're going to take you through the design process and today's workshop. So share your best carousel idea, just words only and run through the checklist that I just went through this checklist here. So if you need to do a screen, capture this and focus, I guess, on the most important one, which is number four, which is, do you have a satisfying conclusion? Is it that light but satisfying that's the critical part. OK so run through that checklist and give each other feedback so you spend five minutes per person, a couple of minutes running through what you did and then allowing a conversation to happen and then switching every five minutes and then make revisions as necessary. And then when to come back and we're going to reflect and share. So I'm going to stop my share and ask, are there any questions right now? Any questions? What we're going to do? Lovely OK. So I think there are 47 of us and I have two moderators in here, so I'm going to subtract them. So that's 45 or his moment here yet. Most dropping his mom off at the airport, so he's going to be pretty late. OK, that's cool. Thanks for that. OK, so we'll set up 15 breakout rooms, OK, and we'll have a couple extra because Alec and Ali will be in those rooms. They can participate. They can share. They can observe. They can bounce in and out. We'll leave it up to them to figure that out. So 15. So here we go. I'm going to create this everybody good because I'm going to send you off and then the timer will start. Can I interrupt you for a second? Yeah, of course. Can I be one of those who just jumps in and out and maybe gives feedback on other people's posts? Maybe if they get stuck. So that they can absolutely somehow call me or I don't know. Yes, thank you for reminding me. Raise your hand if you don't want to participate. If you just want to just be a fly on the wall because you're a noisy background, whatever it is. So there's a couple of you. OK, so here's what we're going to do for those rooms that have three people, but only two people participating. You could just take more time. So go ahead and identify who's participating, who's not. And one person can have all 15 minutes or all three of you could just sit there silently working and just trying to write something, ok? Clear thank you. All right, here we go. Creating the rooms, open all the rooms. So you guys in a little bit. See, David, you made me feel left out. Oh, your hat looks clean, man, mine's filthy. It's actually my wife, so I don't wear baseball caps, say, look, I'm not. Starting the timer. David, I have an idea as you go to your room. Go ride a carousel right now. I'm going to do it. I already have one written. Well, write another one. Son of a gun is going to kill you to write another one. I'm going to do one today because I have it. Of course not. I did not write mine yet. So shall I join the room that I was assigned to? Yeah what do you guys are doing here? Go into those rooms, got here, two participants raised their hands. OK Randall. You're going to say something. Rags, how are you? Good to see you. Goodman also. Is it hot there? Pretty hot. Yeah, I imagine quarantine life. I hear in the news that it's spreading like wildfire there, kind of, but it's OK if you got used to it staying at home. OK, good because on the big picture. Yeah always, always focus on the big picture, right? Shouldn't you guys be in a room? So it's not going up still the big open, it's not one that's going on. I'll read the fight with another. Do you, Terry Randall on russia? Well, Sasha, I need to sign you, Elena. I need to sign you to a room to. Let me find a room. OK I'll sign you up. Hello I just I was trying, I have a webcam and I've been trying to use it. And I couldn't figure it out, so I switch. But well, I see you. I hear you. It's working. All right. It's not my webcam. I got on my iPad. I see. Yeah Kristen, I need to sign you to a room. 20 OK, Christine, did you come back in here, christine? Yeah, my internet is I'm hot spotting off my phone at the moment, so it cut me out and then I just jump back in. OK can I reassign you to another room? Yeah, absolutely. OK, cool. OK, everybody's. Boy, did you get bounced or do you just added or sabrina? So what we're doing. You don't know what we're doing. OK, I'm going to dump you into the room and you could just be a fly on the wall, is that cool? Because this room is very uninteresting, I promise you. Sounds good. Thanks there we go. Sabrina, can I put you in a room? Yeah OK. Let me put you in this room here, just randomly, Emmanuel, can I put you in a room, please? OK this little. Yes, yes, yes, rags. How come I don't know where you are like, I'm not seeing you? Was it OK to be in the same room you have so can do something, but it didn't look right? Terry, you're back here, you're supposed to be in room 13. Me, wait, no, terry, so OK. Brianna, I'm going to assign you to room 13. Lena, nice on you to. You got your webcam working now. It's no, it's not my webcam. It's my iPad. What? still, your iPad looks sharp. Yeah, it's Yeah. It's pretty good. Oh, it's really good. I'm telling you right now I have natural lighting right now, ok? It's like it's sharp. It's good. Well, I have Notability and I like writing notes on my iPad. So my outlines on my iPad in handwriting. So but I can open it on my computer. All right. So I'm going to assign you to a room. Ok? OK. Initially, we got no rags, I can't find you anywhere here. Let me look. My problem? I'm lucky to be in this room. We can do something. OK and terry, can I help you? No no microphone, Terry. You have your hand up still. And rags is in some Black hole here, so OK, we'll just hang out. Absolutely fine. There we go. OK are you guys cool, Randall terry? Yeah all right, I'll leave it like that. But on that note, I recently closed that 10K deal. It was awesome. No I just use the same legal questions with the prospective client. The 10 questions was your prospective client and stuff. Mm-hmm It was so much of learning for myself when I'm doing this and you just brought back the boot camp. No memories. It was nice and I feel good. I give myself 90 days and I joined back in May and said, I'm going to invest time and money on this. The program, which is missing for almost 18 19 months, last they made a mistake. I paid for one year. But having paid for one year, that complacency got in thinking I can take the next week or next week, and there was a lag in the commitment. And I went a spiritual sabbatical that created with it is available abundant. No, you tend to take it for granted. Mm-hmm So this time when I said I paid for one year, I said, I'm going to be committed every Wednesday and said, not if it's not working. There's no point you're going to log out irrespective whether you're paying the money or not. Don't waste anybody's time. And that load your stuff. Isn't that call of that thing? I loved it. I loved it. I said, OK, that's the key. I needed it. And I said, OK, I'm going to be there and was happy that within 90 days, this is the value itself in terms of my own expectations that's taken from a one year of run rate. That's good. That is good enough for me one year. And now I can focus on doing something more. I'm really feeling excellent. Very happy. I love it. So I think a lot of this is just making your own personal commitment, right? It's kind of crazy when you decide it's when things happen and when you say, I'm not ready, then nothing happens. So you made that commitment. Now I do want to tell you something, because did you get a chance to check out the new lead generation positioning? I mentioned bootcamp. I want to check it up in there. OK, so I'm making some revisions to it. So there's no rush. Matthew had asked for some additional gaps because he's like Chris to jump is too big in this. Can we get more of this and that? So I'm writing and recording more stuff. But we've also recently updated the objections deck so that one's handy, especially if you're getting a new business call. Make sure you look at that before you get our new business call, ok? Just I've learned a lot since recording, and I'm just always adding and learning, so it's as good as I know at this moment in time. And we're going to go back and keep recording new content and revising what was already there. So make sure you check it out when you get a chance. I'll do that because I believe the timing of the religion workshop, which is, did I mean, it can't be better than this? I'm in talks with one of a very, very senior person from Ogilvy India. Mm-hmm OK so this is a note for Alex, our editor, to cut out the part. Right after we went out to the breakout room, I forgot to hit pause. OK, Alex, we don't want to waste everybody's time with that conversation. OK, OK, so I want to do this moment here where we reflect and share. So would you guys here just give me your share, your experiences, anything? Stick out and keep this part short and sweet because I do want to give you guys some opportunity to give feedback and critique for those that are brave enough to do this with me. Can I be made a co-host so I can mute and meet people? Thank you. Sorry as well as analyses, she is. OK, does anybody want to share the writing process, anything that you've picked up or learned or struggled with or anything, it's fine. I can go. This is Alex Ali. OK, perfect, go ahead, Ali. So my I'm not really proud of it, it's just like a basic idea I came up with. So it's six tools for sports designers. I know the title. I need to work on it more, but are you going to share what you wrote? Yeah OK, let's share your screen then, because I think it'll just be a lot easier for us to look at it. OK, just give me a shot of that. Ok? yeah, I was just talking like high level reflection. Anybody have any big things otherwise want to dive in to feedback? OK, OK. So Ali, I'm going to ask you to wait. OK all right. Because when we get into the feedback and critique, we can do that. So everybody that wants to have feedback on their writing, go ahead and prepare a document with type that's really big. So we can all look at it. And preferably, no, it's the slides. OK, so I think I saw is it Harris and then Maura and then misty? OK, now I lost track, so I don't. We'll just figure it out. So Harris, go ahead. And then, Maura, you're up after Paris. Yeah so we looked at two ideas, and I think what was challenging in the exercise was that the content, like in the middle, it's very easy and then converting that into a catchy hook was the challenge. OK, very good. like that. That's exactly the kind of feedback I want. Thank you very much. So if you have one really meaty slide that's like the juice, there's a couple of ways to handle this. And if it's to me, break it into two slides and you want to weight it towards slide 8 and number nine, because at that point, there's so much momentum that they're going to want to know what the answer is. OK so that's one strategy that I use. So if it's so meaty like it's a great checklist or resource heavy, break it into two slides and do it for a slide 8 and 9. That's where you want to put it. OK excellent, thanks, Harris. OK, so, Maura. So one of the major struggles, at least for me and like I've seen over time with other people, is like explaining a really complex topic when 10 slides. Sometimes it feels like you have to constantly explain yourself before you try to make the point, and so you can never get to the point. So especially for strategy or things that aren't like just like Black and white like, here's how you like make a button or something, that's really hard. Laura, welcome to my life. Explaining the complicated it is, this is the struggle is real, for sure. So, OK, so on a topic like strategy, which is massive. People have written books and tomes on strategy and strategic thinking. So what do you do? You just keep breaking it down. So here's what I would recommend for everybody, because this is very much the art and the magic to all of this. Take down this big thing that, you know, break it into your five ingredients. So what are the five biggest things like the five chapters of the book, if you will? And then each chapter break into some chapters and you keep doing that until you get to a point in which I can give somebody something that's light but satisfying. Here's one thing you need to know about something that's one small part or subset of strategy. That's that's where you would begin. OK the mistake that I made at the very beginning, which I want to save you from, is trying to distill everything you know, into 10 slides, and it's just those don't make for good good slides. I didn't know at the beginning and I see this all the time on Instagram, and I'd look at it. It's like, I want to read this. But Instagram is not a heavy reading format for heavy reading post on medium. That's the perfect place for it. So thank you very much. Very good. OK, so Mr you're up. For more from our group's conversation, the thing that really stood out is that lighthearted and engaging but informative is much more digestible than data bought $5,000 every time. You know, and I find that if you could inject a little of your personality and humor into it, those make for very slippery slides and it's beautiful to flow. OK, and I'll share some of my personal thoughts on that a little bit. So very good. OK, so I don't know who's next, but I'm going to pick Robert and then mark. OK, and then we're going to get back into the rest of the planned itinerary or agenda. So, mark, Robert, go ahead. Can you guys see this? Yeah, we see your desktop, too. But yes, we are. So what I have in Black is the original carousel, and the feedback that I got was people like the lead of make the tough decisions, but they weren't clear as they read the content what the tough decisions were. so when and and from my perspective, the tough decisions are the strategy questions that you need to ask. And then answer in a precise and different way. Like how is your work different or how do you slice your target market different than your competitors slice their target market? And it's by answering those questions that you create your difference and that's your competitive advantage. OK, so Robert, I have some thoughts for you. Very good. So were you here last week for the heads or tails? The may be part of it. OK, so I think you're leading with the head, and I think maybe your approach might be the tail, which is what I want to take away from this. So make the tough decision. Sounds like this is interesting. You're pulling me in and then the feedback you got from your partners was we're not quite sure what happens in between. So if you were to say to somebody like if after I read your carousel, what's one thing you want me to understand? What is that? Robert, you want me to answer that it's that there's questions you need to answer in a precise way for your business. OK, if I understand it, then how? How do I answer those questions that are very difficult to answer? Like why do you exist? What's the reason for being? Nobody knows that. It's like we've been working through this for hundreds of years, right? So do you have any insight on that? Uh, yeah, it's kind of like what you were saying, it's like you have to chunk it down, you have to look at these key elements of it. So let's look at your work. Let's pick one piece of your work where it's really different and it stands out. Oh, OK, so here's what I think this carousel should be about, which is all problems can be difficult. But if you break difficult problems down to little problems, you can make small commitments and small decisions. So if you take one example of the questions that are very difficult to answer and show an example of how you would break it down, that would be probably, as the kids say, a bigger carousel. Because what you want to do is not just say like, here's the problem. Or gently say, like if you keep working on this, you'll figure it out, but actually give me a toolset. So here's what that'll do for you. Robert is whoever winds up reading this on LinkedIn and on Facebook and Instagram, they're going to say, wow, this guy. He has the ability to take on, like really difficult things. Maybe this is the person I need to get to know, because that really made sense to me. And that would be a wonderful kind of like secondary benefit of you writing something like this. This is not easy, Robert, but if you do it, the reward is there for you. OK, so let's pause on that and let's jump into having a conversation with Mark. I want to have a banger carousel. I like that, don't we all? Cool yeah, those kids come here to help. Come on. Yeah, Thanks. No, I, you know, just in reflection, you know, when this assignment came up, I was like, oh, I'll try it. You know, I'm not a real big Instagram person and I just love the format. It really is such a cool constraint and really challenging. And then in the breakout session, just even the quick feedback was just so powerful. So I'll keep it short and succinct. I just think it's such a cool format. I'm like, man, I might become an Instagram person. I might be. Yes carousel kind of guy to mark is now like, so yeah, Thanks. It's really, really awesome way to tell a story. And it just feels like it fits my because I kind of been struggling to get videos done and stuff like that. And it seems to fit the way I like to work and see things so really beautiful. OK, now I'm secretly tricking all of you guys to become writers and content creators. I really am. And if we take like if I were to ask, you guys all make a crazy viral video or write your next book right now, you'd all throw something at me, probably virtually. And what if I say, hey, can we just commit to making 10 slides and who knows where that goes? And then 100. Slide decks later you have the formations of a very powerful Ted talk, a book or something like that, which is part of a larger kind of thing. I've been sharing with a few friends about how to become an author and expert at something so a little bit. So the Instagram carousel in itself is chunking down a lot of what and going to keep doing this. And if you're relatively young or new to a field and you say to yourself, well, I don't even know what I know. So that's also a prompt for you to like, hey, man, find a problem that you don't know. B that dolphin go deep diving and just find everything that you can about this subject and start to educate yourself. So it's an awesome process and it has multiple benefits. OK, now we're going to get back to. Ali Sabrina, did you have a high level observation, I just saw your hand go up? Yes OK, go ahead. To share what I learned in the breakout session and that we all start with, we are thinking about who we want to serve for who we are doing this, whatever service we have. But when we do the carousel, we think about, OK, what? What do we have to share? What do we know? What can we share? And I think so. That was something I realized that we still have to look at that again. So for whom we are writing, because when you break that down, still, how you formulate how you frame your headlines are as well your slides. I think it's important to talk to a certain person. And I think we all have this, this problem that we have a lot of, let's say, audiences or also a lot of different target groups, and we focus on one. But when we then start again doing something, it goes a bit like it diverts us a bit or converges. I don't know, but you know what I mean? It goes it went broad, broad. And so I think that's something to consider. So that was something I realized. Yes thank you for reminding me of that. It is very difficult to write to no one or two even to write to yourself. But if you think of one person, somebody in one trick would be like to talk to your younger self so that 18, 19, 20-year-old person and some of you are 21. Well, think of somebody else, write and speak to that person. And if you can think of one person, the tone will come out the way that you phrase things. It'll all start to take shape. Just think of somebody. And if you don't have somebody you can't like, imagine that, then literally start to help people. And then you'll start to say, oh, if I were talking to bob, Mary or Jake, this is what they want to know, and this is how I can help them. All right. So, Ali, it's your turn. All right. Let me just show my screen. OK now we've entered a feedback. OK, I love doing this. If you guys want feedback, this is time to do it. You suffer. You have to make that gigantic for me to see. All right. OK, even more. OK OK. Somewhere in there. All right, so where's your headline? Six tools every sports designer needs super specific like that. Having a number like that is very good and saying that you can give me tools and then you're selecting the audience, a sports designer. OK this is very good. OK, so walk me through the rest of this. All right. These come from a lot of questions that people always ask me like, what do you find that Jersey funk? What do you find that logo? What do you find this stuff? And for me, these things seemed like, of course, everyone knows it. But because I've been in this business for 14 years, I know a lot of new kids, they don't. So this might sound a little bit too basic, but I think it's probably it might be helpful. So the first one is the font. It's where you can find a lot of free fonts that you can use in your designs. The second one is SEC logo, which is can get any vector logo of any brand in the world. Victories that I/O is where you can victimize any logo, or any illustration. A lot of people, they would just put like a 200 by 200 thumbnail on a big, you know, k design. It looks awful. So this really comes in handy. Social book removes the background of any image. You have my color space. It's a cool. It's a cool website where you can generate an unlimited number of color palettes. And then I end on my website, which is sports templates, where people can get sports mockups and templates to showcase their design. But I'm not sure. I'm not sure if I should use up all 10 or I should just keep it at eight. Very good. Very good. So David thewlis, who has a lot more experience in coaching people on Instagram. And if you guys haven't already signed up for his free course, which he pretty much gives it all away for free and then actually watch the videos because I heard from him that a large percentage sign up and don't actually click on any video. So if you want more information, definitely go check out David talis, and I'm going to say a couple of things. Yes, use all 10. And here's what I think this is just my opinion. OK, and I'm no expert at this is I think you need to insert a slide between 1 and two because you set me up with the six tools and it seems like, wait, what is this all about? And then you, you get right into the meet and I need an appetizer first. Gotcha OK, so tell me, tell me why. Like, who is this for, really? Because first, when you see six tools every sports designer needs, I was like, what is this? But this is really for like the beginner, right? Like, we're still trying to figure stuff out so you can put a little personal story in there. It's like, I wish somebody had told me this when I was just starting out and my life would be much easier, something like that. So that would transition or bridge from the headline, which is very important into the meat. OK and you said fine, awesome fonts, but the thing about font is, are they free all the fonts and da font or no? Yeah, they're all free. OK, so the word free is really important and it's missing in there. OK so I would remove the word awesome, fine, free fonts, you know, or something that you can use free fonts. Beautifully designed. Sorry, I'm editing on my phone because this is on incognito, but Thanks. OK, that's fine. OK, and with the font. Oh, sorry, I was going to mention that with the font. I mean, it depends on who's reading this and what they're going to be making, but a lot of them are for personal use only or their demos. So there's some that are totally free, but I would recommend like Google Fonts or even what do you call it? Typekit, it's not typekit anymore. Adobe is if you have Adobe Creative cloud, you should have right to. OK, so here's what we're going to do because I think most people may already know about Google Fonts and differnt. Maybe people don't know about it, so just put a giant asterisk on that and say, you know, whatever. Elena brought up in terms of for personal use, something like that. Yeah and that'll be OK. They do have a lot of good, sporty looking ones. Yeah and you want to do is make this visual. OK, you want to make this visual with examples, each one of these. So it's in a lot of these. I think somebody called call them listicles last week, which is what this is, is the list of resources. Make sure you incorporate an example with each. Mm-hmm OK. And then the text would be underneath that. And then at the end here, I would think that you would want to tell a little bit story about yourself or something before you go to like, here's my website. Gotcha OK. Yeah, I might say something like, I was tired of getting not the best resources, so I made right sports templates because the other ones suck. Or if you have a project that you've done that uses a bunch of these things and you can point it out, then like the summary, take away. Like here's a project I did, and I got these colors from my color space and this logo, et cetera, et cetera. So it all comes together. So you showed them the individual components and then you bring it together. Awesome I love it. All right. Very good. Thanks for sharing. I see you wanted to raise your hand. You wanted. Did you have something you wanted to share? Yes, I want to share my first ever outline. OK, I like that, let's do it. Thanks for being so brave sharing with us your first ever outline. Can you see it? Yes, if you can Zoom in a lot more because the screen is relatively far away from my face, plus my eyesight is not so good. This is not just a fashion accessory, is it OK now or do one more step in? Yeah, please one more step. Yeah, OK, perfect. Oh Yeah. Lovely beautiful. OK, see you now. OK so this OK, so are you a pro at procrastination? I like that it's very catchy. OK OK, so how do we get over it? It's not about time management or discipline. How does it work? We lie to. Lou Lou stress, right? Yeah, so that's one every line, these three lines of text lying to ourselves, like we lie to ourselves, we lose trust in ourselves, break promises to ourselves. OK, so lose. I think he only has one. Oh, so just correct that let's keep going. Scroll down a little bit more so I can see the rest. OK OK, stop right there. Crazier, the perfect, the perfect word to describe it acting against our better judgment. OK I can already tell that we're going to have some challenges here. You want to. OK, so what you want to do is just copy this and then paste and then start to edit this thing down because I already can tell it's getting really dense. The sheer number of words already, it's starting to make me feel like, oh, I don't want to read it anymore. So the tenancy is the one to put everything in the kitchen sink into this thing. But the opposite is going to perform better, which is to distill this down to just what it's necessary. If you can communicate what it is that you want somebody to know in 3 or four sentences, that would be ideal and then you can then break that up differently across 10 slides right now there's just there's a lot in here. Yes, this is where I had problems because I figured it's too long, but I don't know how to simplify it. OK, so what we're going to do is let's just do this right now, select all copy and then paste underneath this. And I have this problem too, right? So go ahead, paste, is that all of it? Yeah, it's all of it or just where it becomes long. No, no, I want you to copy the whole thing because we need to see it in its entirety. And I'll talk you through this part. OK, so go ahead and get it in there. So one through 10, I just want to say props to your honor because we have a really good Titans. Call yesterday about this and it was my first Titans call. So you want to? Awesome job. OK, so you want to. Here's here's what you want to do. We fall in love with our own words, and even if you literally just copy and paste it from something, we fall in love with our own research. And so sometimes we have this connection to it, so we can't delete anything. So I find that if you just copy, paste or save as it's good now, start deleting words. Just do it. It's OK, cut it down to 50% Ok? you do that right now, and I want to see if I have this other book. Where is it? OK, I'll be right back. You know, what about maybe using the highlighter and select your favorite parts that way you don't feel like you've deleted and can't remember what you had or didn't have? I don't know. I don't know what to take out or prioritize in this. OK so are you at? Are you a pro at procrastination? Are you saying procrastination is not good? Of course. Really interesting. OK, now I think that's the popular opinion, right, that procrastination is not good, so you're going to make a strong case for that. I actually think the opposite, but and I have this book here, it's called The Art of procrastination, and somebody donated this book to us. And if you're that person in this room, thank you. I just don't know. Was that the office and Greg Gunn gave a whole lecture on what he calls products the nation, which is productivity disguised as procrastination. And some of us have different ways of dealing with this. But this will be fascinating to see how you make this argument right? Because this is a popular belief. OK, this is where like is thing like where you can't move because of it, not where it's actually productive and you have reframed it. Like, it actually Hinders your life. I have that Stare into space. OK, so for some reason, you wanted your mic is super low today. I'm having a harder time hearing you. I don't know what to do. I tried everything. I just can't buy a new one yet. Ok? it's very clear. It's just the volume is low. It's an excellent mic. OK, because I can hear you very clearly. It's just the volume is low, so we'll work on that some other time. So, for example, hear a crazier. Do we need to learn this word achalasia? No, I delete it. Yeah, see. Just delete it. OK so I think what you want to do is, I think because I couldn't get through all of it, I can already tell is you want to give people tools on how to not procrastinate anymore, right? Yes like, so what are they? Can you just tell them to me without looking at your screen? Yes step out of survival mode or try a detox and love the hard work by making it simple and play long term. OK, so play with me here. Let's just play with me. I'm have a conversation with you. OK, and hopefully out of this, you'll have some ideas on what you need to put in there. OK, you ready? You want to? Yes right. You're looking at me. OK, I don't want you look at anything else, but it's hard work. That's why I don't want to do it. How do I get through that? Like, I don't like filling out paperwork, for example. And it is just break the task into smaller bite size chunks. Yeah, Yeah. What's the first step is so difficult, like I didn't want to do it. I hate paperwork. I have to sign a document, you know, I really do, and I'm not. I haven't signed it because I don't want to open up the email. You create your space and then you take the first little step. That's like, if it's embarrassing, if you can't take it. OK, I'm curious, do you know what the human psychology is like? Why am avoiding this? Um, yeah, I know I know the research and the new research, the new research says it's just a spiral of negative emotions it keeps. It's like a never ending cycle. It keeps repeating itself. So you're saying that I have negative emotions around doing paperwork. Yes what are they? Can jump in, that's fine. Oh, I literally watched a video about this, I have ADHD and I used to work in my favor a lot. But there comes a point where it's like you. You continuously put off things that you need to do, like paperwork and stuff, and you're like, why do I do this? It'll take two seconds. And there's a channel called How to ADHD and it's really good. And there's a psychologist that calls it the wall of awful. Oh, you build the wall of awful by like, there's these bricks that whatever you believe about this thing, it makes you feel like, you know, it's awful. You feel awful. And so you and this wall of awful is like just infinite. So it's like an actual barrier that you have to mentally. And then they talk about different ways to put a door in it or whatever. Is oh, I see. You basically imagine how it would play out and you're trying to convince yourself not to do it because you have come to the conclusion that it's very hard work and it's boring, it's unsatisfactory, you name it. so some of this is probably doing some neurolinguistic programming here, right? To take something that you have a negative story about this wall that you build or these negative emotions and reprogramming that. OK, so here's what I think. I don't think we're ready to turn this into Carousel just yet. I think maybe a little bit more digging and writing and refining. So that you can just very succinctly say to somebody, here's one thing that you can do to get over that thing that you hate doing. To help me out there was thinking that I maybe should just try one solution because it seems like a lot. Yeah, just try one, ok? Find one that you really understand. Preferably something very visual. So when I think it was Elena, who said the wall of awful visually that made a lot of sense in my hand or my head, I could imagine a hand holding a brick and on each brick is a different emotion or a story that we tell ourselves. Right? you should totally watch the video. It's like animated. There's like this brain, and it's super cute. Well, there you go again. Relatable so, yeah, the channel is called How to ADHD. Yeah OK, perfect. All right. We're going to take one more, and I think I saw rags hand up before Mark's. I'm not sure. So, rags, did you want to share something? It was Mark first. OK, mark, thank you very much. So mark. Yeah love to love to get some feedback. OK, let's do it. Sure OK, so perfect, so what if you had a plan to? To outmaneuver your competition, to zag when they zig to appeal. So much to your ideal customer that they buy customer, that they buy from you again. And again to make your customers the hero of their life story when they use your product or service to align your wildest business goals. This is brand strategy. It is the most important thing you can do for your business because brand strategy equals your business strategy. OK, I think this is pretty well written. I think there is some overlap here like. What if you had a plan to outmaneuver your competition, you would just remove the two again, even though you're going? I see that there's this rhythm that you're trying to develop at the beginning there, so you might want to rephrase either the headline or that. But the thing is, we'll remember what if you had a plan to swipe outmaneuver your competition to zag when they zig? So I actually had it written like that. And actually, what if was since there's only nine, what if was the headline and then it had a plan, but OK, I got that. What if wasn't grabby enough? But I originally had written it like this? OK, so let's do this. Let's copy paste. Select all copy. Paste this. Let's try. OK I have a suggestion that may or may not work for you. OK all right, go ahead. So what if? OK, so here's what I would do. I actually think that could be really nice if you just did, what if with a question mark, maybe. Or something like that? Because what if our powerful kind of questions. And then you had a plan and then you would repeat you had a plan for each one of these things? And that would be a much smaller you had a plan and then right, and it would say you to outmaneuver your competition so that you had a plan is repeated on every single slide and small type and then to outmaneuver your competition, what if you had know, I'm sorry, you had a plan to zig or to zag when they zig? Right so you just repeat that. And I think that would look really good. And then you need to add some visuals that. Well, OK, so just get rid of number two, because number two is already incorporated in every single slide after. Got it. Yeah so what if it's really big? Like surprisingly and I've done experiments on this weird words on a slide, actually grab people's attention. One of my higher performing carousels that fake. That's all it said, fake and then people kept sliding imposter, whatever else, cheat, liar, each slide just had one word on it and then I gave them the goods at the end, the last three slides. OK, so I'm excited to see where you guys. May I jump in for a second? Yes, go ahead. I want to talk about this headline like what if? And then yours with the fake. What happens on Instagram is, first of all, your post has to perform really well on the home feed, which is very, very people see it. And if it performs well there, then it starts going to get pushed on the hashtags and on the export feed. So for you, you have a huge advantage because you already have a huge audience who jumps in and sees the post. And then if the post is satisfying, it gets a boost. But for others who may not have a big audience, what the way they can find. The starting growth is making a post that performs well on the home feed but gets high. I say click through rates from the Explore feed as well. So when people see, you know, as a small square on the Explore feed, then they click it. And I don't know if what if I don't know if I would click that? So maybe we need to work a little bit on that. Yes Yes. Yes OK. Headline slide 6 more. You just grab the attention like this. OK, so, so so David is telling me that I'm high on glue, and because my audience is big, I'm giving bad advice is perfect. I probably am giving you horrible advice. All right. Here's what I will say. We'll see. We'll see. We'll see. Mark, here's what I'm going to say. We're not done yet. So in my mind, I already know where this is going. So, David, first of all, thank you for bringing this up, and it could very well be true because everything it's like, I don't know why everybody is suffering so much. Everything's perfect. You're like, no, dude, the world is suffering right now. Stop talking like that. OK, I get it. So here's what you do. What if you teamed that word with a powerful image? That pulls people in. It could be this person with a great expression, I don't know yet. Right? it hooks you or it could be something where it feels like a blueprint because you're going to give them this. You're talking about strategy, right? So what if it's like laid out like a blueprint and there's something in the back end tools and like, we're going to put a plan together? I don't know yet, but this is usually this is only half the problem. The other half is visual because otherwise we'd all be just writers right now. Right so it starts here with a good foundation, but I kind of like this repetition. What if you had a plan, you had a plan, you had a plan and because you're really driving that home? Chris, how do you feel about tense, past tense versus present tense because he says this is brand strategy, but then he says you had. Man, that is just not my zone. I'm not. Oh, that's all good, I didn't know if I mess that stuff up all the time. I'm like a future town. I just here's what you do if you speak this out loud and it sounds OK to you. I would just go with that. And if at all possible, guys, before you post anything before you finalize the writing, you should read it out loud because things sound funny when you read them out loud versus the way you write. So I would just go with that, especially if you're Native speaker now if you're not a native English speaker. Yes halleck, a very good book. If you're not a native speaker, that's not going to help you at all. But if you're a native speaker, speak it out loud and like, that sounds funny, man. Something is wrong. And here's something else that I've learned from my, my coach and mentor who is not a trained writer, but he's an incredible writer. He says, you know, I don't have proof readers read my stuff because they tried to make it perfect in english, and there's a cadence in their flow to writing copy. And there's just it's called style, and you just do it. OK, so Matthew is probably right about tenses, but I'm not sure I can't. I can't weigh in on this one. OK, I got to get back into the deck because I have. Thank you very much. Yes, you're welcome. So I realize we're already past hours. So rags, do you have something quick? OK OK. All right. Charles, did you say something? Yeah, sorry. Because this is about the outcome. Who was it, Marc, before, I think? Yeah what if you could rig the outcome? Or rig the future kind of thing, you know, like the future. Oh, I see you're helping out with this headline. Yes, something like that kind of set the stage in the future, so rig it somehow. So it's intriguing. Like, OK. Having yeah, Yes. OK, very good, very good. OK, so Charles, what if you could rig the outcome? I like where that's going to, so that's where can I just got all these ideas change the future? What if you can change the future? Please don't. But yes, it's spelt with one r no E at the end. So I like where Charles is going with this. Just like group thinking here, I love it. What if you could rig what is that rig the outcome now? The problem with the word rig is it sounds like you're breaking the law. And so that's the thing. So you want to see what it's about. Yes I mean, maybe a more like a different way to phrase this would be to say what if? you knew how to get a result before taking the first step or something. So it's not so like, Oh my god, rigging. You know, there is a way to say that, Charles, because we use that kind of thinking to sometimes, like we would say, gain a legal competitive advantage or something like that. So, yeah, something. So there's got to be a way to phrase that stuff doesn't sound so salacious. All right. Let's get back into it. I'm going to share my screen again. Where my. OK, so here's what we noticed to take down something that or kind of know and distill it into 10 slides is a difficult thing. So the key to this is just edit, edit, edit or do a little bit more research. So that you get clarity on this. You can't teach something that you don't first understand yourself. And so that's really, really important. The other thing is designing your slides to flow and to make sure that you don't get stuck in any one area. OK, and if we become attached to our own writing, what I would say is just copy paste awards and just keep doing it. You might have 18 drafts and you'll go back to say, you know, draft number four was the best one, and that's OK. That's what writers do. And we can't just say, like we only have one perfect version, so just keep doing that. All right. So we did the critique already. So now we're going to skip over semiotics because it's too complicated for me to talk about in one call. So I'm going to jump to design because I want to see what you guys do when you pair up words with images, and I'm going to show you some of my a few tricks and tips here. OK so when it comes to design, you kind of have to pick like, do you want to be consistent or inconsistent? Like, I'm not a great example of being consistent, but I would suggest that for you, especially if you're still trying to figure stuff out to be consistent, because then people start to recognize this is a post by you. And here are some examples. I just pulled out 3 from my feet really quickly here. This is from Michael Yanda. He's very consistent with using black, white and yellow. Like this golden yellow golden rod and using helvetica, I believe. And he switches it up from time to time. But he also includes a very simple vector diagrams. Very what are those things called? Oh, I forget. I'm spacing out, but these like these little icons. What's I call infographics? Yes, there's a more precise term than that. These these icons are like the bathroom symbols and all that stuff. Instagram pictogram. Pictogram is the word who said that. Ali Ali, bring you the fire. Good for you, pictogram. Yes, he's good at using those pictograms. He's using these dashed lines and you can see that if you come across his feed, you almost instantly recognize it's Michael Yanda. OK here's another one that has looser rules, but still feel still feels very consistent to me. This is from Ishmael l'asie. I hope I said that right. But you can see, like just from this, this is from his latest feed. He uses very soft colors. Lots of negative space. And his posts are very nice to look at, the point size isn't too big. He cuts out his images and they flow really nicely. And his feed is getting better and better. Because I was scrolling back in time, like when I first found out about him, it was already pretty good, but he's getting better and that's cool because as you do this, you'll start to learn. You know what, if I try this next time, oh, I have an idea for a trick. Let me do this. And then you start to like, find your own visual language, and the last one I want to share with you just popped up on my feet. I was like, oh, I don't really read this person's post, but it's just in terms of design. Using this black, there's really bright green and really Super Bowl typeface. Excuse me. I think it's really lovely. So these people, these three make their feed very consistent, so you recognize who they are. Probably Yanda on the screen one or more recognizable because of their use of color. OK so while we're talking about color, this is really important. So the first step in establishing your Instagram profile or your brand identity, your personal brand is to pick your own color palette. And there's a great tutorial that's from Greg Gunn. I think he goes over this on one of our videos. I think on YouTube, where you can pick a color. And he shows a pretty brilliant way of doing this. And if you guys want more on that, you could either find this on YouTube or on my personal Instagram feed. Ok? but this is kind of hard, I have to say, even though he makes it really easy, it's kind of hard. So I'm really lazy. I'm so lazy that I want to do the least amount of work for the maximum results. So with a little poking around on the internet, I found this. I'm sorry, this is not supposed to be a great gun. This got messed up here. I found this resource I'm going to share with you. Excuse me. I was looking for triada color schemes, try to color harmonies and I came up on this site and there's just a bunch of beautiful colors. And I think the design Wizards put this together as colors for 2020, so they're not picking colors from 30 years ago. They're doing color predictions and harmonies, I think, based on color trends and Pantone systems. So you're going to need to come up with a basic color palette. So what I would recommend is picking like a triad of color harmony like this, like just pick three colors. That's it. So this one, whatever one that appeals to you, just pick that one. OK, and then you're going to need to pick some warm and cool grays, and you can just find those also on the internet and that becomes your foundation. So you're going to need grays, Blacks and whites and some colors. And here's the resource here. So if you guys need it, it's a design wizard. 2020 color combinations. I almost freaked out yesterday when I couldn't find a link again, thinking it's so easy to find. I'll find it again. All right. And so what we need to do is once you pick your color scheme, you can just drag those inside keynote and do and you want to customize your color palette, and I'm going to show you how to do that, ok? It's super easy. It's not something that everybody knows how to do. So I'm going to show you, I'm going to break out of this and I'll show you OK. Let me stop that share, and I'll do this live. So I'm going to go back and share. The keynote is right there. OK, so what I would do is go back in, whereas my design here. OK so when you start out, make sure you're on this format button, right, so you'll see that the basic colors are kind of the good if you don't know what you're doing, but they're kind of super insanely bright. Sometimes this is not even the default color palette because obviously I've modified it. And so when you establish a color palette, you want to add it to this, and I would organize it differently. I would probably do my Blacks and my grays at the top of the bottom and then add my colors and keep them grouped in certain harmonies. OK so the way that you are able to convert this is all you have to do is click on this button here, which will pop up this color palette. You can see the color palette pop up. And then pick this eyedropper thing and then come over here, so I like this color combination, so I pick that. And so you can see in my background is change that color instead of white so I can close this. Now And if you click on this, you can then take this and you can drag it and you can change your colors. And I'm a little reluctant to do that because my color is already set up and you drag them in here, so you would just set them across the top there. And that's what you would do, and you would repeat that until you get all your colors in here. And now that becomes part of your color palette. Now could turn out that doesn't make you happy and you want more colors than what can be contained here. That's totally fine, because if you go back to here, you can just drag these colors and you can add them over here, and that's usually my color palette. Now these allow you to rearrange them versus these, which do not allow you to rearrange like you just have to drag them and move everything manually. But these like, for example, I can group this yellow, I can move it over here. I could bring all my blues together and grouped them by shade or saturation or something like this most likely needs to go up here. I'm realizing that I have a lot of similar colors, so I would do something like that. And then now you have your colors, you're ready to go. All right. Anybody have questions about how to customize it, because that's really important question for you? Go ahead. Yeah do you design your slides in Keynote as opposed to like a true graphic designer program? Hey, easy there with those words, the true graphic designer. Oh, are you calling me? Not a true graphic designer. No, I'm calling myself. I don't know how to use the Adobe stuff. I'm not a designer. I use Keynote. You do use Keynote for almost everything, and I'm going to show you some tricks and and keynotes really good for lots of different things. It's not good for those super powerful moves that you can do only in Photoshop or illustrator, but I have tricks. I have tricks for everything, ok? And my goal is to do this in the least amount of time possible because I just don't have a lot of it. OK, so I'm going to hide this. Hopefully, I could still see it so that you guys can see this only, right? He's even a little bit. Because I'm going to show you an example here. We're going to go from one slide. OK, so fonts are like friends. I've revised the writing and I keep working on it, and I will share a little bit about my processor with you guys in that. When I was writing, I'm like, dude, the tweet that you made wasn't really all that. It got a good reaction because it's funny, but I really wanted to work this friends and lovers kind of theme, and I just kept working on it and work on it, and I started to write this thing where I wanted to straddle this line between talking about fonts or talking about your friends or your lover or your husband or wife or partner. And I found this nice little way of writing. And so at this point, I wrote this and I was happy with it. But you'll see that even here where I think like, I got it, I don't got it. So when I went to design, I changed the wording. OK, so this is from Christos colinas, who sent this to me. He said, Chris, I just want to help you out. I'm not trying to snake anything, but here you go. If you if you like this, you can just use it. And this is pretty cool. And he did a really good job. So he took this and then kind of mapped it out. So you can see like, boom, you wrote something. Here are the images. So some crystals. Are you on the call? Yeah, yeah, I'm here. OK, perfect, so I'm going to give you some feedback, too, so crystal is using the future blue, which I love because it's on brand, but for my own personal channel, I don't use that blue that often, except for in little areas. OK And then he came up with this idea about cookies, and it's nice to have a bunch, but you learn build strong. So he's like, if you have a strong relationship, I won't break like this, I think. So the cookies, if you're going to throw a cookie in here, it needs to be set up from the beginning. So when we do visuals like this, it needs to be somewhat consistent in this thread that is woven throughout, right? Like you might have to have like flower dough and apron or something in the first slide. So somehow it makes sense. Or or cookie monster, that would be actually pretty funny. Or Elmo or something, you know? All right up front so that we understand that they eat the cookies. OK, so that's it. So then you'll see now the way that I handle this is, of course, I rewrote everything and it added a lot more to it because I just want to see like, how else where else I could take this too. So father like friends. And then I started to find images and to treat them this way. And I'll tell you something working with photographs and as much copy as I have, it's difficult to manage. So the thing that I found is if you do do towns on your images and you screen them way back, you can have images and text working together because again, because I'm lazy, just purely because I'm lazy. If I wrote more condensed copy, I'm sure I can get visuals in here, but I just wanted to drop a few things in. So it wasn't pure text, and that's how that translated. And this post is performed really well for me. It's that 17,000 likes in two days, and I'm really happy with that. So here's example to. So I did this again, I test almost all my ideas on Twitter first to see if it works. And when Twitter responds, I'm like, OK, I've got to turn this into something again. Originally, this wasn't really that many slides, so I had to keep working on this to add more. So my process is like, what else happens on social media? And I did a little research and finding out that social media actually leads to a lot of depression and anxiety. There are some mental health issues, and there's a study that correlates this amount of time spent at a young age on social media and depression. So I wanted to bring that in there a little bit, and then I turn into design. And this is what this looks like. I don't consider myself a writer. I do consider myself a graphic designer. But where I'm not strong in just pure writing, I add a little bit of design. And so I'm able to stand out just a little bit. And on this one, I'm using this color palette from the very swatches that I showed you guys and I was like, I'm going to stick to a few colors now and see how it goes. And it made my life a lot easier. So that's what I'm going with moving forward. And they're not too contrasty because some people message me, it's like this really hard contrast that you're doing hurts my eyes. I'm like, OK, let me try something else. And I thought about, like, what kind of image is going to work with this text? Because I had it all laid out already. I was thinking like yoga, meditation, somebody being very happy. Maybe Brock's balancing on something. It just seemed like it was OK. And I don't know what sparked this in my mind, but I use Shutterstock. And I was like, you know what? I want something light and airy. It's all. It just came upon me like, use a dandelion, and I found this vector image, which is perfect because it saves me time from cutting it out. But the best part is I can rearrange the configuration of the little poppies that fly off into different things, and I'm able to shape it much easier. And then I showed it to my wife and she's like, that's a great metaphor, because like, sometimes you just want to do things just for you. And it kind of feels very light and airy and just kind of like, here today, gone tomorrow, it's totally OK. Something light and effortless. And so it worked for me. And so if you guys can start to think of images that can have symbolic meaning that play counterpoint to the words or reinforce the words that you're using, even the better. This post has done really well for me. In 24 hours, I think it hit 18,000 or 17,000 likes, and I've got almost 400 follows from it, which is fantastic. Not a lot of effort here, so I'm trying to spare you guys from all the extra work that you don't need to be doing. OK, so whoops. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to do that. OK, so I'm going to show you guys one more trick, and so when we add images, this is a thing that I found that I thought was, let me go. That's OK. I had an effect for you guys, but that's right, do its own master kit. Of course, you can do gradient maps and you could set a bunch of colors. But again, I'm really super lazy, so I just found this thing on Creative Market and it costs $7. Now, if you don't have $7 and you don't want to spend $7 just make them yourself. They're really, really easy. You can actually literally use the eye picker on this and make them. But these actions allow me to just pick from one of these color combinations. And then to treat my images, and I'm going to show you in Photoshop in a second. And then I also want to show you this trick while I'm in Photoshop, this dual tone image hack. I think David talis might get happy here because he may not know this one SINGING He knows a lot of things, but I want to show you guys something. OK, so you see how I'm getting this effect, and I'm doing this inside of keynote and what's really cool is if I just change the color of background. It all changes for me. And you're like, wait. How's he doing this and I'm going to show you ok? So this is all live, right, so this image is on top of the type. This is the top most layer, of course, I can send it back and look like that. So it's got this nice dual tone screen print look, and I'm going to show you how to do that. OK, I'm going to stop the share. I'm going to jump into Photoshop and I need to share that screen. David, do you know this? Do tell us. No, I don't. No, no, I'm really curious. OK don't do a tutorial on Instagram on this. All right. So here we go. I have this. This is my picture profile here. So I'm going to add. I'll call here so you guys can see what I'm doing here. Send that to the back. So there it is. It's nice and cut out very clean, you know? So I'm going to apply this layer mask to it. And so there's a couple of things. So the actions are here. And if I go into my actions, I can see these do what's tones here. There's a bunch of them. And if I hit any one of these and hit play, it's going to convert this image into. Oh I think I can't have this background on, so let me try that. You have to have the layers selected first. Oh, is that? One layer. There goes. Yes and they're really pleasant. The problem is right now it's a dual zone, meaning two towns do go to towns. So if I hide this, basically this color is baked in. That means if I change my background to different colors, say. Say this. I'm kind of stuck with that now. It still looks good, so I'm not complaining. But if you want more versatility, I'm going to show you a trick on how to deal with this. OK, so I'm going to hide this one now if I take this. So here's the trick eyes. I'm going to select all which is Command a Command C for copy. I'm going to create a layer mask here. OK, you guys see that. And if I hold down Option on my Mac keyboard, I don't know the PC equivalent here. And I click on this. I step right into the mask. I'm working inside a mass right now, so the first thing that I'm going to do is I'm going to fill it with Black. OK, and then I'm going to paste this image back in, and I'm going to put it here. Let's just say it's there. OK, so now, oops, I think I have to invert this. There we go. So that's what it looks like, which looks terrible. OK, until you see what I'm about to do. So basically, all the Black parts are going to be transparent, and all the White parts are going to be opaque. So this is what it looks like. So I step in here, it looks terrible because it's not what it's meant to do. Now, normally I would fill this with black, so if I fill my fill, it reproduces the image that I want. OK, so this is what the image looks like. You can see the checkerboard here, it's all transparent and you could see through to the background now, OK, not a big deal. So here's the cool part if I go back into this and I pick this color, so I use my brush and I'll pick that color right there, that purple hide this if I fill this with purple. That's what that looks like. If I feel it with any color like blue, that's what that looks like and what I want to do is I want to save this out as a transparent PNG, which I'll basically that's how I created this asset. And this is how you're able to create this. So first, cut it out. Then copy paste the exact image into your layer mask. And then fill it with any color that you want, and you can make a couple of these like, for example, if it's your profile picture, I would do this with a couple of different colors and then you basically have a really good toolbox to its very first versatile that you can use for anything. OK, so maybe you guys have some questions about what I just did. Or not at all? Super clear. Yeah, I don't want I'm trying to I'm going to try to recreate it to see if I can find I think there might be a faster way, but we'll see. I dare you to find a faster way, Alec. We'll see. OK, tell me if you do. OK that's all of us copied image, paste it into the layer mask and then. You know, do doing this inversion thing, so this is what the layer mask looks like. This is the fill. You can fill with any color. Does anybody have any question about this? It almost works with just about any color. Whatever you do, so I'm not going to say this. OK David, any questions? I think I will have to rewatch this tutorial because I'm not really familiar with Photoshop, I rarely use it, so I would just rewatch the recording and see if I can do all the steps like everything you just did. I was like, Oh my god, what the hell is happening? I only know keynotes, you know, keynote. OK, so that's it. So right now, what I want you guys to do is we're going to do an exercise. And I think I can spend 30 minutes with you on this. I want you to take your, your, your, your words, and we're going to do this. OK, so you're going to pick some colors, you're going to customize your color palette. Any program that you want, it doesn't really matter. Illustrator, Photoshop, indesign, figma, whatever program you use, it doesn't really matter. And I want you to start to typeset your slides. Into the format, so I'm going to show you right now, I stop share, I did, right? And I did stop the share. OK, so I want you to pick colors, customize your color palette and typeset your slides and then to do to add images, ok? And we're not going to break out into small groups when let's just do this live together. And if anybody is in process and has a question, you can ask me otherwise you guys can just stay muted and just work. OK, so I guess I should share that screen. There it is. So that's what you guys are going to do. Pick your colors, customize your palette, typeset your slides, add images and then we're going to talk about it. And I think I'm going to try to work too. And so if nobody has any questions because I haven't made my carousel for today and it's total chaos if you actually see the process of me doing this. So hopefully I won't embarrass myself too much. OK, so I'll stop the share here. OK 30 minutes, unless somebody has a question, I have a question. Who's who's talking? Oh, Emily. OK, go ahead. Yeah OK. Yes, of course. Is it OK to find a friend and find a breakout room if you want to? Because I honestly don't know how to do this. You know, I can help somebody with coffee if somebody can help me with my design. Yes so the rooms are open. I believe you can go into them still. Yes or no? I don't know. No let me open all the rooms now you can. Is it OK to do that? Yeah, 100% This is your time. So you guys, if you feel more comfortable working in small groups, go back to your room. Help each other out. Ask questions. And otherwise, I'm here and I will help you. I have just one basic question are there? Are there certain like pixel dimensions that this has to fit into to meet that Instagram carousel? And yes, question is, is a LinkedIn carousel the same dimensions as an Instagram carousel? Do you know? Yes, I do. And Yes. OK, so the dimensions are 1080 by 10, 80 or 19, 20 by 19 20. It's just square. Basically, OK, I use 19, 20 by 19, 20. Some people say it's not necessary. It's overkill. But that's what I use. But the minimum resolution, you're going to use this 10, 80 by 10, 80 if you want square, if you want to do 4 by five, which is like four wide by five, hi, you're going to get a bigger screen real estate to work with. I think those formats work really well as well. So I have to do is use a 4 by 5 aspect ratio. So you would do 1080 wide by whatever five high is OK. You would do that now. The cool thing about working in Aquino's, I can export animations, I can export P&G's or JPEGs or anything. I can also export them as PDFs. So I would literally take this and then export as a PDF. And that's how you get to LinkedIn carousels. So it's a little different format. This is the same size for the LinkedIn, literally the exact same size. If you've been following me. Exact same thing. No recently. Sorry recently, I tried the 4 by 5 format for LinkedIn and because I wanted to fill the screen more. So that's what I'm doing on LinkedIn. So go ahead. What was your question or comment? I was just telling Robert he should check out David's course. The free Instagram, of course, because it lends a lot of these things. Yeah, there's like almost 300 people in this group. There should be 300 people taking that course. Thank you. Take my course, Chris. Is there a really quick way to set up keynote with the square dimensions? Yes absolutely. OK I'm I really like Keynote. So any questions about keynote? I'm happy to answer. So let me share the screen here. And going to this part. All right. So if you're under the format or the document, I'm sorry and you see this white screen here so you can do custom slide size. Now it's a PC world, so they have this weird aspect ratio that's an old way of looking at PowerPoint presentations. So that's usually the default. So if you click on this, you can change the dimensions here. That's that's where I would change this 1920 by 1920 and then rock and roll. Now I would suggest that you do 1920 by 1920 only if you have access to high resolution images, because what you're doing is you're scaling up images only then to scale them back down again. So it's no good. OK I have a plan with Shutterstock that I get 350 images per month to download to use as I please. It's a couple dollars and it's worth it. OK, so I'm going to answer any other questions about keynote and then I'm going to open up my Instagram keynote deck and start working. Anybody else? Chris, how do you how do you line up elements across different slides in keynote? Excellent this is a nod to David talis, who taught me how to do this. So if you have let me duplicate this, you have this image and you want it to line up. OK, so I'm going to Zoom out a little bit so you guys can see. And in the next slide, when you swipe, you want them to overlap nicely. So I'm going to duplicate this. OK, so now this has to be on that edge. So if you go into format. If you like this element here and you go into range, you'll see that it's xy coordinates here, the x 1359. So what I do is take 1359 and I subtract 19 20 from it. So let me do this with my little calculator. Sorry 1359 minus 1920. Equals minus five, six one, so I do minus five, six one, and when I hit enter, it'll be exactly where it needs to be. So I shifted that thing minus. The width of the document, and since I'm just a super nut job on that stuff, I'm going to go in here and trim this because I just it bothers me that it looks like that, right? I don't want anything spilling over. So that's kind of like what it would look like. That's how you get them to line up. Now if you use Adobe illustrator, which I also have an Adobe Illustrator template, you don't have to do any of this. You just literally let it flow from one artboard to an x. No problemo. It cuts it. It just lines them up perfectly. So when you want to do really tricky things, that's what I would. I would go into Adobe Illustrator instead. I have templates for both, obviously. Good question. Anybody else? Yeah thanks, Chris. Cheers you're welcome. Uh, Yeah. Because, you know, with the dandelion image is just one very long image. I will show you. So let me stop this. Very good question. Let me see if I can find it because. Not always that organized. There it is. You open this up, and the answer is no. The short answer is now, and I'll show you the image right now, and I'll share it. There it is. Adobe illustrator, OK, you guys can see that, let me reframe this a little bit. OK this is the dandelion image. It's all vector art, so I come in. Why this? So I was just lucky that usually I hate vector art because it looks so artificial and fake and clip art. And this one happened to be really nice because they did a really good job of drawing these things. When you Zoom in, you can see that they're like fine little hairs. So from far away, it looks wispy and it looks like a photograph that you. Made into a silhouette, now you can see here, this is not nearly wide enough for me. It really is not. So I'm going to open up. I'm going to show you I'm going to open this up, OK, inside my keynote deck and then I'll show you exactly what I did with this. Now the first thing I did was I colorized this to the color that I needed, so I took all of these changes into whatever color I needed. That's not the color, obviously, but that's what I did. OK, so I'm not going to say this. Let me stop the share and I'm going to open up another deck here. Then I'll share this deck. OK, here we go. Hoping open this sucker up. And I'll show you all my template pages and everything, so you guys can see it, so here's how it goes. So you can see you can see it bleeding off over the edge here. OK, so I did this exact same trick. I basically already had this slide. Excuse me. I'll show you how we do it. So let me duplicate this and then I'm going to delete that. OK, so I had this. And the reason why it's left ghosted here is because I want to see how much overlap there is. Normally, I would just clip the. The mask here and drop it over to here, but I wanted to see where it breaks because this is important to me here, so I'm going to take this, I'm going to copy this and go over here and paste it. So it's in the exact same spot. And then I'm going to go to a range and I'm just subtract 19 20 from this. So this is a 12 78. So it's minus 6 for two, so I'm typekit, minus 6 for two, and then I'm there. And so now that I already know where the other one goes, I'm going to just clip this here. Like that? I Zoom in, you can see that it's actually a really good piece of vector art here because you can see that kind of fake transparency I was talking about just because of how thin the lines are, where it overlaps the word OK. It feels pretty good. Now I had a choice to make here and I was debating this. Should I move my text over here or should I leave it there, but then send this image to the back? And I decided ultimately to send it to the back. Now, I may have another problem here where you see, like, it barely cuts over here, just barely. So I may make some adjustments there. If I don't like that, what I would do is I would take this image and I would shift it over. Like, say, if you hold on shift, then the left arrow key. It would move it 10 pixels at a time. So one two 3 and say that for let's say that, that's good. Then I would go back and take this and just shift it for times to the left. And then re mask it, ok? That's what I would do there. So that's OK, so I got that. So this one, it was a little bit of a pain because you can see there's a little bit of overlap here. So I had to see this little sucker right there just for those five hairs to stick across. I had to duplicate it. Now these ones here are literally the same things just scaled up, I think. So if I double click on this. You see the rest of it over here. Ghosted, if I Zoom out, you can see a little bit better. See that I'm just repurposing the same assets over and over again. And it was far away enough that I can get a clean cut right there to the left. And so then I'm repeating those elements. And then I wanted to repurpose this asset again. But they were married together like these two dandelions, so I just went back into my original Illustrator file, deleted one of them, rearrange the little poppies or whatever these things are called to move them around, so they're a little bit different in their arrangement. And then I use that asset. And then there it is. I think this is let's see how many assets. It's just one. OK and this one, because there wasn't anything too heavy. I decided to keep these little floating things on top of the type just to create some dimension out of it, so it creates the illusion that some behind and some are in front without doing any work. And that's it, and then I did the dualtone trick. Because this background can change colors. And my image is still there. I did debate, though, whether or not I should make this background a little bit more contrasty like that, which also looks very good. So once you pick your colors and you if you pick really good colors, you can change the color combinations to your heart's content. And it just works. So getting off of that great foundation of picking really solid, beautiful colors, it just makes your life a lot easier. Fewer decisions to make. OK, any questions? OK this is what the colors look like, I added them all in here, and I started I dropping everything, and this is an organized to work together as just one giant color palette because you can see a lot of the colors are very similar. I don't recommend doing this. I would just pick three to six colors, maybe and then just use those. I love these colors here. Super retro looking. I'll figure out a way to use them. But you can see when the colors are inverted over each other, like they use the orange for the type and the blue for the type that they start to vibrate. I don't know if you can see this. They vibrate loops. So that's where you have to introduce other shades or tints. OK the last thing I want to show, you guys, is when I go and do my master slides, my master slides look like this. This is still a little unwieldy for me. I still need to work on this. So pretty much every slide is based on one of these slides, and it allows me to really to create consistency. I notice when people submit slides to me and that these things move around from slide to slide. I was like, what are you doing? To for consistency, they should be exactly in the same position from slide to slide. So that's really easy to do here. All you have to do is copy and paste them. It's even easier to do in InDesign because you can have master page and master page elements, so if you update one piece of information like the date, it ripples through. Unfortunately, keynote doesn't do that yet, and I'm hoping that someday they will, but we're probably using keynote for ways that was not intended for. OK you work on these vertically, not horizontally when you sit them out. There's no way to do it. Oh, there's no other way to do it. Yeah, this is how it works. It's not meant to do that, but you can look at it like this. If you look at a light table, you can see it like this and then you could scale them up. If you want. You can see it that way. So if you work in a Adobe illustrator, I have an art port that is 10 wide and I can see it like a strip like this. Yeah, that's what I've done these enough now that I know what's going to connect and what's not going to connect. Oh, and the reason why the reason why I work in Keynote versus other programs is because your ability to take this slide and move it over here. Because before I used to designed inside keynote when I'm writing and so sometimes it would not flow. And I'm like, god, it sucks here, so I got to move this here and I move things around and then it's like, OK, it feels much better. So from a point of view of a storyboarding device or tool. Love but now that I write and I take the time to write inside paper first, I don't have to worry too much. About shifting the slides around because I already know that the flow was working before. And one of the cool things to not the cool things, but the reason why I shared my methodology with you is because when you write, it looks OK and you're not worrying about the rag. The way the sentences break. And then once I get into keynote now I have to pay attention like you don't want to have a widow like where? Let's just say. Like, that's their. So I try as much as possible to rearrange the break of the paragraph. So that doesn't happen. OK, not always possible, and sometimes the rag doesn't look good, no matter what I do, so I just either force a break or I add a word to it or I change the word altogether. So this is the nutso designer in me is like, yeah, I just don't like the way that looks. I need to change it. OK any other questions about keynote? Or in general, now, now you have this kind of flow for creating these carousels, how long does it take you to if you have one written, how long does it take you to create the say your last post still takes time. I got to tell you. I want to tell you that it's really easy, but it's not. I think the last one that I did, just the one I just shared with you probably took me. An hour, it should be much faster, but I'm still like god, I just don't like the way this sounds. I need to rephrase this and. Is this the right color? Don't want to break it like this, so it takes about an hour. It used to take all day, so made vast improvements here. So, Tom, I think you asked the question, right, tom? Yeah, so if so, if you get your thing down, you can spend less than an hour a day building a pretty decent audience and you're only going to get faster and faster. OK, so partial. Yeah, I was going to ask, as you're going through, you know, your process and thinking and going, rehearsing the words and everything, how do when it's ready? Because I find that it's like it can always be better, right? So you can, even after I post, it can be better. I'm like, dad, you know, the thing is, OK, truth time. Sometimes I write, I'm like, this is fricking good. I like this, and I can't think of a way to make it better. I just can't. I'm like, this is it, man. Let it go. It's time to give birth. Let's just push the sucker out and it'll be better tomorrow. But I'm going to release it today because I have to. I put it out there. And then people respond to ask questions and they make comments, I'm like, dude, you're such an idiot. They have so many better ideas and I feel like such a chump. But then a couple of thousand likes later, I'm like, whatever. So here's what I do. Here's my saving grace. I make notes of the comments, and because it's like we work much better in dialogue, right, the brainstorming thing that where we can sit together with friends and share ideas and we bounce ideas off of each other, they get better. That process works. So what I do then, is I revise it and then post a different one on LinkedIn. See? so it's not it's not permanent. Nothing is. And I think this is one of those expressions where it's very apropos done is better than perfect because if you just keep sitting on and squeezing it, it will probably get 2% or 3% better. But it would get much better after you release it and you actually have a dialogue with people. And I got to say there's a lot of dumb people on the internet, but there's a lot of smart people in the internet. And if you just don't listen to dumb people, you have really great free brainstorming partners. I got to tell you because they make little comments and they, like one person says, my BFF enfance, is this and that? And I forgot that term, BFF and like Chris, where were you? You should have put that in the slide. Thank you. And I'll help you. I love your lighting and the color in the background there. Thank you. Working on it. All right. OK anybody else? Yeah, I have a question. I'm more general question. Go ahead. I am not active on Instagram all right now, but I want to get into it, and I was wondering if I should go with my company brand or with my personal name. Yes and I'm wondering what your thoughts are on that. I guess this all the time. We have a company account and we have a personal account. I find it very difficult to write for the company. Mm-hmm because the company is a collection of people and it's not necessarily a reflection of me. Now I know that mostly that's a mindset and a limiting belief, and if I could get over it, I would. But I found that once I started writing as myself as my own personal brand, I could have more of a point of view without worrying about is this right for the company? And so it's more liberating for me now. L, who is one of the moderators of this group, she works for us. She does a lot of our social media and runs our campaigns. She writes for the future. So for whatever reason, she's able to do it for us. She's a pro. So I just do it for myself, so I would just suggest do it there, and if you are not active at all in Instagram, this is a fantastic because failures work better in the dark when nobody's looking. So you could just try a lot of things and nobody cares. Once she gets somewhere, then there are more eyeballs than the pressure increases. That's when it gets harder. OK, who else has a question? Because I have a question? OK, go ahead, Asha. So I'm feeling a little confused. I was watching your one video with Melinda and you say you should not pause to get its own same content on LinkedIn or Twitter. Yes and now today I realized that you were saying we can export the same PDF. And we can post it. I'm trying to optimize my effort, but at the same time, I don't want to share the same content. So what would be a smart trick to manage? OK excellent question. Thank you for bringing this up. So years ago, what people were doing. They were taking the literally the exact same content using some kind of third party platform to push it across every, every platform from Instagram, Facebook, Twitter to LinkedIn. They literally were doing that. And I said to her, you don't want to do that because then you are telling people, it's just my opinion, you only need to follow me in one place. So this is kind of getting interesting now because I write on Twitter. And then the tweets that work well, I convert into an Instagram, so you can say literally like, yeah, I guess it's the same content, the same idea. But it's not because I transform it, right? And I post natively on every platform from Twitter. I don't use any scheduling programs. I just hand jam at myself and on LinkedIn. Now that they're integrating their version of carousels with PDFs. Well, it makes a lot of sense that your highest and best performing Instagram post for business audience might also work. So I cherry pick I'm selective, and I curate and I don't post on the same schedules. I write different captions and some people who follow me on LinkedIn will notice. LinkedIn has very little limitation in terms of page number, so you can do a 78 page document if you wanted to. So then I do that. Because it's hard to squeeze an idea down to 10 slides. It's very hard. But once I know it works in 10 slides, I also know how to expand it. So that's what I do. So I'm against automated schedulers who pushed the same content out because I just don't know if that's the best way. It's not native, it's repetitive, it's automatic. But if you find things that work for different audiences, go ahead and repurpose your content. Now, here's what I'm going to do to my highest performing Instagram carousels. I'm going to take that, I'm going to record audio and then release that as a video on YouTube. So again, same content, repurpose formatted differently and posted natively for each platform. That's the critical part. Excellent question any follow up to that, Asha. Yeah, I'm just thinking that if I'm having a cat as on and. Hello can you hear me? We lost you. Say that again. I'm saying using the same cat as one of the Instagram, but just expand that idea little more further. Instead of 10 slides, I can make 15 or 20 slide and then it can work on LinkedIn to you. Yeah, but you just got it. Yes, you could literally use the exact same thing. I've done it and I've been able to grow a pretty decent sized following on LinkedIn. The one thing that you noticed is a lot of Instagram carousels will say like or share or save. LinkedIn doesn't have that in the same way, so you may customize that last slide. So that it feels right for LinkedIn. But I'm really lazy, so I don't even do that. OK and do you do the same thing for twitter? I just realized my audience is on Twitter more than Instagram, so I'm figuring out. Yeah, so here's like I gave a talk on this in what was in Amsterdam. I shared the exact process. So it's really weird and incestuous, right? So it starts on Twitter, and what works becomes an Instagram post, and Instagram has colors and typefaces and images. And then if it works really well on Instagram, I'll export the PNG and then bring it back to Twitter and say something different about one of the slides or two of the slides because it's now visual. So it's just kind of like this boomerang thing. It just keeps going around and around. So that works to. But because you have more followers on Twitter, you can judge that it works or not, but people like us who are studying and we don't have followers, how do we judge that it is best? Yeah so you're going to find a place where you have the largest audience. It could be on Facebook. It could be on LinkedIn wherever you get the highest amount of engagement and use those places to test your ideas because you need a larger sample size. Now, if you don't have a large following anywhere, what I would do is go and join a group. Post there. Mm-hmm and so you see, you know, some of these groups have hundreds of thousands or tens of thousands of people. See what sticks? You'll find something. Here's the weird thing about Twitter. People will read and share and retweet your thing, and they will not follow you because I've seen people who have 50,000 likes on their tweet but only have a few followers. Twitter is weird, and it's very hard to grow a following on Twitter. In my experience, so. Put tweet it out and see what happens. And it's relative, right? So if something only gets like one comment or one like but something else gets 15. That's a pretty good indication. Yeah, OK. That's how. All right, thank you. You're very welcome. Who else is up? I only have a few more minutes here and then. Oh, go ahead. How and when is it good to mention credits and sources like carousel? Yeah, it's very good. I'm not perfect at this, and I try my best to cite as many places or people as possible. Notice in the color palette I mentioned color wizard I gave you. They're linked. I told you about them or design wizard. I'm sorry and I try to site people. Now here's the thing. People on the internet are very amoral when it comes to this kind of stuff because they're afraid. If I share my source that people will see that all I'm doing is just moving information, I'm an information career from point A to point B. I would rather risk people accusing me of that rather than them saying, Chris, you're trying to plagiarize other people's work and that's a very bad place to be. And I've called people out on the internet and they've done this to me and they've done this to other people. And it's not a good way to build your reputation at all. And it turns out the more generous you are with citing sources, the better it is for you. And potentially the person that you look up to and are quoting will spot you and actually interact with you in ways that you didn't think possible. The reason why I have a relationship with Blair ends David Baker. Marty Neumeier is because I constantly share their stuff and I cite them all the time. So if anything, I'm a booster club for that person, a one man booster club, and I build them fans and I help them to sell books and to raise their profile. And now I have a relationship with all of them, some of which now were on a cell phone basis, like we're texting each other. And if you ask me years ago, are you going to have a relationship with Marty numerai? I'd like, no. A Lorenz. Oh so this is the really cool part. All right, so don't hide where you get stuff from now. I don't have a lot of time left. And I heard a couple of different voices. So what I'm going to do is Charles, Alicia and then pavitra. Let's just do a short follow up. Is it better to mention it like in the slide or in the description below? Both both. OK, thank you. Yes don't hide it. Put it everywhere. OK Charles, go. I was just going to say David thewlis did the opposite in terms of condensing his content for TikTok really successfully lately I saw this week. It was really good repurposing the Instagram stuff. So good for you, and it's worth to look at how we did it. David's going to crack the TikTok thing and share it with all of us, right? Yes, thank you very much. Yes Charles, you're active on TikTok as well, right? No, no, my wife is, so I kind of like, take it out on her because she's that good from the bad stuff. OK David's going to be the canary in the coal mine for us on TikTok. He's going to figure out how professionals can invade the world of teenagers, and he'll let us know. OK, Alicia, go. I just want to quickly mention that one of my clients, I'm helping reduce some care skills really to recipes, and we actually repurpose her carousels onto Pinterest as a poster. Yes, beautiful. Pinterest is also another great way to generate leads, guys, because it allows you to do backlinks and people who are on Pinterest are in a buying mindset. So if you can figure out how to turn your content into places where people are looking is perfect. Alicia, Thanks for reminding me of that. I need to do that. Somebody who's been trying to help me on onto Pinterest. So we're going to do that. Lovely OK, so, pavitra. Go ahead. We're not getting audio. Let me say this, typing something in. OK so for some reason, we can't hear you, so go ahead and keep working on your audio settings. I'm almost out of time here. Anybody else? OK I just showed the design for the design. Yeah, just one second. OK is anybody still in a room? I'll close all the rooms. You ready? Yeah can you see my screen? That is I'm sorry, I was looking at the wrong screen. Go ahead. OK 6 tools. OK there's a little issue with hierarchy here. And this is Ali's work, right? Yeah, yeah, so so sometimes when we're kind of getting into this, I would caution you guys about using too many different point sizes and what's the most important thing to read here? What do you think it is? I think sports is honest. OK, so but the word needs as big as. Yeah because, you know, like sports is so big, I don't know how to fit it, how to make it fit. This is sometimes the issue with these. It's a challenge. Yeah, it is. It is like a puzzle and you keep moving things around, ok? When I would try this at the very beginning. So let's just duplicate your tax here. And just hide this one, ok? And just put it all the same size. All the same color. Same everything. Mm-hmm And then start there. Sometimes we get too tricky for our own good. Yeah got me see that also its need do not need just for grammar. Need OK, six tools? Sports designers need. Yeah so get that all at the same point size and in a case like this, I have to warn you guys. Ultra condensed typefaces are very hard to read. Sometimes you have to open up the tracking on them, but just be mindful of this, that these type, this ultra condensed typefaces are generally just good for headlines and you have to be very skilled at putting them together. Otherwise, you make it difficult, more difficult to read. OK so just work on that. Much so, it's only an issue with the hierarchy. Any other comments or you think it looks ok? Well, the hierarchy is everything because I need to be able to read this. Otherwise, I just see the NFL. OK Yeah. Now is NFL used more in this thing? Or is this just on this main slide? No, this is actually I'm I just used my template here. I thought about putting like a Photoshop logo instead of NFL, but I thought NFL might be more relevant. Yeah, so see, here's the tricky thing. This becomes about maybe the NFL, maybe I don't know. you have to. So in this thing, you have to ask yourself, what is the person who's going to look at this? What are they supposed to look at? So you have your logo in the upper left corner. Is that your logo? Yeah so every one of these things that you put in is telling me, look at me. And then at some point, I'm not going to know what to look at. I got a badge. I got these giant word needs and then I get your logo. It's like you got to just reduce this thing down and simplicity will be your friend here. OK So the thing about sports designers? So six tools, I think, is kind of important because that's really what you're doing. You're going to share six tools, right? Mm-hmm And I think that's kind of the way you should put more emphasis on the six tools part. Gotcha so maybe like a big number 6 and then it kind of like goes, yeah, yeah, I possibly. Yeah, Yeah. And then and then the football at the bottom. Yeah, I don't. What I would do is just start with a type, make sure the type works. Mm-hmm Maybe a big 6 and then tools and then sports designers need OK. Maybe that's how you do that. And then what secondary image supports this? I don't know. Now, notice, even on my own Instagram carousel, I just use text almost everywhere. That's not important. Like, I don't put logos like a lot of people put their logos, they put their faces on every slide. It's like, do do we really need to see that everywhere? So that's something that you should consider legibility first and finding images that complement the idea. All right. Gotcha OK. All right. So I think that's it for us. I have to stop. So I want to take this opportunity to welcome everybody that's new or who hasn't spoken up. But I think we've lost everybody at this point. Have we lost everybody? Similarly, new in this group that hasn't introduced themselves. Yes, I'd love to say Hello. I'm not kidding, can you hear me, I can hear you myself. Oh, cool. Oh my camera. Sorry Hi. I'm not new, but it's been a long time since I said hello. My name is Marcel. I'm from Germany and I have my own design and branding agency. And yeah, I'm happy to be here. I am happy to see your face because when we saw each other in real life like I know you. But I don't really hear from you and Marcel, despite being a very big guy, he's a very he's a very quiet, shy person, right? So I'm just happy to hear you speak and to see you on camera. I love the books on your side, by the way. Yes, I'm a big fan from my bio. Yes, I could see that. OK, so who else is new? Who wants to introduce themselves. So we can say Hi to you? OK, Michael, go ahead. Yeah, hi, I'm Michael. I am a Dutch guy living in Baja California, in Mexico, so I have a small agency. We're working completely remote with guys in Costa Rica. Some one guys in Italy, another new partner is in Oregon. So I've been benching all the future content now for four months and signed up for the pro group. And so I can really already notice it in my business, so I'm super excited. And if anybody, I'm still looking for an accountability partner, so anybody is looking for someone, please reach out to me. All right. OK, we're going to follow up with you, and I should have done this earlier. In case you guys don't know, Alec, Mo and Emily are the facilitators of this group. Emily has a deep history and experience in user experience, design and writing workshops. Alec is what we consider the human wiki. He's probably watched every YouTube episode, every. He kind of is the keeper of the flame, if you will. And Mo is Mr charismatic. He's like the happy guy who's got a master's in communication. I think philosophy or psychology. So it's a pretty interesting mix of these three people. So these are the people you're going to lean on to get help and to make your experience here a little friendlier or just to have a buddy or partner just reach out to any one of them. OK of course, don't kill them with all your messages. But so if you need a performance partner, accountability partner, what we want to do is I think Elle has a thread on going is like, who needs a partner? We're going to find you, partner. OK, so make sure you post and say, hey, I'm Dutch, living in Baja California, I do x, y and z. I'm looking for an accountability partner in this time zone, preferably. And Michael, I have a question for you. You live in Baja now. This could be a stereotype, but are you out in the ocean fishing all the time? Well, the beaches are actually closed again. OK, so normally I am surfing or going to the beach with my family. Yeah, that happens a lot after work, but it's a little more tricky. We kind of try to evade the patrols because there's the beaches here are so empty. But I don't fish yet, but I go to the beach, so I'm really close to the ocean here. Yeah, when you get a boat and you start fishing, I'm going to be your best friend. OK, so I just want to put that out there. Oh man, come by. Yeah OK, so that's Michael. Anybody else? Yes, beautiful. OK, so I don't see your name, there is a Kristin or Kirsten or. Yes, Kristen. OK, Hi. I go by kit, so I'm Kit on Facebook. Kit OK. Beautiful yes, I'm Kit. I'm in Melbourne. I'm a graphic designer. I've been part of the group for a couple of weeks now, but this is my first call. So a graphic designer in melbourne? Beautiful what time is it there right now? It's three or seven AM. Oh, my god, you get like an award just for being the Super trooper. Oh my god, really? Wow, OK. And you seem very coherent. I could tell it's dark outside. Sounds like it's light. Yeah it's very early. OK, so welcome to the group and Thanks for introducing yourself. If you can do me a favor and if you change your name to the name that you want me to call you, bye, it'll help me out a lot because I'm horrible with names. So just write kit like iced tea. She's the superstar example. She spells her name and she spells it phonetically. So you know how to say her name? I love that. OK beautiful. Thank you very much. A graphic designer. Ok? and then next, it's Shelly, right? Yeah hi, I'm Shelly and I'm from calgary, Canada, and I've been a designer since I said since the dark ages, since we used actually, since it used to be like a craft where I actually used wax and pen and ink and that kind of thing. Wow and I've mostly through the years, mostly been print and usually large like books like annual reports and things. And so our business has been kind of dying a slow death over the last 10 years and getting closer to retirement, so almost letting it go. But during covid, I started binge watching your stuff. And actually first, the first one I saw was the Instagram, that first Instagram thing. I got caught my eye because of a travel blog I have. I'm interested in your Instagram thing and binge watch from there, and here I am. So literally and looking into maybe look at focusing on brand strategy more. And I just had my first brand strategy session a week or two weeks, week and a half ago. Yay I think there's a whole group on strategy, right, Emily. I think you might know something about that. So get in touch with Anna Lee. This is very good. So you're an old school designer and and you're saying you're getting closer to retirement. First of all, welcome to the group and Thanks for sharing. Thanks now, as a person who's been in design for a really long time, I have to imagine you must have a lot of artifacts from the old days, and some of those things can be transformed into digital products that you can sell for. Not a lot of money, but over time they can be worth a lot because I shared something with you guys. But if you're going to create a market, there's people who get ink rollers and they just make patterns and textures, and they'll sell it to you for like 10, 12 bucks, 50 high resolution scans. They're really well organized and they cut it out for you and it's worth, you know, whatever dollar they charge. It's worth it for me because my time is worth more. I feel like I'd rather buy it. So something that might seem like an old relic, an artifact that is not worth anything to you currently in this digital age and what people want may actually be worth quite a lot. So Ian Barnard is a guy who sells a lot of products on Creative Market and also retro supply company, which we had Dustin Lee on, who's a friend of Diane who introduced me something that you may consider, ok? You may be sitting on a treasure of like unused, untapped intellectual property that you can just repackage and sell. So definitely think about that because you can sell into retirement while drawing passive income while doing brand strategy. That would be my wish for you. Thanks you're welcome. OK, Shelly. And who else? Anybody else that's not spoken up and wants to say Hello or hasn't said Hello. In a really long time? Once, twice. OK, that's it for us, I'm going to stop the recording, guys. Hey, Chris. Oh quick one. Yes, go ahead. So have you thought about what the future of Instagram will be? As in the next six months to a year. Have you thought about that and what it could be? I don't know what you mean. That sounds like a really deep question. What do you mean the future? OK, maybe it's too deep for the call, but no, just in terms of they might start adding video in their carousels, which I'm not too sure they do right now. But I think obviously from a technical point of view, it will kind of change and evolve, right? Yeah, it changes and evolves all the time. First of all, they're starting to promote the Instagram TV stuff even more. They're going to allow you as a creator to share in the profit of the ads that they run for the first time, which is pretty cool. I think Facebook has to keep up with everybody else. They need to keep content creators on their platform. There are a couple of new features that they're talking about. I think they're called collections, too. David, is that right or something like that? Elections like I heard of like guides, and you can collect all of your posts based on Topics and then you can put in a little extra text so you can collect them. Yeah is that what you're thinking? I think that's what it is because people are telling me that this is coming and they're only releasing it to some of their top influencers to be able to do this, that you're able to collect things together and label them something I don't know. But we know this Zuckerberg's not asleep at the wheel. You may not like some of his policies on censorship and things like that or lack thereof, but they're paying attention. They have to be competitive, so lots of things are coming. And what you were saying about video. Where you have lost you on the visual here, what they're saying about video, people do embed 1 minute videos per slide and that's more work than I can do, but it's also quite effective to do something like that. All right. OK, that wasn't like an easy stop recording.

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