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Ask Me Anything: Price Options, Starting a Youtube Channel, Networking in your Industry

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138
Chris Do
Published
January 30, 2021

After Dark session with Pro Members.

Read Transcript
We are now recording and I'm going to what am I doing? I just put this late up here. Share one. Where are you? The screen. And then. I need to do this to hit play. OK it's call number one, 38. This is the nighttime call that happens periodically, and this is an open agenda call, which means whatever you want to talk about is what I will talk about. So I'm going to dial my energy down because there's only a few of you here. We'll slow it down and we'll talk to you about whatever's cooking, what's hot on your mind. And if you don't have anything, there's other things I can talk about. So having said that, to stop this here. I do this. OK, I think I'm going to cue up somebody. Where's randy? Randy in? Hello first time here. Hello oh, hi, OK. Beautiful wow, welcome. So I would lose. I'm going to try to wait and see what happens, so I don't know what. Just jump on in. Beautiful I have a question. OK you want to start it off? Go ahead. Yes so. I do branding projects. And my projects are usually between 10 and 20,000. But a trust for a 10 and 20,000. Take some time, I feel so I need like a lower tier product. So I have a low tech product, which is like brand coaching. But I feel that it's two different target audiences, if it makes sense because the coach is like I find people request coaching or usually like mom and pop shops or local, they can't afford the 10 20. The question is, how can we get to 10 20 easy? I close 10, 20, 10, 20,000 projects. But the cell cycle is very, very long. Yeah OK. How do you pronounce your name, so I say it correctly, Shia. Shia, don't bother trying to let us know when it's OK because I'm OK with that. I'm not so sensitive with that stuff. OK so shia, your question is you're selling engagements at the 10 to 20,000 range and they're a little bit longer in the cell cycle. So you can close them. It's just it takes a long time. Yes and so you're wondering, what else can you offer in terms of your services that start the relationship to get the thing rolling? Because once I'm in, I'm in. Yes yes, Yes. OK Are you familiar with creating pricing options? The concept? Maybe I don't know if it's framed that way. OK, well, let's talk about this now. We're contextual people, we're contextual learners. We don't know of something salty unless we have something that's less salty or really salty, and then we know what's right for us. I've referred to it as the Goldilocks syndrome, right? The fairy tale tries a bull. The porch too hot. Too cold, just right. She tries on three beds too stiff. Too soft, just right. And it works kind of like that. So everybody here, this is broadly applicable. Take out a piece of paper or get something to write with, and I want you to write down your core offering the thing that you sell the most of it. Just write some bullet points, what that looks like. And then right, the price down. OK And then what you want to do is to write something that's less than that to the left and something much more expensive to the right. It helps people to make a decision. So what's happening is when shia, I assume, is submitting an estimate and talking to a client about its full branding offering, he's presenting them one option. So what do they do? They're going to go shop around. They're going to compare. They're going to think about it. They're going to mull it over. So one of the best things that you can do is you can just give them something to compare you against yourself. So if a full branding package costs 10 to 20 k, maybe just a logo or the strategy session is 5. With no deliverables, except for the strategy part or just a logo and no other branding components to it. And then the large version of this now would have to use our imagination because $20,000 with this was his former high ticket item. So now let's say that you included coaching in the high ticket item. And you included training for the staff that I represent six months of oversight or something like that. The whole point is to make it easier for them to say, you know what? That's that. Looks like the best value for us. Matthew, who is in the MBA program now, he's going through, I think, what week three or two? And he was talking about how if you look at a wine list and the wine list starts at 20 dollars, $25.30 30 five, 40 and 40 five, the one that everybody picks is the one in the middle. $30 bottle of wine. And that's what people do. So if you reset that and you start the price again at 30 30 five, 44 to five fifty, then they pick the new one. It's like what everybody picks is the one in the middle. It feels like like, I deserve a little bit more, but I don't need the very best. So I want you to try that now. I want you to think about your product offerings and be able to present your clients to say, look, I have three options that I've crafted just for you. Option number one is what I would call the White glove experience. You give it a name and describe it as we do strategy, we do the branding, we write your copy. And we also include three months of maintenance or oversight, will train your team and includes x number of hours. I'm available 24 hours a day and that's going to be 45,000. And you just pause for a little bit. Let the price anchor do its work for you. OK, then you can say that moving on to what is our most popular package? It's 20,000. We do the branding, the messaging and the strategy, but we don't do any oversight. Some people don't need that. Don't want it. They have teams at house to do it. And the last option I've crafted for you is you just want a quick logo and we can do that and we can do that for K. Well, so strategy somewhat, you need I create you a logo. I do three versions and then we're out. And that's it. I love that. What I have? Can I push back? Oh yeah, I didn't even know there was a pushback here, but go ahead. So I come from a position till now, maybe I'm going to change after that conversation is that I'm the expert. I'm going to tell you what you need. So I'm the doctor. I'm going to prescribe a prescription. The doctor won't tell you you can take either this medicine or this medicine or this medicine if someone is an expert. I want to know this is the solution for your problem, I mean. OK, I'm not sure that's true in real life, and I don't think it's true to this application. If I have an ailment, the doctor will usually say we can go surgery right now. You can get on the operating table. And we can do this right now. You can get a second opinion. We can do a less invasive thing and see if the cancer grows or if this worsens, right? Even the doctor tells you this because people like choices. I'm going to tell you what the three best options are for you, and then you get to decide want to talk. I will give my recommendation. I would do and do I recommend the middle one or let them determine. The best thing that you can do is not to sell, just to present. Just tell them what the options are. So you start with the highest one, usually right? And then you go with the middle, which is the one that, like I said, you'll say to them, this is our most popular, best selling package. Most clients find that this is exactly what they need, and that's how you're priming them to think. This is what you're using social proof. Yeah, that sounds really good. And then the lowest priced option is the one that will be very profitable for you because it's the least amount of work and the highest profit margin. So you're not going to lose either way. What Blair will call the option, the cheapest option, the small option as the Home Depot wonders, is you can do it. We can help where they train and guide you, but they don't do any of the work to make it not as appealing to them. Of course, I just did this on the fly. You all need to look at your product offerings and think about that. We have since implemented. Price anchors and pricing options into a lot of what we do. It makes the transition or the transaction happen a little smoother. Go ahead, Shia. If that's the case, would you put pricing on a website? And you can, if you like, but what we like to think is that what we're providing to the clients are more custom. So it's the price will not apply. It's not like you're going to buy a widget, but if you have more productize pricing and packages, you can do that. So that was my point. If I do a custom solution, it's not a cookie cutter like out of the best thing, we're going to design a solution for your problem. So what is the solution? If I give them only strategy and I don't do the rest, they don't get their solution for the problem. They don't have a solution. So if you only do strategy, then you have a problem with that. I have a problem with that because they're not going to get the real value. But that's. OK all right. So let me ask you in your real life, when you go in to buy things, the most expensive package is the only one they're willing to sell you. They're not willing to sell you anything else. And how do you feel about that? Like, I'm having a real experience of that. Right? but if I buy, I don't whichever product is a form right to the few pricing option, but it will have different features, but it's going to core. The core function will work. Now, if I sell them only a brand brand strategy and the execution is not done. Yeah, they have a half a product. I can't use it, get nothing. But that's according to you, though, shia, because the large consulting companies, that's all they do. Do you know that razorfish, BWC, Deloitte and touche? They are mostly just do strategy and they charge their clients in the millions of dollars? So does our strategy know? So the reason why my client will pick only the $10,000 strategy is because the budget is not there now, right? So if they would go in the case of the agency, someone would go for strategy, then go to another agency for execution, so they will end up paying the same price. Yeah, but that's true. That's their choice. You understand that if you want to get that, but the question is about it, if somebody has a twin, they don't have the $20,000 budget. That's just that's not necessarily true. If they have a design team that they like to work with or they have an internal design team, or they just think they don't want to pay for your design services and they want to do it differently, what do you mean by design is awesome. No, I get that. Yeah, right? But it's my question. I don't think it's a taste issue or a preference issue. My assumption is that it's a budget issue. Therefore, therefore, a half a product, which is only strategy, not execution, without getting the value. OK well, I don't know if I'm going to make any progress with you arguing with you like this, but are you? I'm not trying to argue. I'm trying to think otherwise. OK look, I personally put more value on the strategy part than the execution part. So each one of us, you and I, we get to decide what's more important, right? So when I charge my clients and Matthew and Ben have done a strategy session before for 480,000 with no deliverables. We sleep really well at night because we actually don't even want to do the deliverables. We're happy coming in there, helping them to find what the problem is. And making some strategic recommendations. And we're thrilled by that and other companies pay us for the exact same thing. For example, a client asked me to help them be a consultant for a virtual reality experience. I did none of the work. All I did was say, that's a good story or I don't really like the camera moves on that, and here's what I would recommend for that. They paid me $10,000 just to give my opinion no strategy at all. So here's the thing that I would like to help you guys think about a little bit is this I want to start here that if you are in love with the process that you have, the results that you have and the clients and the revenue and the profit that you have by all means, do what you do. Do it again. Rinse and repeat over and over and over again. But if you were looking for an option to change the outcome that you have right now, then you have to also change your attitude or your point of view on that because otherwise everything will stay the same, right? So one option. I'm not saying it's the only option one option for you is to consider having three price options to help them pick the one in the middle. And you'll be surprised how many times in your real life that you pick the one in the middle. And I'm going give you one more example here. I ordered furniture, I'm about to order furniture, and the price was really attractive to me. And then they put in 2000 worth of delivery services, and I was like, that's more than 14% of the total estimate. For delivery. And I was thinking, this is insane, so it says white glove delivery. And so I'm emailing them back. I'm getting stuck on this point. I will pay for the tables and the chairs, but the 2000 is killing me right now, so I ask them, I don't want white glove delivery. Well, we need to assemble the furniture and all they try to make a big deal out of it. They're going to lose the sale on me because they won't let me just buy the furniture. Well and if you force your clients to make those decisions, then you'll get 100% of 0. Got it, I was happy to buy the tables, and now I'm rethinking my purchasing decision because there's so hard on the terms. I don't want your delivery service like that. I don't need you to unbox everything. I could do it. And that's a choice I get to make, right? Right so think about it, you want to give your clients. The illusion of choice, really, you want them just to pick the one in the middle. OK, so here's what we do on a client that you don't care about that you don't want that you just can't stand. Try providing three pricing options for them. Design the one in the middle to be the most attractive. Now, if they pick the most expensive one, guess what you made out really well, because you're going to do some consulting on the side and it's a high, high profit. Right, make the one in the bottom. Not a great deal, meaning you don't get a lot, but you pay a lot. So the one in the middle looks great. OK, let's follow up somebody else have the same experience. Let's talk about the same thing. I don't want to change topics just yet. I want to make sure that we are able to find some resolution to this so everybody understand the dilemma here. If you're joining us late, bob, go ahead. Jump on in. So let me back into Sheila's corner for a moment and just say, let's say that your capabilities niche is that you bring the magic as a through line from strategy to the deliverable. Like what if she is magic sauce? What if his special sauce is delivering the goods? Off the knowledge product like that, his best value is that he wants to stay focused on that to service a market that he's going to cultivate around that. Is is that, you know, is that intrinsically bad? Not intrinsically, but I think it served him really well to this point, right? And prior to me learning about pricing options, we usually just gave our clients one choice. And it's exactly true to his word, our budgets are a bit higher than his, but it took a long time. They bit us against other people. It was a competitive situation or you would do something and you wouldn't hear back from 2 and 1/2 months because it was that long of a procurement process, because you also need to know this for companies. Sometimes when it goes above a certain price point, they have to like, have four conversations about it and bid to other people, and it can get kind of tough. So what I try to do now whenever possible, whenever it makes sense, is to provide three pricing options. Blair ends did the same thing. You want the book? It's $200. If you want the digital version of book, it's $100 if you want the full thing with the recordings at $350. Guess what people buy? They buy the book. He made a fairly outrageous price for a book work for people. Right right. I don't want to think I don't want to take over the entire session and be centered on me. I have bought my original question was not how to make them to decide my original question. What would be a starter product to get to know me and to create a relationship? So I can then upsell them to. Right, so I thought I answered that, because if you have a truncated version, something that is missing one third, let's say you do strategy, they just love it. And that's part of our selling strategy is what we think is when we do this. I get it. You fall in love with that and you're like, how can I leave you? Shia, take us home with this. OK, because that answers my question. I thought I thought that you just did I should only sell the strategy and not follow up with the design, you're saying just start with the strategy and southern design that makes sense. Well, yes, I would not just use that term upsell just yet because I do mean it in earnest that if you buy the strategy, you can stop right there. There's no pressure, but I'm so confident. Like, you are so confident that when you do discovery with this, chances are you going to ask us, Chris, what's the next step? Oh, I don't even have to sell you at that point, right? They're going to ask for it because it's that good right now. If we believe in ourselves, we believe in what we do. Is that good? That's usually not a problem. And to Bob's question about if what you do is soup to nuts, a to z, and that's the magic you can insist, that's it. I sell discovery for 5,000 separate, separate product discovery. Yeah that's your entry level product, then. Yes, it is. Well, that. Say, you know what, I. Here's what I would say if you're hesitating to pull the trigger on the $20000, I can understand it's a lot of money you don't really know me. So here's my recommendation let's do a phased engagement. That's a term you use phased engagement, right? So let's minimize the risk. Well, let's mitigate risk. Don't we do a $5,000 discovery? Here's what you're going to get and then you get to decide if you want to continue or not. There would be no pressure from me. And that's something you feel more comfortable doing. They'll say Yes or they'll say no, still. And then at that point, it's like, I don't have anything else that looks kind of like my initial offering. It's funny that I do this, but with a different frame, so I could just keep doing frame that way to solve a problem. Yeah there's one other thing that you can do. You can take your 20,000. And if they're just like, oh, that's a lot of money, you're like, I get it. Why don't we do this? Why don't we agree to do $2,500 a month for a 12 month contract? You could just pay me installments. Well, can we do that? Yeah, you can. Well, I will draw up a contract. You pay me for 12 months. And if you want to keep working with me, you can after that point. There's a lot of different ways to do this. So you're just trying to make a big thing, a small thing. And whatever you do that it's much easier, right? I think you guys may have seen me do this on a whiteboard session recently with some students. It said if you eat a big pie, it's difficult to eat. So just break it into slices and then a fork. A mouthful. That's all you need. And if you can do that for your things and still not feel like you're short selling yourself, short changing yourself, then go for it. OK that's right, very good. Origo thank you for the question. Yeah beautiful. How do you go? Go ahead. Now you're still muted to do. So, Chris, knowing what you know today. Would you say that pursuing YouTube as a full time thing still feasible and if so, if you're starting out from zero? What would be your strategy to grow your channel? Very good. Very good question. Thank you. So if I were starting over today, I still think YouTube is a super viable and I would do it absolutely. And my strategy would be to study what Matthew sensing is doing and just copy him for now. Because he's already had 100,000 followers or subs in five or six videos. OK, so I would reverse engineer his process and try to do it the way he's done it, and he has the subgroup or it's not his group, but it's I think there's a YouTube subgroup with the pro group that you guys can get a lot of one on one just super niche information about YouTube stuff. OK, now I will share with you what my strategy is because my strategy is not Matthew strategy, but Matthew is like pound for pound, the most effective video to subscriber ratio that I know of. OK, sounds like some crazy van life video OK, here's my strategy, and I'm going to share this in my follow up to the 10,000 followers, Instagram video that I made. And people often ask like, oh, so what I write about, like, what am I supposed to say? We can see this, we can see this today that there's so many carousels floating around from. I don't know how else to say this from people who really should not be teaching anything because they're barely know anything to begin with. We've seen that poorly designed, overly complicated to thin, like there's no content after 10 slides. I'm like, there's nothing here. And if it wasn't for that future wolf Wolfpack thing, I would never even see this in a hashtag, OK, we all know. So here's what I want you guys to do. OK, everybody, I want you to just use your like mind. Walk with me right now. I want you to imagine that you're backstage. And there are 4,000 people waiting for you behind the curtain or in front of the curtain. The emcee introduces you and you have 18 minutes to knock it out of the park. You walk on stage, the lights hit you, the music's pumping. What are you going to tell those people? Now, if your first instinct is to turn around and run, you're not ready to write content. I just want you to think about that. What is it, I'm going to say to 4,000 people that are going to be worth the minutes of their life that they give up to me. So if the question is, have nothing to say, we'll begin the journey of finding something to say. What's happening right now, and I take partial responsibility for whatever influence I may have had on this is young kids, a young designers, young people in the experience, not in age are literally just rewarding something or going back to the exact same source. And regurgitating the exact same information with the uglier typeface, with an uglier color palette, with an uglier image, and I was like, what's the point? And I understand that at all. So now we're having an honest conversation with ourselves, and we know that we have something to say to people that matters. Well, let's start writing. The simple thing that I would do is to step back and say, what are 5 to 7 points that I think are worthwhile for somebody to know. OK and I would take a look at guy Kawasaki's talks. They're short, they're informative. They're funny. He has a very specific formula. He does a top 10 countdown. And he has funny little expressions. Right and what he'll do is he'll start off with like a big statement like. Great companies or innovative companies focus on the mission or fudge. What did they write down all that? I wrote it down somewhere. Oh, he says, don't focus on making money. Make meaning. Don't make money. Make meaning. That's what he said. The people want to understand, what it is that you do and have a connection, so then he's like, here are some examples. Here's how Google makes meaning they want to organize the world's information for you, right? They want to democratize information. It's like, what does Apple want to do? Like, they want to democratize personal computers. They want to make sure everybody can use the computer. They want to make it easy. So it just goes through the list. It gives examples and it's great. So he comes up with an idea phrase that's catchy, easy to remember. And then he gives you an example. And then sometimes he gives you the a example and he says it to. Right, he's like, you want to have a mantra and a mantra short, it's memorable. It's not a mission statement. Forget the mission statement. Have a mantra, it says here's Wendy's mission statement. He reads it and he's like, this is the a example. And so the audience laughs. So these are really good. I would study how these people structure their talks. We've been talking a little bit internally about if you want to excel, don't copy the framework. Copy the process that developed a framework. Right, like, what was the thinking that was put into some of these talks, like how did they begin this journey? So I'm going to just use myself as an example because I can. I have great, you know, I know what I did. And so if you look at my carousel, you're like, hey, that's kind of cool. It's interesting. And what people do, literally, is copy the structure like he's using champion Gothic. They ask me, literally, and then they get the fonts right. We know that. And then they put the same mouse type and they use the same phrasing, the words like, 2019. And it's just, gosh, it's literally the exact same structure. But what they didn't look at was the process in which the structure was created like, oh, I see. So Chris is like doing some kind of click baity title. He's really pulling my attention with some visual or combination of words at the beginning. At the end, he summarizes in bullet point form. I mean, what? I'm doing it right, and then he breaks it out so that it feels like nice just to move from moment to moment, ok? And I see it's building, it's building. And then he summarizes, I get it. Now, where did you get this information from? Oh, I see. He's referencing this author and that author, so maybe I got to go read those books or books that I'm interested in, not the same books. I wonder if he's highlighting words or phrases, I wonder what the process has been like. I wonder if he's looking up on Google. Additional information or pulling relevant quotes. And you see, that's how you would do that today. And the whiteboard sessions right now have been quite successful for us because they're really long in content and they're getting good amount of views, sometimes 50 thousand, sometimes 100,000 views, and it's really helping our channel to grow right now currently. And these deeper discussions with pro members are working really good. That little cut Dynamo. 200,000 views. It's responsible for a couple of thousand new subs to our channel one video, a couple of thousand subs. That's pretty good. So maybe you could sit there and think, oh, you know what, I need to have high level conversations with people who are really interesting and articulate and controversial that we're willing to polarize people with what we say. Yes, viable, make YouTube content, make content, period. I'm hopefully building like a pretty tight ecosystem and my pyramid. It looks like this my pyramid. It's like Instagram, LinkedIn, and YouTube. And these three just play with each other and it's pretty awesome right now, and I'm reaping the benefits of that. OK, so most definitely, guys, I think personally, not only for your self-esteem to learn what it is that you're thinking to build an audience, to gain influence to generate leads and interest in your products. Please get in the content game. It's super effective for all those reasons now, and realize one thing this is really critical for you to hear is it's a long game, it's the long tail baby. If you want the big splash at the beginning, this is not it. But I would plant that seed today, because soon it's going to grow into this beautiful oak tree. Or whatever your favorite tree is. OK, now are there, is there a follow up question to that? How do we go? Um, not a follow up. You see. You seem defeated. We weren't even arguing that you seem defeated. No, it's not more defeated, just more. One of those things of like, you know, the whole Gary V thing, I always reference back to him. But you know, some time you just got to hear that one thing from the one person that is really kind of puts you into like, hey, you're in the right path. Like, last year, I started my YouTube channel last year, and all of last year I had 150 subs. I maxed out on that. So beginning this year, I already put out four videos this month and I'm up to 240. And a lot of that stuff has came from calls that have actually done with another videographer. I took that video, edit it and post it in a subgroup for like younger videographers coming up and then just posting that content and a lot of the stuff. That's stuff that like I hear you talking about. But for like graphic designers and everybody, I started tailoring that content for videographers and like nine, like within like, you know, for me, two weeks, having like 90 new subs, it was like, Oh my god, this is crazy. Yeah so then two days ago, I set the goal to be a full time YouTuber within the next two years, which I figure like with 10,000 subs, I could do something like that, which I use your strategy of like, OK, I need 416 subs per month to start getting reaching that goal. But you say what you said, breaking up the process. Look, can I look at what you guys are doing or just more of a reassurance? For me, it wasn't like defeated, but I was just like, all right, you know, you got to do just keep pumping out content. OK, I believe I can have a four hour conversation with YouTube growth strategies and what I've learned, but I don't want to pull this entire group of 42 beautiful people into this conversation with you right now, unless that's where they want to go for the rest of this. Now, let's hold this thought I will steal one thing that Matthew is very good at and share with you. OK, so everybody just pay attention is it doesn't matter what platform you're developing on, how often you want to post. Here's the thing. Matthew wants to make content that people want to see, period. He's not in it for sport. I am sometimes in it for sport. I will admit I will make a video because this is what I want to say. I don't care. Anybody sees I'm still going to make this video. But Matthew is like a ninja. He throws. When did you start? He wants to kill one person. That's how he works. So what you need to know is what's hot? Put aside your own bias and what it is that you want to do for a second. What is hot? What is trendy? What are people searching for? And there are a bunch of tools available on the internet that you can use to find out what's trending. Now, if you have a hot idea, let's just say you're like, you know what? I was in the gym. I was thinking about something. This is going to be hot. It's going to be so hot. All you have to do is write that idea down. What are you going to call this idea and then go to YouTube and put that word in and see what videos come up? If there aren't a bunch of like videos that are going bananas with a couple of 100,000 views, forget about it, that's not the idea. But here's the cool, cool bit about this is you can see what's hot and try that phrase and keep putting it in until that leads you to a bunch of like hot things. You're like, Wow. Watch all of them and ask yourself. And be very honest. Can I do this better? Can I do it a little differently? Can I add a little flavor to this? If you can't forget about it? It could be that what you could do better is you're like, I could do this, I can make a shorter and I could do stop motion animation and it's going to be awesome. And then use similar phrasing and keywords in your tagging and descriptions and you go to town and try it. You get 2000 subs from that video. Forget about for the year. You'll see. OK, then what I would also suggest that you do is purchase some of the dumb content off your channel because, you know, sometimes people look at a couple of videos like, I don't like this guy. It's the same once you have interest, make sure. You have a couple of other videos that kind of feel like that. Otherwise, there are going to be like, why is this guy cooking? This doesn't make any sense. Why is he trying on shoes? Not for me, they're out. OK, so guys, if you want to do the YouTube thing and I'd love to do this with you, especially when we do our pro meet up. I want to teach you everything I know about being present on camera, how to phrase certain things, how to build a tight little presentation. I can help you do that, but that will be a meet up. All right. OK, thank you very much for that question. How do we go now? I know Randy was not first to raise his hand here, but I want to talk to him because he had a really good question. I think we would all benefit from hearing. So, randy, you're up. So I want to follow up with one. I think you actually already answered. What was that noise? Oh, don't worry about it. OK, so how do we I mean, because we get a lot of insight from you here in the group? How do we take this insight and actually put it out without actually copying you? And like I said, I think you already answered that. But I mean, it's kind of like a fear like one of the members in the group are like, well, he's just copying Chris. Who said that? I'm not I'm not going to name names right there. And not only that, I'll follow this up with you mentioned earlier to Rodrigo. think I'm saying your name, right? I apologize if I'm not that there are some people who should not be teaching others or and I'm assuming that you're saying, as well as putting out YouTube videos about their material of what they're trying to say, that they shouldn't say anything. However, if they don't grab that part of the market before someone else does, regardless of them wanting to catch up on their education, someone else is going to take that from and then they'll just be a mystery to right? Yeah so should they wait like you said or should they jump before they're ready. And then catch up on education? Ok? there's a lot of questions baked into this question. All right. And it's just not one thing. So let me address a couple of things, and I want to add some context because Randy and I had a conversation earlier today, and so I want to make sure that is communicated to all of you there. There is some fear of naturally. So because we saw how quickly our little pro group came together and said, this guy who literally ripped off core and just repackage it and selling it for like half the cost. People got really angry on our behalf and we're very protective. So I'm going to see how Randy's like do. If I do something like that, it's this whole group going to turn on me and just shut me down. Yeah, if you do that, yes, hopefully that's what they do and they come, you know, we come together and say, that's not right. That's not cool. But let's be very, very clear about something here is this person who I don't need to mention his name right now. He literally copied like command copy command paste Command C Command V the entire documentation and change the graphics and the color palette, and recorded his own video and sold it for a good deal less than what we sell our products for. Same phrasing. Same exercises. Same steps. Oh, my God. That's called plagiarism, that's called theft of intellectual property, this is not inspired by or influenced by it, which is very different, and I think in the creative community we get very sensitive about like an original idea and where we get it from. There's a couple of things that's going to help you in this thing. And I want to be very, very clear right now. So I'm going to look in the lens and tell you this. I actively encourage you to learn as much as you can from everyone in this group, including myself. And to be able to process that and regurgitate that information and in which way you see fit. I think if you use literally the words of somebody, put quotes around it. And cite them, this is what professionals do. There's no issue here. People, professional authors do this all the time. They cite their sources, and that should give you. You are stating your intentions very clearly. This is not my idea. This is where I got this idea from. What I would encourage you to do is to mix in your own flavor, your own voice, other sources that you pool from and add something to the conversation because nobody likes a poor copy of the same content. That's the problem with copies when you look at knockoff copies of luxury goods, it's poorly made. They don't pay attention to the detail. So you're like, well, who would buy this? Does the world need a counterfeit product? And counterfeit is not a good label to apply to yourself. So yes, many people. Are encouraged, our influence are inspired by the kinds of things that we do. I have no problem with that. Other people might have, but I don't, because I'll be the first person to tell you, no idea for my brain is original. That's it. I don't have original ideas, and if I did, they were all bad. OK, so randy, thank you very much for saying that. And if somebody is going to give you some beef, it could just be that they're saying this is too reminiscent. And that's where you need to just add your own style to it. And oddly enough, when you do this, you start to build your own authentic, true audience around what it is that you do. You know, there's like drunken history where they tell the history of the United States or the world and they're all a little bit smashed, so it's more interesting than a standard history thing. There's a guy who does like history or big concepts, and he does it like not in a rap, but like street, like the way he talks about it. Like he talks about Lolita. He talks about literature and classical stories using like street terminology like whatever. It's really cool if you ever seen that. So everybody has their own flavor, their own style, right? So do that and you'll be OK. All right. All right, now I'm going to move on to I think, hey, some hands went down and lead you lower your hand. OK, peter, you're up. A yeah, I think you already answered I forgot it was just about not wanting to sound like a copy because a lot of books that we read are very quotable, right? Like the definition of a brand from Marty Neumeier. A lot of stuff that you say, stuff that Simon Sinek says. But as long as we quote it like you said and give it your best. You know, if you do your best and there's going to be times when you forget where you got it from or you forget to cite it, like when you're speaking, I think the world will forgive you if 85 percent, 90% of the time you're doing your best to give credit and to help promote. The authors or the people that you are inspired by, I think it'll be OK, because then you can look at the body of work and say, look, yeah, they slip once or twice. It's nobody's perfect like that. Yeah, and I think a good tactic that I've been using that might be helpful to everyone else in here, too, is that depending on the industry that you're in, I usually give a lot of examples and frame it around that industry to give people an idea of what I'm talking about and how to apply it. Perfect OK, now I see Daniel's hands up and then when to bounce back to order. OK thank you, Chris. So I have a question because I've been doing some kind of drawings on my Instagram account. And as well sometimes I feel the need of teaching, but I don't want to show that I'm teaching and drawing at the same time. As well, I don't feel like I should be creating another separate account where I just do carousels. So what can you recommend for like a guy who's just starting to do drawings and still wants to teach? OK, so you're a young guy you want to teach and you're not fully confident that you're at that level where you could teach, right? So you're kind of stuck in this weird spot. All right, now, here's the thing. I think it's one thing to pair what other people say, and it's OK to do that. I mean, I'm doing it and it's like, well, what does it mean to you? You could tell a personal story. You can provide an example, you can say, like, I was really inspired by this idea. And here's the idea, and here's my take on it. And that's how you do it in your carousel and like, what do you guys think about it? Here's here's one thing that you guys don't realize the reason why it took me six, seven hours in the past to make a carousel and it still does, to a degree, is because I want to make sure I fact checked. I'd do my best. I try and research. I try to make it really digestible. I'll watch videos. I rewatch films. You know, I'm looking for something to add to this conversation if I can. And it takes a while to do that, right? Say, for example, the story about Grandma Moses I read originally. I think in gosh, it was at the compound effect. Or is it the power, self confidence I read in one of those two books, ok? And I couldn't remember where I read it, so I had to dig around and find it, reread it and then I read her bio or a Wikipedia, and I looked at some research and I'm trying to find the best way to tell the story in 10 simple slides. It takes a lot of work, and then you get there and then some other monkey on the internet. It's like, oh, I love that story, ok? I just retell the exact same story the way you said it. So that's the problem. Like, you didn't do any work. You even understand what the story means to you. That's the problem. OK, so if you're interested in something, I think that's a license for you to start to dig deeper and find something more and try to connect it to things. The weird thing is, the more I read, the more I feel like every book is the same. It's really bizarre. It really is. And it's kind of cool to be able to pull something from here to take something from there and over here and try to tie it together. I think that's where people are like, oh, that's cool. So you can be rewarded for being a good researcher. I like that. Tell me something I didn't know before. Tell me in a new and novel way. And if you can't don't do that one, my book is filled with ideas I have not made yet because I just I'm not feeling that that's a good piece of content. And to be honest, I mean, I shouldn't even be telling you guys this. I went back and looked at some of my slides. My I, I was terrible. What was it thinking? Oh my god, that could be phrased much better. Or that was just stupid piece of content? No why would anybody look at this? So I still go through that. I'm reluctant to tell you that because I know then nobody here will do it if I tell you that, so pretend I did say it. All right. All right. So what are we going to do now? Also, other hands have popped up. I've lost track of who's who. I think we said I was going to go and now I see Sean, Randy and David with their hands up. Ok? how do you go? Oh, it's actually just piggybacking of the previous question, because I know you mentioned before that a lot of people credit you for a lot of what Blair says, but then you mentioned something about and that you're like, just more outspoken about the his own cause. And I just wanted to touch base on those two, I guess give people more, I guess like more insight into that because I know a lot of this stuff that you've taught comes from Blair's book, but you are more well-known than Blair is, in my opinion. OK, let's talk about that. Yes, I do quote Blair a lot and he is on my book list. And probably if somebody put a gun to my head to name a book, I'm win without putting manifesto. And so I'm constantly doing that right. And Blair knows this because he's like, I think you've helped me sell more books than anybody else has helped me to sell books. This is what I mean when I say pay respect, give credit where credit is due. And you know this and it's like, I can't get out of a conversation without quoting Jim rohn, Blair ends and probably Marty Neumeier. It's just going to happen. And it's almost like a I'm a caricature now because I can't escape it. I'm going to do it because it's been phrased really well and I try to do that. And then people are now saying that that's Chris's idea. I'm like, it's not my idea. And I think in this case, and I hope Blair feels the same way, is we both win. I get to share his message to a whole audience of people who would otherwise never been exposed to, would never be interested in it, and it's going to help him. It's going to help me and and he's a little bit older than me. Not much, but he's older than me, and he's probably not playing the game like the way I'm playing it, which I think some young whippersnapper is going to outdo all of us in a few minutes here. And then we'll be Chris, who? That's just the way it's going to be because they're on TikTok tok, shaking their butt and they got the message. I don't know. I have yet to figure out how to do that. It's one of my curses in life, I do not know how to dance. TikTok forever will be out of my reach. OK Gary doesn't dance. Who's that? Gary V doesn't dance, he's doing really well, just doing the same thing he does on YouTube, but just shorter. Oh OK, good for Gary. Yeah, Gary also has a full time team of 20 people doing everything he wants them to do. So I was right, but actually somebody has volunteered to help me to take over my TikTok account and cut our older videos down and just post it like crazy. So maybe it'll work. It's just like, I'm going to try to master a few platforms, and I think I'm doing OK on the three that I mentioned. And that's as much as I can do right now. So those are you guys that are crushing on TikTok. God bless you. Go do it. Have fun. Enjoy make a name for yourself. Apparently, it's very easy for you to get a following on TikTok. Eriksen is a really good example. Is doing really well on TikTok. Yeah OK, so I think we'll go to Sean and Randy and then David, OK, and then back to Shia. Go ahead, Sean. OK, here, you, Sean. I don't know why. Can you hear me now? Yes, we can. OK so I was wondering if you have any advice for dealing with nerves or making the most of a social situation where you feel like way out of your league? Are you going to something with industry peers? Yes yeah, I have an opportunity pretty soon to go to an event that pretty much everybody in my industry will be at. That's pretty high profile and photograph and VFX. Yeah and yeah, music. Things cool. I think this one's kind of tough. We're not going to lie to you, Sean. It's going to be tough if you look up to these people. It sounds like you obviously do for good reason. You're sitting there thinking, oh, man, who am I? And I think you're focusing a lot of your energy on yourself, like, I don't belong here who love me in this thing. It's like I'm stupid compared to. I mean, they fart out better stuff than I do. You know, you have this kind of negative self-talk that's going on. How about you just focus on them? Just focus on them like, Oh my god, Mary, you worked on Mission Impossible 45. I can't believe I'm talking to you right now. I love that shot or what you did. Oh my god, Ashley. Dude, you rock, dude. You're the one who inspired me to get in this business in the first place. How are you doing? And then you just put your energy on them. Just tell them how you feel about them. And don't worry so much about what they think of you. OK can you do that? I think so. My the thought that comes to mind is like, I don't I also don't want to come off as a fanboy and then be like, sort of prove that I'm. Beneath them. Yeah you know what I mean? Yeah, I think there's just two ways to play. It is like you can watch like, I own this and I'm an equal, and that sounds like it's going to be hard for you to do. So I play it the other way now. I'm like, I'm a fan, I'm not going to lie and I've done this myself. I really have. And I even tell people not to do this, but I did it, and it makes me feel really comfortable because I'm not suppressing how I really feel. And I think that's where some of the stress comes from. Like when the client says, we only have a dollar for this and you were thinking 10 thousand, you don't see anything, it's going to create anxiety and stress for you. So if you meet someone, you're like, you're the most amazing person I've ever known in my whole life, and you're just trying to be too cool for school. And that's where the conflict comes in. So I know that we've met some celebrities in our lives. I've told the story before where I sat next to Hicks and Gracie, probably one of the greatest living mixed martial artists of all time. And I talked to him the second time I found enough courage to talk to him, and it was like, oh, this was easy. Once it just told him something Sugar Ray Leonard, the Chris Martin from Coldplay was by our office like, hey man, great music I love, you know, it's like it's to try to pretend otherwise. It's really where the internal turmoil happens. So just avoid that. It's OK. What if they saw you as a fan like, dude, that guy is really cool. I like him, he was really honest with me, everybody else is just being pretentious. Yeah, and we get that a lot in l.a., people pretending to be people for school. Why don't you try a different strategy and see how it works for you, ok? That sounds good. Amen good luck. Thank you. OK don't eat anything with a lot of acid. Yeah you have enough natural acid going on that night. So don't do that. Don't you'll be in the bathroom. Ok? who are we going to? Randy Wright, Randy David, chia and then Misty. Let's let's go fast, guys. I have another 10 minutes or so. Fire two questions. One is very, but one is very short, so I got a part of an Emmy nominated video that has nothing to do with either of the two brands. And I know that's a good traffic and I'm trying to figure out where to put it. I'm starting a business brand that's more commercial, and then I have my personal brand. And I have no idea where to put this thing because it's. Positive and about social awareness. So you want to use it, but you don't want to use it? I want to use it. But what's wrong? Because I. Because I want it to be of just about that, I don't want it to be about my brand, you know what I'm saying? Because it's a positive social movement and it's not something I want to associate with the commercial side that I'm working on, nor do I want them to see that associated with my personal stuff. But I still want that traffic, so I'm made. You sound like you're conflicted here. Like I said, what do you use it when you don't want to use it? Yeah, which is it? I want to use it and use it. Just use it. All right, so the other thing real quick, real quick is when did you stop asking for permission to jump and start teaching? And what was that process like? Because a lot of people here are scared to. To actually educate on the platform, do the carousels and Peter mentioned it, educate while you educate yourself while you're teaching. So did you do the same thing or did you just like, hey, I knew I was at this level. And I just like, I'm going to start teaching. Yeah, you know, I started teaching like five years out of school when I thought I had enough experience running my business, and it just so coincided like I put on my mind five years out and five years out, an opportunity opened up and it just worked out pretty good. So I had at least five years of experience, and the first year teaching was pretty rough. I'm not going to lie to you because I was doing all the things I tell you not to do now. I was pretending to be somebody I wasn't, and I was like, I had to have all the answers, and it was just when somebody could ask me a question. I didn't even know what they were talking about. I'm like, wow, just blow past it, right? And today I would do it very differently. I would be very honest, sincere and say, wow, that's like, that's a concept I never heard of. You know more about this than me. I would just say it now, or what do you mean when you say that because I don't I've never read that, I don't know what word you're talking about. And then just come clean and through maturity, through experience, you start to learn, just come clean with stuff. And I think the same can be true about social media. So now the new teaching platform in social media is not so much in person. And if you're just learning something, just tell people, I'm just learning this thing, but I enjoy this, and maybe you will, too. Or, hey, guys, you can't. You won't believe this. But here's something I found out recently. So stating in those terms, like new, I'm still learning. This is like a research project I'm working on. Everybody is cool. It's when you try to pretend as a 15-year-old kid that you're a branding master and you've got seven years of experience and you speak from that kind of authority. That's where it gets really rough. And like people say they could smell BS from a mile away, so that's what I would do. OK, I'm only saying this because of the proliferation of garbage content that people complain about. I personally don't have a beef with it. I don't think anybody in this group is putting out that kind of garbage content. So this is not a sneak attack or a kind of veiled commentary or critique on this group. Not at all. OK all right, David. Hey, guys. So I want to circle back to the conversation of having three pricing options. So my question is, how can I craft a three pricing options for console sporting only offers? And consulting offers. Yeah I don't want to do like content creation, but I want to onboard a few clients for only consulting. OK the formula is the one that you want them to pick is one in the middle. The one that is like the ritz-carlton white glove experience is the one that's going to be higher. Some creativity, some thinking has to be put into this. It would not be possible for me to freestyle this because I don't know enough about what you want to offer. OK And then the lowest tier one is you can do it. We can help. Now, since all of it's consulting, you have to figure out how to do this. You can do the analysis. The first part, right? and you can do some like an initial report, like what posts are doing well for you, what you might consider doing more of or less of. And here are three people in your space that are doing really well. You can just do that, and maybe that is worth something to somebody. The whole point of it isn't necessarily to tell the cheap option, it's just to make the middle option look a lot more palatable. And analytics doing data science stuff is actually really valuable. Or you could say, look, based on the preliminary research here, here's the hashtags I think you should try. I'll give you three data sets to try. OK I could put together a style escape for you and what I think you need for your Instagram account. Mm-hmm Are you getting ideas now? No David, sorry, my internet is terrible, but but Thanks a lot. I think I got it. Got it. Ok? good. I like giving me the silent treatment. OK I think we are to Shia. No, we're speaking. Did you have your hand up? You did OK. I'm going to make sure we have time for you, so let's do this Misty and then Shia. Go ahead. OK mine's really quick. It's really just a comment that came to mind when we were listening to Sean's experience that I heard someone say that nerves and enthusiasm feel the same way in the body. So maybe if we think about that when we get the case of the nerves, that can be useful. Yes And that person is Simon Sinek. He talked about interviewing athletes at the Olympics, and they said that, you know, the reporters kept asking him, are you nervous? Are you nervous? Like, no, I'm excited. And he says that basically, if you look at it, the symptoms of being nervous are quick and heart rate. You get sweaty palms. And you start to envision the future. And it says, what's the symptoms of being excited, your heart rate quickens, you have sweaty palms. And you have visions of the future, so they're literally the exact same symptoms. We just need to change the message that's being transmitted and how we interpret it in our head. So instead of interpreting it as being nervous, reinterpret it as being excited. Like, I'm really excited, they're almost exactly the same feeling. Right, and true, true, true, the life my wife's like, honey, you're getting ready to speak tomorrow and you haven't finished your talk. I'm like, no. And she's like, I'm so nervous for you. I'm like, I'm not. I'm excited. Please stop telling me you're nervous because it's going to mess up my game. I'm good. OK Shia. Hey, guys, no more hands raise, no more hands raised, this is it. Go ahead. You have to unmute. I could do it for you, though. OK, you're ready. Go ahead. So switching to the visual. Part of the brand I used at the beginning a few years ago, I used to present like half baked stuff options, so just to test where the client is. And we went in circles, revisions back and forth. It never end ended. The last 15 brands that I created. I just presented one concept, but pitched the hell out of it, meaning to say show them the full, full mark UPS and all that stuff. So I read the book from Blair with recommendations, and he talks about the addiction of the reveal, right? And that we are addicted to the reveal and take them along. With the process, so when it comes to strategy that makes I do that all the time. But when it comes to the design, I felt every time I present a second or third option, I open up a can of worms and it never ends, and I remember why I only present one option. My question is, I know that you do stuff. So what am I doing wrong that the second represents something else? It's goes downhill from there. OK, let's refer back to the book of Blair. OK, since you've read it, I've read it too. It's just that problems, when raised early are cheap to solve and problems raised late are expensive to solve. So you want to bring all the problems up front? So how do we do that? What do we recommend people do? So if you do discovery and strategy up front, we're bringing up all the problems. We're getting clarity, we're getting alignment on what it is we're trying to do. And to me, the great intermediate step between that and designing something is to do style escape. So the style escapes are some options we can talk, we can work through the problem and then we can go away and design. And I'm in the same boat as you, Shia. In the early days of pitching because we used to have to pitch a lot for commercials, we would throw 10, 12, 14 ideas at it and just spend a God awful amount of money. And the clients were sitting there overwhelmed with the plurality of choices, the embarrassment of riches, if you will, that they had a hard time choosing. And it inevitably asked us, which one do you recommend? Like you said the doctor recommends, then we would make a recommendation based on what we heard. We like this. Or sometimes we'd remain very objective and say, I don't know. They're all our children. We love them all equally. You get to pick. OK, fine. Later on, when we learned how to have conversation with the client to hold their attention and to dive deep into what it is that we think they need almost always, then we could only see one solution at this point only. One thing. So then we would just present one thing, you either take this or you don't. We don't think there's 35 ways to do this based on this very thorough conversation that we've had. And we then just eliminated the choices and then they get to pick or not. It's risky. It's the way I work, so I don't do stealth escapes, I only present one concept and the last 20 brands got approved. The first, like, I didn't have any revisions. My question is, should I do stealth games or not? No like I said, if the process is working and you like the results that you're getting by all means, keep doing that thing. So the last 20 projects have been frictionless. You only do one concept and they're happy and they will recommend friends keep doing that thing. Right you have set up yourself in a position where what you're doing, you have a very clear process. You're a good listener and your clients, the ones that you're able to find respect and like that process. Don't complicate it. Don't introduce something new to have a lot of extra opinion. Now, sometimes the clients do feel this way, especially when they pay you a lot of money for peace of mind and just clarity that they felt like you've explored it. Even if the option is very good, just keep in mind the whole contextual thing, right? We don't know if it's good, if we don't know if it's perfect until we see something that's not perfect, like, oh, well, that was really good. I'm glad you made that choice. But I always tell them is look behind the scenes. We did a few out. I'm not showing it to you after we begin the process and we close, then I'm going to show you and I do it all the time. Just to show them, look, you see, I could have shown you this, but I wouldn't save you. Yeah you know, Paul Ryan is famous for doing one logo for a lot of money for from $100,000 to million dollars, and he built these really beautiful books. And if you ever get a chance, go find these books. You can find them at the library or online somewhere, I think. And what he would do when he was designing. The Ford logo or the morning star logo or something like that, he would show you the evolution of his thinking. Really beautifully laid out that page by page. It told the story about why this works, why that doesn't work, and then eventually arrives at the one logo. And that's the one he wants you to buy. And that's it. And part of his contract is, I just make you one. You already bought it so you could use it or you don't. That's up to you. So there's alternative ways to make it work for you, ok? All right. Emmanuel, you have not had a chance to speak, so please make yourself be heard and then we're going to wrap it up with Sean. OK, I have a very easy question. Great very easy. Last week, at the end of the call, you said, I'm tired. I don't know if I'm ever doing this again. And you showed up today. So my question is why? My question is why? Let me say that. It was like, Oh my god, he's quitting this PM call. I love this. Oh no, no, no, no. Hold on, hold on, hold on. Let me clarify. Let me clarify. The problem was that day I had done an hour and 45 minutes in the morning, and then I did another hour and 45 minutes on a PM car and I was like, guys, I'm tired, I'm done. And I didn't want to create this expectation with everybody that yes, every week we're going to have a 3 and 1/2 hour long conversation. That's all. OK thank you, because you actually said the words, I do not know when I'm ever going to do this again. We'll have to edit it out, obviously. Here I am, you know, we're very I'm very happy about this. OK, that's good. All right. Thank you. OK, John. Oh, no, I just forgot to put my hand down from earlier. So sorry about that. OK very good. 6:50 PM. I'm going to do a whiteboard session either tomorrow or Friday, and I'm going to encourage you guys to tune in. I'm going to talk about how to create an innovative culture, whether your company 1 or 100 it should work. I've come back from a board meeting with a company that I just want to inject some innovation into their thinking, and I started to realize some of the sticking points. I'm going to share that with you. I've created this thing that I shared with Matthew. He seemed pretty excited about it, but I call it innovation bingo, so you guys will have to tune in to see that. OK, so a little tease there. Good to see all of you. I'd like to take this opportunity to, first of all, say, say goodbye to all of you, but also to give everyone who wants to introduce themselves and say hello to do so now. OK in this part, Alex will cut out. So if you're new? If you feel like you're new. Please, please unmute yourself. Tell us who you are. Tell us where you're from and tell us the one thing you want to be known for. So, Christie, go ahead. The Mike. There you go. Nice to see you. Nice to meet you. This is my first time here. I hope to get the most out of this group. And I want to thank you for giving me this content, the free content on YouTube. And for this group. I want to be remembered for. I don't know why. I don't know why. Right let's do this again. Let's do this. Rewind let's rewind the tape. Ok? you're going to say your name, which you haven't said yet. You're going to tell us where you're from or what city you reside in. And hopefully you can think about the one thing you just want to be known for. You can change your mind later. OK but I cannot see if I'm nervous or if I'm excited. You're excited, for sure. So go ahead. Do it. My name is. Hi, guys, my name is Chris. I'm from bucharest, Romania. From Europe. I'm a motion designer and a VFX artist. And for now, I'm a freelancer. Beautiful you did it. Good job. All right, who else wants to say hello? Hey, there you go. Hi hi, I'm Radhika. This is my second call. I had it last week. I'm from India. My company's name is laughing popcorn. It's a small studio which I'm looking to shape up. And I think the one thing that I want to be known for is somebody who changed the face of design in a developing country like India. I don't want people to go through the struggles that I've been through. Beautiful that was more ambitious than I was hoping for. So that was awesome. Thank you very much. But in this group, what's the one skill or one thing you want to be known for. So that we know how to kind of remember you? I am working as a brand strategist, and I think I come from a knowledge design background of designing and MBA like management. I think I'm stronger with my business and the thinking and strategic parts. So how to build cultures and companies establish business? I think I'm stronger there and I want to make it even more stronger. Great, fantastic. I love the name of your company, too. OK, thank you. Yeah, it's very nice. All right. Who's up next? Who wants to say hello? Although, OK, fire away. Hi, I'm Amy Lynn. I live in Napa, California, and I'm a wine packaging designer and I've been designing for over 20 years, but I wasn't able to get a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of science, so I'm working on the business aspect now. Beautiful thank you and welcome to the group. Norcal in the house. Hey, who's up next? I'll go. Go ahead. Yes so my name is Reggie ballesteros, and I am also from Northern California, I'm from the San Francisco Bay area, specifically Vallejo, but most people know San Francisco more. I am a photographer. I went to education for engineering, but I since quit that and I've been a photographer for five years. And as far as what I want to be known for, I want my legacy to be. I'm that guy on YouTube who taught you how to do photography. Awesome very good. So welcome to the dark side known as the creative arts. OK now, who's up next? Yes I'm looking at you. Yes Heather. OK, there we go. Good evening. I'm really from Israel originally, but now I'm living in Peru. I've been traveling around the world for around South America for the past five years and building digital companies for about 15 years. And well. One thing to be known for, I'm now writing a book called The nomad MBA and. It's kind of taking the concept of being a nomad and but not as traveling and working more as traveling and learning by building companies. Awesome next time, may I make one request? Turn on the lights, you're so dark, I can barely see you. All right. It's the only way I get to know who you guys are is if you guys speak up, there we go, whoop. The lights are on. It's like magic. Now I can see you OK. The men in the mystery man. OK, who else? Who else? I'm not going to force you said it. OK, then, that's it. I want to hit Stop Recording right now.

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