Search
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Dashboard
>
Library
>
 

How To Create Instagram Carousels Part 1

#
162
Chris Do
Published
June 19, 2021

This is a breakdown of Carousel's secrets. There aren't many secrets, but for those who haven't done this before or are having trouble figuring out the game, there are a few. You could find it to be really useful as part of the series on assisting you in generating leads, which is extremely crucial for us and our businesses.

Read Transcript
In most here now. Oh, there he is, just snuck in right as the door was closing. I heard you talk about the three questions. Yeah so let me share my screen, and it's this one. And I believe. You guys are seeing my screen. This is Carousel secrets. Yes well. OK, guys, welcome to call number one, 62. This time I've included it in the title, so I don't forget myself. This is Carousel secrets. They're not that many secrets, but for some people who haven't done this before or we're struggling to figure this game out. You might find it to be actually very helpful as part of the series of helping you guys to generate leads because it's very important for us to generate leads. I'm a big believer in pulling people into your orbit, so inbound marketing averse as compared to outbound outbound marketing. So this is the Instagram workshop, part one, which you guys are getting a taste of something I'm planning on doing later on. And there are five components to this. It's upcycling, writing, semiotics, and I'll explain all these things later. Design captioning and seo, which if you guys need help with seo, David talis is your man. I just dabble with it. He's basically set me up with my seo, and then I just stop working on it. That's how much, how hard I work on it. But you might notice something here. Why is it I always present five things, well, you guys remember the five ingredients we talked about this. It's about sharing five things about the thing that you want to share. So it forces you to kind of make some pretty hard decisions as to what you want to include and what you don't want to include, and you're going to see this theme pop up over and over again. But right now. For this workshop, I'm only going to focus on the top two parts upcycling and writing. OK, so by the end of this call today in an hour, you guys are going to have multiple attempts at writing something. We'll see how it goes. So let me first explain the concept of upcycling. So upcycling is just my way of trying an idea out before you put it out into the public. Before you go and put all the time and energy into making the carousel and designing and finding the perfect typeface and color palette, you're going to want to test the ideas first. And there's a lot of different ways to do this. But in Hollywood, there's a famous expression from a studio boss. It's like, tell me an original idea I've seen before. That's all I want to do. They want to recycle ideas that have worked from books, from comic books, from other movies to make the SQL the prequel, the trilogy. Because those ideas work, and I'm going to put that much money into something. Make sure it works. First And this is where we go in and we start to excavate and we're looking for an idea to work on. And so this is going to be relevant to the problem. I'll give you in a second where we can try ideas out very quickly and let the market. Our audience validate if it's worth putting more effort into it. And then we get to iterate on it a couple of times before we go and put in that energy and effort, ok? And over time, you're going to develop this habit where it won't feel like it's work at all. It's just part of how you communicate with the world, and we're looking for ideas that work. So here's how I do it. I gave this lecture had a word. So if anybody was at an awards in Amsterdam, you might recognize this. But here we go. So these are a bunch of tweets, and I figured out how to use Twitter as a tool to mine ideas. This is where I test that little ideas, and the great part is Twitter is very ephemeral. It goes out into the universe and it gets deleted unless, of course, you say some horrifically racist or sexist things and it's going to go back to haunt you. But here, here we go. I put out a couple of ideas and I'm looking for ideas that past a certain threshold. For each of us, it's going to be very different depending on the size of your audience and the virality of your tweet. So you see these things right here. So one of them has 1.6 1,000 likes and the other one has 1.8 1,000. But I'm also looking at retweets. So I'm scanning here now. Normally, I would say, like all of these are potential candidates for making Instagram posts, and this is where my ideas usually come from. And if you read Neville Maduro's book, how what is it called? This book would teach you how to write better. He talks a lot about just right whatever mood you're in, if you're feeling a little cranky or crabby, just right, and don't worry about it. And he says that oftentimes whatever mood he's in, those things that he writes resonates with his audience way more than something where he's calm and levelheaded and he's being very neutral. And if Twitter's too dangerous for you to do that, and sometimes it can be fine, a place where you feel safe to just write ideas. And he says, each and every one of us, when we feel like we're in that moment of writing. Don't get interrupted, just let yourself work, and he says that we all have about one to two hours maximum of good writing time in US a day, and that's it. So if you're in a flow just right, don't answer the phone, don't answer emails, don't do anything else. Just write until you're done. And then you could stop because pretty much you're spent for the day. So anyways, here's a tweet that I put out here. And this came actually from a video, which was a conversation, right? A Livestream after hours with Bob. And we were talking about this whole idea of imposter syndrome, and I said something like, hey, man, I know you don't like this expression, fake it till you make it. So there's a different way to look at this, and it's maybe believe it till you achieve it because people are very sensitive word to fake. They think it's fraudulent. I think it's wrong, and I put that out there and it started to kind of catch some steam. So even the tweet is an upcycle of something else that was done, which was an upcycle or something else that was done. Keep trying this, ok? So you're going to be sitting there thinking, OK, so where do I find my ideas from? And I'm going to tell you the five ways that I find ideas, and I want to warn you about the one way that you shouldn't do it. OK, so your personal stories these are the best is why it's at the top and your life is full of mylivelessons.com today. Unfortunately, we just don't pay enough attention to them. That's why we don't think they're interesting. But if you go into your past. And there's a prompt that you can think about. Think about all the homes you've lived in. Just map that out. If you have only lived in one home, that's an interesting story in itself. But me, I've lived in many, many homes and they're tied to memories and stories. And then after you think about those homes, you could think about objects that you really care about, things that have the sentimental reason and then think about the story and the emotion that's attached to that. Personal stories are fantastic. People love them. One of my favorite ways to learn is to hear somebody else's story. And extract my own meaning from it. Now, on the left and right, here are memes and jokes. I find that these actually work really well for Instagram posts. And memes. I made a habit of collecting these things, and I'll talk to you a little bit about that later, and then there's jokes and then research if you're interested in its specific topic. My suggestion is don't just start writing something from your memory, your recollection, your gut feeling, because it doesn't provide a ton of value to people. So if you're interested in branding, just type and branding, but branding is pretty broad, so you might want to type in some other keywords to make the search more narrow and specific. Then read, I find that within the first three to five things that pop up on Google Search that aren't ads actually help me to understand the subject better, and then I start to see themes emerge. I was looking for something on writing tips and I'll talk about that later where I noticed that two or three blog posts pretty much posted the exact same content. So I'm not sure if there's plagiarism going on or they just referencing the source material too closely. And that's what they're doing. And I'm sure because they're on top 10 Google search, it's doing wonders for their business. And the last one is external. There's some sites that you can look at that will help you generate ideas so that you don't even have to do the research and to dive a little deeper into personal stories. This is from Russell Brunson's secrets. This is a book, and this is the person who created the website ClickFunnels. And some of us in this group are practitioners and pretty good at designing ClickFunnels. But anyways, he's like, here are some of the story prompts or ideas a story of loss and redemption, like how you lost something in your life and you did something maybe bad, something that you regret and how you're able to redeem yourself. You lost a relationship, you lost a business and how you came back from the brink of destruction. There's the US versus them story arc where it's going to be polarizing. Here's what we believe. If you're of the times, there's people who are obviously showing allyship or part of the Black Lives movement. And then there are definitely some people who are anti-black lives and they keep saying, all Lives Matter. So that's an us versus them kind of story. There's the before and after and what you're seeing here is you're seeing contrast, you're seeing change, so before and after. So here's how I used to do something. And here's how I do something now or this is what it looked like before I learned this very valuable thing. And that leads you to the amazing discovery, something that somebody gifted you, or something that you found yourself through by doing a lot of research and trial and error, a lot of failure involved and secret telling secrets. Things like you won't believe this thing. I'm going to tell you this thing. I don't normally tell people this thing, but here we go. Notice at the beginning, the title of this workshop today is called Carousel secrets. I was just applying what it is that Russell Brunson's talking about all of a sudden and now it's like, wait. Secret tongue, huh? There's something here, something special, because I'm going to belong to a very different group. And once I learned a secret, it's going to be an us versus them that people who know the secret and the people who don't. The last one is the third person testimonial that is getting somebody else to share their success about the thing that you taught them. That also makes for a very good story, and it's very believable. OK, now. Memes have mentioned this before. Now you and I and all of us that are surfing on social media have found really funny things that are very relevant touch and emotional trigger inside our body or nerve, and we laugh and we share it with people. And then we forget about it. We move on. I want you to start collecting those now. Pull them screen, capture them. Save them to your photos and your albums that just keep dumping them in there. I find that when the well runs dry of ideas, I just go right back to my folder. Excuse me, I go to my archive. I read through a couple of things and they make me laugh and I'm like, oh, that's really cool, let me try and make something out of that. The cool thing about memes mostly is that there were usually ugly, poorly typeset, and the resolution is horrific, so they don't make for great, high fidelity things. So what's really cool is if you bring in your own imagery and it's a popular joke that people know about or something that's funny. That's really funny. Like clients be like and then designers be like, you know, those kind of memes that pop up, those things work really well, and they're shared a lot and people like those because it just it makes you feel like, yeah, that's really kind of how real life is like. And those have been some of my best performing posts. Now, the external, the external, there are some external places you probably want to screen capture this. Of course, I'll create some slides for you, but if you're jonesing to get started on this, you're probably going to screen capture this right now. Reddit do not spend that much time on reddit, but it's an excellent source for some very polarizing opinions the dark web sometimes, and you can find some very interesting questions that aren't out there. And if you can find one that's interesting and you see that it's got lots of votes and a lot of comments to it, it's telling you that a lot of people feel something about this and I like to start there. You want already. You want to approach something that people already have a lot of interest baked in before you go and make a carousel. Ok? there's another website called answer the public's, and it's kind of a visual mind map of some of the most interesting or popular questions about a specific topic. Of course, you can go to quora, which is a website just for asking and getting asking questions and getting answers. You can search the Google Trends. I'm no expert there, but that's another great place to start because Google knows what people are looking for. You can join forums and communities and just participate and engage post questions and find something there. So it does require a little bit of work from you. To find out what people want and what you're looking for are unanswered questions that are emotional triggers that people get bent out of shape over and find something that you feel passionate about. And when those two things align, that's where you begin. So that's a little bit of me talking, and now we're going to do a little exercise. Every time you see this word, an image of somebody moving like active, we're going to do something together. So here's some prompts for you to think about in a few minutes. I'm going to ask you guys to do this, but I want you to search through your social feeds wherever you're most active, and hopefully you're active on one platform or another. Look for either a post that's done really well or a challenge, or a comment from somebody who's usually angry or has a different opinion than you and see if you can find something that's worth writing about. OK, if that doesn't work for you, that's totally OK. The other thing you can do is just research the topic. Now in this group here, I try to encourage all of you to try to become experts at one thing, pick one lane, go down. That lane goes deep as possible. So, for example, I saw Priscilla's video yesterday on branding. She's talking a lot about branding, so that's obviously something that she wants to be known for, that she has a passion and interest and experience in. I suggest that she look for that. Analyst video was about sustainability. So of course, she already knows a lot about that. But perhaps she can find something else. Maybe an interesting phrase of video that she can watch and say, oh, that's really interesting. That's adding another dimension to what it is that I know that's a great way to phrase that same thought that I had, but just much more powerfully. OK, so that's it. What you want to do is find a question worth answering. So I'm going to have you go out there and do a bit of your research, ok? Define a topic that you want to work on, so I'm going to stop the share. OK, now research is wonderful because it could be done quietly. So I'm going to ask my friend Mo to set the timer. And we'll say, well, how long should we do this for? Oh, it's great. Eight minutes, slide said eight minutes, Yeah. Yes, it was so light and transparent. Great design, Chris. Yes, I know. OK, so eight minutes is what we're going to do. So most at the timer. I want you all to go find something you're going to write about. So you're going to read and you're going to read real fast. All right. And we're going to do this silently. I'm just going to sit here and stare at your beautiful faces. If everybody wants to talk to me about anything, we can do that. OK, so if that bothers you, just take your headphones off and just do your research, and I'm happy to answer any questions right now. And there's the second part coming up. So once we figure out what topic we want to talk about, I'm going to help you. OK, I'll listen to some music then. Oh, Chris, I have one question. Yes, but when you're trying to test your ideas on Twitter, but you don't have a following yet, how can we still do that? Excellent question. Excellent question. Go look at somebody who has a good following that speaks on subjects that you want to be known for as well and just look at their questions. Look at their tweets. OK OK. You can use somebody else's research. OK Yeah. And I want you to know that, you know, love how everybody looked up. It's cool. Blessings one. How come you can play it now, but yesterday you couldn't play music? Oh no, I wasn't. That's Ricky. I was like, was there a sort of multiverse mode that you were talking to? Something I have to let you guys know. This is, oh, I should stop the recording. Was it going back to recording? OK, so I have a question for you. Do you guys feel like with a show of hands that you have something to start writing about because this next part is about writing? So just raise your hands if you feel like you got something. OK, not a bunch of hands, I have to say, OK. Put your hands down, everybody did not raise your hand. Let's have a quick discussion and then we'll get back into the talk. Ok? what are your challenges? So help me help you. So just raise your digital hand and then I'll pick you. Or Mo will help me or an analyst will help me pick. OK, I only see one hand, so I'm just going to pick this as Shelly. Hi, Chris. Hi I'm just wondering, is it OK if I pick a topic that is like a business to business? So it's not for me likely generating for me, but it's like a client. I have that like a question that may be good for them to answer. Or is that not right for this exercise? Oh, you don't have the answer. You're going to put out a carousel that somebody else has to answer. Well, like if it was in real life, I'd be doing it for my client. So I'd be saying for my client, I'd make this carousel. Ok? I was just thrown at me. So the idea here is that you want to create content that is valuable for others and that establishes your authority and that you're just giving. So if you ask of something, then it's not. Actually, if I'm understanding your question, then you're not exactly following that. This would be like I'd be if the client hired me to do that for them, so I would be researching a thing for them. And they'd be putting it out there, they'd be putting it out there. OK, OK, that's fine. This is actual work for you, then. Yeah, Yeah. Something I have coming up and I thought, oh, yeah, OK, that works for me. I see what you're saying. Yeah all right. So I now I looked back, and now there's two people with their hands up. So Mo. Who is it, linda? Linda? Linda, OK, but. I've actually been working on a carousel and what it is creating content to share with people who aren't sending their kids back to school. So like a call for talent, a call for knowledge for people, and the name of it is create one lesson. so the idea is for a large group of people to create one lesson in what they're expert in to share with all of the different grade levels or make a lesson each grade level and then share it. Virtually in a PDF or something that you could actually print and mail or the instructors could print out and send to the student that don't have access to computers. Mm-hmm So that's a carousel that I'm working on right now, and I'm just trying to figure out the best way to. Build a community around that. OK, that sounds like a big question. It is. I'm just trying to help you guys, right, one carousel. You know, it's like, I don't know the community and build all this other stuff. Yeah, that's I can answer that, but that's going to be a deep thing. So it sounds to me that this what you're doing is the beginning of something that we're going to pick up on, which is probably just want to put on social media if you're a teacher, if you're an artist, if you're a creator. I would love to share one assignment from you that people that are maybe doing work. What is it called home schooling or something that they can do or participate or other teachers can share? And then based on that, you're going to pool the content out and then you're going to share that right. So sounds to me like you have step one. Step one is to generate ideas and then step two is then to consolidate and curate the ideas and then repackage it, hopefully with everybody's permission. That you can share. Right I think the first step, though, is getting a group of people to. Express a sincere interest in it. Yeah, so what I would do is either if you have a decent enough following or engagement on a platform, I would just put that idea out there. If that's not the case, then I suspect that's the case. Which you can do is just join other communities of teachers or artists or people where a bunch of people that might be able to do this congregate and you might want to talk to Ari. Now he may have some strategies because he recently just went full nuclear mode and is already in here. I don't see him. But Ari launched a program he's probably really busy summer camp for kids, and he did a 700 $800,000 launch. So I'm sure you can learn something from him about teaching and downloadable and building a community. Excellent. Thank you. OK So reach out to him. Ari Chang. Ok? I believe that's the name. OK, so we're going to pick up two more questions and dive back in this because I have to bounce that 9 o'clock. So Mo, Elena and then boss. OK, perfect. Just hold your questions for a little bit. Elena, you're up. Hi Hello. I still have to introduce myself on the Facebook page. I don't know how to explain what I do. It's kind of hard. But so what I specialize in is, I guess, analyzing and predicting trends. Oh yeah, it's different. So that's why I was kind of I didn't check answer the public yet. I actually like knew about this site and I didn't think to check it because I don't see a lot of content about it. Like, I mean, you'll get like the articles that are like 20 design trends for. But I get like a lot more in depth with things not just based by year, but based by like. And anyway, I'll just tell you what I found. So I kind of suspected that people were going to look for trends post-covid-19 post-pandemic. So like, how is that going to affect the market moving forward? And I. The way that I do trends, I don't just specifically look at design trends like I follow fashion fine art, like just I'm just like, I consume a lot of. Are content for all these different industries, so I thought a carousel would be good to kind of show how trends would affect different industries like tech startups like entrepreneurship, stuff like that. And some of the other cool things I found were like design award awards trends. So you can look at the different awards that have come out that one you shared, like with all the W's awards. Yeah so I always look at those two. And so you can tell what's kind of coming up with that. And I think it's just like a special ability that I have to predict and forecast trends specifically related to color. Like I have consistently been able to kind of predict what colors, what, what colors Pantone is going to release for both false. Fall, winter and spring summer, like the palate, like, I don't get it, I don't nail it, obviously, but it's very close, so you'd be Nostradamus if you could nail that. Oh my gosh. OK, so I'm sorry, just in the interest of time. I'm cut you off for a second here, ok? I ramble. A trend forecasting is super hot and popular in every format that you can make it in. I noticed that Ron Segall, our friend, has been releasing content about the top five trending websites or the five best this. Those things go nuclear almost on every channel, so I think you're ready to go. You're ready to go. All right. So, OK, so let's move on to boss' boss. Let's just get right to it. You have a question or comment. Me, Yeah. I just I just wondered where one would find research research material that's more relevant than all the listicles we're bombarded with on the internet. This I'd like to bring value, but I don't want to be another designer telling you how important design is. So I'm constantly looking for objective proof or statistics that show the value of design or branding. Oh, OK, that's perfect. That should be your topic, then. How to measure the value of design? Yeah but it's very difficult to find. That makes it even more valuable when you find it. OK right, I mean, you just said something here. Everybody just pay attention to what Moss said, he's like, I don't want to do what everybody else is doing because I just feel like I'm just a me too. I think this thing is really valuable, but it's not easy to find. So literally your question and the answer is the same is that you want to find something where it's not been exposed to death. But I just do want to say this one thing for everybody here, it's hard to find a new country that's undiscovered. It really, really is difficult. So before we go there, I'm just going to suggest just join the pack. My goal is for you to be in the top 10 Google search for whatever it is. So even though there are 10 other people elbowing into that space, if you design it a little bit better, if you add something new or even if it's just new because of its post date, you'll rank up there and it's good for you to start to take over. And I'll tell you what I mean. Way back in the day when we were first starting, I think in 2014, when I typed in branding on YouTube, I got some weird stuff. It wasn't what you were thinking. It was tattoos. I guess that was considered under personal branding. So there are a lot of tattoos and skin art, and there was something about cattle and branding like the hot iron stamped into a Cow. And that's what you saw in 2014 on YouTube. So now when you type in branding, we're probably going to be two or three of the top 10 search results. And we're starting to change the algorithm because this is what people were really looking for and there was no content. But if you ask yourself, man, isn't that super saturated already? Aren't there enough books on branding and people talking about branding? And the answer is super like, clearly yes, but not on YouTube. So that's the thing it's like sometimes we can get stuck with. Yeah, everybody's already talked about it, but not the way that you're going to talk about it and it's not on the platform and using the medium that you're going to use. So don't get totally stuck their boss. I think you can do it. I'm pretty sure you're going to do it better than most people. And then spend the other time searching for that thing that nobody has written about. And the reason why I'm excited about what you just said was because I wrote down here literally on my notepad here. A topic for me to write about is things that are difficult to measure and that I'm related to design because people say like, well, what's the value of design? Designers even say this. So just because it's difficult doesn't mean you can't measure it. So get into science, and I'm sure you're going to figure something out. And when you connect, connect those dots, it's going to be super powerful for you. I'm going to get back into it. I'm going to share my screen. I like when you're talking to boss, because when you say his name, it sounds like you're saying boss and it just sounds like a cool engagement in a conversation, just like that. Thanks, Mo. Thanks, Bob. OK, now we're going to get to writing. We're getting into writing. So here's a trick or a technique or a prompt. I want you to think about. The coin has two sides, heads or tails. And oftentimes I really struggle with writing, and I figured out that sometimes I'm a heads guy and sometimes I'm a tails guy. And let me explain what that means. Heads start with the headline, the big idea, the hook and then start to fill in the other slides that you're going to write about. OK and sometimes I struggle with finding the right headline. And then and then I figure out, oh, this is going to be nice. OK, I like this, but don't want to write the rest of the slides. It falls apart because it was too click baity. It was just misdirection. And sometimes that leads me in the wrong path. But if you're good at writing headlines and that drives it, this is the big idea. Start with the headline, and there's this formula that shared in Nelson so Neville Mazorus book that somebody else would also repost. It was the name the monk, and it's using the rot formula, and the rod is an acronym for results, objections and time. So I'm just going to read it to you. OK, so if you write your headline and you struggle with writing really good, punchy, attention grabbing headlines, focus on the results. So here here's a result that they would want learn to speak Spanish. Perfect that could be your headline. Learn to speak Spanish, I'm interested, I want to speak Spanish and I want to learn great. And the objections would be well. Even if you have poor English skills. OK And then the timeline or the time frame would be in 20 days, so when you put that all together, it's something like learn to speak Spanish in 20 days, even if you have poor English skills. That's a pretty good headline written by a guy who writes headlines for a living. And you could mix it up. You don't have to just do the Roi or the t you could do all together or TO or the tr, which is in 20 days. You can learn to speak Spanish, so you're adding the timeline and the result. OK, here's in reversing the order and going, Oh. Which is the objection first is have poor English skills. You can still learn to speak Spanish in 20 days. All right, I hope that helps you guys. This is the right formula, results, the results that your audience wants and the objections that they might have. In the time frame. All right. So if you started with your headline and you're doing good, but you can't write the rest, I suspect then you're a salesperson that tells, Ah, the take away the meat of what it is that you're trying to talk about. So this is where I usually I'm strong, like this looks like how tos step by step. Here's the big inside the key idea. Here's a framework I want to share with you or some prompt that's going to help you think about your life or work differently. OK, so the way we look at this as heads, it's all the sizzle and tails is the steak and you have to have both won drives, emotion and the other drives logic. A lot of times people share with me carousels, and the reason why I decided to do a workshop on this is because I've been giving so much coaching advice online to people on Instagram or sending me carousels that I realize certain patterns are emerging. Some people are very good at creating a lot of sizzle, a lot of hype. And then at the end of it, it's not satisfying to me because they've not given me anything at all. Some people. A very detail oriented. They do a lot of research and they give me all stake, but there's nothing to hook me in and I don't want to read all this information. And the other problem is too, it's like it's easy to do research. It's easy to copy and then paste. But it's not easy to distill it into bit-sized pieces of information, which really demonstrate that you understand something. People either know how to write their own way, which is usually really bad, or they know how to copy paste and they can't change anything or adapt it. Therefore, it is borderline plagiarism if you don't give credit. All right. There's one last little thing I want to share with you before we jump into writing a quick air recap the Ida formula. OK, you guys remember this as far as I know, it's first developed by Elia St Elmo Louis. OK and it's mapped out. Exactly It's 10 frames there. The Ida formula. OK, so a is where you get the attention. This the headline if you don't have them here, they will not look at anything else. You have to grab their attention. So use the rot or rot formula here. And then eyes for interest. So you have to have to build up like keep driving me past every single slide because I have to. I have to keep digging deeper and sliding into your carousel. Otherwise I'm going to lose you. I think David thewlis told me this before. Maybe it's not technical, but you've got to get past the third or so frame because the algorithm looks like, oh, you lost people. So eventually the algorithm learns that maybe you didn't do a good job and they're not going to start. Keep sending this out to people. So you've got to get him to slide four. This is a valuable lesson that I learned because I was frontloading all the information, therefore not creating a very compelling reason why people should get to the end. So this is why we have the parts, the detail now in the eye to formula it says desire. We create desire in the mind of the audience, but this is where usually I provide the detail. Now you have to really tell me, you hooked me, you baited me all the way in. You better give me something meaningful here, or I'm not going to be happy with you. And if you do this too many times without giving me anything meaningful, I'm going to unfollow you. And the last one is to call to action now, this is usually for advertising, for marketing. You don't have to have a call to action, but in case you do, I'm going to suggest that you ask for one call to action. A lot of the people who submit carousels to me, they ask them to save this to, to send it to, to make a comment, to love this and to hit notifications and then to also buy their e-book. This is 17 things to do on one slide, and it's way, way too much. And you can see it right away. And I hope this is not disrespectful to anybody, like when I go to Taiwan and I go into the electronics mall, it's signage everywhere. It's just overwhelming. And that's what it feels like right now, so go the Apple route, just say one thing, one call to action, ok? Now, some of my tips for writing as they relate to carousels, you must have that explosive moment and this directly ties into the workshop. We had just done 161 and one sixty, I believe. You have to have that if you don't have that. It's game over. A big moment. OK, the next tip I'm going to give you is boil it, which is to reduce everything down to get rid of all unnecessary words. And it turns out there's a lot of unnecessary words and you don't have to write perfect English. It has to be somewhat grammatically correct and intentional. But boil it down to the fewest number of words and image swaps is that if it's a complicated idea and an image serves it better, take the time to make an image, a diagram, a chart, something like that. An image, as they say, is worth a thousand words. So this is how you can get around the limitation of a complex idea without killing the person. We're not on Instagram to read a book. It has to be fun. It has to flow. So this is another term that it's described from Neville, from a writer he admires a lot. It's called the slippery slide. That's how it should feel like you just flow from slide one to slide 10. And it's like, wow, that's really good. So that ending has to be there. Otherwise you're going to laugh, be left empty. Ok? and another great thing to do is just to focus on this, which is, is it something new? Is it novel? Is it going to be helpful to the person looking at this if it's not? Keep working on it. So I'm going to show you an example. Remember this thing about fake it till you make it? I'm going to tell you literally how I took this tweet and turned it into Carousel post that performed really well for me. OK, now here's the interesting thing you see there are 66 comments on this tweet, and I like to use my internet friends and some of my frenemies to help me write. They'll bring research, they'll bring opposing points of view. They'll add dimension to it, and then Lo and behold, it becomes a full on carousel. So if you look at the characters on this, there's not enough content here for a 10 slide carousel post, so I need more. So here's how I decided to break it up. Just by putting that word fake, just big and bold. It's enough to create interest, I think, because it's also accusatory, it's got an aggressive tone to it and it might be something that people are thinking about. And then I find three other ways to say the same thing. Fraud, impostor, cheat. And I start to think about what people think about or the voice that you talk to yourself in your internal voice. All right, now, here's the really cool part. I explain it in the next three slides, from slides 5 to seven. I just explained the concept. OK and the really cool part is Blaire ends drops in this quote from writer. I kind of forget his name now. I'm spacing on it. Well, whatever he is, he co-wrote this for me because of his response to my tweet, and I love that. And then Blair says, you know, you have to be able to commit before you're confident. That's the secret. And so he's referencing two of the slides here, so he helped to write this unknowingly. Is it Dan sullivan? It's Dan Sullivan. Thank you very much. Thank you. OK, so here we go. We're going to jump into an exercise part now. So you guys got this, see the formula. Find something that works. Crowdsource the writing for you, because people give you really great comments and feedback, or they'll drop a quote and it's a quote you might not be aware of, and so then you're able to like, oh, you guys and do my research for me? Thank you. And of course, I already knew this is going to work. It worked in the video form. It worked in the tweet form. It doesn't always work, but there's a high probability of success here, and I'm a real big believer, increase the pleasure and decrease the pain. So you don't want to spend all this time writing and researching and then to find out it doesn't work and nobody cares or too few people care about it. All right, so here's the exercise for us today. OK, we're going to jump into text editor and you're going to write to carousel ideas right now. And then we're going to share and then we're going to get feedback now. I'm going to ask you guys something. Do you want to go into breakout rooms and work or you just want to work as a large group and we'll just work silently? OK, now this next screen, you need to do a screen capture this, all right. If you're going to do this together or separately later on, I want you to just go through this checklist. OK, you're going to get a ticket. If you don't do this, you need to grab the attention. Remember, it's one idea per slide, and it has to have this nice flow from slide to slide. If it's too heavy on one slide, redistribute the information and spread it out so that it's just nice and even. OK and make sure that there's a satisfying conclusion. So this is your checklist. If you if you don't do these things, there's a good chance that's not going to work. So I'm going to break out of this. And you guys are going to start writing. Is that ok? That the majority said large group out of the four people that recommended, but they said silence, which I think is like, don't talk about road mikes, you know, no road mics will just work in silence. I know exactly when 9 o'clock is, so you don't have to put a timer. OK, perfect. Putting a timer anyways. Can I ask you a question? Yes so do you have a suggestion on how long the title should be that first slide, because some of those examples were pretty long? Yeah the shortest title is possible, so I think three to eight words maximum. And I want to do something here. I'm going to show you, Mo, you are you doing the music again? Who's that? No music this time. Who's doing that? I don't know. You'll figure it out. No music this time. All right. I'm going to show you guys my. My writing for Instagram. OK as soon as I can find it. OK, here we go. And I'm going to say this caveat, David, you're not allowed to look at this because you'll get to the post before I do and I'll be God fricking David. He's so fast. He's so fast. All right. It's a verbal NDA. Yeah, signed over, you guys. All right now. OK I'm doing this. It's like me showing you my underwear right now. OK so this is my Ig post ideas, ok? And I just keep a paper doc. You guys can use Notion or Trello. It doesn't really matter. And I'm going to show you how it looks like, OK, these things I pulled from the internet. Somebody had shared something OK. A meme somewhere, I found, so this is kind of relevant to what we've been talking about. And this is not original writing. I want to share these ideas. This was I saw somebody post this on my Facebook feed and it looked like a mural on a building. It says we will not go back to normal. I love that. That's the right, the right amount of words for a headline. And then I started to break it out, so this would be my 10 slides. Normal never was. Our pre coronavirus existence was not normal. Other than that, we normalize greed, inequity, exhaustion, depletion, extraction. We should not long to return my friends. We were being given the opportunity to stitch a new garment, one that fits all of humanity and nature. And that's by Sonya Renee Taylor, and I love that. So that's one that I'm just going to make. So people are asking me like, hey, Chris, you haven't posted a long time on Instagram in terms of your own post, you've been doing a lot of guest post. That's true because I have this back catalogue, and when I feel like it, I'll jump back into it. OK, so this is about the length of headlines here. So I'm just going back into my own content, like fonts are like friends and then figuring out how to expand it to 10 slides. I like your at the bottom. That's kind of a lead in for us to want. Like, you were talking to us about earlier that. Don't know if. So, Chris, quick question, Yes. Do you see yourself like a certain amount of time during the week to do this and you create maybe two or three at a time? OK, let's do real talk. I'm going to stop the share here. All right. I was telling Mo this yesterday, I'm getting lazier and lazier as I'm getting older and older. I want to do the least amount of work. And I was telling Mo I used to really care about Instagram and growing it because I was chasing L ls, part of our company. He's chasing her, she's running our future Instagram account, and I was just tired of trailing her. In my mind, this is unacceptable. Somebody was like half my age kicking my butt. I'm not going to accept it. So with a little help from David thewlis, I was like, I'm going to just do this, I'm going to grind it out. And I spent over a month and a half just doing carousels three to four posts a day. It was insane. This was my entire life. And anybody that knows me knows I'm super competitive. Ask my children, ask my wife they hate it. I play to win, or I just get out of town. That's it. After doing this for a while, I kind of got caught up in this like, Oh my god, now I have to keep doing this and it's never going to end. But this is not my business. My business is making courses, it's teaching and coaching and helping others. Yeah, I'm helping others in a way here, but it's not exactly what I want to do all the time. So recently, I've come to this conclusion. I got I'm going to stop caring and see what happens. So I used to get all manner of shape, like, am I going to posted this and only 4,500 people liked it or, oh, I'm getting 35 new followers just sucks. Life is terrible. Oh, only 10% or 3% new audience. Oh, well, I'm going to do. And I didn't like that feeling at all. And that's why I put out that post. Like, it's OK. To post something just for you. That chasing the comments. I think it's like called Cloud chasing or something like that. The young people call it that. It's like, that's what I was doing and it was just making me miserable. So now I post, sometimes I don't post and sometimes I'll respond, and sometimes I don't. And I feel so liberated. This is a prison designed by me for me to hold me back, and it was just so freeing just to post and like, say to yourself, I don't give a flying F if anybody looks at and I just don't even care anymore. And it was just like, oh, I got a little bit of my life back, I want to tell you. So, yeah, so how much time do I dedicate to writing and posting a day? A zero time whenever I feel like I write something? And right now, if you've been following me on Instagram, I write nothing. Basically, they're all submitted guest posts. And that is working itself. Because I get so many crappy posts, I have to tell them, you have grammatical errors. This doesn't make sense. This is too complicated. You're you're trying to say too much here. And that's what kind of prompted me to start thinking about how to help others just like you in a workshop, be kind of format because that's all I'm doing. I'm just advising people how to make better carousels now. So you're probably not that place where people are going to just submit like, really great content for you to post and share, but it's just a way to think about this. So if it's important to you, if it's a goal that you want to have put you, put a timeline, put a finite goal and then get there and then ask yourself what you want to do next when you get there. OK Chris, there are some other hands, but pre 400,000. Chris Chris told us that his first ones took between six to eight hours to do just to give you a baseline so you don't beat yourself up. And then the more he got his hands dirty and the more he made, he was flipping them between 20 minutes to an hour. And Dave towels will tell you to like, parameter yourself within an hour and post whatever you make in that hour. So in addition to him now having guests and whatnot in the beginning, just so you know what it takes. Yeah, I want to explain yourself. Yeah, I expand on that. The reason why I'm sharing with you, what I'm sharing right now. And the reason why I keep talking about this is because even if this is your first post, it doesn't have to take you six to eight hours, ok? Because a lot of it was just me trying to learn like, I have these decks and I usually talk with my slides and the number one mistake I made in the beginning was to put too much into one carousel. So if you follow the guidelines that I'm giving you right now to keep it flowing, not too much, it's just one big idea, one idea per slide, you'll do really well. Now top 10 things are great, but that will take up all your 10 slides and you have no room for a headline or anything. So top eight top eight things top five things five tips that it's going to change your life, or five things you need to do, or five traits of very successful people. Those things work really well. Listicles, it sounds terrible listicles, it sounds like something else. OK, next question, I have two more minutes here. David, I'm going to pass you for a second. Is that ok? I don't know. OK, thank you. Priscilla and then Amy. OK, Priscilla, go fast. My question is about and I just put in the chat resharing people's posts on your feed like good bad. Pros cons because I see some people, they will share some posts in the theme of what they're doing and then they get followers from them, and it's a lot less time spent creating anything. Yeah so I'm going to tell you, from my point of view, I don't love rideshares. If you're going to reshare, I prefer that you don't alter it. This is what people do. They reshare, they make it uglier and they change the images and then they insert a grammatical error in there. It's like, what are you doing? I don't like that at all. The reason why they changed the design is because they want to hide their sources, so they strip out all the credit. They don't even know who the original author is. They're just regurgitating something. So if you're going to reshare, we share wholeheartedly the entire thing mentioned credit tag. But here's the problem with resharing. Then you just become a reshare artist. And I think I want to encourage you guys to find your voice to create expertise and then attract people to you. And once in a while, I think it's great to do, especially if something that you truly believe in that somebody said really well that you can't do better. We'll don't change it. Just take it. Ask them, do you mind if I reshare this and then share it? All right, one last question I'm already late. So who's the next one, mo? Amy? Amy, go ahead. Amy Lin. Correct unless her hand was up from last time, you know, she lowered her hands. You're good, you're good. No, I lowered it for her. I was like, oh, you lowered it. OK? OK, so you guys, I'm going to bounce, you guys can continue this conversation next week, we're going to take what you've written hopefully is really good, and we're going to start to design and make something, and I'm going to show you how my mind works and pairing up images with words, ok? It's a little secret sauce there, so we'll be back for part two. That's it for me. You guys can hang out, but I'm going to bounce. All right. OK by everybody, by Chris. Thank you. Thank you. May be the Instagram doctor has generously said that he will stay, answer questions, look over things. So Dave, I will help you moderate. But it's your show, brother. Thank you very much. I'd love to help you guys to create killer carousels and what I raised my hand when Chris was saying that you should get through like the third or fourth slide, as that was something that I told him. And unfortunately, that's not based on scientific data. But I just read a whole book about copywriting from one of the best copywriter like this weekend. It was like 12 hours. I just read it in one sitting. And what he says is if you imagine a print ad that has like images and headlines and whatever the whole point of these elements is to get people to read the headline. And the whole point of the headline is to get people to read the first sentence. And then the whole point of the first sentence is to get people through the second sentence and then to read the third sentence. So and I was thinking to myself like, wow, this is really good for Instagram carousels, because the whole point of the first slide is to get people to read the second slide. And then the whole point of the second slide is to get people to read the third slide. And if you lose them before the third slide, they're just not going to come back. That's why it's really difficult or it's really important not to frontload your carousels with really heavy stuff. And in the book, he shares that if people read 25% of your advertisement, whether it's in print, it's a sales letter, then they are really likely to read the whole thing and it's on carousels. The 25% is the third slide. So yes, it's sugar man's copywriting handbook. Thanks thanks, Moe. So that's just something that I wanted to add. That's why it's really important to keep it really, really light and easy in the first of the first few slides. Then you get a lot of commitment from them and then you can keep rolling with it. So I don't know how to do this critique right now. If someone has written like 10 things, maybe they could put it in the chat. So then I can give my two cents. It's probably the easiest and only had a question. Annalee had a question and then if you can just raise your digital hand, if you want to be critiqued or if you have a question for David regarding what you're writing and working on. Yeah, I have a question. I wonder how if you can look at the result of Instagram post with the really good design and then posts that are just a copy without any no pictures at all because people do both. Can you? Can you? But like, what is the difference between the two? Or if you don't use pictures? Yeah, exactly. Like can you see like I looked at Melinda's, for example, her catalog posts were no design at all, and I think I know why, because she more wants to position herself as a strategist. And I do too. And I know that could be a really easy clickbait to have a picture that really captures people. You know that. Lipstick mouse that Chris had or, you know, things like that, but it's like it's not me. And I don't want to do it so. Do you have any reflections about that copy versus more design? Yes, definitely. The way I feel about it is, and I told this, I'm just going to let you guys in on a little secret. We work together with Melinda on those posts. So she made it and I critiqued and gave her feedback. And one of the things that I told her and that really helped her to like it really clicked in her brain is that you should think of the imagery that you have on your slides as the images you would put up if you were speaking on a Ted Talk. Learn the words that you put on the slides should be the words that you would be saying if you were saying the Ted Talk. So if you were just if you just wanted to say like a one, if you just wanted to tell your story. And I think she had like gifts on her Instagram post that maybe her she would have like two slides of those two gifts. And then the rest of it is something that she would say. So, so that is how I try to whenever I have something that I want to like visually show triangles, funnels, rectangles, whatever. I try to use that and I always focus on delivering information with the visuals. And then the copy is, is what I would say. And what is like the voiceover basically, OK. It just really quick follow up on that because I just felt like, you know, I don't have so much time, but I still want to start doing it. And one option is to do it myself. And I'm not a designer, so that will be more that Melinda's style. The other thing is to actually hire somebody that is really good at design. Then I can do more like you do or Chris or, you know, somebody else. So it's like, do you have any advice around that? Because I want to have followers and I want to create really good content because otherwise I could do something else. And so what's your thought about that? What I would recommend is to just like images are important on the first slide when it's seen on the feed. And if you can combine the right image with the right text, and I believe that Chris will talk a lot about that next week. Like sometimes like the way I create my carousels is I just make the 10 slides. I just write everything down that I want. And then at the end, I figure out, OK, how can I design the first slide? And I sometimes I find an image, sometimes I don't. I rarely use images now because it's a lot of time to find those typekit images, and I don't know how much they help. If you want to hire someone, I recommend not hiring a graphic designer. What I recommend is to hire a presentation designer, because presentation designers can help you to design slides that can convey the message. They understand storytelling. They understand a lot of stuff. Obviously, that's going to be a little bit more expensive, but we are doing presentation design here. This is not just the social media post or a banner or something. It doesn't have to look beautiful. The whole point is to get it. Read how you do it. I don't care. Excellent OK. We have to look kind of good, right? Kind of the right look at me. They look terrible. Oh, I look up all the names that you see. Yes and they have millions of likes. I'm like, really? I'm a huge fan of like kitschy kind of art and that sort of thing, just like really tacky looking. That's what I love about. I think it's so funny. Like, I actually save a lot of the worst stuff, not even just me, but like bad art. Like, as a cartoon, I don't know. I would have to send it. I it's hard to explain. They call it curse on Reddit. Like cursed images. I haven't. I haven't read those I haven't seen, but it's like a. Yeah, no, I've tried to talk about emojis. I started writing an article about how emojis and memes have sort of replaced actual language. It's like a visual language that people understand, like all over the world. So that's what's cool to me. But if it's OK with everybody, I'm arenas, I'm arenas back in because there's some hands. Sorry, David wants to get some critique, but Yes. Gif game needs to be strong in your emoji. Game needs to be strong, too. OK Abhishek and Reggie, then Misty. And please raise your hand if you want to be critiqued like David, don't you charge for this kind of coaching, bro? So you guys are getting like I do. I charge 400 bucks an hour before this call. just them off. I just jumped off a coaching call right before this cool 500 bucks an hour. So use this time, guys, use this time. Take take your time for his generosity, you know? Oh, shows, so like I have three things like. First of all, like I've written a piece like a 10 pointer for my next proposal or something. This can be something posted on Instagram, or on LinkedIn. So I'm trying to copy whatever should I posted here in the chat? OK yeah, I just a chat so everybody can see and then I can go through it. Can you share your screen? Oh, OK, perfect, perfect. This is this is what I've written right now. So this is around accessibility like. Oh, so on the eighth slide, you have five points, correct? Right? OK. So I'm just going to read this out loud. OK, so first night is your website is not 100% ready. Or three tips to make your website ready for everyone. Those are our alternative to two ideas. Yeah perfect. Not everyone can browse. Browse your website. How can they just read the next slide? 15% of World population have disability of some form, $2.2 billion are visually impaired. 466 million people have hearing disabilities. Wow, that's huge, right? Here's what you can do. Eight tips one. Learn about different sorts of disabilities to read the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines three. Idiots or content next projects as per those guidelines for implement your accessibility strategies as per your new plans. Five keep practicing that might sound or not, take it one step at a time thinking about making a website? Let's talk OK, first. First impression is your title didn't hook me, and maybe it's because I'm not like a web designer or something, but I do have a website. I think that headline can be made a little bit more punchy with things like you're leaving people. You know, without a website or something like that, so you can talk about how people are actually making a huge mistake. You can over exaggerate this thing, like how they're making a huge mistake, not focusing on the visually impaired and things like that. OK Dave, can I hop in just as someone who's deaf blind in the group and say that yes, you could lean into the did you know, because my disabilities are invisible. So you can stand right next to me and you won't know that I have them the same way that you can visit a website as somebody with or without disabilities and be able to navigate or not navigate that space. So maybe it could be. Did one an x? Many people have this type of disability and next slide one an x, many that type of disability. Next slide. They have a hard time with websites for these reasons. Next slide. Here's how you could make it better. I don't know. I don't do carousels yet, but. OK yeah, Thanks a lot. Thanks a lot for that. As for as for the numbers, I don't necessarily like only use those numbers. They're good to support you, the data. What you can do is if you are talking about 15 percent, then have 100 people there and then color 15% of the different color. That's amazing. You can relate 2.2 billion, you could say. I don't know. We have like 8.6 billion right now. So then you have 86 people. Everyone represents 100 million and then you color them separately. So now we are getting into like infographics design. Same thing with how many people have hearing disabilities? So as Chris said, one image is worth a thousand words. You can put the text 504 four or five 6 on the, you know, like under the image as just an explanation, which would be again, your voiceover. So if it was a Ted presentation, you would only have the people there no text. You will only have the people there, like those 10 by 10, you know, 100 figures. And then you would say that 15% have a disability of some form. And then the next night is your vision impaired, et cetera. I think we need to work a little bit on the beginning. Um, because those the first two or three slides, those are the most critical. Right so. I like based on from the two headlines that you just said, I like the three tips to make your website ready for everyone. I think that's a better one. It might be even better to talk about, not how to make it for everyone, but how to not leave people out with disabilities. That's how you can improve it a little bit. And then instead of not everyone can browse your website, you can ask them a question, are you leaving people out of browsing your website? Are you making this huge mistake? Are you making these three big mistakes that everybody makes? OK, that's amazing. Yeah oh, good. Also also the third slide. How could how could they read it? Or I'm not sure about the third site, but what does that mean? How can they just read the next slide? Ok? sure. What did you want to say there on the third slide? So I just wanted to say like the first light is about the subtitle come again. I just thought it was all about like, you know, like just making them a little curious. What do you think? How how can they sort of? No, sorry, not a little curious, but like, you know, asking them with anger or some sort of disappointing emotion, like, how can they? It just be the next life, something like that. Mm-hmm What what I recommend is to think about how would you say this to another person in a conversation? Because when people are reading it, it sounds like you are speaking to them. But if you are using different sentence structure as what somebody would use in speech, then they will feel like that. This is just written, and that's when you start to create a disconnect. So they are reading it, you know, as a person. And it sounds like when you're reading a book, that's somebody is like speaking in your head. So for the third slide here, if you say the first one or the second one is, are you making these big mistakes that leave people out of your website? You third site can be. Let me show you how many people you leave out. Oh, can you start the four or five six, you see, I'm creating the slippery slope and putting on a lot of grease on it, so you have no way of getting out of it. It's like I'm I just brought like two liters of grease and not just put it on your slide. So you're just sliding now. And now four or five 6 is those three things that we talked about. And then the slide is, wow, that's a lot of people. That's huge. Yeah, Wow. That's a lot of people. Right? here are my five best tips on or what was that learning about? Yeah here are five things you should do to make it a better experience. And then slide 7 and 8. You can start using more text from slides one to 6 and 7. Even you have to make it like the swiping speed of a car sample is like one or two seconds. She has to have this really short rhythm of like, yes, yes, yes, I'm swiping, getting the dopamine hits all the time. I'm just swiping through it. I'm glad you dropped the bomb, but at from eight. And to nine, what is it, nine that might. Excuse me. That might sound a lot. Uh, yeah, you could ask them something instead of that might sound a lot. Does it sound like a lot? Oh take it one step at a time. Yeah, try to ask, because even though they cannot directly answer it, it makes people think. OK thinking about making a website, let's talk instead of, let's talk, say, shoot me or message me. And then in the messages, you can start asking them about their problems and you can send them your calendar or schedule a call, and then next thing is have a bunch of new cells, so that's how it goes. Thanks thanks, Dave. That was huge. You're very welcome. So here's the next one. Reggie's next and then Jamie and more questions like if you don't mind. Abhishek, let's give somebody else a chance to ask. And then if we have time with Dave, we can get to your second questions at the end. Is that cool? OK, Yeah. Thanks, man. Reggie, go ahead. All right. I just put it in. I just posted it in here, if that's cool. I feel like I'm going to do a. I feel like this is a new webinar technique for you, Dave. Like, hey. Exactly Yeah. And then at the end, this is a prescription like, OK, this is the course, you need to purchase to get better, right? OK OK, let's see, Reggie. Allow me to talk about it at all. Or do? No, no, no. I like I like the first hand experience. Let's see, OK, how much of the message you actually deliver through? That's the whole point. And at the end, I can ask questions. So cover image wedding photography for introverts. Cover image. I love getting photography, but I'm an introvert. What can I do to be successful? I'm awkward leading to your personality. I don't like to. Oh, these are separate ways. People like separate types of introverts. So, OK, so I'm awkward leading to a personality. I don't like to pose people. The reality is, some people need help and direction to look their best in a photo. Our job is to make people look their best. OK, I'm not confident. You must be confident in your skills and have to community confidence so your client can feel confident and quiet. It's fine to be silent, but explain the silence. Audience submission from story sticker. Audience submission what are these three story stickers here? So I'm using I put a story just earlier today to ask like, hey, introvert photographers, what do you. What's your biggest challenge as a wedding photographer? And I'm going to use that to crowdsource the most popular responses to be the last two. Or like I'll change the order, but just to see if there's something that I miss that people struggle with often. So these audience submissions are the struggles that people send to you. Yeah and then I'm going to do a second point like, you know, how each thing is like, I'm awkward and I put a strategy to overcome that or reason to overcome it. So I'm basically going to use. It's basically it's work in progress. So 7 and 8 are going to have their own things too. I'm just I'm still waiting to see what my opinion is. So, so the whole structure is one story, sticker submission and then explanation. And you do that from number three to eight Bayside. Yeah well, basically three to six are my ideas. And then I didn't seven or eight, but I want to do my highest performing posts have been top lists, so I figure I can use 7 and 8 to crowdsource my audience, to see if I can find something that's useful to put in those too, like letting my audience write part of the post, basically. Mm-hmm And then the nine the is supposed to be an action item checklist to improve based on to eight, but with something that they can just save the post for later, like something to entice them, to save the post for later. And then the call to action. I didn't write it down, but I was going to say, like, what's your biggest challenge as the introvert wedding photographer? OK, call to action. OK, so let me give you a few prompts on how to make this better. Your second slide is too long. I can already tell the copywriters say this that your first sentence, you know, the whole purpose of the first sentence is to get people to read a second sentence. The easiest way to do this is to make a really short sentence. So if it's like three words and you're OK, they just read it. If it's like a 15 words, multiple sentences like put together, it's really difficult to read it. So, so make the first one shorter, you could say. Now banning photography for introverts and then the second leg, the introduction slide is that you asked me here, I answer. And then number three could be. Are you awkward? It's better to ask questions if you're not like screen or you're not sharing the submissions from the stickers, it's better to ask just as a question. So are you awkward leading to a personality? And then I would put the number four as there is a beefy slide, put it, put it to the end, if the order doesn't matter. That put the heavier sides at the end. So then maybe the number four could be the I'm quite it's fine to base line. Or are you quiet? It's OK. Just explain it and then keep the shortest or the shortest ones in the beginning. And then the heavier ones. In the end that make sense. And then call to action can be I'm making a new course for introvert photographers. So sign up here for message me if you want to join or something like that. Just kidding. Yeah, cool. I want to add something before we move on because I think this is an excellent meta exercise that's happening while we're critiquing stuff. Something that Chris told me directly when I'm making calls or setting up calls for the group is I have to send. I send him an outline of what I'm going to be making right. And the first time I sent the outline here was like, I don't get the flow of what's going on, so I want to encourage Reggie or anyone else. Thank you for having the courage to share this publicly. The outline the naive reader should be able to know from beginning to end what the end result is. So without the context of explaining it right now on the call, I don't think David would have gotten as strong the end result. And that's what Chris was telling me. It's like I should read this outline before you even create the deck and know where you're taking me and what the journey is. So that could be like a thought process that we have, especially when we're sharing our ideas in the group because we want that feedback from each other to keep pushing forward whatever your 10 slides are going to look like in outline form in the unit. When we post it, try to do it in a way that when someone reads it, they know the journey you're going to take them on. When you make this carousel or when you make this deck just as a piece of encouragement, they're OK. Anna Lee, is there are there, are there any ladies that have questions? We got a lot, we got a lot of homies, you know? You know, the guys in this little sausages here, it's just know a lot of technical stuff going on. Is there any ladies who wants to talk about things here? Yeah before we move on. Oh, partial. There she goes. OK, perfect. Partially awesome. Sorry, guys. Going to do you want to finish your thought? Or should I just go with a critique? No, no, that. That that was the thought. So the top five must have skills. Teens need to thrive. They may have mastered algebra. How do you pronounce this? I can only pronounce it in high gear algebra. OK, thank you. Black what matters most for their success? Like what one passion self-management, communication, problem solving, collaboration. Want them to have fun while building one of these skills? Join our next creative challenge! OK, perfect. I feel the headline is to too long. I know it's like 10 words, and it's good because they are really simple words. Usually there is this thing that copywriters say, I just accidentally became a copywriter over the weekend, so I'm sorry for that. So what they say is usually using words that like that have two syllables are really easy to read. So if you're using words with three syllables, those are not. Those are getting more and more difficult. So the word choice is good because these are like, really easy to understand words, but we can reduce that. For example, we can just throw from the beginning to the toilet because we don't need like it doesn't add anything. So then we have top five. I think the must have is not must have here. So the top five skills teens need to thrive. So now we just cut out like 30% of it. So as your title gets smaller or like shorter, you can use bigger typeface, which will then which is a bigger pattern interrupt on the newsfeed or on the Explore page. I'm still not sure if this makes it easy for a person to decide whether they want to consume it or not. That is the first decision they make when they read a headline like do I want to read this or do I not want to read this? And it sounds a little vague. So I know. I'm just thinking, do you have any ideas on how to make this a little more specific to the audience you're talking to? Yeah, I mean, it's funny, Chris mentioned, you know, crowdsourcing some ideas and thoughts. So I posted this morning on Facebook asking other people like, what do you feel are relevant skill sets for the team's need? And that's starting to populate some, some thoughts. So relevant was another word that came to mind in terms of headline in terms of a word that might stick out more. But yeah, I have to go back to my thinking chamber for that. Mm-hmm You can think about what kind of teens are them. So or if you're just talking to like all the teens, then your headline is good, but usually and I'm fortunate I don't have a background on use, I don't know how big is your audience that you are, that you are like almost sure that you are going to reach if you post this on Instagram. How big is the following. It's pretty small. It's not big, probably. Yeah yeah, if it is small, then I recommend to go more specific. You can talk to certain types of teams or you can talk to like teens between 14 to 18-year-olds or, you know, whoever this you can think of the creative challenge or the previous customers that you have, and then just try to find some kind of common connection that they have. So then you can start talking more to them. Jim Rohn says this, and I think Chris phrased it multiple times previously, is that if you have small resources, don't try to solve a big problem. And in this case, if you have a small following, then we cannot talk to everybody. We have to go like, you know, more like niche down more and more until you find that sweet spot like, OK, there's 500 people like almost all of them will resonate with this message gets it and someone's asking like, am I talking to their parents or directly to the teens, which for right now, most of the people that I am attracting his followers are parents. You know, teens like, you know, older people or people who are involved in education. So so yeah, I'm not sure exactly how to really navigate that. But right now, I guess it makes sense to really just hit up the parents and speak more to them. How to develop, how to develop the ultimate or the necessary skills in your teens or, you know, like you can say, you can look at it from a different angle, which is like the fear, like don't develop these skills and your teens will die. Maybe that's too much, but you know, you know what I mean? Like, these there are basically three different angles you can look at when you're writing something. The first one is fear. So, you know, something that I just said. The second is the narrative. So if somebody is like famous and then people can relate to, I just on this coaching call that I had it was a guy who was doing a weight loss program for him. Adele is a really good character that people can relate to because she just lost. I don't know how many pounds recently. So if she or if he writes something like how Adele lost 30 pounds and you can too, then that is something that's another angle you can look at in. And then the third one is excitement, which is to bring people towards the pleasure, which is something that you used here, which is to thrive. So you can and I highly recommend this to everybody. The headline is one of the most important parts in the carousel. So don't just stop it like having one headline. You might need to write down 10 different headlines, and then one of them will just tickle your brain in a good sense. And that's how you know, like, OK, I got it. This is the one. Thank you. Other than that, I like the structure a lot, so the first two or three slides, those are good to get people like, yeah, obviously everybody knows the theorem of Pythagoras. But yeah, like what can we do with that? And then third side is good to get them interesting at home. What is what is it that they actually need? And then from 4 to eight, you can give them a good content. And tonight, maybe you can combine 9 to 10 into a big call to action, slide on the 10, so maybe you can have one more slide in the beginning that just teaches them a little more that creates that slippery slope, because if you can say something that you have four or five, you have five slides that are like the value from four to eight, if you can pushed them to 5 to 9 and have three light slides in the beginning instead of two. That's just how do you? It's a more slippery slope. OK that's what we need to create somehow. Is it slippy year or is it slipper? I don't know. Like, what is it? It's like slippy. What's the slipper slipper slipper slur? We're going to leave that alone, slipperier, slipperier, slipperier. Damn, that's hard, Yeah. Does it make it slippery? It's more slippery. Sheesh OK, cool. Well, thank you. There are a lot of answers up. Yeah, a lot of hands. I'm going to go. I'm a I'm going to go against the Zoom and have another lady since we had two guys. So Shelly. Mm-hmm Thanks I'll just post my thing here. So I haven't got very much here, but I guess I was asking a question first. This this is I'm thinking of a client that I have who is for wood construction, basically. And so I was thinking if the number one would be to two choices, I guess the first question is, is it better to have something that sounds like is what dangerous? Maybe sounds more catchy. But I was wondering if I should start on a negative note like that and get them to read it. Compared to is wood safe? Maybe as a more positive thing. It doesn't sound as compelling. And then my second question is, if these are the three things if two, 3 and 4 are the slides that are asking a question, should I answer them after like in five, 6 and seven? Or or should I ask the question and answer it, ask the question and answer it? So I'd have more like great questions. I love it. Yeah OK, so the first part or the first question you ask is like, is it better to attack it from a fearful angle like away from fear? Or is it better to go towards the pleasure which is in this case, is a danger or fear? Which one is or danger a sort of safe? Which one is better to go with? I personally like to go with the positive, and this is what this gentleman I think his name is, Joe Sugarman wrote in his book. It's usually always better to start with towards pleasure. Like if I ask you, like, is your house safe, then you like in your mind, you still think about how it can be dangerous. So you but but you say like you, you make a little more positive like and then people can decide like, yeah, it may be safe. And also, I just like how Joanna pointed out that don't use that more than two syllables. This this is really good. Really good. Joanna is a really good student here. When you say dangerous, that's three syllables, right? Safe Yeah. I'm not a grammar professor here. I don't know if it's the one or two. It's a whole. Just one. It's one. Yeah, OK. In Hungarian, we have, we use, make syllables based on the vowels. So I see two vowels here. So that's why I got messed up a little bit. But yeah, so that is one syllable dangerous is 3. So is what's safe is that's easier to read. You can put in a magic word, which is. So is your food safe? that just, you know, it has a different effect on people. So that's probably the one that I would go with. And if you want to still communicate or still appeal to the fear part, then you can put in an image that has wood burning or something like that. Or you can put in an image that has a safety. I don't know if wooden house or something. Yeah so those are the two ways that you can play with these things. So I just recommend to try to stay positive as much as you can. OK the second part or the second question that you had, would you like to ask a follow up for this first one or shall we move on? No, I think that makes sense. Yeah, Yeah. OK, perfect. Thank you. So the second part is, should you ask the questions first and then answer them one by one? Or should you alternate? I believe alternating makes a little bit more sense on, especially on Instagram, because then it gives a little rhythm to the post and rhythm. It's, you know, it is like music that if you say like bullet burn and then you can answer it and then get it right, then you can answer it on like slides. So that would be it's usually good to have four questions because then four questions and four answers is 8 slides plus the headline, plus the closing slide. That's a perfect harmony. So you just have to figure out the fourth question that you can put in there. I usually just like to make things up to make sure that it's the 10th time. That's that's how you think of something else. Yeah, Yeah. So and as for the structure, it's the same thing as I, as I told Reggie is to the shortest answers should go in the beginning, if you don't have a sequence that you need to bring people through. OK that's what I would. This is the feedback or the direction that I can give you. OK, Thanks very much. So, David, just to be clear, you're saying give make one slide a question, make the following slide its answer. Yes OK, good deal. Yes OK, man, we got some hands. I just I would like to say that I have a heart out in 15 minutes. OK, Jamie. As I try to keep the high, Jamie, I tried to keep the feedback a little bit shorter, as I see I already see patterns popping up, so then I can just reference. And this is basically my life. I'm just trying to like these are the problems that I'm seeing all the time. So I just really refer to what I said before. So hopefully we can speed it up and I see six five hands. Yeah plus, Jamie, so that's six in 15 minutes. So I try to keep it short. OK manzarek, simple and quick, so, so on Instagram, I'm trying to focus on just designing shirts, and I can only do it to just share with musicians and other clothing brands specifically. Stewart brands what I do, and I kind of do it to wear the like 90% is pictures and octopuses text. So the first picture or the first post on the carousel would be like the actual shirt. And then the second picture would be like, say, it's a panda bear skating on Iceland, and let's go. So first or second post or second picture would be the polar bear. And then it would be like the. Kind of working on design on the left side and kind of have a plus sign and they kind of do some funny mean thing where kind of transitions, how I got to the polar bear and then like the next picture, you submit to where, like I did the sketching for the mountain and they kind of do like a plus sign. Like a funny thing, kind of like, say, like snow or like, look, it's just like that initial the final product. Kind of showing people the how can I give the thought process behind the designs? Yes and I want to do in a way to they know, like the process. And what I do, and they'll be like, OK, like I see super time consuming. Let me hire this guy so you can do some of the Fermi. Would I be a cool way to go about it because I won't do it in an indirect way like this is what I do instead of, hey, you know, hire me, I do cool stuff instead of saying, I want to show it. Yes, I think this is perfect that you brought it up because this is the community who needs to learn how to storytelling with your case studies. There is an account on Instagram that I really like. I'm going to put it in the chat. It's made by James, and he is really good at showing the logos that he makes and then telling the story behind it. And I think that is exactly the same thing that you are thinking about right now. Just keep in mind the story structure. There is a hero who has a problem, but he cannot achieve it because there is an obstacle. And then, you know, through going on the journey, then it finds the resolution. So that is the kind of journey. You want to make. You want to bring people on. We're showing the sketches and just telling the whole story of how you made it. It's really good. So that's a fantastic idea. And I'm not seeing that really often nowadays. So this is something that this group, a bunch of creative people, a bunch of designers, you can get really good at this. And if you do, you will stand out because not many people are doing that. There are some, but if you can do it better than them, you are going to stand out really well. So just give it a try and just try like, you know, putting a lot of reps, as many projects as you have, just tell the whole story. All right. That's it. This was shorts, right, mom? Yep, I'm going to I'm going to bring some Chris Doe energy here. I need you all to get right to the meat. The question hit David with the question, and he will be able to dissect if he needs any more context. OK, so Dom. All right. So I'm just going to post my dyslexia in my structure. I just want to hear your thoughts. And you know, we can critique from it. OK, I might read the whole thing, or we can just go that first one. Can an artist create luck? I think that's good, good for a start. Second slide, too wordy. Why do some artists seem to cruise through their career? What makes them so lucky? If you like these two are similar questions, so what you can do is on the second slide, you can ask, you can say, let me ask you something. And then the third side can be a paradoxical question, which is why is it that some artists seem to cruise through their career while others fail? And then It just it just opens up people's minds. This is again the copywriting principle to use paradoxical questions. And once they buy in to your paradoxical question, this is the moment when they buy into the solution as well. So when I ask you, for example, why is it that some people are this skinny, even though they eat like 3,000 calories a day? What is their secret? And then as soon as you start thinking about it then and I tell you the actual solution, that's when you buy in. So let me go through the post or the whole thing and just going to speed. Read it pretty quick. I love it. I like how you put it as like a whole story of this person, Git. And maybe you can think about how you can make this shorter. I assume that this is just a first draft and the whole magic of writing it happens at the editing. So look at words you can cut out, just as I did with I'm sorry, I forgot names before when we cut out the dirt and the must have Michel. Yes, thank you. Partial partial. Yes so so cut out these words that might not be absolutely necessary, and you might be able to cut it down like maybe 30% to 50% of the words. And also, this is something that you can also do is once you have this post, you can publish it and then you can reorder the slides and you start with this sculpture just as if it was like, like a movie or like a Netflix show, which starts with the digital sculptor. And we don't know why we are talking about him. But then at the end, you'll figure it out like a comic or something. So now you have two posts, so you can just don't post them, like in like in Italy, the same day or next day, give people a few months to forget it and then you can post it again. There was there was a post that I shared, which is like, how top eight or eight ways to help your friends business for free. I shared it once it got like 12,000 likes. I shared it 5 months later. We got 12,000 likes, so. So don't be. Don't be scared of like people. Forget these things. And when one post performs well, you can just repost it. A few, like obviously, there will be a few people who remember it, but the majority won't. So that's good. I like this one a lot. There's a lot of good story in here and a bit of good message. Thank you, David. All right. Roy, welcome rags. Robert, Brett, Amy and then back to Abhishek if we have time. Thanks David, the space suit of a jet. Mm-hmm Oh my God. It's jumbled up smoke. By the way, this is perfect timing. I know it was like everything you're mentioning is copyright related, we need to have a copywriter. I know. I think Trump would be leading. No, no, not well. Workshop will be good. I know at some point, whenever the theme of the month is appropriate, Bret is going to be leading a copyright call of some sort. No doubt just based of it. Yeah, I see it. First thing that pops into my mind is the first slide is too long. I don't know if you guys start to notice the pattern here. Are you rejecting designs? Which client or are you presenting designs, which clients reject? Why not ask them, do clients reject your designs? Sounds with Yep. Maybe, maybe I can cut out like three words from here stop presenting unlimited revisions. You can instead, like stop presenting, you can make it shorter by saying don't present. They're just really, really like tiny game of words here, but they mean a lot. It's not a rock paper scissors game, you know. the rest of it, I like it. I think it has a good flow, obviously what we measure is probably next week after you design it. We will see how well it actually flows. Like sometimes what happens to me is when I write down my ideas, they flow good on paper and when I design it, it's terrible. So just don't be surprised by that. Sometimes it happens. What I want to point out is the last slide here. Ready to present designs which client can't reject if yeah, I assume that's a question. Do you do that as a work? You have other designers. Yep then you make your primary call to action to message you. So then you can get some leads. That is the ultimate point of the whole exercise that are doing here. The best types of leads is somebody who messages you on Instagram, and it's not it's not like common below. The reason I sometimes ask people to comment because I already have too many opinions, I cannot I cannot respond to. So it's better for me to just build the community. But in the beginning, it's much better to ask them to DM you and also like the Save share comment. This is like good. Good to have there, but it might feel a little overwhelming to do so many things. I'd like to just do one major call to action, which is like, that's the biggest, that's the first action I want them to take. And maybe I put in a second one that like, like this here or save it or share it. I usually just ask them to like and share because those two are what helped me grow the most. Gentlemen, are welcome. I had to go so, Robert. Hey, there. Do you I put mine in the chat already. Do you see it there? If you scroll up, it says make the tough decisions. Oh, in a second. How far is it? Oh, I got it, I got it. I got it. So the audience is owners and salespeople for expert firms, and the problem is that they do great work. Their clients know it, but the new prospects don't know it because they have to tell a better story. But also they have to be more differentiated. So that's kind of the context. Mm-hmm OK first things first, your first slide is too long. Just make the tough decisions. Make tough decisions. You can cut out the duh. You don't need it. OK all right. I'm not saying it's like long, but the shorter the better, so if you can make it, whenever I see a way to make it shorter, I say it's long. So, you know, everything is relative. So make tough decisions. I know that adds a little bit. You know, it's debatable if you actually need it or not, you can leave it in there. I wish you guys could experience the music in my head that softly plays while David reads and silence. It is by far the greatest thing, and I'm so upset that I'm not sharing my music with you all, but I just wanted to let you all in on that. The music on Spotify. Oh, Yeah. Oh, you know, the next time I start reading, I'll just let the key to music, it's OK. I like this lot. Good rhythm here. That is something that's important, Robert. So I think that's a good one. Also, another copywriting thing is to get people to keep nodding. So when I first slide says, you deliver value, your competitors can match, the people start nodding. But do your prospects. Now it? I don't know. Most expect expert firms look and sound alike. Yes, they do. And then you just keep nodding. So really, really good job there. And I think there isn't anything that I'd like to really point out here. Let's see next week how this thing comes together, and maybe we'll be able to adjust a few things, but I like it a lot. Thank you. Thanks for call to action. Do you think just because I really don't want a lot of clients or a lot of people, I just want the right ones. So just. Just message me, like, just leave it something simple like that. Yeah or you can if you have, like, a certain call to actions you use that resonates with your ideal client, then you can use that. So it better something simple than like go watch a webinar or download something or whatever, just like just make it short and sweet. Yeah webinars, or, you know, like listening to podcasts and things like that, there's a lot of friction there. So the more friction, the less likely that people are actually going to take action. Ok? the m is the easiest. And once they are in your DMS, once they have slid in your DMS, then you can send them all of the links that you want. And so so that way, like if until you are like small and you're just only working with a few people really easy to to, how do you say this? Qualify them in the dms? So, yeah, the DMs is DMs is where the money at guys, people are not talking about this enough, I believe the DMs and the stories is where's the money at? And the feed is very growth is. Cool Mo, just to clarify, is the assignment for this week just to write it or it's also to start designing it. I'm going out on a limb here because he didn't make it really clear in the presentation, but the outline is going to be today's and this week's objective. And the next week he's going to walk us through how to actually create it in a design format. So the look and feel of the carousel. So all you have to do for this week is basically everything you guys are throwing in the chat. The final version of that in the unit? Mm-hmm Cool Thanks. Yep thanks, David. You're very welcome. Who's next? OK, we got Brett and then Amy. And they're finishing it on the clock, right? We're finishing on the clock. OK, let's go, Amy. Yank you off stage like I do in the breakout rooms. I'm going to just what I mean. OK I don't. Cue the music. I'm just going to start reading now. Of course, it would be one that's not as good. I like this a lot. This is really this is the type of post that is like controversial. So it's like a blunt statement in the front like, I don't like yellow and then you, you go through it. I don't think there's anything that I could like really point out. Maybe you can make the end a little heavier that some, you know, some like maybe where you can choose the color or how can you choose the color? But if you don't want to, this is a great post, boom. And it's just like that. You're welcome. OK, Bret and then abhishek, he's waiting so patiently. He's like, I got two more questions. I'm going to get them in there. Rapid fire. Oh, here we go. The power of under thinking, keep the music. Yes I missed the slide numbers, and I believe this is more than 10 lines. I don't know where you want to break the slides, so obviously it has to fit on 10 slides because that's the maximum that you can upload on Instagram. Again, what I would recommend here is to make the second slide shorter, to make it really easy to read. You don't want to lose people on the second or the third slide. So, Bret, that is what I would say. And this seems a little light to me, so it might feel like that. There is not much in it. So again, you can put some moral value at the end. But if the whole point is to be more inspirational than, you know, a bunch of these short and punchy slides, they are really good. That's something that I would recommend is to like. Beginning is easy, as Chris said the interest and then put some details in the end, maybe some tactical tips of how to overcome or how to become more of an Undertaker or things like how to become more detached. You know, like an exercise that someone can do, for example, like next time you do this, then or next time this happens. Here are five tips to think about or five. Five things to do. I don't know that I like I like this thing. Just, you know, without the slide numbers, it's a little difficult to judge how things are structured, but I like the idea and besides the second slide, it has a good flow. OK, thank you. Moving on. OK yeah, that he said, Gotcha. So abhishek, we got back. You have 30 seconds for your two questions. Go ahead. So the first question is about grade ICU more, Chris. You guys don't follow any certain type of grade on Instagram. So but I, as a brand like, we have been following some sort of grade like, you know, posting one type of content. And one line second type of content in second and third. So does that make any sort of sense like to do it in the longer run? And oh, you mean, if you are posting like carousels and videos and single images like how should you combine them? Or which one is like better or worse? Yeah so like what I have been doing is like my one one, my one set of photos, a lot of sort of knowledge typekit results like where I am trying to give some sort of value. The second lane is all about my case study like concept type ideas. It's something like my portfolio, something like our portfolio, and it is something like the court or things which we read somewhere or something super valuable and like, what? What is the source of it like sharing the link of the book along with that? So that is what we are doing right now. So but but I see a lot of people also like, you know, following certain. One example is like Bayesian agency. They are also doing a great job in maintaining certain sites like, you know, lanes. So maintaining these sort of lanes is a good idea. I don't think it matters that much because and the end of the day, for your posts to perform well, they need to perform well one by one. So the good structure of the feed with maybe if you make like a beautiful grid, it doesn't matter that much for your growth. It might matter if you once people get to your profile and then maybe that increases their conversion rates. But in the beginning, I wouldn't necessarily worry about it as again. Like, your posts have to perform well one by one, so they are not that interconnected. It can help for people to find your posts so you can do it if you want to. I don't do it because I don't have that much energy to put into structuring everything. I was like, oh, this is a good idea that's posted on like 30 minutes later, it's out. So that's how I operate. So I'm not like, OK, on Thursday, I'm going to post my case studies. So I don't know you, do you? I don't think that it matters that much. I think many people are just overthinking their grids. I can tell you a lot of examples of people who are using it and growing fast and people who are not using it and growing fast and counterexamples to both. So it doesn't matter. OK sure. And my second question is like, is it going to have more questions now or. No, no, no, he had to. This is the last one he had to. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, yeah, sorry. So my second question question was like in the profile pic, is it important to have a face? Because like right now in our team, we are like, you know, for creators creating content together and putting it on Instagram. So it's kind of like a dispute to someone in the team to put someone else's face on the profile pic. So we have heard that, you know, putting face makes it more makes it more. Yes, it's more traction. But for that sort of like, you know, for people are putting effort for these sort of girls on a regular basis. So yes, that sort of thing. What what I shared, I just I just published a free course. And in that I shared this or I answered this dilemma, which is like, what kind of profile picture should be used? It's really simple. If you're a private account and you are just a person sharing your personal and like family stuff and your dogs, then use a really personal image, you don't have to overthink it. It's not for your business anyways if you are building your personal brand. Use a professional profile picture like your face. If you're building a company brand, then use the company logo. That's it. OK so there is no harm in using the company logo. It's not a product. There is no harm in using the company logo when people are working together for a certain brand itself. Well, if you are like if you can get creative and put four of you on the profit picture, if you want to do that, but like you have to, you have to think about are you building a personal brand or are you building a company brand? OK, I don't. I don't know if there are. I don't think that there are other options that you can build. So is like you are to this or that. And according to that, you just pick your profile picture. Makes sense. Thank you. You're welcome. David, you want to I know. Oh, did you have a question? It's just the shortest question ever. Can you please link the guy that you mentioned on Instagram about the storytelling I buy? Yeah, I can put it in. I don't use sugar man's book. No made it by James. Oh, OK. I think that's his. That's his handle. Yeah good question, David bro. Putting him on everything he does. Thank you and thank you for being here a whole hour critiquing people's work. And I want to give it. I know there's only 24 people left, but before we wrap, I want to give a special congrats to those that made videos and threw them in the post. I know that was maybe for some of you, the first video you've launched, and to rip that Band-Aid off is huge. Keep that encouragement going. Any feedback that we give each other? Let's do it in a way for us to continue to improve and move forward and work. Me and Chris, we're talking. We're going to make this like a regular thing. This is not a challenge. This just going to be left for the call and then we'll never hear about it again. So maybe in two weeks you'll hear like, hey, another video sprint or another carousel sprint. Other than that, the homework is right, your outline. You have some heavy, heavy copywriters and carousel creators in the group that will probably give you their two cents when they're not busy interacting with their ginormous audience. OK but other than that, guys, we will see you next week where we dive into the nitty gritty of actually designing. There are already two keynote calls in the Pro group if you want to get a head start, if you're one of those students, the go getters and also David just launched a free course and I think he's up to almost 3,000 students now in a 24 hour period. So if you want to get more nitty gritty on the Instagram stuff, he's your guy. And you know, that's the course. And there's the master class too, where he gets so deep that if you don't know how to swim, you may drown. But other than that, guys, we'll see all next week. It's all love. Bye bye, everybody. You're very welcome. Thank you, Dave.

RELATED VIDEOS

Office Hours - Video Content Process Overview, with Matthew Encina
Office Hours - Video Content Process Overview, with Matthew Encina
TheFutur
November 22, 2021
How To Create Instagram Carousels Part 2
How To Create Instagram Carousels Part 2
Chris Do
June 24, 2021
Facebook Ads Q&A
Facebook Ads Q&A
Elle Money
June 28, 2021
Office Hours - IG Stories, with Elle Money
Office Hours - IG Stories, with Elle Money
TheFutur
July 12, 2021
How Do You Get Perfect Lighting? And How Do You Find a Coach?
How Do You Get Perfect Lighting? And How Do You Find a Coach?
Chris Do
March 19, 2020
How To Craft Personal Stories
How To Craft Personal Stories
Chris Do
September 12, 2021
thefutur.com
Upgrade your Membership

Join the digital community, find people to work with, jump in the live calls, and more! When you upgrade today, you will immediately get:

Everything you have now
Two monthly live group calls with Chris Do
Weekly Office Hours with experts
Access to the digital community
Exclusive job/project opportunities
Peer accountability partnerships
Everything you have now
$150
/month
Billed every three months
Upgrade For $449

Or get two months free by signing up for the year!