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Lead Generation Through Clear Communication

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128
TheFutur
Published
September 9, 2020

Mo Ismail gives a keynote presentation on lead generation through clear communication.

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I can record to the cloud and watch the entire group together. Ladies and gentlemen, it's good to see everyone's faces. Some people knew some people I've met and talk to a bunch because I talk a lot. It seems that way, but this is call for the record 128 the am call and it's the lead generation continued. David talis just hit K. I just wanted to say it on the record. I hate you, but I love you all at the same time. Congratulations ladies and gentlemen, we are continuing a conversation that we had last week. The goal is to really create depth in the topics that we're talking. And this is the community call. So this vibe is different. I'm not here talking to you as an expert. I'm talking to you as a fellow member and a fellow colleague, someone that is in the journey with you to help you and make you feel empowered to speak up and to learn more and to apply the things that we're learning. OK, before we get started, I'd love for anyone that's new or that has not spoken up yet to jump online, unmute, say who you are or what you do and why you're here. So this is Matt. I kind of did this earlier. Mo, I don't know if you want me to do a brief one liner if who I am. Yes, please. Sure thing. My name is Matthew, and I'm a National Geographic Explorer and canon photographer, and I'm now shifting from the editorial world of not being able to put on my table to the commercial photography world, where hopefully I can change that. So I'm still doing the other stuff. I'm just trying to actually get paid and make a better living because I'm good at what I do. And I'm here to hopefully learn from the community. I'm very open minded and I'm looking forward to getting to know you all. Welcome, brother. Thank you so much for the introduction. Hello photographer in the house. That's what's up. Good to see you. Good to meet you, Greg. Hey everybody, I'm Greg manko and I just joined the group last week. This is my first call and I joined because of the thank you. I joined because of the business bootcamp, because I did that in July and it literally saved my business. I run a marketing consulting firm. Thank you, Daniel. And I needed to do something. It's been around for 10 years and just through all of the amazing stuff that happened there, I hyper targeted that as the only marketing agency that's dedicated to long standing firms. And in two months I've just turned everything around. The mindset was the most helpful of all of the modules, and I met amazing people. I practice partners in Canada, Porto, Portugal, Romania, Italy and I just wanted to keep that feeling going and keep the amazingness going. So great to meet you all. Greg, welcome. I'm super excited that you're like a marketing guy because I think you're going to provide us some value in today's call because there's some marketing lingo that I'd love to hear from you expound on for the people that are trying to build up their lead generation muscles, you know what I mean? I'm sorry. Just a quick thing. There was a Legion component that Ben, Matthew and Chris were testing, so that's also something that I can maybe drop some gems in here. There you go. That was super helpful, too. That's what I'm talking about. Awesome, man. Thank you for saying Hello. Thank you for being here. Ok? anyone else that's new or hasn't spoken up? Hey, I'm Jennifer. This is my second call. I slid in last week about 10, 15 minutes late, so I didn't say anything. And I'm a web designer and digital marketing specialist near Seattle, so I was invited by Angela merseybeat, so I'm really excited to be here. Thanks for having me, and I'm not going to turn my camera on because I've been home with a sick kid for three days, so maybe next week I'll introduce my face, parent and arm. Welcome, welcome. Thank you for being here. Thank you for speaking up. And welcome to another Seattle light. Seattle light. Let's go. OK, last call for newbies or people in Seattle. Oh, I'm sorry. Darian derrion's from Seattle. OK, good. Yeah OK. Anyone else? Before we jump in. Danny, can you keep an eye out on the chat, please, because I'm going to be I'm going to be rolling? No, you said no. David, can you keep an eye on the chat? No, Sylvie, can you keep an eye on the chat? See, screw you guys. Sylvie's Sylvie is here to play. All right. And it's probably like 4:00 AM where she's at. OK, let's jump right in. Let's let's jump right into it. I'm going to share my screen here. Let me know that you guys can see it whenever it's shared. Can everyone see it beautiful? OK, we're going to bypass all this. Well OK, we're going to bypass all this stuff. OK on the last call, we did have an activity a lot of people had started to realize that they may not be communicating effectively what it is they do to where it's in alignment with how their customers understand. So I want some brave souls to maybe share what they've learned if they did that activity. And what they are now implementing after the feedback they received, maybe one to two people. So those that maybe haven't done it yet are still doing it can gleam some ideas on what they also need to work on. Marta, please. So I received some feedback, and from one person that was too much text from another person that was just about enough text and explanation on the website. They both understood half of what we do as a business and that other half is something that we need to expand. I also, on reflection, see that we are super clear on what we do, the problems we solve, and we have a super clear process on what we do and how we do it. And I think it's moving towards a lack of clarity and explaining it to clients in the right way. So that's my reflection. So they were clear on what you do and how you do it, but you feel like you're not explaining it well enough with your clients when you're in a real life meeting. Is that what you're saying? Partly so. The feedback I received was that there was understanding of the mindset work we do and how we help people with burnout. The words that were used, the difficult modes to overcome. So this is the feedback I received, but there was no understanding of the energy side of things, we do. So this is the other half that we probably have to go more into depth with explaining or rephrase it differently. Got it. Got it. OK was it? And was the activity overall helpful for you to be able to target the area? That you need to improve on was the oh, sorry, yes, Yes. Absolutely any feedback is always super helpful because it shows me OK if there is at least one person who may be a little bit confused when receiving a message, there may be few more out there and we may miss those potential clients. Got it! Well, Thanks for sharing, Marta. Appreciate that. OK anyone else that did the activity that wants to share on the feedback? Dreger you always have, guys. So I actually spoke to Marta over messaging, and I think something that, with what you guys do, I think even getting like a simple explainer video off fiber can do a lot of wonders for you to fill in that gap of like, you know, because you do have a lot of text on your website. And I think you've been able to get a quick voiceover done, getting some graphics to kind of give somebody like a 30 second elevator pitch on your website. I think would do wonders for what you're doing. I mean, are you think because there is a lot of text, but I think if you can get them on, you know, with a video and then like, you know, you're going to go into marketing, there's a retargeting that you can do and all those things, because that worked with the I built a website for someone who did something similar healing work to like CEOs and CFOs. I mean, at first he is like, you know, wanting to explain a lot of what he does with a quick video with the core messaging, what he did really. It still saves you time and having to explain things, but also works as a marketing collateral that you can put on your Facebook page. You can put it on YouTube. It works from a lot of different spots, so that's all I wanted to throw in there. Mo, you did a great job, bro, bro. I really appreciate that feedback because it ties really well into what we're talking about today, and I love the highlight of minimal effort for maximum results. So you're creating this piece of content to literally communicate with your client and expound on what it is you do and show your personality. But at the same time, you can take it and reproduce it across multiple different platforms like Drago said for marketing. So you're not doing a lot of work in comparison to the writing, you're probably having to do a lot more editing work. You're probably having to select different types of blog arenas versus that video it can be a mass production. So Drago, Thanks for expounding on that. OK any other person that did the activity? I'll tell you. Oh, sorry. You know, wait a little bit longer. OK I did the activity, and Marta gave me some feedback that was incredible. She said, I see what you do. I know what you do. I have no idea how you do it, and you need to tell me and walk me through your process. So I feel more comfortable when I purchase or when I make a sale with you. And that is spot on because our website is only acting as a landing page right now to showcase our portfolio and to tell them kind of the niche that are the service that we're offering. So the second, she said, that it's in alignment with what we've accomplished and the gap that we need to fill. And I know Rachel, who ran strategy on us, is probably like I gave you a list of things to do. You haven't done it yet. But what that taught me is there's a degree of communication that is correct and that we're on point with what it is we offer. However, if they wanted, if I wanted to convert that client, I haven't made them feel safe enough because I haven't walked them through how I'm going to get them to the end result. And that's something that I need to work on. OK so I'm going to I'm going to share again. For us to start the discussion, unless anyone has any feedback at this point. Any feedback? Go ahead. I got. So some of the talked about, and I kind of feel bad talking about this person, not so bad about it, but I was a really big follower of Donald Miller from building a story brand. It actually took one of his courses, but something that we started doing in all of our websites is when you talked about its clients want to know that you have a process, and I think that's something that Chris talked about. When you're able to actually niche down on something, you're able to relate to a client like, hey, I've done this before. We have a process in place. So like if you go on our website, we have a very simple four step four, we do video for you. We have a strategy session. We have, you know, a production, post-production distribution. Those are our four pillars of what we do. So the client knows that. And within each step, there's little things that go with it. But they know when it comes to website, these are going to be the four pillars that we're going to go through our process. And that's what you should expect because, you know, when they know, because you can keep tally of the, hey, we got to this step, we got to do the next step. When clients don't know what's going to happen next, there's an uncertainty of not knowing. But if they know that, hey, we're on track because we did pre-production now we're going to shooting. And after shooting a post, we're going to work in distribution of the video. They feel like they're part of what's happening. And that's something that, you know, for us. It's something that clients know for a lot of people that never done video before, it's an unknown. But how helping them have clarity on what the steps are really help us even close more deals because they're with us along the whole way. I couldn't agree more. And it ties in perfectly to what we're about to jump in, which is, are you sorry going to share here? OK the biggest theme from the homework is, are you making it easy for your desired prospects to find you and connect with you? That was the biggest takeaway of the theme of that call. And are you helping them understand the unknown to make the sales dialogue that you have with them easier? So if anyone is familiar with marketing and funnels, right, because a lot of times we throw out things in this group, create content, create content, create content, create content. This is Hubspot's kind of pretty well-known funnel where you attract through the content that you make and you're putting out for people to find who you are. If they're strangers and then you lead them through that content to a hub that you can convert them, you try to close and then you try to delight. The goal here is to easily push them through if they turn into a lead to then turning into a client and then after they become a client, you try to help them service your business by delighting other clients. I wanted to start with this because it led me to basically the framework that I understood from the call with Chris and to God to give you some context. I remember that Debbie on the last call, the homework we did was a little dated, so I picked a call that was contemporary and it was a former member that was having a really, really tough time in their business and needed leads right away. The issue that I found with the conversation was that we were all still saying the same thing. So again, it it went back to why is there not production of lead generation when we kind of know what it is we're doing? So the things that we gleamed from that call before we get into member questions about it was there's this revolving habitual action that has to take place when we're growing our business that a lot of us, I think, either may be scared of doing or there's a fear of rejection there, and it's the networking, the relationships, the outbound and the social interaction. This is something that needs to be nonstop. And what Chris mentioned is when he started his business, he built a relationship with a small agency that later became the same agency that worked for Microsoft. He built a relationship with a local Mitsubishi dealer that was making TV ads that small TV ads until he was able to do that long term with them to transition into national TV spots. So the outbound and the relationship building and putting yourself out there is not dead. It's just something that has to be done simultaneously with these things that are inside, which is to make yourself easier to find with lead generation, you can't hide. So a lot of us aren't creating content. And if you remember last call, Colleen's biggest take biggest advice was she's creating an immense amount of value driven content through her podcast, and it's leading to more engagement. So what's the kind of content that you can make that's best for you and your style and your personality that can give value to the end viewer and convert them and take them to your website? Which I'm calling the hub because on the call for those that watched it. Someone said you don't really need a website because you hear about how overwhelming creating a fully flushed out website is and then that pushes you away from creating it all. So for those that are in the early stages of lead generation, like me and my business partner, we're not too long ago create a landing page that effectively gets the point across of everything you do for the client to land on there and be like, OK, I know who they are. I know what they do, and I know why it solves my problem and how it's going to solve my problem. Don't let the idea of a fully fleshed out site hinder you from creating a one page stop and show hub for them to get the information that they need and be converted into a client. But all this is on the back end of what we talked about last week, this content and this hub needs to be effectively communicating what you do and they need to understand it and it needs to be in alignment. So if you do your job well here while networking and creating relationships when you connect, like Drago was saying earlier, and for me, connection is get the meeting, you're in a sales negotiation and you're actually face to face communicating or you're on a call. This is just bringing everything they've already consumed and everything they've already touched to life through you. So you're taking them through this journey, as Chris would say, scaffolding them upwards versus trying to just get the sale at the first point of communication. You shouldn't be trying to get the sale when you're communicating with them over content. You shouldn't be trying to get the sale or sell them on the website. You are a person, as Chris says, you're a change agent. If they are even interested in your content and interested in your website, it's for them too because they want something in the future that you're going to help them get. And after that, your communication with proposal and engagement and closing should be in line with the how you're doing things. So we've gotten you this far now we're going to, you know, if this proposal looks right, we're going to move on to the next stage and again, you're making everything easy for them from the moment they find you to the moment that they engage with you and sign the deal so you don't find them in a state of buyer's remorse. There needs to be a level of congruence between each of these stages with how you represent yourself. So when they sign, after you've generated the lead that they feel closure in that everything is in alignment from how you started and got them. OK, I'm going to take a breath here, and I'd love for anyone to jump in with a question or feedback or expansion on this. Hugo, I think I saw your hand raised. Yeah hey, Mo, how are you? What's up, man? How are you? Hey, I have a question. So, yeah, so we talk about, you know, being clear on our website, right? But what do you recommend we talk about because there's two way to go about it. You can either talk about your client's problem. Or be clear on what you do. Right? so I know Chris, talk about, you know, always focus on your car and on your customer, you know, talk about their problem. But we also want clarity on what we do, right? So I don't want to mix two messages together. So what do you recommend people to do? I hold off on my feedback if anyone wants to answer Hugo's question. But I have feedback, but. I think you need both my perspective, I think you have clarity with what you do, but you also need to be, you know, client driven in that sense. And I think something that has helped me a lot and I think everyone in this group, if you're into any sort of lead generation into web design or anything like that, having a basic understanding of some SEO tactics goes a really long way. And then something that really helped me generate a lot of leads is we wrote one blog post for a website that is, how much does a video cost? That right there, since so much people tour website for traffic, it's just, you know, local market is that, you know, I'm providing them value. But explaining to them, hey, this is how much of video cost, and it's very simple, sort of like buying a house. You want two stories, one story. Every price is different. Is this going to be on the beach or is it going to be out West away from the water? All those things very just like a video would, and we break that down in a very simple blog post. But you know, when a client is looking for someone online and they find like, oh, there's video production company made an article about how much the video cost. We already have a connection about this already having an understanding of how much our video costs because you put a price in there like, hey, normally these are different samples, because how much these costs we want to have a conversation with them is already there, ready, more educated now on the other side, having clarity on what we do and having a process that relates to them, like, hey, these guys know what they're doing. So that's where I say, like, you need clarity of what you do, but you also need to be able to bring them value. But that's my Ted Talk for today. Thanks to you, Greg, I saw your hand up, man, I would love to hear your input on this. One of the things that we learned from Chris in the business boot camp is one of the quickest ways to do that is to have your positioning be so specific and when you're describing what it is you do or who you are and who you focus on. Also describes what it is you do. And so here's a recent Instagram post, and I'll post the link to that. But essentially, it's when you get down so specific that your client base. And you're a little scared about it, but it's large enough that you can actually survive off of it and then. You determine what is and what's a valuable engagement with that client. And so, you know, like Drago just said, it can be views of a video. It can be click through. It can be all those sorts of things. But what actually are you looking to achieve on the website? But what I learned and I did this too, because I thought I was really specified before doing B to be marketing for financial services firms, and that was just so broad, so wide. My target market is really it's 2000 firms globally when I get really down to where it is, but it's large enough. It doesn't mean I can't talk to all the other firms. But I'd say, you know, for example, a friend in the course is a video retoucher, and he was so scared of really pulling that down, but he realized. And as Chris says, the last thing the world needs is that other marketing generalists and other video retoucher generalists and other graphic design generalist. And what we found in the course is that the more specific that we get. The less issues we have with all of the rest of this. Because that starts to answer all of those questions, because then your audience realizes. Whatever it is you do, if you're in video for, he always uses, I think it's vegan bakeries in Brooklyn. You're who I'm going to, and you don't have to explain anything else because you are going after what it is, I do. And you know what I do. So that's just I mean, it took a long time for that to sink in. But once it did, it's incredible. And then you have other people just seeking you out saying, I know I'm not a vegan bacon in Brooklyn bakery in Brooklyn, but can you help me? so that's the best, probably besides mindset, the piece of advice that I got towards explaining what it is you do in the simplest terms possible. Thanks, Greg. Hugo, are you still on? I just want to I can't. Oh yeah, I see you OK. Yes, I'm going to. I'm going to. Do you have anything to say from their feedback? And then I'm going to. I want to recap it and add a twist on it from the call that we just reviewed and for the sake of this call and for the sake of your question. Yeah, I would love to hear your thoughts. There's still some confusions that I'm not sure of, but I would love to hear your thoughts first and then maybe I can follow up on it. Absolutely OK, I just want to make sure that I understood your question correctly. You said, what should I communicate on my website? Should I communicate what we do or should I focus on communicating directly to the client in solving their problem? Is that correct? Yes ok? Drago said. Answer the and Drago. Correct me if I'm wrong and recapping. But Drago said answer the clients questions and solve their problems via the content you create to then lead them to the website and the website shows them what you do and how you do it. So you're kind of using the content as the problem solving tool and technique. That's the value driven, and the website is highlighting how they solve that problem and through answering what we do. And then Greg is talking about positioning, which is a conversation that is constantly brought up in the group, and it's niching down when you show expertise in what you do for a specific type of person as you create depth. The large rt, as Chris would say, people that may not be in that industry will reach out to you because you've shown expertise and can by default, help them in what they need. Is that right, greg? I'm looking at your face to make sure that I. OK, cool. My addition to that based on. The study of these calls comes with Chris, and just my own experience is that the website? Good, see what you do, and then immediately say how what you've done has solved other people's problems. So the method that we're using, whether it's in an elevator pitch or on the website, it's like we do or sorry. You know how some people need content to market themselves and put themselves out there? Wonderful well, we create we strategize to get the best idea to create video content that you can use to market. In fact, we had a recent client that had this problem that we solved, and this is the solution we were able to get. So what that would look like on a landing page or a website is just a very clear services section of what you do and potentially a case study or a testimonial because the testimonial in and of itself will through the customer say this is how they solved my problem. You don't even have to do it for them. So in sum, what my expansion to what Drago put very well and what Greg said would be, you want to say what you do and how it's already solved a problem. So the client can see themselves in the person you've helped and feel a sense of urgency to need your expertise to solve their own problem. Does that help a little bit with the question? Yeah can I give you by example and you tell me with, you know, I'm missing anything, I love how Draco is treating, you know, anchoring the content. That's the problem and then angering your website as the, you know what you do and stuff, but like, for example. So my thing is, we help direct to consumer marketing with we help young build company with direct to consumer marketing strategy. So they can compete with the category leading brand. So I think that's pretty clear on what we do. Mm-hmm But I feel like the part that's missing is, yeah, you're competing with the category leading brand, but it doesn't really touch the customer's specific issues. So you can. So this is the thing that I'm confused about. You can't go into specific because then it gets long and you know, it gets winded. And I don't want that. I want to be short and clear, right? so it's the balance of the two that I'm struggling with right now, and I feel like Dragos example, like his advice was, you know, it's one way to solve this problem. I feel like if you brought those two things separately, it will help. Mm-hmm Yeah, I would like love to hear what your thoughts are in terms of how we are positioning ourselves because, you know, creating the website stuff. Yeah, that's the easy part. I think most of us struggle with is the positioning. Mm-hmm Can I can I jump in here, mo? Yeah, please. Sweet so Chris has a sheet that I think might help a little bit with this, which is like, it sounds a bit like you've done it, maybe expound a little bit more. And it's that like we do, we help x solve x solve y by doing this with that right? You remember what I'm talking about, mo? Yeah, Yeah. Yeah, the positioning unit. Yep, yeah, the positioning unit. There it is. Yeah so if we could, I think have you have you gone through that already and establish that because if you have, that's kind of the way you mix those two together. Hugo, you still online with us? Oh, there he is, yeah, yeah, I'm not sure which one you're talking about, but yeah, at some point in, you know, in the life of the future, I think I have done it before. I'm not sure that's the exact one that you're talking about. Yeah, I mean, like, yeah, I understand what you're saying. OK yeah, because it sounds like what you're wanting is a version of that as it goes a little bit more in depth on each side. So that's the elevator pitch, right? Like if you only have five seconds, you say the, you know, we help this type of client solve this type of problem by doing in this way or whatever or in this area or however you want to define that. But the take that out there or else you're going on this Alec. We're getting yeah, you're going, you're going robot on us there. Yeah OK, here you go. Just to continue on with the I see hands. OK, y'all, give me a second. I want to make sure that we dive deep with Hugo because other people, I'm sure, are suffering from the same issue. But I see hands. Don't worry, I see you, Hugo. I can tell you from my personal experience, from what Chris has told me and from this last talk that I had to watch again, even though I was on it is what you told me. Sounds very beefy. And if I was your potential client, I'm going to be really honest with you, I feel like you're talking above. My grade level. I actually don't understand what you do. And immediately, I'm kind of turned off. Mm-hmm Because you need to for lack of a better term, dumbed down the language. And this is what he said directly to Jeremy. He said, if you haven't been able to command brand strategy and you're trying to help these local businesses, these local businesses don't understand what the term brand strategy means. So ease them into it. And he used the terminology Trojan horse. He said, what is something that they will understand that you can hook them in with? And then When you get them in the meeting, you can expound on the service you do. So if you take that positioning statement that you just said to us out loud. At its core and its most simplest form, and you may not be able to do this right now, what is it that you do? For me, somebody that runs a business that's struggling, that doesn't understand all this marketing speak and brand speak and all of these things that me, you and everyone else in this group just regurgitates on a regular basis. What would you say to help them understand what you do? We will help. We will help turn that prospect into sales. Super simple, and how do you do that by getting dumb leads and converting them? And how do you get leads and convert them with strategies, with marketing strategy with a framework of like niching down? OK what have you done in the past that you could tell them? That equates to niching down and marketing strategy that they can understand. We have a case study that we show the clients. I don't have time to see the case study. Uh, with you right now on the website. What, what, what are you going to tell me? I would ask you what I would try to understand what your problems are and then go from there. I got you. I think maybe I'm not being clear. Me and you aren't talking just on the website you've done, you've done impeccable. We turn prospects into lead into sales and we help you generate more leads by doing what. And you can't say nisshin, you down or brand strategy. Mm-hmm I giving you clarity. Yeah, that's where I'm struggling with, I'm not sure what that word is, so I would maybe. I would ask your previous clients and say, what did I do for you? And have them say it back to you in their own words. Well, they say we provide clarity to them so they know what to do next. So they can grow the business. And when and what's the box that clarity comes in? Clarity in terms of what they need to do in the business, what is the next step and what's the next step? Like a roadmap? OK so we provide you a map or a game plan for the things you need to do to market your business. Mm-hmm So the word map sounds much better than strategy. The word game plan sounds much easier than helping you niching down and receive clarity, and it feels more tangible. So for us, we used to say we used to say things like we create these emotional visual pieces of communication that convey your blah blah. It's like, who the hell am I even talking to? Mm-hmm You know, I may have a master's degree, but this person is like trying to make sure that his family is fed, right? So what I say is. We create a shit ton of video content for you that conveys who your business is so you can get more clients. What you've got to treat them like, they don't they're like a little kid so they can understand well and they don't, they don't know, you know me and you are living in our world every day, but they're not. So when I say we create videos that serve as content for your customers to see and then get in touch with you, they're like, oh, that makes sense. Now it's much more elaborate than that. I mean, we run brand strategy. We understand their voice and tone and personality, et cetera in the third. However, they don't need to know any of that if I'm just trying to hook them. Got it. So I think to answer the original question, just very simply say what the service is. So what you do and that beautiful line where you said we turn your prospects into full sales by creating a game plan that you can follow to create good marketing work or however you want? Mm-hmm OK thank you. Does that help, do you have closure because I totally empathize with how difficult that is, and I'm notorious for over explaining so no, the reason why is so, so here's the balance I want to look professional, right? Right but then I'm using too much of the lingo, the industrial lingo that which. My customer might not understand, so yeah, I understand, and I need to balance that. Like when I say marketing strategy, not all people understand what that means. Yes, a lot of things. And I understand, man, when he hit me with that, I was like, OK, I'm talking way ahead. I'm OK. Yeah he was like, Oh yeah, OK, so thank you so much for asking that question and allowing us to get deep with you on it. And being so vulnerable. Sophie, can I finish the deck and then we talk? Is that possible? Is that ok? Yeah, Yeah. OK OK, let me finish the deck because it's the takeaways from that call and then we can just open it up to roundtable discussion. OK, so a lot of the takeaways are stuff we already talked about. But the thing is what stood out to me and I want to write your takeaways as well was make yourself easy to find through value driven content in a way that plays through your strengths. Just because someone is blogging doesn't mean you need to be blogging. Just because someone is creating video doesn't need you create a video. Rachel, for example, is an impeccable writer. Her first blog took off. You know, other people are just amazing on video, so find the medium that best serves you and use it to deploy value driven content that out teaches the competition. There are no more secrets, as Chris would say. Think like a chef. OK, have a one stop hub to direct your prospects, a.k.a. a landing page. If you don't have a fully fleshed out website. OK, don't pressure yourself to have a fully fleshed out website, but a landing page that just says, oh, OK. This content also translates to what's on this landing page. I think I want to give them a call. And what we went deep with Hugo was speak to them, not above them as you grow. Yes, your ideal business, your ideal company, your ideal self is to become this amazing pentagram. But you talking to local businesses as if you're pentagram. They don't understand. So you need to be able to simplify what you do for a fifth grader. And don't be afraid to use the Trojan horse method if you do brand strategy, lead with brand identity and then get them into the door and introduce them to brand strategy. OK some other things on the call and for in general only showcase the work you want to be known for and you want to acquire, not the not the word, not all the work that you do. So if you're going to case study, case, study something that you want 10 times of. OK during the sales process, be a change agent and not a sales pitcher, he went in deep on that 20 minute call where really dissect what you're doing and see. Are you coming off like somebody that just wants to close the sale off of the first interaction, whether that be your content or your website? Or are you trying to build a relationship to help them reach their goals and be a person of service? And then the last thing which struck me because right now in at mocs, where we're going through that is we can be a little too bougie and not take on the work that will end up becoming bigger work. So it really resonated with me when he said we started doing local commercials before we did national commercials. We started working for a no name gaming agency before we did Microsoft. So don't be afraid in your lead Gen journey to start small, build that relationship and trade upwards. So use that relationship to leverage you into another plateau of business. And that's I can say that from experience, that's literally what we're doing now through a relationship that we have with an agency. OK, I'm going to stop sharing my screen. Floor is the people's so takeaways, questions from the homework. Thoughts so you can start us off. And I'm taking notes while you guys are talking. I actually wanted to talk to Hugo about what he was saying, it's just a few takeaways. First of all, let's just remember that people normally act and is driven by emotions. So as you're talking to your client or to your lead in your website, just remember that when most said about just showcasing what you did and the experience of the people you did it to. It's really powerful. I've been trying to work that with myself while building my website because they. People buy their emotions and then they will work with people they trust and they will trust you if they can relate, so they will be able to relate with you if they know that you help some other people just like them. And then what Jason said on the chat about talking to them as amateurs because they do not know our business really made me think about that Chris gave a million years ago. I don't even remember. But what he said is he was talking with business man and he learned all these little terms about just business. So when he will go into a meeting, he would talk to businessmen with their terms and they will be like, Oh my gosh, I can relate with this guy. 'cause he used the same words as I do is people trust in people that have the same movements that they do in the same words that they do. So if you can have a client, maybe a former client or someone that in the business, they can sit with you and tell you, OK, so this is a translation to what you're saying in my business. So this is the name, and you can use those words. You will be able to connect through an emotional level because they will see you as a person. They can relate with. And that's really powerful with someone that's just starting because they want someone they can lean on and trust, and they will take care of their baby the same way that they will. So that was what I wanted to say. Iraq, Sylvie, thank you for bringing that up, particularly the mirror and matching part, that's whether online or in a sales interaction, you can use their language and their wealth of knowledge to transmit your own business and brand. So very powerful message there, Sylvie. Thank you. Thank you. Other thoughts, Melvin, did you want to expand on the mirroring and matching, I know you kind of jumping in on the chat there. And if I'm calling you out, don't worry about it. OK Melvin is working. Yeah I can't see it, but I'm sure he's cooking up some LinkedIn videos. Now there is. Yeah yeah, so the media matching aspect, it's something that I learned in NLP neurolinguistic programming. So essentially it's to be very so we have this thing called sensory acuity. So what that means is that we are very sensitive to it, the kind of language that people use. So typically there are three, three broad categories of people. One category of people are the ones we call the visual field. The predominant way that they talk, that's visual. So they like to they like to use certain words like I could. I can see my outcome, for example. And then the second category is what we call auditory kind of people. They are people who say things like this sounds good to me. So the choice of words that they use. And of course, the last category of people what we call the kinesthetic. So the kinesthetic people are the ones who say that this feels right. So depending on the kind of words, the choice of words that they use, we then try to relate back. So for example, if the client, or if the prospect is say, HMM, that sounds right to me. And then what you mirror and match is that then you would use words that are related to the auditory, you know, sensing auditory sensing words to reply to the client. So that the person is able to say, HMM, you know, the person wouldn't, wouldn't per say, or would it be able to immediately realize that but the person will be sitting this guy or this gal is really speaking my language? And so I think that active listening like, you know what, Chris always say, you always start off with a question. Even if the client say that I need something or the prospect say I need something is always associated with the list of questions that we are so that we can dig deeper into what they're thinking. And then relate it back in the same language that they use so that we have that commonality. Yeah Melvin, I'm freaking geeking out over what you just expanded on because I feel like it just hit me like a ton of bricks, what we all need to do whenever we were, whenever we were taught to teach. And in academia they would say there's need to accommodate different types of learners and you literally just hit it on the head. You have the visual learners, the auditory learners and the kinesthetic learners, people that need to see people that need to hear people that need to actually be doing it, the feeling to understand it. So when you're communicating to your client? Your whether it's your content or your website, they are a student. And you are communicating them to teach them for them to learn what you do and how it solves their problem. And then in the real world, like Melvin was saying, when you're talking to them and you observe and listen to their language, you understand what kind of learner they are. And then you can deploy necessary solutions to help them, so if there are somebody that likes audio, your content should for that person probably be a shit ton of podcasts. This other one wants to see and feel it. Maybe you should have a workshop once a month. So, dude, powerful, powerful Ed, thank you so much for saying that out loud, Cheers to you. OK other questions from the homework, other questions that have come up from this call. Any personal experience that you want to share with the group that has helped you? I'll throw something else in there, and just because we are talking about Legion and just because I actually had something that came in to me yesterday is strategic partnerships. I don't think they're spoken enough and they're just finding other people in your area that service people exactly like you grow the relationship with them, even if it's like, you know, you have to do. Don't tell Chris this like free work for them for like put in the door. It's like, man, it's just like I, you know, from I did a video for a local agency for like $200 to literally just cover my cost. But they were able to use that video to attract new clients, and they focus mostly on a lot of marketing for lawyers. But every time they need a video, do like go to Rodrigo or go to Rodrigo. And I mean, like, you know, $200 or whatever, you might look at it for me to get a lead like, you know, highly qualified lead to. That's the best thing about this because they're sending me people that they want. Video there's none of they're like, hey, I heard you need videos like, hey, you know, John over a web promotion partners recommending you. We're looking to do a series of three videos. It's a hot lead, and it's a really big difference in the quality of leads that you get and something that can be different topic we could talk about. But I like, especially when they come from a referral. So find people in your area that you could partner up with that, you know, take them out to lunch and does something. You do a lot more, you do a lot of cold call and you build relationships. And you know, it's building relationships with people that are also in your industry, but not also just people that you want to clients. But that's my big thing in Legion because it goes a long way for me and my local market. That's that's the best $200 you probably spent, you could have spent it in Facebook ads and it wouldn't have got you a hot lead like that. So it's just shifting and reframing the mentality of quote unquote free work or spec work, you know, because to me that I do that in a heartbeat as well. And I think it kind of ties in to a big takeaway that was mentioned on the original lead Gen call, which is you're trading up, right? Maybe that was the first interaction at $200. But you built a relationship one you're in the know how with these marketing agencies and now the next engagement through them is way bigger than $200. And you never know if that can become your testimony of how you got your first national client. So it's these the people that are speaking up are sharing stories of things that they've done that have worked for them out of a sea of tactics. OK, so for Melvin, LinkedIn videos work for Drago this B to B networking and creation of content for them that then he can leverage for his own business works, right? So as we continue to talk about legion, or maybe this is the last call about Legion for a while, but the theme is are you communicating effectively or are they are building relationships? Are you easy to find? And then are you leveraging all of those into things that can connect with the audience. And then convert them? That's my spiel to jump in. I want to just ask Rodrigo as to take this opportunity as you started this topic, Rodrigo, that you build those strategic partnerships, and I'm curious, how does it work in business world? And we had the message exchange with more about it. Is this purely kind of friendship recommendations or actually do they get their cut from the work you get? And I'm just thinking, OK, how do they monetize the fact that they send. So many hot leads to you? Because then it saves you so much time, I suppose, and you just get on with work what you love doing the most right? So how does that work in business terms and if and if there is no cut, if there is anyone in this group who has this experience of actually giving a little bit of a percentage of the money from the job to a recommendation? So how does that work? Basically, that's my question. So it's all of the above. Everyone's different. What with this other promotions company and work with? We we just have a friendly relationship that he just like. Listen, take care of my clients. He's like, I want you to do extremely well in them. They don't like you. Don't need to pay me anything. Just take extremely good care of them. That's what he wants. Then I have another. I work with a local TV station that every agent that sends me a lead. They want 5% of whatever the production cost is. So everyone's different. And this is like, you know, I go back to like, you know, my other unofficial hero mentor Gary Vee, and he talks about finding out what's important to them because that's what's going to matter. You know, to some of them, it's like, hey, take me out to lunch, you know what I mean? But like understanding what they care about and give them what they want and give them what they need. That's kind of where I go off because like, number one is the same. Everyone wants something different. So like, you know, sometimes other people we work with, we get free tickets to show. So then I give those tickets for the shows to other clients. I just try to leverage all of my relationships because then I want to connect those people. So like, you know, we did a video for a they are like a fire mode, water restoration, people. We did a company profile video for them. I worked with another company that all they do is flooring. I connected both of them together. I mean, like, so now that client has a huge account for someone that I work with, and they're both extremely happy because, you know, the relationship that we, the three of us have created. And that's it's about building that community within that community and being able to connect with people and bringing those values. And that's what I just try to do is bring the value to those people. They're going to bring me value. So cool, let's go. And anyone else with experience of building strategic partnerships. This is a lot of primarily how I'm getting some of my design work right now and a lot of that has actually just started from going out for coffee or going out to lunch with people that are in my industry. And I think the thing that I would contribute to this is just don't expect it to happen quickly. I mean, the project needs make sure you're communicating with them like what you're doing and how you're doing it and what kind of benefit you're bringing to your current clients. But at the same time, just don't expect it to happen overnight. So one the largest branding project that I've been working on just recently, just this week, I've been talking with this particular agency for 5 plus years, so it can take a long time. I think that's the hardest part is just getting for at least for me, is getting out in networking and actually just building those relationships because I get too busy or not busy, but I just get too bogged down with doing the work and not actually getting the work. So I. Just work the relationships, it kind of grows naturally. Am I in my case? Marta, I think Christian and then Greg have some feedback for you or around this particular discussion, christian? And then Greg. It now. Can you hear me ok? Yes, sir. Well, I just want to add one quick note I learned from Blair and was if you are giving a reduced rate for someone that you're working with, it's good to always show that on your invoice. So that they have a reference for what your actual prices are. So when they're talking to other potential leads that they may send you, they can give them the correct budget frame of reference. So that's something that I've run into problems with before, and it's good to definitely have that information up front and also to put it in if there is a direct exchange of value in there. What the expectation is on their side as well. You can lay that out in the contract, whether that's sending so many leads or whatever the case is. That's just all I wanted to add. Thank you for that question. That's that's a very, very good point that I wish I had learned earlier in my career, because then people refer you without you referring yourself and they're like, Oh yeah, he did this project for such and such. And you're like, and then the beginning of the sales engagement is OK. They probably told you that we do it for this month. And it's a battle in the early stages and you definitely don't want that to happen to you. OK, thank you so much for sharing that, Greg. And then young, you know, young is in the building. Hell Yeah. One of the great pieces of advice and a huge surprise for me was from the positioning module of the boot camp was to find someone in your industry that you admire and then stalk them like, go on Instagram, Twitter everywhere and then start following, you know, posting some things of value to them and all of that. So I found a woman who's been in business as long as I have, and I said before, like my business was on the edge. She is the number one influencer in wealth management and she's a marketing consultant, and she started her business at the very same time. I started following her. She ended up going to this conference that I did in September. And like the first thing you know, I said, can we just like, meet, say Hi or whatever I tapped on the shoulder. She turned around, give me a huge hug, and she was like, Oh my god, like, you know, it's great to meet you and all of this. And long story short, three weeks later, we're working on projects together. She's trying to get me speaking engagements with her. I mean, it's just not that this is always going to happen, but it was something where I thought, Oh my god, like, who is this woman? And is she ever going to talk to me much less like the first time she like, liked one of my messages? I was thrilled. And what we realized is, you know, part of a limiting belief is, do you think these people were always at this level and they weren't. So everybody started somewhere. And that was very humbling for me. And I like I thanked her and she says, this just means I have good marketing. She goes, I'm a real person and I really love that you're reaching out to me and that you were similar and all this kind of stuff. And I would say is like, find someone who you admire. Who you would like to be, and chances are they will be thrilled by it. Because they're we're all people, and it's just so amazing, like she's in London, she's calling me like, I'm in New York, she's in New York, but I'm moving to Berlin in two weeks. And it's just like it's. Fucking fantastic. Sorry, I just have to for the language. I love it. This woman. And I did not even know each other a month ago, and now we have business partnerships and she's introducing me to all these people. So I would say, just put yourself out there, be yourself. And I don't know, you know, maybe you'll find your April a men that testimony and that story is my life. So I just thank you for bringing that up and congratulations to it. Awesome relationship with somebody who's a heavy hitter. OK, Jennifer, and then I'm going to recap the call and then we're going to end with an action item not to overwhelm anybody and then move into it. And I think Priscilla has a question to OK, Jennifer and then Priscilla's question, Jennifer. Hey, yeah, I wanted to tag on to the comment from Loretta about strategic relationships. So I have some people in my local network that passed referrals to me and one of the struggles. So I guess to answer your question for smart is I get I give 10% of the initial project. So it's like web design project. get 10% of that. But if there's continual work after that, that happens. I don't keep giving them a check because I just feel like I've earned that at that point. But then the other thing I wanted to bring up, which I found kind of an issue is that I have a really high expectation of the work that I do like. I want my work to be the best of the best. I'm always trying to grow. But one a couple of the people that provide means to me, their level of work is not that great. And so I have a really hard time passing the referral back. For example, there's a graphic designer in my networking group. I see him every Friday morning plus other times, and he passes some really great clients to me, and I'm really thankful for that. But he is not a great designer and so I don't like passing leads back to him. So that's something that I found challenging, but not sure how to navigate that, but thought I would throw that out there. Does he get 10% from you? He does, Yeah. Oh, that's enough, because it's your right. I agree with you. Your reputation is on the line because the continued engagement and I feel 10% of any healthy, especially. Is it 10% off the top or the bottom? What you're giving them 10% off the net or off the gross. Off the gross, I guess. Yeah, OK, Yeah. OK, so if it's like a $10,000 project, he's getting a grant. Oh, gosh, is that 10 percent, I don't think he's ever given me anything, nothing. I do like the initial project, so the clients that he's given me, like the initial project, was like 1,000 for the first month. OK, so just the initial project. Got it. Got it. OK I just wanted to touch on that. That'd be that'd be a lot. Yeah, that's why. Because, Yeah. Not even going to go down that rabbit hole. But yes, I'll cross that bridge. Thank you for sharing that. Does anyone have potential help on not referring back? I think the percentage is more than enough at that point. But the commission, yeah, it just becomes awkward because I see them all the time, you know? And so he knows I work with other designers. Mm-hmm but so far it's been OK. Well, I think something with that. Who's all talking? OK go ahead. No, sir, I think something, David, I spoke to Chris about before something like this is you can always give him work, but like you can manage him while giving him work and give them creative direction. So there's definitely a lot of ways you can nature their relationship. And you could just let him be like, hey, listen, I think you're I think you're a great designer. I believe I want to work with you. But the clients I'm working with are expecting certain things. I love to be able to provide you more work with some of my creative direction. That's something that you do interested in doing, you know, because then you get to build him up, and I think that's the awesome thing that I love doing. I get a lot of kids that are like straight out of film school, and they want to make like, I want to make an artistic movie. I'm like, no, I need business videos I could teach. Like, I could teach you how to make business videos, bring your cinematic skills as long as you're able to take direction. I'll give you smaller jobs like 500 jobs that I can take on. I'll give those to you, but I need you to be at a certain level. So if I'm getting these close to you and if you're cool with that, I usually really does, not you? I mean, I get it. It's not going to work out. But I think just being up front and having a conversation with them about it and guiding them through the process could work out for you. Yeah, that's an interesting idea. I'm assuming that he's teachable, I guess he's been in the business for a long time, so. But yeah, I like that idea. It might work for someone else, another person. OK young reminded me that I forgot about him, I didn't necessarily forget, but I kind of forgot because of all, what's happening, but you jump out liberal. Yeah so I joined late due to meeting and so I'm not sure how exactly the talk has been, but I just wanted to share about the partnership. That partnership, because I do probably do different work for most of you. So the product. So project typically involves a very heavy development work. So what a partnership I have is there's a development firm, which is totally different from creative design or development firm, but product. When they develop product, they need somebody design it right. But they don't have a designer in house, right? This development firm. So the development from using my service when they have the project requires heavy design work. So because they are larger firm, they do their own sales and to keep their business going. They have to have a word, right? So so from that point, for me, I will. I know I will have some work as long as their business is going. So that kind of how I say, look at baseline work. So like, I do get my own work on projects, which is could be higher priced than partnership with this development framework. But it is kind of a. I would say hedging the baseline work, so that kind of, I guess, some peace of mind that there will be somewhere as long as these guys have work. And then I have the freedom to go out, find my own project clients. So the point I'm getting at is if you can partnership with the legal firm, but does something. Different from your work, but. Get have requires your types of work. I don't know what could be for creative professionals like you guys do, branding whatever, they all just create work, but somehow if you can find that kind of leave the lead generation cells on their shoulder. And you get benefit from it, but not necessarily as your main stream of your work, but can be a baseline of your work. Young, thank you so much for sharing that. I think if I heard it correctly, it sounds very familiar to what we're doing right now with this other agency where we're white labeled, but also the stories that Chris brought up with Microsoft and these other places where you're almost that strategic partnership is easing the pressure on your lead generation because they have such an influx of work and it's serving as your salary almost. And that's your base salary. And then you're able to go and get whatever it is you want at ease. Does that sound about right? Yeah, so not necessarily salary, but we negotiate the project price like a fixed price. But another benefit is because these people are larger firms. They are clients are big boys, so I get to meet them. I get to work with them and they understand, oh, actually, I have my own business. I don't work these guys for full time. So that actually ends up. They refer another world directly to me because this development firm and I, we're not competing. So there's no conflict of interest because these people are just totally bunch of developers and don't care about the design. But those people, I get to know when they have a design focus or someone has. So I think it kind of expands your network and you normally wouldn't have a chance that hard to get to know them. So that's just another thing. But yeah, I think we'll use of more rights right away. That was awesome. Every time I hear young stories, I'm like, I want to have Young's business because it just sounds so just seamless. I'm like, dude, how did you build a relationship with a company that's just like feeding? But I think that's an awesome way to take on a strategic partnership. It's almost like you're on the inside. Just be careful not to poach, but it seems like in their regard, there's no conflict of interest. OK Danny D And then I'm wrapping this thing up, guys. I'm going to want to bring us home. It's better be this better, be a credible Danny. No, no, it's good. First of all, tell me if you can hear me. Good Yeah, you're good. You're alive, you're hot. Got it. All right. So I have two golden nuggets from your home work, and I think these are important because I think we didn't get this today. So one of us, I hear Chris has the same skill through curiosity. That's the first one. And I feel like this is important, like the way we try to sell to people. It's not. Do not convince combines. Convince them sorry. It's just more asking the right questions. Be specific about your questions. So, for example, how to hear many of them have come to you and they have their self, a nose or even they don't know they have a problem. And the thing is like, we ask them like, oh, so what is your problem instead of like? So tell me, tell me about this design campaign is working for you. Are you happy with the results? They will get back to you, they will say. Maybe, yeah, I mean, other inspectors or I do find have this problem, I thought it was going to be better. So instead of just going to hell and ask them, like, hey, what is the problem you have? Like, I feel like I want to help you. I want to provide that help because you're convincing them. So I think that's a huge one. Then I want to piggyback on Greg, what Greg say today that is align yourself to the brands for the heroes you admire, too. This is a huge one because this is something I've been doing through the carousel, the past carousels I've been working on. I want to work with some streetwear, your brand, European brands. And basically what I decide to do is pick the colors they usually do. So basically, these brands like black, red and white, and they have some kind of positive messages. So that's what I've been trying to do with all my carousels that some positive and Jones' voice in there to show it to. When is a moment when the moment is right? Something that Steve Robinson does very well is when he does a UPS for the beers. It's awesome. And by doing these guys is where you want, where you will find the gaps, because that's something that's well, Hayes study them. They study the customers, study their customers, not the competition. And see, where are the gaps, because when you ask this question, so then again, like, for example, what are your goals? What is that desire state that you want to achieve? That's where you can provide some actually help. You can say, oh, so how much revenue you want to make next year. We want to make about $2 million more or something like that. Then you can say like, right, well, what are you planning to do? You're selling through curiosity. You're asking questions that are maybe a little bit more specific than just like, tell me about your problem. So I think that's it. OK, wonderful. Thank you, Danny, for that. I'm going to share my screen because I added all of your takeaways because there's I'm not recapping all this is just so if anyone wants to screen share, if anyone wants to screen capture, I mean, this is what everyone. Yeah, I can make it. Can you share the slides? Can you share? I got you. I got you, Alec. But the overarching theme, so I don't have to go through these is we talked about clarify your positioning, ensure that how you're communicating is in alignment with how people are understanding it, then make yourself easy to find through ways through content that speaks to you, whether that's content, strategic partnerships, networking. But it's all things that happen in tandem with one another to get you to the ultimate goal, which is, like Danny summarized at the end, they're selling through your curiosity, which in my language just means build relationships and know that it's going to take time to cultivate those relationships and convert those relationships. And sometimes those relationships can be as powerful as Young's relationship, where it's an insider, large agency that's feeding him a consistent flow of income to where they are his lead generation animals. So or it's like Drago, where he leverages that relationships and turns it into a bigger client. So your goal should be clarity and communication to serve building a relationship with somebody through your position. So whether it's saying what you do or the problem you solve at the end of the day, you're communicating to get them to come to you. And build a relationship with them before I sign off. Any remaining? Things around legion, because my soul is telling me that next week's call we're going to move into something else, is my soul right on that? One last thing. So when are you guys to check out? Marcus Sheridan, if you guys haven't heard of him, he's called a sales lion. He owns his marketing company product. I think it's called impact, but he's the one that I learned about writing that piece of Article. How much does it cost? He has a lot of free training on his website. I mean, it's to me, it's really game changer stuff that if your guys are really looking to develop. No, that type of content. Check them out, market share didn't impact the name of his company is called impact, but it definitely helped me a lot and I love to share that with you guys because it made a difference in my business. So that's all I have for that. Can you drop that in the chat, bro? Yeah let me look them up right now. Yeah, and maybe in the maybe in the event afterwards. OK, OK, OK, cool. Any lack of closure around legion? Yes, very quickly. I just remember the call that you shared yesterday for the homework. That was one thought. That's a crusade. You want beer clients. It means that you have to be more time with the client. So that's important to build a relationship. So I just wanted to get that over there. Yes, thank you for bringing that up, larger engagements take longer time to nurture and to convert. If you're trying to get $100,000 engagement, you're not going to do it off of the first coffee. There's just no way. There's way too much risk involved for and to alleviate risk means more rapport. Building means more trust building before you can even go in for an ask of that caliber. Unless the trust and the risk is already mitigated by years of experience, quality positioning good case studies to where when they come to you, it's already in an RFP format because they know you're somebody that can handle 100 grand. OK maybe I'll just ask the closure question in the event, and you guys can type out what, maybe I'll ask it in a takeaway. Do we have closure around this topic. So we can move forward into other areas like marketing and positioning? Is there a leftover question? It's my last question is there a leftover question that we want to give to chris? On Legion. So you can hear it from. I was going to say, god, I'm not going to say god, it's blasphemous. OK, closed, I think we need to act. Good OK. All right. Stopping recording my favorite part of the call to start recording. Do you want to stop cloud recording you?

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