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Lead Generation Tool Workshop Part 1

#
157
Chris Do
Published
May 15, 2021

Chris Do hosts a workshop with the pro group for developing a sales funnel and lead generation tool.

Read Transcript
Welcome back. We're going to jump right into this, we're not going to sit here and beat around the bush because we have a lot of work to do. Today's call might go 90 minutes, maybe a little bit longer. So I'm hoping that most of you guys can stick around. I think we have some work to do. This is your request. And I also want to tell you that if you weren't here last week, we talked about why we're doing things a little bit different than we're structuring our calls. So there's going to be some margin for error, some room for learning, and that makes me super happy. I'm comfortable in this little dangerous pocket that we live in. So we're going to have three moments when you guys are going to go to work, two of which you'll do in small groups and one will do in one really large group, ok? And I've made through people my co-host today and Lee returning as our champion from last week as well as Mo. And I think I heard Rodrigo say he wanted to co-host with us, just help me keep things going. And if you're new to the group, please just mute your microphone for the part for this part, and if you want to say something, I encourage that. Just unmute yourself and then talk to me. And we're good with that. Another way to do this is to go ahead and drop it in the chat and tag one of our moderators. Tag, one of our co facilitators, Anna Lee, Mo and Rodrigo, and they'll make sure to flag the questions that are most relevant for the Q&A part. OK that's another way to participate with us. Having said that, Alex will begin to edit right here. So this is called number if I'm doing my math correctly. One five seven this is the lead generation sales workshop. You see a little different design here. Got a little busy, ok? And a lot of the things that are going to be talking about today come from me just learning in real time with you. The workshop survival guide, which I read recently by Rob Fitzpatrick and Devon hunt. They're going to be guests on the show or at least one of them who's going to be on the live stream. Let me know later on. If you guys want to be a part of that, I can bring you in the Zoom call, for sure. All right. And we're going to apply what we've learned. So I'm going to begin with telling you what the learning outcome for today is. So this will allow you to stay focused or not. And if you leave, I won't feel bad at all. If this is not for you. If you don't want to design a sales funnel lead generation tool to help your business grow and generate leads. You can leave at any time. OK I suspect nobody's leaving, I hope. We have to have some constraints with this because I think in the past we've gotten really ambitious with what it is that we want to do and then people wind up not doing anything at all. So the constraints for you specifically is to be able to complete this whatever it is that we come up with in one week. That means one week from today, midnight Wednesday or Tuesday morning, whatever time that is, midnight Tuesday is when you have to have whatever it is that we're going to do together in this workshop. Done you have to make it OK. That means you have to work within the restraints of what you know, how to do with the network that you have and the tools and resources that are available at your disposal. And that's it. OK, so from last week, a quick recap what did we do because this is a continuation from last week? If you missed it, no worries. I got your back. Ok? we came up with a bunch of things that we need to do to come up with a survival plan to get through the economic hardship that so many of us are going through in the three most voted on. Things are in front of you here, but we're just going to focus on this one right here, which is what's the best lead generation tactic to focus on. You would think I could come in here with a very universal answer and tell you, here it is. Here's my best lead generation technique or tactic, but that wouldn't help you because we're all in different circumstances. We want different goals. We have different bandwidth for work and time. So it's going to be a very individual thing that we're going to do. And from last week, you guys remember KSW, which is it a knowledge thing that we're trying to share? Is it a skill or is it a wisdom thing or helping people make decisions? And so when you want to teach someone we had like a knowledge base and then you use a lecture, and if you want to teach them a skill, they've got to do it and they've got to do it, get their hands dirty. And for wisdom, you have to give them a scenario to challenge them, to get them to think like, what's most valuable to me? What would I do in a situation like this? So I'm going to do a little bit of this today. So the agenda is as follows. There's four parts to this. What we're going to ask you to do is to in small groups, what has worked on you. I posted this question on Twitter. And people kept answering it incorrectly. There I'm a poor writer or they're just poor readers because they keep telling me about what they've done. That's worked, but I'm asking you to ask yourself to get introspective. What has been applied to you? That's gotten you to take action to sign up for an email, to download a PDF, to watch a video to click, hit and subscribe to purchase something to investigate deeper. Now those of you guys that did the homework, the flip it and reverse it exercise. You're well prepared. So you're ahead of the game already. But don't fret anybody that's jumping in if this is your very first call ever. Don't do not worry. We'll take care of you. OK, and then you have to ask yourself, why did this work on me? And this is where some of the wisdom and skill development is going to happen. You have to stop and think, and we're going to help you through this. I'm not going to just throw you in a pit and tell you to figure it out, and then you're going to develop your own appeal. What plan of action? That's what I was thinking about. Plan of action was late last night. Sorry, you're going to develop your own plan of action, and that was one of their requests that annually helped to surface for me that a lot of people, they need literally step by step instructions. So they can get it done. We're going to do that and you're going to do it. And the last part is, if we have time, we'll do some Q&A. OK, so we're in to apply the things I've learned and some of you have learned as well, and we're going to workshop this whole thing. So here's part one, part one. Here's your prompt. In the last 30 to 90 days, what sales technique has worked on you? What triggers you to take action? The action part is critical, and when I say action, I don't mean to buy just what caused you to click, what causes you to go to the website? What causes you to stop the infinite scroll and take note? To do something if you took action, then it would count, so I just want you to think back if you need to close your eyes. Just think back like what's worked online in person? Did somebody knock at your door? Did somebody call you on your phone? Did somebody DM you on social media? Something has happened. And Mona, I got into this conversation. He said, Chris, I don't buy lots of things like now you buy things all the time. My friend, you just don't know it. You're being influenced all the time. And I'll show you and I'll prove it to you in a little bit. OK, so if you need to screen capture this because this is your prompt, and I hope the prompt is clear, and if it's not, please ask me in the last 30 to 90 days what sales technique has worked on you, not for you, but on you that some external person entity company brand did to you that made you take action. OK just remember that. So there are little steps here. Where do it like this? And nobody's going to panic because it doesn't look like a lot of time. It's on purpose. Relax it'll be all right. So here's the small group exercise. You're going to select one person in the group immediately to be the time monitor. This is super critical somebody who has an iPhone or a smartphone or some timing device where they're going to say, OK, everybody in 10 seconds, it's over 1 minute mark and now time's up. Now we're going to move on. I need somebody to be the timekeeper. And if you don't mind timekeeper, you're going to do this for as many breakout sessions as we have. I think this might help us. Ok? each group needs to be self-sufficient and to regulate their own time. You're going to do two minutes, two minutes of silent work. So when we break away, you're going to just sit there and nobody's going to talk to anybody except to select your time monitor. And the time monitor is going to say go and you sit there and think and write down any loose ideas, fragments, whatever it is you have. OK And then when the two minutes are up, time monitor is going to say, stop everybody. All right, let's share. To have 1 minute each, you have 60 seconds on the clock. Now, if you don't have an idea, don't worry. What we're going to do is we're going to ask everybody that is in one of these breakout groups who did the homework to start first so they could set the tempo and they can talk about what has worked on them. And then you guys can discuss it and you're going to go around the room. So we have 66 participants. I think groups of four might make the most sense. OK, so we're going to have how many rooms is that 15? A little bit more than 15 rooms. So you're going to need two minutes to do silent work 1 minute each and reflect on I'll give you a little slop time, but make sure everybody goes at the 60 second mark boom times up next person. Go do not disrespect somebody else by taking up all the time. OK, then we're going to return and we're going to reflect. I'm just going to call a few random people to share something that they thought worked. All right. That's it. So I'm going to stop sharing here. Any questions? Any questions so far, everybody. I love it. When there are no questions, it means we're in deep trouble. OK, so I have a question. Yes, go ahead. You want to. So at one point, van invited the question a very great facilitator, and she would let us know the time during the breakout session. Is that possible? So no one has to keep track of when to switch. I don't understand the difference between what you just said and what I just said for everybody suggesting that you send a group message to all the groups with each time marker. Yes only one time monitor for everyone. All right. I'm just going to ask you for the time being. Thank you for asking that question. Just to do it the way I've asked. OK I think this group is going to be very powerful in regulating themselves versus like, hey, uncle said, this is the time you guys can do it. I believe in you. I really do believe in you. And you can do it. OK, I might ping you. But the problem is I'm going to be doing things too. That's the only a real problem. And I'm going to forget, I already know that for sure. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to create fewer rooms than we need because Anna Lee and Mo and Rodrigo, if you choose to participate, fantastic. If you don't, that's totally cool, too. They may be bouncing in and out of your room. So don't worry if there's only three of you, you will have the full time as everybody else, ok? I'm planning on. So let there are four people in each room, so some of you guys will have more than four. So I'm going to create the room right now. Any other questions or suggestions or thoughts? I have a quick question. Go ahead. I'm just a little unclear. Hey, what's up, chris? I'm just a little unclear on the reflect and right. Is that what we're doing for the two minutes? Yes the prompt, Geoffrey. The prompt is of the last 30 to 60 days, I think, 30 to 60. What did I say? Let's look here. Yeah, I need a 90 days. What has what sales technique has worked on you? So it's going to force you to take inventory of whatever you've done in the last three months. And we've been mostly locked down here. So there's a good chance you're a prime prime target for a lot of marketing campaigns because you've never been in front of a computer more than you have. I think because you can't go anywhere, you can't go to the theater, you're in front of computer all the time, so somebody is marketing to you right now. Might even be talking right now, see, somebody is always selling you an idea, I promise you that. And you're buying most of the time. OK, now the thing that I want to do based on what you want, I had just asked previously is I want to create a system that we turbocharge. We empower each and every one of you. Tivo to figure out whatever it is that you need to do with your life. And that would make me so, so happy. We don't need I don't think we don't need other people to tell us what to do. We're very good at solving our own problems. So I'm going to teach you how to do that. So that I make Fisher then out of you all. All right. So that's what I do. OK, so here we go. You guys ready? Everybody ready. OK, so I'm going to start the thing here. I'm open all the rooms and I believe you guys have been sent an invite. I'll see you in there. Six minutes, ish. Assign a timekeeper. Chris, you want us to just go into the room that you assigned us? Well, you could do whatever you want. OK, cool. You can go, you can participate. You could just listen, but you need to let people know. Or you can just hang out here. Bounce right back or whatever it is. OK, OK, I'm going to join the room. OK, OK, we shift room when we join the room? Like you were? Like, if I join one room, do you want me to stay in that room? You could do whatever you want if you're like, this room is good. I want to bounce. You come out. You tell me, put you in a different room. I'll put you in another room. Ok? Yeah. Hi, Chris, I just got here. I'll do. We get into a room. OK, I'm going to sign you to a room. All right. Thank you. When I signed it to room 12. OK all right. There you go. Hello, Angela. Do you need a room? OK, I'm listening to them right now. You room 14. Oh oops! Oh, no, I just canceled all the rooms. What idiot Are multitasking failure failure? OK I'll have to just say the extra time. Pardon me. I didn't catch the prompt of what we're doing because I just joined. OK, so the prompt is as soon as guys, I apologize, everybody is what happens. I'm trying to keep track of time. Angela asked me to drop her in her room. I actually closed all the rooms. I'm going to send you right back into it. This is why men are terrible multitaskers. I'm like trying to control the music here, so I apologize. I'll send you all right back right now. I'm sorry. And then somebody, ok? Angela, stay or stick around for a second so I can explain to you what we're doing. Ok? OK, and then and then you join your room. OK hey, I know what you guys are thinking. What happened? That was fast. It was the fastest 60 minutes I've ever had in my life. OK well, Hello. Hey OK, I'm going to send you guys all right back in one of the rooms. Yo, I hit the wrong button. I hit the wrong button. That's just it. User error. Open all the rooms. Go back to your room. All of you. Sorry how you get a fresh few minutes. I know. There they go. It's such a big red button you feel like you have to push it. OK so, Angela, what room are we going to put you in? Oh, I think I already put you in a room. OK, now, Angela, the prompt is this the prompt is in the last 30 to 90 days. What sales technique has worked on you? What got you to take action? OK, let's worked on you. Not for you, but on you. OK OK. When you're sitting there, money your own business and something popped up on your radar and you're like, that's really interesting. I won't check this out. Yeah, OK. OK, so go to your room. OK all right. What does everybody still do in here? OK you need to be assigned to a room. I'm going to put you into room. 15 there you go. Daniel Brewster, I'm going to assign you to. Room four. There you go. Chris Nathan, we got kicked out of our room. It brought us back to the main session. He did. Yeah what room are you in? Nine OK, so I'll put you, ok? Give me one second. Nathan, I'm going to put you in room six. OK, Linda, you're in room nine. Oh well, what happened was a room nine, everybody got kicked out. Something said, we're returning you to the main session and here I am. OK, well, I'll sign you to room 10. OK and are you here in? That's where because joystick and and Sigona are in room nine right now. So I was the only one that got kicked out. Yeah, because your teammates aren't here, but I can move you to room nine. I'll move you back. Go ahead. There you go. You see it now. It's not yet. Really? well. I was even sharing a screen in that room. It says you're in room nine. Are you sure? Did you check you click on breakout room at the bottom? No well, that's where it would be. You see it now. Florian? Hello. Linda, are you good? Well, Florian, you need to be assigned to a room, right? Are you just joining us? Florian? hi, Yes. OK, so let me just tell you what we're doing today. Yeah, I'm kind of on the way and to walk and not really able to. Oh, OK, that's fine. I'm just listening in the background. Ok? no problem. I don't even need to tell you what to do. I'll just push it in a room. Ok? here we go. I'm going to push you into room. 10 where you got. Hi, Colleen, do you need to put in a room? Now can I put you in a room now? Hi Hi. Should I put you in a room? Yes, I can only. I cannot speak right now because. OK, no wires. You can just listen. OK, I'll put you in a room. Thank you. Yeah I'm going to put you in room 13. OK, thank you. In recording, there we go. All right, all right, so what we want to do right now is we want to have a reflection moment and I don't need you to share your story. I just want you to share the best idea that you heard. So we have different rooms here, and I'm going to just have three people go, so not everybody needs to share. If you heard a really good idea and you'd like to share it if it's your own fantastic, if it's not, doesn't matter. You can just say I heard this great idea, and here's what I thought was really good. And just raise. OK, so I'm going to give it a second there, I see some hands go up already. Before I call anybody. OK, let's go with. OK OK. Really? just all guys, huh? And I was thinking the same thing, all dudes. All right. There are a lot of women on this call. Bunch of jocks. There we go. There we go. OK you know what we're going to do? I'm going to pick Tim first, and then we're going to go with Elena and then I'll pick somebody. Somebody else, ok? Just give me a second. And Ann, there we go. So it'll be Tim, Elena and Ann and Mo. You're helping me keep track of this stuff, right? I got you. I'm juggling a lot of balls here in my eyes on the prize. Yeah OK. OK, so let's go. Tim, unmute yourself. Talk to me. All right. Good morning. So one of the things that we talked about was actually kind of came from me is actually the group I bought into it about a month and a half or two months ago. And it's the subscription fee for it is significantly higher than what I would usually pay for anything on a monthly basis. And it was a long sales funnel for me. At least I found out about the future about probably about six months ago, and it was just through the Instagram video. Then I forgot about it. A couple of months later, I think I found the Hamilton brewery branding series. And so that was really interesting. And then I think for the last two months before I purchased, I was kind of like watching the content like multiple times a week and I was searching like, if I had a business question or something, I would search whatever my question was and I would add the future on it, and usually I would find something that was related to it. And so the big selling points for me is over those months, you guys really built trust and authority in the sense that you guys know what you guys are talking about. I looked up blind and I was like, OK, they're legit. They've actually done work because a lot of people on YouTube or ever talk about something they haven't actually really done or have that much experience in. There was a lot of great information with awesome deliveries, so a lot of the videos were engaging, humorous and kind of like there wasn't too much content, but also not like I didn't feel like she could watch the video or like, oh, I thought I was going to give you an answer for this, and then I didn't. And so when it came time to actually purchase, the first thing was the subscription was addressing. A real time issue that I had is that I'm building out of business and I felt like I needed more support from other business owners and other creatives. And the other thing is that I felt like even though the price tag for me was high. What I would be getting out of it would be more valuable than what I was paying for it. Great so that's been proven exactly right. Well, thank you for sharing with me. Our funnel works, ok? As you can hear, there were a lot of parts and pieces to what Tim said. So let me just break down a few of those and reflect with you, ok? And if somebody can think of a different one or something to add to this, please be my guest and jump in. Just unmute yourself and say relative to what Tim just shared. For him, the $150 for a monthly subscription is a lot, and I agree. It is a lot for me too, because I don't even buy Spotify. I just listen with the commercials. OK, so I get it. It's a lot. Netflix is, what, 15 bucks, 12 bucks. So this is like 10 times the cost of Netflix. All right. We get that. It took six months, so the sales funnel for him took six months and it was mostly organic him just searching for things. He he did not mention an ad. I think he just dove into the content. I didn't see an ad now I see ads. Oh, in. I see we're wasting our money on you. I have to talk to Elle about this. You're already in stop start marketing, Tim. OK, that's fun down here. Same here. Yeah, I get they even marketed to me. It's just like, you guys. You're wasting your money. I'm bought in. I promise you. I'm totally bought in. OK, so Elaina, go ahead. Yeah, hi, Chris. Hi, everybody. So I want to kind of a little bit echo what Tim said, because I noticed in our group that most of the things that people bought in this period of time came from someone they trust. And it wasn't from someone new. So I'm thinking like the trust and expertise from someone is very important thing in making this buying decisions or subscriptions or those kind of things. So Yeah. OK was there something that you bought into recently that you can share with us from your group? So, yeah, I was I subscribed to participate in skill challenge, which is run right now by Martin neumeier, because I was because I took his workshop. Yeah, in the future. And I want to learn more of how he kind of view things, how he viewed branding and. His point of view, it's really interesting for me because it's flipped from, you know, branding being part of marketing. And he's saying like it has to be. I flipped and branding has to come first, so I'm interested in that, and I want to really understand he's thinking and I thought that this challenge would really bring some insights into that. So, Yeah. OK remind me again, what did you pay for the workshop? Approximately I don't remember now it was. It was around 900 around one key, a little bit less because of the discounts. Yeah, right. Would it be safe to assume that you read one of his books before? Oh Yeah. OK, so you write a book? And did you happen to watch the video that we did with him before you decided to buy that ticket? Yes OK, so you're really bought in at this point. Oh Yeah. So Elaine is efficient, already jumped in the boat, so we need another person to share something with us where they're not totally in the boat and something happened. Something interrupted. OK, I see that there's a lot of raised hands here, so let's do this. OK, I want to get to this because I'm hoping to hear more stories. So I'm going to hit Stop. I'm going to ask you guys to tell your story, whatever it is that you observed in terms of the best idea you heard in a minute and a half. Then we can get through more people and then we get to move on. OK, so we said Ann was going to be next. So Ann, you go. The stories that we shared were anything super different from what Alina and Tim Tim just shared, but it was the same thing. It was based on a recommendation from somebody that was close to them. One of the examples zirconia gave was that someone recommended to cash for her, and then she ended up purchasing that product for her agency. But the underlying common factor with everyone that shared something was that there was a need that they had. It was all business related. The recommendations came from people that they trusted or knew. They observed or consumed content around that before deciding to purchase. OK, perfect. Does anybody have a story that they heard that they can just point to one thing? This worked on me. This worked on them. I think it's worth sharing. Missy, did you shave your head? Am I seeing your image correctly, I'm like, what this? No, you know what happened? Oh, there it is. OK, OK. She went extreme. Know somebody my haircut there. I'm like, oh, OK, we're OK. We're fine. She went punk rock. You guys total punk. OK all right. All right. Does somebody have a specific story to share about something that hit them when they weren't looking in like, wow, this was amazing. This was remarkable. OK, I say that to people now. I see Maura and then I see Peter. So more and then Peter. OK, OK, Thanks. So I like very I'm very jaded about ads, so I like him. So like, I see it's sponsored. I'm repulsed immediately. But I was like scrolling through Reddit and I am a part of an entrepreneurship sub. So I read it and I saw a post from somebody that was like, oh, how I went from like 0 dollars to like 300k then like six months with my real estate tech company. And he did this like super detailed step by step guide to exactly how he did discovery on clients, did his marketing email. He showed like screenshots of like evidence that it worked in the very bottom of it, he said. If you want to learn how to do this too, like I started a startup Facebook group, which was his first step of like the lead generator. And I was like, damn, like, you're playing me, but I like it. Like, I respect the game and I it like, I thought that was like, so undeniably valuable that I was like, I'll buy in. Sure so I don't. It's not necessarily a credit card transaction, but giving my email is important to me. So so you join that Facebook group? I did. Yes ok? You took action. Fine look at that. A self-professed person who has an allergic reaction to advertising fell for the oldest ad in the book. OK, let me ask you a question. Want to dive a little deeper once I see something like that, I'm like, ooh, I already know where this is going before I even scroll to the bottom. I already know where you're going with this. What made you keep reading, what made you keep going down? I saw a couple of screenshots of like proof that the results of, you know, and he had like just tons and tons and tons of pages of screenshots in like even of his sales and his the email list he generated. So I was like, OK. I mean, even though obviously he's setting me up like, it seems real. And what made you think that was real? Yeah like linked to the Facebook group that he had done his lead generator And it had like thousands of people on it. And I looked at his website like, I like, kind of investigated him. So I was curious. And all the things he said there. All right. Mark, are you a designer? A web designer. Great, you know, Photoshop, right? Yeah OK. Just asking you because when you guys say it felt real, it's like, what is real? I mean, now they have deep fakes where you can't even tell if it's a real person doing it or not. So it's very interesting. So you looked for some proof. Some evidence in screenshots felt legitimate enough, and you may need to go back and look at those exact screenshots and study them. Why did this one feel real? Because I could post anything. And you said this is very interesting, too. It felt real because he had a link to a Facebook. With thousands of people in it. It's not hard to also create a Facebook group and get 1,000 people in it. You probably already have 1,000 people in your network, so I'm only pointing this out to you to be more self-aware as to how things are working on you, that this may work on other people as well. All right. So I want you to think about that. I'm a schmuck. Ok? no, I'm not. I'm not saying these are triggers. These are triggers that we all respond to, I promise you, because I'm going to break something down, because if you're a schmuck, I'm the world's biggest schmuck because I told Mo, I buy everything. I'm just curious about like, where does this go? Right? and I have a little bit more discretionary income, so it doesn't hurt me so much if it's wrong and I'm wrong a lot of times. So let's just go there. OK, we're not immune to this stuff, and this is what holds our society and our communities together. If you are interested in more of this, read the book influence. I think it's called the power of persuasion by Dr. Cialdini. OK, excellent book. And he's going to talk to you about the things that hold us together that you can use for nefarious goals. All right. Who did I say was after you? Oh, it was Peter. Peter, go ahead. Share something with us, please. All right, cool. So I watch YouTube a lot and I leave it on autoplay while I'm cleaning the house or washing dishes, and this video pops up. At the time, I was watching a lot of travel bloggers, travel youtubers, and I apparently was watching a video from this company called moments. But and they sell lenses, they sell these small lenses for your smartphones. But I didn't even know I was watching one of their videos because they were literally just going around. It was like a vlog, but then they were using their products, and I didn't realize that it was, you know, all of this was content marketing pretty much. And I was like, oh, these guys are pretty cool. And I kept on watching until the third video in. I was like, why do they keep on? Oh, it's their advertising, their products. But then they're going around shooting at really cool places, collaborating with other YouTubers. It just all looked really fun, and I didn't even get a sense that they were trying to market their products until the third video in. So it was felt very genuine. You know, they have the same three people appear on all the videos and they're just having fun drinking coffee, exploring. Did you do something? I did. I bought three lenses from them, and then and then and then I started it, Yeah. And then a gimbal and you know, then do they make gambles? They have won the movie Free fly. Oh, OK, all right. Yeah I think it's a collaboration one. But then that's what really got me into wanting to learn how to do like vlogging through my smartphone because I knew I couldn't afford a DSLR. And then from there, it just led me down the rabbit hole. Got it. It's excellent. OK very interesting. OK when Maura was describing before, it was like straight up one on one marketing. You are talking about stealth marketing where you can't even tell it's an ad it took a little while before you even realized that. So both work the direct like, let me go through the front door or let me climb the back fence and enter in through the back door. They both work. All right. It's very interesting. Now I see a lot more hands, but I realize we've only completed barely like one exercise. So with your permission, I'd like to move on to part two. Is that OK, everybody? Yeah OK, I'm getting some thumbs up, so I'm going to share my screen again. Yeah and OK, so we got through this part. All right, so I already made some notes on my pad here, which I will go back and add to this, so let's go to part two. Shoot, there's so much stuff on my screen. And we kind of talked about this, but now we need to get into it a little bit deeper now, some of you guys who did the homework actually have spent more time thinking about this and breaking it down, and it's really kind of important. So I'm going to share some stuff with you, ok? This is a very short talk, and we're going to be looking through the lens of why these things work and what's happening here. Nancy dart talks about this in her Ted Talk about communication and marketing and persuasion and storytelling that there are the way things are today, like our ordinary world and the way that we'd like them to be, the way things should be and what we want to do is we want to build a bridge from where we are to where we want to be. That makes sense, right? And your customers, your potential clients are out there looking to change something about their life, about work, about how they feel about themselves, and you need to figure this thing out. One of the best ways to do this is to make sure you understand where they are today. I really know who you are. I know what the problems are. And when you describe in a certain way, it triggers this desire heightens your need to want to change. It's really fascinating how this works. And I'm going to share with you the Dr. squatch breakdown, ok? And I even want to point out to you how brilliant his name is, Dr. squatch. This is one of those oxymorons like jumbo shrimp or sensitive men. If you think about it because squatch Sasquatch is like a big hairy thing, mythical creature or whatever. It's running around. A missing link in the evolutionary chain, and then they add the word doctor, so it's like, this is a sophisticated beast. So if you think about this, this is kind of who they're marketing to. And when you go on their website, this is what they do. They make hand-cut cold poured soaps with interesting sense. OK, now I happen to be watching videos just like Pedro and videos and ads pop up all the time, of course. And I've seen this that several times, not this one in particular, but this is the one that made me buy. So this is the third ad I've probably seen from them, mostly because I'm a student of advertising and marketing. So like I said, I'm your best target to market to because I'm interested in how you sell to me already. Even so, I could not escape the pull of this ad. So let me talk about what's happening here, and I think there's some things to learn for all of us. I don't know if you guys are familiar with this term and lp, which stands for linguistic programming, and it's how a lot of therapists help people who have certain phobias or mental roadblocks to get past them. What they do is they look at an experience that they've had and they use different words to describe it. And slowly but surely, they're able to reprogram the way the person thinks. So you can change the behavior of somebody by assigning different values to it. OK, so the spot opens up and it's a 4 and 1/2 minute video, and I watched the whole thing now multiple times just to study it. And here's the thing I use a body wash. I use axe body wash because it smells really good. And what they first start off with soap is different than a detergent, and they say in the beginning of this thing, you're not a dish, you're a man like I. So he's trying to tell me right now, right away, if you use a body wash, you're treating yourself like a dish in the sink. So he's moving me pretty quickly from point A to point B. And they even tell you detergents are for dishes and they show you this thing, right, and it's a pretty outrageous demonstration. And I don't consider myself a dish. I don't want to be seen like that. So he reprogrammed me in the first 30 seconds and it was pretty brilliantly done. So he has to make the world that you live in today, the way things are not good, not desirable, so that I'm primed now to want the solution. So we move on from this. If anybody has any question, please ask me because just open up your mic, unmute yourself and just talk to me, ok? This is critical in making these things work. All right. Next up, and I broke it down to three parts here features how I felt and the tone. So features, we all know how to do it smells good, it's all natural, it's nourishing, it's cold process hand-cut and they show shot after shot of women and men smelling the soap in a blind smell test. And they're like, wow, it's so good. Oh, I, I smell you all day long. And I think probably through research, at least on their part, I think a lot of men buy their soaps based on the fragrance. We don't really think about skin care or if it's drying or if it's natural or if it's good for our body, it just doesn't smell good or not. And so there's a good long segment of a bunch of people smelling the soap, and they're able to do something through video that you didn't think was possible. They activated a sense beyond visuals and what you can hear. By proxy, the people that they've cast for the video tell me it smells really good and they show you all kinds of people, skinny people really fit people, Black people, white people, latinos, asians, whatever they show you all kinds of people. It's like it's universally it must smell good to everybody. Interesting so what's the feeling that I got? Well, women love it. And if you use it, maybe you'll feel more attractive and you'll be more confident. And the other feeling that I got as I dug deeper into this is, I think I'm a little bit smarter for taking better care of my skin. And then it made me wonder because my kids use what I use and they see what I use, and so am I setting a bad template for them to follow? So I was starting to question my own fatherhood here. Some really interesting, deeper emotions. They never say any of this, but this is reading between the lines. It's implied and the tone totally over the top. Super funny and just speaking to you like a man, and it's pretty hilarious if you like into man humor. And what's odd is they have these two guys with beards and the one guy looks like a lumberjack. The guy on the right, they're wearing his flannel and he's reading a book next to the fireplace. So manly men who are vulnerable and they're trying to show you a reflection of their audience in these spots. It turns out because I was reading an article from the founder, he said that he thought the soaps would sell really well on the coast, California and New York, but it's actually in the middle of the country where they're buying the most soap. And they were surprised by that. OK here's something else that they did. They created a villain. And this is critical when you're writing copy and something that I'll be adding to the brand messaging Kip kit to describe this in a much deeper way. Every story needs a villain and a hero, and the villain is big soap companies, so they even call them big soap like. And you know what? Big soap sounds like big tobacco. They did another neurolinguistic programming thing there. They associated big soap with big tobacco, who we typically hate and we've learned to hate. We've been conditioned to hate them for the last 20 plus years with all the anti-smoking assays that we've seen out there, big soap and they tell us they cut corners because why they make, they want to make more money. At your expense. So now I'm a little offended by this, and they go in to read the ingredients in the soap and they're all weird name chemicals. And they asked a normal person to read what's in their product, and it's all natural. And it got me to think with all these chemicals that are on my body is there. Is this the cause of why some of my skin has dry spots and I don't want these dry spots are really annoying. And so they take me a little bit further along like me rationalizing creating an emotional connection, why I need the soap. Well, naturally, they're the hero. They have all these natural ingredients. They're made in the good old US of A with a time honored process that's been around for thousands of years, harkening back to a better time with less chemicals and less processing. Made in small batches, cut, hand cut. And then they show you a variety of people working on this to make it feel like, wow, it's a very diverse, interesting group of people making these soaps and then they have social proof. Thousands of great reviews and he shows it. With hundreds of thousands of satisfied customers. In case I was still wondering, they close right near then. Satisfaction guaranteed, if you don't like it, they'll send you a full refund. So it's kind of closing the deal and then it buttons up with a nice call to action and you notice there it just says, go to this website. They don't talk about pricing, they don't talk about product matrix, matrix, nothing. It's just go to the website. Let's give it a try. So I thought, OK, what do I have to lose? I'm kind of into this. Let me see how much it costs. And then when I got there, you're kind of overwhelmed with the quantity, the different fragrances and the different products. So that's what they have an onboarding quiz. And this helps with the paradox of choice. Tell me one thing to do, because otherwise it's going to get very confusing. So the quiz was kind of fun and a little weird. Consistent with the brand. And as soon as I finished it, it sent and it asked for my email so it can send me the results, getting me to make these little micro commitments microtransactions. So I got the email and what did it do? It didn't just tell me the results. It gave me a code to purchase. So now what else is there left to do? Not a lot. I'm not hearing anybody asking questions, so I'm going to now set up the next exercise, if that's OK. Here we go. Problems an observation. Yes, please. You guys probably saw this too. You know, I thought it was interesting about their ad campaign is that he built rapport right away by having your back. You're not a douche. Right that microsecond, that first 10 seconds of building rapport with the client or your prospect. I've been noticing like really big retail retailers who are really successful do that too, like they catch that rapport thing right at the beginning. Good point, Misty. You know what? Also, I never thought I was a dish. I did not think body wash was detergent. So this is one of those ones where there was no problem. I was happy to buy another bottle of body wash. No problem at all. And they stopped a certain behavior. So if they follow through and deliver on a great smelling soap that soft and all natural and doesn't drive my skin, I'm good to go. And they've grown their business quite a bit. It's shocking because I think in 2016 they're already doing $6 million of sales. It just so. Regular old soap. That's it. Is that an amazing? I didn't know I wanted this. This is why I wanted to share this with you, because I don't mean once Bob Barr or SOPA and I think, you know, my wife gives me these bars of soap and they smell funny. You know, it's like, no, I want a manly soap. This is not for men. And they made sure this is for men. This is just for dudes like you. You hairy bastard. You know this is it. All right. Go back. Go buy soap now. Yeah, I'm not trying to sell you to buy this stuff. Guys, hold off. I can't what I'm saying. I've even gotten my. I've not received my package yet, so hang out for a second and I'll tell you if it works before you jump to the group call and had a comment. OK right. Oh, I just had an observation, so you purchase the. Previously, we're using xyz. Yes so the tone in those ads that they have are similar. So it's kind of like the over the top like a man type thing, but where maybe ax fell short was they just left it there like this is so for men? A body wash for men. But it seems like this other company took it deeper as to like, OK, let's talk more about the ingredients and this other stuff. So it wasn't as superficial in terms of hitting those the feelings that you have about the product that you use. And there's like a deeper sell there than just like the superficial like, hey, this is just a superman, right? I want to point out a couple of things just so you guys know the full story. I'm repulsed by the ads from axe. They're meant for teenagers because there's like a guy who's being chased by, like half naked women all over the place. And I'm like, come on, this is so stupid and so base, right? I just want to make sure you guys are aware of that. And when I go to the store, if you were actually to watch me inspired me at the drugstore, I literally walk down the entire aisle and smell every single bottle of body wash. I, my son, is like, you smell this one? I like this one. It's woodsy and this is citrusy, and we just go through it all, and I'm offended by the packaging. It's horribly like ugly packaging. It's just this weird Black shape with a bright turquoise thing with a silver label. I hate their logo. I hate everything about them. So these guys know exactly how men buy body wash if I'm just a sample in this larger group. It's 100% based on fragrance, because what are we thinking? Soap is soap is soap is soap. So the only differentiating factor is the smell. And then I remember one time I'm like, smell this and then my son like, runs over to me, smells me. It's like, oh, dad, I want to use your body wash. I'm like, it's for men. Here's just a little guy. And that's why that other thing was about being an irresponsible parent. Like, maybe this isn't good. So it's very sensor driven. And how do you communicate smell through tv? How do you do that? And they did a really good job. So I want to share that with you. OK so let me share. I'm going to keep going here. All right. We're going to get into the next exercise. And here we go. Next small group exercise. We're we're going to use the same time monitor, ok? And hopefully you guys were able to talk about a couple of different ideas. And I need somebody to share those screen, right? Some notes and then you guys are going to vote this. guys remember dot voting. You just make a mark on the screen as to what you think the best idea is. And it doesn't have to be universal for this exercise to work. You guys just have to pick something and we're going to go through it, but I do want you to work together versus separately so that you can help point out what's happening and avoid the blind spots, if you will. So you're going to do five minutes of silent work now. You're going to take one of those ideas and you're going to sit there and you're going to work on this next prompt? I'm going to share with you, ok? You're going to deconstruct a sales approach just like the way I showed you in a second ago, and you're going to answer these four questions. And then after you finished doing the silent work, you're going to share and compare five minutes. So it's like least a 10 minute exercise. And we're going to try and keep this one on time because I could see I'm off time here. Are they going to come back to the group? So here are the four questions that you might ask yourself, OK and answer these things. So again, screen capture this. Here we go. How did the brand present the problem? This is really important. I don't want a solution until I understand the problem, so many people go straight into the solution. And I referred to this as painting the pain. I don't want to have a low fidelity painting. I want you to feel it. And it's fool beautiful rendering. I need to understand the problem really well. The more I understand the problem, the more likely it is. I am going to take action and you notice a lot of infomercials. They spend 80% of the time talking about the problem here, just in there, like just give me the solution already. And the reason why you do that is because they've been very good at pulling you deeper into understanding the problem. This is especially helpful and necessary for cold leads. Prior to this moment in time, you'd even know you had a problem until they told you you have a problem. The world that you see, there's a better world out there and you'd be a fool not to go and participate. Ok? how did the brand frame the benefit? So I gave you an example. There are a lot of features, but they're really starting to talk about the benefit some explicitly communicated in some implicit. How did the brand overcome your unspoken objections? You have to really think about this and you have to sit down, write like, why didn't I want to buy this before and write down everything that you can think of and then see how they were able to get you over that? My main objection is what's this made of? Is this any better or different? How do I know what this smells like? I don't know what scent and fragrance is right for me. And then last but not least, how did the brand get you to take action? Ok? why did you jump into the Facebook group? Why did you go and give them your email address? OK, they're going to come back and get a chat. Everybody clear with this. Stop being the share. No, I have a question. Go ahead, please. So just so like, where do we get the ideas from on the things that we have to? Oh, perfect. Good question, David. The last session, like literally what you guys just did in the first breakout was to find, like what? We're good ideas. What worked on you? Now I don't have time or nor were we able to talk about the different ideas you came up with. But I'd like you to narrow your focus on like one thing that caused you to take action. I didn't tell you every single ad that I saw from them. I just told you the one that got me to move. So a lot of you guys were looking at the entire sales funnel, and it can get overwhelming and you can miss very valuable parts, so I'm going to suggest that you focus in on one part of the funnel that was the trigger for you to take action. Absolutely for the breakout room time moderators, what's our total time on this micro session, 5 and five? So five minutes to sit there and think and write ideas as a response to some of the prompts, the questions I gave you. And then you come together. So you're going to need a couple of minutes to first identify what the ideas are from that group and just get to it really quickly and just reverse engineer it. OK Matthew, I noticed something. Your microphone is really hot. You may need to look into that later. All right. It's coming. It's peaking. And I saw it in the video. I'm like, I didn't notice that during the live, but I'm hearing it right now. Your Mike is super hot. It's not the golden mic. It's just hot. OK OK. Any other questions? Everybody? I see some consensus. It's still not clear for me. So we go in the room. We have five minutes to list all of the ideas. No, no, no, no. You don't have five minutes to do that. So let me share the screen again. OK, so keep your mic on and we'll do this. I'm glad you're asking this, Dave. So this is helpful to me. Thank you. OK you have a time monitor. You need a dot vote, one idea first, before you do the five minutes of work, you have to dot vote. You have to come together as a group. What were the ideas we have for people? What were the four ideas for sales techniques that had worked on us? So, so we have 1 minute to do that. Theoretically, yes, one minute, OK, you need to just because you guys just came from that conversation, right? The ideas are still fresh and you're like, let's not vote it, somebody create a grid. You know, whatever tool Photoshop anything, just share your screen and vote it really quickly. Is that clear now, david? Yes OK, any other questions from anybody? Now, I was going to say I see some concern faces out there. Chris, yeah, I think I know I have a follow up to David's question now that I know that I even understand the problem. Yes Yeah. The five minute of silent work. Is it going to be in relation to the most voted yes? OK the people that the people that idea didn't work on, how are they going to silently work on it? You're going to have to just work together. OK, so we're silently working together. Look, I just shared with you guys the breakdown of Dr. squatch, right? You don't have to have bought soap, wanted to buy soap, but you can participate in that. Could you not? Can you like who said it? Somebody jumped in and said, hey, Chris. Oh, and and said, like, hey, Chris, you know, be aware that their ads are like this, this and that. So she was able to contribute. And she's not even a man, thankfully. Right so she you guys can get in there and reverse engineer any sales technique. First, we just need to understand why did it work, what did they do? That's the critical part. So if somebody says I recently bought this and we love that story or that ad, even though we haven't personally seen it, we can ask questions. We can sit there and like what was happening here. And if you don't know anything about that company or that ad, you have five minutes, you have the internet. You can just jump on the web and look at it while everybody else was working silently, whatever it works for you. So, OK, all right, I heard some other female voice. Somebody want to say something. Was it radical? Yeah, Chris is just confirming this only. So we just picked one idea out of that. We just brainstormed together and decoded, according to your phone questions, right? OK yes, sort of. And we'll do this one more time. OK, I'll just. Everybody just focus on my shiny head right now and just listen here. Just focus on this fire. know it's amazing. OK, here we go. The first thing you're going to do is you need to identify as a group. What's the one sales technique that I was most effective of the three or four that we heard today? Which ones the most effective to this group? And then you're going to work individually. So that you can think without people yelling and influencing you just to answer those four questions about this idea. Now, if you're not, if you're not familiar with this. Go and do your research in the five minutes. While everybody else is sitting there and thinking and writing, I need you to spend at least five minutes just quite thinking. And then at the end of the five minutes you're timekeeper is going to say it's been five minutes. Let's go and reflect and share. And then you're going to build a composite like this seems to be the most salient ideas. All right, cool. We're going to come back to the group and we're going to share some things that we learned. Is that clear? Curve, it's not I'm going to have to tag a partner here like Anna Lee or Mo or somebody else to explain this because. I don't know how else to explain this. Other than the wages, did anybody else? OK it looks like we're clear. Hallelujah all right, you guys. This call is going to be long. We're only through exercise two here and we're not even started. So you guys, you have 10 ish minutes. Don't waste them. OK if the group is done in faster than 5 minutes each, go do your reflection. Start sharing. Start talking about the idea. Go to your room, please. Let's see a little bit. And if you don't want to go to Rome, you can stay here and talk to me, it's fine. Would he have something to say over there? So I'm just laughing at the ending. Go to your room, please, like it was very, very. I know I realized about the same thing. Not in a punitive way. Never go to your executive suites, everybody. Came forward to do this, it's rude. We're back, so I need to share. You know, there's a lot of buttons to hit, I'm surprised only like did one thing wrong, technically so far. I'm sure I've done a lot of other things that were wrong. Ok? you going to get a gaming mouse? Then you can just press the different buttons, right? No, that's even more buttons to screw up. You don't understand the juggling act that's going on here. All right. So what's the one thing that was most useful for you in terms of what you guys talked about? I just want you to take a minute and I need everybody to jump in here and we're going to get into part three. OK, what's the most useful thing for you? OK, so I see some hands already going up or is that an old hand, david? That's a new hand, right? Yes, that's a new hand. OK, so we'll go, Dave. Charles let's see the others. And Emmanuel. OK, let's just go with that. And we'll see what happens. All right, David, go ahead. What's the most useful thing for? For me, the most useful was that we lacked understanding of the definition of what a sales technique is. You were kind of outline outlining like funnels and, you know, different like content marketing things and multiple touches. And that's where we spend most of our time. OK, so we were like thinking, what if? What is the difference between a sales technique and the tactic? And it just we couldn't start the exercise in time. OK, so that means that's a failure of the call, totally. Because someone puts you in this place, the homework was putting you in this place, so we have to have a deeper discussion about what that is. And David, can you highlight and make clear for me where the confusion is? I don't think so, because somebody in that group or somebody else share that same feeling, expand on that, please. I can't solve a problem I don't yet understand. You have the same problem and this is where it broke off for me. So there are names, forces techniques like spin sailing and challenger sail. And then there's techniques for selling that go into you have to do this, you have to do that. And then there are tricks. So how do you break those down and what enters, let's say, in the spring setting or in the snap setting or in? OK, that's very good. You want to thank you for that. I think what you're talking about are ways that people have labeled something so that they can own it and sell it to you. So forget the label for a second. I think the prompt, as far as I was concerned, was pretty clear. What's something that's worked on you? We don't even need to know a single sales term to know that something's work, because if you bought something, if you bought an idea, if you sign up for an email list, if you join a Facebook group, if you purchase anything you've been sold. You've been sold, so we just need to identify one thing that's happened to you, that's worked because this is very important, and I think our lack of understanding of this is probably a pretty good sign of reflection on this group's probably inability to generate sales. We don't know what we're doing. We just have no idea. And that's why we're not even, you know, that's why we're like cats and trying to hurt cats together. And it's like, everybody's like, I got one off the TV, but there's another one on top of the washing machine. It's like, it's too much for me to do it. OK, all right. So hold on that thought. OK, so who did we say? What's next? Well, you said mahi, but I would like to counter and say Alicia should go because we made her lower her hand the last time and not go. We didn't make anybody do anything like that. We just call people for permission. were like, may you please be OK with us going into the well because I saw so many more hands, I saw too many hands and we have to move on. So, alicia? Go ahead. You get to cut the line. Oh, goodness, the pressure. Yeah, OK. So I would say that one of the big things we kind of talked about was social proof. So we were talking about how, especially with your ad, Chris, we were talking about charging for logos. It wasn't just talking to the camera, it was a group and it was a whiteboard session. And I think that one of the things that we gathered was kind of situations where there's other people there or somebody is talking to somebody else that seems to have a lot more validation to it than somebody who's just simply speaking to a camera. And also, when it's a little bit more authentic, like there's something to be said for it not being like a super high production video that's just someone sitting there staring at a camera and speaking. And then the other thing, too, is content marketing consistent, regular, valuable content marketing that creates the trust factor. So we can then go to the channels, or we can go to the different social media spaces and just see that it's always consistent, it always delivers. And therefore we have the trust and it's been built. So, yeah, that was a big one. Very good. Very good. Alicia, I'm sorry. I cut you off and made you put your hand down. Oh, no worries. Ok? very good. OK so let's get back. I think it's my history now. My niece. Yes hi, Chris. One of the main things main problems I was facing was I. I get influenced by ads that have something that pulls me towards them because of emotions. And I usually see them in TV commercials, and I couldn't. I couldn't understand how I can bring it into content and all this stuff, like if I send out a Facebook ad or an email, how can I do that? So we were looking at mails from Ben burns, so Jordan started it out with meals that were targeted at him for the program. But then we realized all the meals from Ben are user very conversational style. And then we started breaking it down. And that's when I understood how emotions could be, you know, broken down into different pieces and used for used in whatever way we choose to communicate with our customers. So we were looking at things like speaking in a very conversational way, not forced. He had also used retreat and for her technique and some of the meals. And I remember him doing that with us during the bootcamp also. So it was kind of enlightening for me, and I feel like I feel much less pressured now. That's great, thank you. Thank you. I see more like the hands are popping up like weeds, which I think is a good sign for this group. So far. So we're getting pretty high engagement. I'm going to ask everybody else that wants to speak. Just tell me one thing. I don't even need context. What's the most useful thing that you got thus far from your conversation? Just one thing. The most useful thing. All right. Mo, who's next? Emmanuel Manuel was next. And then Charles. Yep exercise, but what I really found remarkable is that every single one of us had participated or purchased one. Some of these better professional betterment products. So every single person is like seeking to transform themselves and trying to take action with some form of coaching and transformation products. So it's I mean, we're all in the same place, but there seems to be this tribe of seeking and transformation. And I think that I mean, my experience with the Greg hittman stuff, what he really, really makes it sound like everything is about you. Like every single number he uses just screams me, me, me, me. So it's very, very hard not to react when you literally feel like someone is speaking directly to you and to your issues. Perfect that's the highlight right there. That's the Nugget. So you have to be super clear as to who you're talking to. So Dr. squatch was talking to a bunch of bearded, hairy dudes in the midwest, apparently, and they responded in kind by buying millions of soap million worth of soap. Ok? this is really, really important. So if you were on camp, let's just generalize where all things to all people that's telling you something right now. You're spreading yourself really thin. And you don't understand your market. You just want any customer, not just me. And it's a very different feeling. Any any customer will do well, was that. I have something to add about that I recently bought Sales Navigator for LinkedIn and I'm testing it out, and the way that it filters people is through very specific occupations and very specific categories that these companies fall into. So if you are, whatever technique you're using for sales, if you can't get past that point, it becomes very difficult to know who you're talking to. So even these softwares that are kind of programming us into their own way of working. The first thing they're asking is this person in marketing, advertising, restaurant, hospitality and even asking you to make a profile. That's very clear. So when you show up to them in a DM or in a connection that they know who is trying to connect with them. So I just want to add that if you reverse engineer that program, it's very probably easy to narrow down your audience to just one to highlight that. Yeah, I want to share something real quick and it's borderline inappropriate, but I'm going to do it because I think it highlights the point. I saw this funny t-shirt and I remembered it. And he says, not looking for Mr. right. Just looking for Mr. right now. If you make your clients customers feel like that, forget about it. I want to have a connection with you. I want you to know what my pain points are, and I'm going to trust you. I'm going to give you my money. I'm going to pay you a premium over your nearest competitor. I'm going to go out of my way. I'm going to travel to a different town or a country just to work with you. I'm going to spend 10x what I would normally spend on a subscription. To be a part of this, you need to know me. Have to have that deep connection with you. And that's a big point, ok? We said, Charles, next, I think Charles is next, but if we want a variety it with a woman member, no, no. Let's go Charles. Go go Charles. And then we'll pick someone else. Go Charles, what's your what's the most useful thing for you so far? It was useful to deconstruct our thought patterns on how we make decisions in the sale are sort of thing was about going through a person with authority, which was and how we ended up where we are today, which in my case was getting Corps and then from Corps coming to the group. So it was really useful just to see that path line sort of pointed out. Mm-hmm And it actually went against that podcast. Sorry that you've done with them, Steph hammerlock recently regarding, you know, does a brand really matter and whether we make decisions, you know, do they really matter or not? So it was helpful, at least on my end, to see that they do. There there's a pattern, there's a sequence anyways. Are you saying that I beat Steph and that debate? I'm just kidding. I'm kidding. Yeah, looks pretty hot down there. I'm just saying, no, I'm just kidding. OK all right. Misty no, no. Hold on. Hold on. We'll get to Misty. One second, missy, you're up next, I promise. Mo and I worked on this yesterday. We were talking about. What has worked on him and the first reaction is nothing works on me, I don't do anything. That's your first natural reaction. My BS radar is just really freaking high. I could tell you right now. And then. Yet as soon as he said that, I was like, are you sure, boom? One question he's like, oh, you're right. So what? I just want to build off what Charles said is that we do need to take a minute. And if we go and excavate our own thinking to figure out what our own internal triggers are, what a lesson that is. And Emanuel wants to do self-development. It begins here. Just crawl inside your own brain with a couple of prompts and sit there, think and reflect. Because most of the times we're just reacting to things, we don't even pay attention. We're going to sit here. We're going to pull out all the Nuggets until they're laid bare before your eyes and you can sit there and pick up the ones that make sense to you. And you can start to work on something for next week. All right, let's keep going. Misty and then we have to stop. We have to stop because we have to get into to exercise. Three Misty, this is really good. Thank you. I'm totally on fire. So this is an interesting thing that Ken brought up, restating the call to action at the end. And what I noticed is that, like with apple, they call, they state the call to action right up front and they present it as the problem. And then they take you through this transformation and they give you and they interestingly put the hero and the villain side by side and let you decide which one it was and then invited you to go ahead and be crazy, too. Mm-hmm And they just asked you to think different. That was their call to action, but I love that they presented some really strong emotional indicators and let you pick a side. Mm-hmm And they did a wonderful job in the I'm a Mac, I'm a PC ad with John. I forget his last name, hodson, or something like that. They did a wonderful job. It was so good that Microsoft was really angry at them, and I asked them to stop doing those ads. Yeah, that's how effective your ads are. All right. All right. So we're starting to get somewhere. So, so David comes back from the break, guys. Like, we failed. I'm like, David, don't? How dare you set that tone? There he is at that time, but he actually raised a really good point. And maybe we're all a little confused as to what the heck is going on. OK and I think you want to contribute to that conversation, too. Let's go back to the deck or something. Where am I? All right. We are now into part. Part 3. This is it. OK, we're going to take action today. So I love this anatomy of a murder because I feel like if we break up the big problem into a little knot by size pieces but smaller pieces, it's a lot easier for us to process and out of the book. 101 things I learned in advertising school. I saw that there were a couple like little extra moments here that were added to the sales journey, the customer user journey. And so I just wanted to briefly touch on this and talk about how you guys can understand this. So if you want to just screen capture this, OK, before anybody can hire you, they have to become aware of. And this is converting a non lead into a cold lead or just pulling people into your universe, your orbit. And we have to make them aware. A lot of the ideas that we're going to focus on probably today happen to take people from the awareness part, maybe into building interests or preference for what it is that you do. Most of you sell some form of creative service, and if you want to launch a product like Anna, then we can talk about that as well. But we have to bring them into our world in order for them to buy something from us. And so it goes awareness, consideration and after you figure out why they would consider it, why did they become interested or build interest? Why did they like what it is? Why do they prefer what it is that you do? And then what makes them purchase? So the purchase part, I coded a different color because if you can sell somebody a creative service, end to end with one marketing initiative, amazing. But I would consider it a win if you just got through stage one that now they're aware of the who the heck you are, and you give them a strong and compelling reason to consider the next time they have a problem like the one that you solve. And the reason why I wanted to look at it like this is because it's not enough to just create awareness, because if you run around naked on the street, set your hair on fire, you'll get awareness, but not consideration. So it's important for you to understand how these parts are interconnected and how one drives the next. So that when you're designing something, your piece of content, whatever it is, your sales process that you're understanding that eventually they have to be pushed into a place where they're going to make a transaction with you. Now the other thing I want you to be aware of is this is that, from the point of awareness to the time that somebody makes a purchase. It depends greatly on how much money relative to that person it is. So if you're in the supermarket, if you're able to go to the supermarket and you see a pack of gum, all the impulse buys are right at the register and they know this. The supermarkets have done a lot of research and have figured all this stuff out. This is why the tabloids are there. All the little impulse items are there. And when you think you've been a really good shopper and you haven't purchased any junk food, they know you're vulnerable. They know the story you tell yourself is I didn't buy any junk food and there's a Snickers bar right there. There's a bag of M&Ms or some other thing that's going to pull you into buy. It's all right there. What you guys sell is not what I would consider an impulse buy, and it's pretty far from it, depending on who you're talking to, of course. And there are multiple dollar signs there. So the funnel, the journey of the user, the customer is going to take a lot longer before they make a purchase. So why? Why do I want to tell this to you? Because let's not try to go out and create one piece of marketing that's going to get somebody to spend $10,000 with you tomorrow. It may be unrealistic because there's going to be a lot more touchpoints to this, to build trust, to be consistent and do all the things that you guys have already shared with us. OK, now what I want you to do is be able to create your own lead generation sales tool. Now, whatever label you want to apply to that you can. But the goal here is to take a cold lead and turn him to a warm and a potentially hot lead. That's it. OK, so you guys remember last week I talked about this book, how to design and teach workshops that work every time the workshop survival guide. I want to ask you guys this. I can't see your hands right now, but go and raise your hand if you bought this book last week. Right I know some of you did, because there was a link that was shared. I think Van shared it and a bunch of people are buying this book. So even though you sat there and thought to yourself, I don't buy anything, I don't believe in any of this stuff and this doesn't work on me. Those of you who bought the book didn't even realize and I wasn't trying to sell anything, but you did make a purchase. You were influenced by something. So what I want to do is just spend a minute and do this together. Ok? and here's what the screen looks like. I wrote these questions recently. So it's a bunch of little things that I've learned over the years. And from books that I've just recently completed. And so there's a bunch of prompts here. OK, so I'm going to just go through this again. Screen capture this. You might have to do something like this soon. OK, so who is your prospective client? What problem are they trying to solve and why should they care? What level of awareness do they have about the real problem? And that was really interesting as it relates to Dr. squatch, because I don't have any awareness that body washes are not good for me. I still don't know if that's true. Where are they most likely to find out about this solution? So this is really important because as you're designing your sales tactic or technique or tool, you have to take into consideration where your clients are spending their time. So creating content or a sales funnel that's out of YouTube. It's not going to help you if they don't go to YouTube. If they spend all their time on LinkedIn or Instagram, that's where you need to design your solution. It has to be tailor made for them, specifically speaking to them and their pain points. How will this benefit them? How will this make them feel? So if you go back and watch this video later, you can go back and see I did break it down based on the benefit and the feeling and all the things that weren't even said that was going on inside my mind. What makes your solution unique and different? This is very important. If you can't articulate this, you're going to have a big problem because you're just like everybody else. You're a me too brand. You're a me company. This is a concept that I just learned from reading the book be how to become a sales rainmaker, how to become a rainmaker. And they said that you need to look at your offering in a bucket rise value relative to your client. How much money will you really make for them, either in savings or earnings? And to be able to calculate that? So if you sell a product or widget that's actually more expensive than the one they're using, but the last 10 times as long you need to calculate that for them. So your pitch to them would be, how would you like to save $0.14 on every product you make for an annual savings or earnings of $267,000. Would you be interested in talking to me about that? Well, you've already put it in terms the client cares about in the book they sell. They say that whatever you sell, what you're selling is you're selling money, you're selling money to the client. So the dollarized value, I'm not going to go too deep into it right now, but think about it in those terms, OK, what social proof are they using to lower your perceived risk? Testimonials Amazon reviews conversational atmosphere with people that look and talk like you. OK, there's a lot of social proof there. Press releases or awards. They've been featured in news organizations. What are they doing to build social proof? It's one of the principles of influence, by the way, the book what worldview do they have as it relates to your solution? So when we're able to align what it is that we think and feel to what they think and feel, it's a win. And what, if any, urgency is created and we know that urgency creates triggers to buy in. Urgency is also built around scarcity. I only have 10 self-development packages that left. I only have two of x and one of this, and this is going to close down in 72 hours. Those are all triggers and we act on those things. OK, so what we're going to do is this I have it broken down here and so I'm going to write together. Obviously, I can't share my screen like this. I'm going to stop sharing it like this. I'm going to do a little differently. So those of you who bought the book, who bought the book last week, raise your hand again. OK, a handful of you, so I'm going to ask you guys to participate with me and you, we're going to see going to see how this works, ok? I'm going to share and then you guys are going to do this on your own. Are you guys doing ok? I'm supposed to take a coffee break in here somewhere. Should we take a break right now? I was going to say, yeah, let's go, guys. Let's take a break right now. OK, let's take a 2 minute break. Oof. two to 3 minute breakout minutes. Here we go. All right, those are the guys that purchased the book. I'm going to ask you a couple of questions about. It's kind of weird because you're answering this for me. So who is your prospective client like? Who are you guys? You guys are creative professionals. Right? and then Emmanuel talked about, this is that you're interested in self-development and you your experience too. And you have some degrees of success already because if you didn't, you wouldn't be in this group because the price of the group is the barrier to filter out people who aren't ready to be part of the group. OK, so what problem are they trying to solve? Mo, I want you to participate in this because we had just done this. But don't be the first person to say the answer, because we've kind of walked through this already, OK, but if we get stuck, I want you to jump in. So those are the people who bought the book. Try to help me fill in the answers here. So what problem were you trying to solve like as it relates to the book, the workshop survival guide? Learn how to teach better. OK anybody else? Just unmute yourself and just talk, let's go. Along the same lines would be just better facilitation tools. Thank you. Tools to get people to think you buy the book too. Mm-hmm Anything else? Pardon me. I don't want to be left out as a workshop or, you know. We say that one more time. I don't want to be left out as someone who runs workshops, so when I saw the book, I felt like it was really imperative to buy it as well. Yeah, OK. Hashtag FOMO. Hashtag FOMO. OK what level of awareness do they have about the real problem? What would you say? And this takes you guys just tell me what you think about yourself. I'll try it again, I thought it was I have a high awareness because I know how hard it is to run workshops, so I'm very aware. Well, I would say the same for me, I found a correlation between workshopping and just coaching people in general. Some of you guys run core. Maybe you guys want to improve your ability to do core. Yeah OK. All right. So let me ask you this question then. How many of you guys were searching for $1 on workshops before I mentioned it? Yes, that was banned, right? Yes OK. Is van the only one? I was kind of. I was just interested in workshopping after getting the free one from Jonathan Jonathan. Yeah, Yeah. Yeah from Jonathan, Jonathan Courtney. OK, so you were already searching already this one right here. OK, now notice the people who purchase the book already want to buy the book? Not weird. And those that didn't purchase the book? Well, we're not hearing from you right now. Maybe you're not aware and you have no interest. OK this is kind of important. OK, so where are they most likely? Find out the solution now. Why did you buy the book here? Why did you buy it after I mentioned it? Because I trust you so, so from someone they trust. You also gave it very high marks, I think you said it could potentially be I don't know if it is this book or another book you recommended in your top 10 or, oh, this is not the book, but yes, this is a good book, but not my top 10. OK, yes, the Coaching Habit. Yeah, OK. Yeah, it's a very high rack. Mm-hmm It blew your mind. You were like, Oh my god, these things are so cool. I didn't realize the, you know, you could use things in this way. And so if anything surprises you. It has to be good. OK very good insight. The insights that you shared were very interesting. Mm-hmm OK do you know how this will benefit you and how will it make you feel? By buying the book. Mode and control, because, yeah, because I get to learn new things. Mm-hmm More tools to help people. Techniques, I guess. OK, so you feel empowered. Mm-hmm OK maybe make smarter, competent, confident or confident. Make more money. I'm going to put competent to because I actually believe that's why. But here's the thing. Everybody that bought it, who's finished reading it, who's opened it? This is quite interesting, isn't it? OK, so we know people have open it and some people have bought it and not even opened it. So that to be done. I'm close. I'm about to be done. Come on. OK, OK. Well, there's different reasons why you need to read it. Well, OK. So here's the thing is we buy because it makes us feel. We are closer to who we want to be. Is it? It's why people have an addiction to buying courses and coaching, because the act of buying makes it's an illusion. You have to do the work. But this is in a lot of the sales books that I've read. This idea is overlapping in all the books. You need to understand that, so if you understand who people want to become. Is a better chance that you're going to speak to that. OK, I'm going to answer some of these questions to move this along. They're not many books on workshops. Attractive design. Simple looking. OK, I might skip this. I know we can do this. What does dollarized value of your solution? What do you guys think the book costs? What, 20 bucks, 15 bucks? Not, not a lot, but what was the value to you? How much do you charge to run a workshop? I don't run a workshop, but it could potentially be worth thousands. If I got really good at it, I could charge that much. OK so we want to be very specific. So if anybody has ever run a workshop, if this book help you at this book helped you to run workshops better. How much more money do you think you could make in a year or the next workshop? Not thousands. Thousands, Yeah. Yeah, I mean, I charge 10k, but I'm always worried about defending that value. So that's one of the reasons. There you go. Out the book beautiful. OK, it seems like the more workshops you run, the more you can charge because then your expertise builds. At least that's the case for me. So again, this is probably not in the right category, but this is a shortcut to gain deeper experience so that you can justify shoot just. By high cost. Right so the social proof reviews, reviews, specifically me. I reviewed it for you and Amazon and Amazon. Does it have high reviews on amazon? Well, yeah, relatively high. OK, I'm going to answer this question for you here. The worldview this is from all marketers or liars from Seth Godin. He's like, you have to find a previously undiscovered worldview. It's kind of interesting. So I'm going to ask momoh, what worldview do you have as it relates to books? That I'm educated, that competent, that knowledge is power, that I'm a trusted source. It's not exactly your worldview. Let me let me help you with this, ok? I think knowledge is power. It's good and education is a good thing. Yeah, education has the potential to change the world for the better. Those are world views. New, new forms of education is needed. Yeah, but it's a book, though, but OK, I'll write that new forms of education. I was thinking the book teaches you a new way to teach. OK, I see. Workshops is a new way. Yes it's much better, Emily. Thank you. Workshops are more effective, right way of teaching. OK and your world view could be that we're. Pardon me. Each specific things that your expert in a new way, sort of like that. OK say that one more time, like you kind of broke up there specific things that your expert of certain specific, certain specific things goes export that you're an expert at. OK, well, your worldview could be that information products are the future. OK was there any urgency for any of you if you had a workshop coming up? This could be handy for me, it was because Manoli asked, is our two ls? He asked me to run workshops for setting workshops. What's that? Start selling workshop as the backyard. Yeah if you've started, if you made a deadline, start selling workshops. Yeah OK. I thought it would be good to read the book and cross-reference it with the workshops that I'm going to be participating in so more. So we're trying to figure out the structure of workshops, right, as you're taking them. And you see the world view also, as you know, wanting to be a change maker. Yes, that's a total Yes. OK this is off topic. That's fine. But my question is when looking at the structure of other workshops, do you think that's dangerous if you're trying to create a unique workshop in your own business sphere? That's a great question. Hold that question. Sure thing. Ok? I think you caveat it by saying, I don't want to derail you, but then that would be a derail. But I'll get into that, ok? There was urgency because I told Mo, you have to read this book before our next call. So I gave him an urgency. So he didn't really have a choice there because we are running workshops for you guys. And we have to be more informed. So there's a real need for us to learn this fast. All right. OK, so we're supposed to do corporate, which we've already done now, I want you guys to do it. OK, so here's your individual exercise. We're not going to do any more breakout rooms for today. We're way over time, and I thank you for you guys hanging in there with me. I hope to make this super valuable for you, and you have to stick it out to this part so that we're going to actually do some work together. So this is the individual exercise. We're just going to work silently. And the thing that I need you to do first is just to determine what tool is most appropriate for you. And remember all the constraints that we talked about, this is something that you're going to build.

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