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How to Sell Knowledge Product Pt.4 Sales Video Review

#
89
Chris Do
Published
July 9, 2018

Chris Do critiques videos of Pro Members selling their knowledge products, amazing tips about being engaging, and how to cut.

Read Transcript
You guys, this is call 80 nine, 89. This is the fourth call on launching a knowledge product last week. There were some there was some confusion about what it is that we're doing, but it looks like this week we're back on track, so I'm excited to see your videos. And I think there are four of you that have submitted a video. So we're going to talk about those. And that means because there are so few people who submitted, we'll get to spend a little bit more time and won't have to rush as I normally feel like I have to do to get through all these things. So I'm going to turn this over to Caitlin and Caitlin. You're up first, right? Yeah sorry, one SEC. OK, no problem. And then after Caitlin, it's Derrick and then. All right. Right I say that, right. Yeah are you having trouble sharing your screen? No, I don't know how to present this, I just did it in our movie, and so I don't know that I render out a QuickTime movie somewhere on the desktop. Ooh! that you open that file up and then that green thing at the bottom will allow you to pick a lot of different things you can share, including just the application. So share that instead of sharing your whole desktop, just share the imovie, then open up and hit Play and we should be able to see it. Thanks so much. Here we go. Something's coming up. OK, go ahead, hit play. Let's see if we can hear it. OK Hi, I'm Caitlin visual designer at Beckman company. And one of the developers behind brand blocks. Chromebox is a visual framework for building brands that raise capital inspired teams and get customers with brand blocks. We'll show you how some of the top companies built their brands from the ground up and how you can to. What you'll get is step by step videos on how to use the brand blocks framework, printable worksheets, a collection of valuable case studies on how you can practically implement your own brand blocks and a PDF workbook beautifully designed with everything you'll need to know. Over several years and across dozens of successful brands, we've learned that you must have clarity in your foundation in order to have growth in your future. The brand blocks provide this time and time again. Download now to start building. All right. Ooh, OK, good job, good job, good job. OK I'll probably have to watch it a couple more times, but I have some notes already. OK, Caitlin, I see you kind of like nervously waiting for the feedback there. Are you ok? Ok? Yeah. How do you feel? Scared I don't know. Why are you scared? What scares you? I'm on the spot in front of a lot of people that I admire. OK but we're all friends here, so it's OK. And friends take care of friends, right? OK all right. You let me just go through this like. First, I'd like for you to do a little self-evaluation. Looking back on your video now, is there anything that you felt like you did well and that you could do better? Let's start there. Um, I think it's pretty clear. But I think I need to work on delivery. I'm pretty. I don't know, it's like QVC and then it goes Sarah McLachlan at the end a little bit. Don't love it. I tried so hard to not sound like that and I just couldn't. But yeah, I think that's what I would fix, obviously, like lighting and stuff, I don't do this a lot, so I don't know. Mm-hmm Do you have a camera or are you just shooting it off your whatever built in camera? Yeah, just it was just off my laptop. Oh, for a laptop? OK you probably have an iPhone or a smartphone. Mm-hmm The camera on your smartphone is better than the one that's built into your laptop. OK that's one little thing. And if you download an app called filmic fIlm I c, I have it. It allows you to override a lot of the auto things that you can lock the focus, you can lock the exposure and you can set the different recording bit rate so that it could be a higher resolution file. You just need somebody else to help you with that, ok? Otherwise, everything in your setup should work the same. So it doesn't really matter, to be honest, if it's super high quality. Video it matters more what you say and how you peer across camera. And if you're delivering the message OK, so those are some technical things I've seen people launch courses just by holding their iPhone in selfie mode and just walk around and talking, but they're very good at doing that. Yeah, you could do that too, because what you need to do is you need to get near a window. Mm-hmm Now with direct sunlight but indirect sunlight so that you look as good as you can? OK OK. It's easier for me to talk about some of the technical stuff, so I'll start there and then I'm just kind of still playing or processing the video in my mind. You you don't want to crop off your head, necessarily, if you don't have to. I don't think you have to. So let's get you near a window or you could be walking outside or just being a part of nature. If you get a little mouse for your iPhone, you can pretty much shoot anywhere, anywhere that's not too noisy. So that you could have some production value in your background. Here's another trickier tip. A lot of people don't like looking at a clip for too long. A rule of thumb in commercial editing is that every three seconds you have to cut. You have to cut to something else. If you notice a lot of YouTubers. They have a script that they're going to say and then they say it, but the background keeps changing. So it adds visual interest, it keeps you engaged in the content. So that's another tip there. OK and how many different levels of energy do you have, Caitlin, do you I mean, is there like what are you out of normally from a 110, where 10 is like climbing on the walls? What are you normally? Probably not, a. Would you call yourself like what level? Six six. And what's the most excited you've ever been? 10 at where what are you doing that you're at a 10? Probably sports watching sports when somebody does something awesome, when they do something awesome or there's like a foul that shouldn't be called, you're like screaming out of your head. I hesitate to tell this to people, but I'm a Patriots fan. So whenever cool happens to the patriots? Yeah, like making it to the Super Bowl. Yeah, Yeah. I was watching that game was like, unbelievable. Yeah I'm not even a sports guy. I was like, Oh my god, Tom is unstoppable. Yeah, that's probably like one of the few places that I'll just jump up and live. OK, now I don't know if you could tell just thinking about that, your face, your face and your expressions. And your body language just changed instantly. Did you? Did you? Can you tell? Did you guys see that? OK, so I want you to think about the Patriots when you're selling your product, OK, because if you're not excited about your product, how can I be? And a smile, a laugh, a wink, anything. It's infectious, it's like, I'm happy just to see you be happy, right? Anything that you can do that feels natural to who you are. So we want you to inject that into your pitch. Can you do that? OK, now look, I have many different degrees of my energy level because people who join the protocol after watching a bunch of our YouTube videos like Chris, you're a lot different on the protocols than you are on YouTube. Because, yeah, because I think I bring a different level of energy. I'm talking to people and I'm competing for their attention to stay tuned and not jump onto another channel. So I have to be engaging and I have to do things that normally don't do because it requires a lot of energy and it is taxing. So you just need to be at that 9 or 10 for the two minutes that you're recording your video, then you can go back to just normal. Six OK. OK yeah, because I think if I brought that kind of energy on these calls, you guys would be exhausted. First of all, you already made the time commitment to be here, so I don't need to be all crazy on you. So just realize that because some people freak out because they'll be talking to me before we go on air and that all of a sudden when we're on air, it's just the switch is flipped and I just go bananas and they're like, whoa. So now I just warn people. We're just talking, but you're going to see a different person emerge as soon as they say. Cue the music. That's what happens. OK all right. Let's talk about the delivery and framing the problem. Does anybody have any other comments before we dive into that? I was just going to say it's mainly the audio quality, I think the two things I saw was just audio quality and the cut timing. I thought you sounded fine. I, you know, I don't know you or anything. I think that's probably the first time I ever heard you talk. So I thought you sounded, you know, fine. But yeah, if the audio quality was better and the cuts were cut a little better, I think it would be pretty, pretty good. Hey, speaking of audio quality, I noticed there's some weird noise on your mic. Michael sweet took a weird, low end buzz. Did you guys hear that little robot voice? Yeah OK, Brian can hear it. OK OK. Anything else? Anybody else want to add anything? Because then I'm going to just dive a little deeper now. Anybody? the pacing. Talk about the pacing. So for the pacing, when you were listing the, you know, the PDF workbook and things like that, it was like a little bit of too much time and between each one. So if you get the pacing right, I feel like you could also captivate and keep people's attention and just lead them through. Mm-hmm So just you're just talking about closing the gaps between the bullet points that you're talking about, right? Yeah OK, now a very useful tool that Jose shared with me before, is if you were to draw a graph or at the top of the graph is emotionally high. And at the bottom graph is emotionally very low. Draw a graph as to how you want people to feel during your short pitch. And on the. X-axis, that's the time, so at the beginning, do you want to start really high or do you want to start low? Do you want to build up? Do you want to go up and down? Think about that. It's just draw a little graph. It could look like a sine wave. It could look like a. Declared that shoots up, so it's our build and build, and it goes crazy and it comes back down to give them the details at the end. OK, so usually the parts that are the price, how many modules and all that kind of stuff? That's pretty straightforward. So what I'm missing from watching your videos, this is that have we framed the problem at the very beginning? You introduce yourself, you talk about what this is, but we haven't framed it. And the best way I know how to frame it is to ask three rhetorical questions. And Simon Sinek is great at doing this, if you watch this Ted Talk. And start with why or the golden circle? You'll see how he does it. He comes on stage and he's like, why are some companies more valuable than others? Why do people feel this and that, and he asks like three why questions? And that gets people to lean in, because now I know what I'm going to be listening for. That's why when you guys come on the show or on a pro call, I just say, just get right to the question. Now I know what to listen for because then I say that's not necessary. That's inconsequential. That's what I want to hear. OK, so I would do that even before you introduce yourself. So you just change that. Let's just let's practice right now. Caitlin, ask me one or two quick questions that are relevant to your product. why, I don't know. Just try it, just freestyle, it's OK. So why our problem is that so we have a problem statement, I might need to work backwards a little bit. Savvy entrepreneurs know they need a brand, but it's. Are hard to make something flexible for growth on tight budget. OK, so. Why are some brands actually? Why are some brands able to resonate better with their customers than others? Why? to some brands, take big risks that pay off. I don't know. OK you showed three logos in your presentation, right? Nike, Airbnb and something else I can't remember. Was the third one, Apple. Apple, why did you show those three logos? So Nike is a good example of leading with who they are and why they exist and what they work. The easiest example is the Colin Kaepernick ad. OK so they knew that they were. I don't know, rebels, they were there, millennials, they know who they were, so they knew that they were kind of leaders. So when they made that move? It turned out OK. There was that dip and then it spiked. And so why can people take big risks? With the confidence. How do some companies take big risks with confidence? I don't know. Yeah OK, so I'm starting to get an idea here. First, I think you probably need to tell a little bit of a story, so here's the beautiful thing, guys, you could write a script out. You can have this all planned and rehearse and rehearse and rehearse until you get your delivery down because you only need to do this right one time. If you have more tools like the tools we have, it becomes a lot easier because I can have a giant screen behind the camera that has all my words on it and I just need to deliver it in short chunks and then you can use your edit to piece it together. OK, you don't have to freestyle like what we're doing right now, which is pretty nerve wracking if you don't speak for a living, which very few people here do. OK, but what if you start it off your video by saying something to the effect of like what makes this brand so unique and so valuable that they would be daring enough to do an ad like this? Well, let me tell you why. Because their brand that's driven by purpose, they know who they are and they know who they're speaking to, and for that they're rewarded with a market cap of $17 billion or whatever. And that might be the thing that separating you from where you want to be. Hi, my name is Caitlin, and this is the brand story blocks blah blah blah blah. Does that make sense. And then you want to tell a story in there somewhere because you've got to hook people in because as you were saying, it felt like at times like QVC energy would tell people a story that you're passionate about and observation. And if you can give them one or two pieces of information that's going to enrich their lives, they're going to feel like, wow, this girl is just not like just trying to sell her stuff to me. She taught me something. I wonder if I went a little bit deeper where this will take me. And I would love for you to do some product shots where you can actually see what it is and not just talk about it. OK and this is where having a mirrorless or DSLR camera is going to be your friend because if you shoot shallow depth of field, first of all, it looks really sexy. Second of all, you don't reveal at all. You can just pan through and they catch glimpses of things. And it just seems like this is it. This is really cool. And if you're really, really confident in your product and you're not asking for too much from them, just show it to them. Teach them. Because you have to move beyond the buyer resistance and their resistance is this is a dime a dozen. This is just another way to get me to give you my email or to give you money and you need to get past that. OK, so you need to connect with them. OK can you do that? Run dry. OK, I guess that's all I can ask for. Yeah OK. So keep thinking about Tom Brady in all his greatness. The Patriots and then channel that until you get yourself like, yeah, I'm ready, I'm ready, and then do your thing. OK OK. Was that helpful? Yeah OK. Let me know if you have more questions. OK All right. Do we have anything in the comments that we need to address? OK, so nobody saying anything. Let's move on to Derrick. Derrick, are you ready? Yep just a second. All right. I'm excited to see your trailer, man. The guy who got trailers for a living is going to produce a trailer in our last night or something. What's that? I put it together in like the last couple of hours before I went to sleep last night. So you went to bed thinking, this is great in. You're afraid, you're like, what's it? Let's speak for itself. All right. Ready Yes. Wait, wait. Hold on. Let me let me move the screen over. I want to see it big. OK, ready. No audio, no audio, no. Oh, that's weird. Are you sharing them the movie? Yeah I walked over my keyboard. OK, that cat. Let me see. Try again. OK sure. Oh, sure, computer sound. And try this again. OK just a good trailer is the best way to get people interested in your movie, video game, YouTube, channel, book, podcast or anything which has a lot of dialogue or voiceover to pull from. Because while people are very selective about what to invest their time in. Most are willing to spend one to two minutes to help them make that decision. But turning hours of footage into a 1 to 2 minute trailer is a daunting task. How do you know which lines to use and how do you put them together in a way that makes a coherent and exciting narrative? There are literally infinite combinations. This is why I created the trailer script template. This framework is a step by step process, which will take you from hours upon hours of footage to a finished script, which you can then use to edit a trailer which tells an engaging story and lets the material speak for itself. You'll learn how to select the best lines, organize them for future use, and construct a short and engaging story. I have over 10 years of experience making trailers, and for most of that time, scripting stage of the most difficult part of that process. But this framework takes out the frustration and lets me quickly get to the creative decision making. All you'll need is a text editor. Pen and paper or stickies. You can even use this framework to collaborate with people online or in real life. You'll never feel intimidated by hours of dialogue ever again, and you'll be equipped to make great trailers scripts to help you share your story with the world. Whew good job, dude. Thanks if the trailer, I cannot create a trailer for his own product, we are doomed. We are just doomed. OK excellent job, man. Thanks Wow. I only have like two little things to say, so I'll say that first to give everybody some time to think about this. And then I'm going to ask you the same question. So I'm going to give you some time to think about it, which is what did you do? Well, what could you do better? OK First thing I want to say this, I'll give you some time to think there's a cat that walks into your video. I see your shadow. It's like put the cat in a somewhere else feed the cat right before you shoot the video. I love bad takes for the cat. Meow while I was talking. OK, second. And I think this is a big one. I think you need a call to action at the end of the video. Yeah like, OK, sign up today for whatever it is. Tell me, OK, you got me. Class starts on October or in October. Whatever give me something. OK all right. I think there's a lot of people saying, nice, good job in the chat there. OK, so so Derek, What'd you do? Well, what could you do better? I feel like I did a good job of framing the problem and then addressing the solution. Yeah, or making look like what I have as a solution. Mm-hmm I spent a long time working on the script there. I think there's a lot of stuff in here that's like my be a role. Obviously, it's not final by any means, but I want to have be a role where maybe there's someone actually writing on a pad with a pen, maybe show people like putting relevant stickers on a wall, that sort of thing. So those are stock shots that you have right now that you're going to replace everything stock. And I just I just downloading stuff from my friends, YouTube channel and stuff like that. And I stuck this into. Yeah Yeah. So that stuff is all temporary, and I would totally reshoot this and have more interesting background or something like that. Yeah do you have a good camera to use? Yeah, I have AI have a DSLR I could use. OK and a good mic and a quiet room. Yeah OK. I think I've decent enough, Mike. OK and I mean, you had a lot of little technical things that I'd fix for the final version, and I would probably also just include if I'm going to have sort of tiered versions of the course and I would describe what they are at the end of. But I was trying to keep this short because this is already over 60 seconds. Is there tiered versions? I'm planning to have some that right now. I'm contacting some friends who I've worked for, works with for game trailers to see if maybe they could provide assets that could help make this a cool thing. I see. Yeah, there's still a lot of stuff I have to flesh out about what I can possibly include in it. Mm-hmm I have to say this, though, but for a first take for somebody who's just worked on this in the wee hours of the night, the night before you're off to a very good start, I'm really excited to see where this goes. And the cool part of this is you don't really need to build a course. You just need to launch the course and see how many sales you get. Mm-hmm and you never know. I mean, you it could fall like a thud, you know, or it could take off. And next thing you know, it's like, I don't need to do client work anymore. Guys, this is pretty incredible. And so it could be a thought experiment where you try this out. And it just it turns out to be something else and leads you down a whole other path. Who knows? But I think you're off to a really good start. I think if anything, if you could like what you're saying is to spend a little bit more time shooting the b-roll because that stuff usually looks really sexy. Yeah and people are seduced by visuals. And in that way, I think you'll elevate the overall visual field of it. Yeah, there's a lot of technical things that I would totally actually put time into. Mm-hmm This one, actually what I did was because I don't have a teleprompter. So what I did was I recorded, oh, I broke everything into chunks and I said, OK, I'm going to put myself on screen for this part, not for this part. So then the parts that I wasn't, I just walked up to the phone and just read it right from the script. But everything else, it broke in a small chunk, so I could try to remember it. Yeah so believe it or not, if you just get yourself introducing the video, closing it out and one or two bits in between, you don't have to do the whole bit. So you could literally do what Matthew did, which was to take his laptop and his what is that blue snowball? Go into his closet, close the door because the clothes help to absorb the sound and record really pristine audio? Yeah and then he was able to just use that as the soundtrack to this thing. Yeah oh, and on screen persona tip was so I did a few recordings and I realized I looked super kind of down or like complaining about the problems. So I just kind of like, I just like some of those. Yeah and then to get myself hyped up a little bit more. Yeah so a lot tips there. Yeah is it like just making your body really tense and then letting go? It was just like I was just like smiling and just kind of like jumping around to try to get the energy. OK, so good. Hopefully, I looked OK. Yeah, you look fine. And if there's anything that you can do to frame it so that it's just not a talking head, that would be better. Yeah, OK. You'll see that a lot of people who have been in the video making game for a long time, they start inventing all kinds of stuff like they'll come close to the camera. They'll come back and they'll do things. So there's a little more movement and they'll talk with their hands. I just didn't even mean to do that. I was just exhaling. Put my hands up there, but talk with your hands, get your body involved. So it's not like just your mouth moving. Yeah, I was trying to bring my hands in, but it was kind of a tight shot, so I think I would have a wider angle. Maybe I see you a bit more my body. Yeah, look, and I'm going to make this offer since you already have the equipment and you can do this. But if you didn't, I would say guys that are in La. Just let me know you can come in and just shoot in our studio, use our equipment, bring your script as a text document, and we can throw it up on the teleprompter and you can get this thing knocked out. That'll be cool. OK all right. I'm going to stop this. OK, let's see here, stop the shares, so last but not least, is Ari and let stand, come in or stay. See, see here. Now, OK, all right, you're up. Ari? Yes. Hear me, I can hear you now. Yes OK, so go ahead and share your quick time and OK, wait, don't get play yet. Let me just get there. Ok? all right. Go ahead. Let me know if there's sound. OK no sound, no sound. I'm sorry. Oh, one. oops! One second think, Derek said there was some button that said like share computer audio or something. Yeah, sure, OK. One more time. Hit play. Go ahead. Founder of Sophia and brand lab that I owe, I have the tactical step by step guide that will help you make this event be a talk of the town. You have tons of great ideas. You want to build community. The only thing that's holding you back is the entire planning and marketing process for the events. While this is the only screen games that you need to your cell, this is just grab a copy of the workbooks below. And for $49 you get all the insights, including a checklist, calendar templates, pitch templates to all of your sponsors and partners, and more. The pre-launch pricing ends in four days to grab your copy today while they're available for $49. If this doesn't help you speed your entire planning process for you, then and differentiate your event on your money again, here's what you'll even marketing workbook even applying workbook plus 3 bonus items costing guide and template event planning checklist, as well as social media and design templates. So grab them today. OK there was some audio problems there. Hold on. So I'm going to try and watch it locally on my machine here. So you guys maybe did you guys experience the same thing? There's a lot of hissing in there. Let me just do this, ok? We'll listen to it here. Sounds like Disneyland in the background. Well, I know sorry, my kid is not in school today. OK, I'm just watching the video. OK all right, all right, so same question to you. What did you do? Well, what could you do better? First of all, everybody, thank you very much. Good job, Ari. OK I was just struggling through the audio parts. OK, so we're going have to get that thing down. Audio is actually more important than video, so we got to just get you some better microphones or a room or something because there's so much hissing in that video. Yeah, distract you. I think that's probably my heater. So I'm going to have to figure something out with that one. Yeah, OK, that's fine. OK, so what did you do well and what could you do better? Well, I definitely need to add in some like the viral thing, pretty much edit this video because it's just like a straight shot on me talking. That's not 100% compelling, in my opinion. I love what Derek did on his videos. I just feel like this video is nothing compared to his at all. But I do feel that I think I get the script down, OK, I don't know what else I can improve in there other than adding the date of the launch. And I feel a lot more comfortable in front of the camera, so I don't have any issue on that one. But yeah, I guess those are a couple of things that I would like to improve. OK, good. Does anybody have feedback? I have some notes myself. I was just going to say you could just do simple Zoom cuts just to break up, break it up a little bit. OK, let's talk about technical equipment. What are you using to film yourself right now? I have the Logitech webcam pro. Do you have anything else? Higher quality than I do? I just need to set it up. What do you have? I have a DSLR. Oh my God. It's not doing you any good in the box. OK Oh my goodness. Well, I just I did this morning, so I really didn't. OK shall I see you just like, hey, there's a deadline. I got to do it. OK there's no shaming here because you did more than everybody else, right? The three of you guys that posted a video or the four of you, you did more than everybody else. So congratulations on that. I know how that feels. I had a business coach for over 10 years. Every time it was like, we're about to meet. I just made sure our power through our to-do list from the whole week in like one day. So I get it. You guys are all busy. So what we need to do is we need to spend more than just this morning working on this video, at least spend the night. OK, so we'll work on that. I think there's some similar notes that I'm going to have for you, as I did for Caitlin. I think we want to vary our energy level. We need to frame the problem, which so people usually do these things in a very linear way. They introduce themselves and then they talk about the product. But at that point, it's like someone's going to skip this and I don't want them to skip it. Ok? I think honestly, the thing that you should start with is b-roll of an event. OK, so I get that there's people and they're excited and they're raising hands that they're laughing. There's Q&A, there's a panel, whatever, excuse me, whatever event there is. I think that'd be good to see. And then over like voiceover is like, how you begin? Right? and you say it in your script. I just I need it to be written in a way that just really draws me in because you said you have a great idea, but nobody likes to do event planning and you want to whatever it is, you have the bones in there. I just need you to amp it up. OK, OK, Gotcha. What's the biggest pain point of somebody throwing an event? Pretty much planning the whole thing. Get more specific with me. Top three concerns. Top three pain points or problems. Finding venue, coordinating dates with the venue and then finalizing details for the events and getting everything set up and push it in. All right. How about selling it? And that too. Are you going to help them sell it in a way, Yes. So no, well, not. Look it. In details, maybe, no, but some sort of guiding it. Yes no, the answer's still no. OK, if it's not the hook, then it's not the hook, then don't talk about it because I was going to say, man, the hardest part of planning an event isn't all the other stuff. It's like, can I sell this event out? I'm going to lose my shirt. That is it for me. And that's a lot of work, so you have to have a whole plan, but you're talking mostly about the event planning, coordination side, right? Mm-hmm Yeah, go ahead. And what are the consequences if you fail? Well, you get stressed out and then you just don't have enough energy to get other people excited, including partners, vendors and all different things. OK, so I'm going to give you a story, story, script, note idea that when you were telling stories because I used to teach this stuff, it has to be about drama and conflict. And the best way I know how to do that is to exaggerate things. So when I say to you, what happens if you fail? You kind of have to put that lens on and think about it. I call it like the teenager syndrome, because missing a phone call is the end of the world. Having a bad haircut is the end of your life. And that's how they talk, right? So when I say to you, what's the worst that can happen if you fail, you're like, oh, stress this and that. It doesn't really sound like, oh, it's all fine. Let me ask you that question again, what happens if you fail? You don't have a sell out event, you lose money, you go broke, see the difference between the way you say it. Gotcha OK, OK, give me another one. What happens if you fail? I mean, you can't further the mission. Think about it. It's like people put on events because they have an idea they want to share with the world. And the only way they can continue to have future events and not go bankrupt is to have the event be successful. Yeah, go ahead. So what's another consequence of failure? OK a blank right now. OK, just think about that. I want you to make two columns. You can call it win and loss. OK, so what happens if I win? I change people's lives. You make an impact and. You pretty much exposed your brand and. Get exposure. OK so make a list, right, as many of those things down as you can for win and for loss and then try to frame your conversation around that. This is what's at stake when we understand a little bit better. As you see right now, you're thinking of it from your side. Here's what I'll do for you. Here's my thing here's all these things that I do. Aren't I wonderful? If you frame it like this is what it means to have a successful event. It means that you further the mission and the cause. You get to do more of this. It's life affirming and all the hard work. Everything you've worked for comes down to this one singular moment. Don't risk it. OK you understand. Yeah OK, I'll give you a different example because I was in the shower. I was thinking about something totally random because I'm getting into all these arguments online with people, you know, Twitter beef. I started my life. I was just thinking I just wanted to tell them to shut up. So I'm going to make a response video so I don't have to do it individually. I was just thinking about this idea. You guys are what double keys Downing is. Guys know what double keys don't. Ok? a lot of you guys don't know that term, and so I've been talking to Matthew about teaching the business of design, but introducing one key business terminology that you should know, especially when you're dealing with clients that are in the decision making seat, not through marketing people, not through art directors, but actually to the client. And you should know this term double keys Downing. In the store, when you go to buy something, let's just say for easy math, $1. The store bought that thing for $0.50 so that they can make a profit, so they buy it for $0.50 for $1. And that means that the manufacturer has to produce that thing for no more than $0.25 because they're going to sell it for $0.50 and they need to make their $0.25. So the price doubles every time, so it costs me $0.25 to make. I'm going to sell it for $0.50. The retailer then buys it from the manufacturer and then sells it to you, the consumer, for $1. That's what double keystone is. So I was thinking about going to CVS or one of these stores, the pharmacy, and then pulling out like a Snickers bar and talking about this and understanding what you're really paying for. Because so many people in the creative field falsely assume. What this cost to make is what I buy. And I'm going to use this to illustrate a couple of other points, I'm going to shoot inside this TV, I'm still trying to figure out how I can do this without them throwing me out. But I just think having the backdrop and pulling things from the candy bar section, I can talk about it, OK, then I'm going to make a parallel here with how agencies and clients work. And because people don't understand all the stuff behind the curtain, because when an agency pays you, the individual or studio pays you, you're getting what I would consider the breadcrumbs. And not the whole loaf. And you're all not you, but people in the creative space are just happy to fight over the crumbs. So what I tried to help them understand is if you can get closer to the client, the manufacturer, you're going to cut out the middleman and you can do the same amount of work except for you're going to realize more of. The fruits of your labor. Obviously, they did not do a great job explaining that concept to you. It's still just a draft, so, you know, I mean, eventually there'll be awesome and maybe it won't be awesome. I don't know. But try to think about stories, parables, key concepts. Think about the background in which you're going to shoot in how you can really drive the point home. As you're sitting there and you're talking about events, I want to see events, I want to see images, I want to see things, but obviously you don't have that much time to edit it, right? So yeah, at least, Yeah. And then let's get really cleaned audio. OK sounds good. Thank you. You're welcome, it's minus 30 degrees there. Yeah, you don't want to be here. I'm not going there either. But what's that? I don't want to be here either, but it is. So yeah, it's minus 50 somewhere in the country too, right? This is a crazy, cold storm. Cold front going on. My goodness. Unlike Chile at 70 degrees here, I'm like, oh, OK, look, you yeah, you pay for it. OK is. Last call for Sasaoka is here, Stan. So OK. All right. OK, so what I want to do is I want to use the rest of the time to talk about whatever it is that you guys want to talk about. So I'm going to give you a minute or two to formulate some questions. I don't want to just pull you on air, and you ramble on for like 10 minutes. I'm sorry to characterize it like that, but that's how it feels to me. Ok? or does anybody else need feedback on whatever it is that they're doing? And we didn't cover you yet, and you're here today? So for so. At least for my question, I'm doing one for businesses and, you know, like strategy and stuff like that. So when shooting b-roll footage, what exactly how do you go through the process of figuring out what you're going to shoot for your project specifically? Give me a little bit more detail like I didn't totally understand, like for strategy. What is the product that you're making? So for basically like a course filler like strategy and like workbooks for finding your branch voice and I say, OK. So you're wondering like what your role should be? I'm not asking specifically for that, you know, I don't want to go through my project, but I am sort of figuring out for other people like how do you shoot b-roll for your specific thing? Like, what's your process for thinking about it? Oh, that's a great question. OK so presuming that you guys have a script and you've read it and record it, now, you're trying to find the visuals to correspond with that right and you want to change up the shot so that it's not one thing because one thing is very boring, no matter how good that thing is. And just thinking about this, like if you have a physical product, try to frame the shots to include the physical product. And even if you don't have a physical product, make a mockup or something so that it looks like something interesting. I saw a video when a guy was doing a live three day design sprint, and the way he did it was really cool. He used some software to do mind mapping, so he would like create little clusters and bubbles and attachments to them, and you could see him do that. He's thinking through his problem. So as a designer, any kind of designer, it's thoughts made visible, right? So think about how you can communicate that part. So for rh, she's talking about event planning. She could be looking at calendars and writing things down or just showing her moving things around on a schedule like if there's a template for event planning, it could be that everything is triggered based on some kind of waterfall project management system. And she can show that you can see that Derek did a good job with showing the timeline, text documents and things like that. They look good now, since he only did it the night before. Maybe if he had a chance instead of just doing a screen capture, he could frame it with his camera so that you can see the computer screen and it's lit well. And that will make it look a lot better, especially if it's at an angle. So those are you guys that are thinking about shooting and you don't have a lot of experience with framing and moving the camera around. There's a couple of things I want to talk to you about. Shooting something really flat on is really boring. All you have to do is just turn the camera slightly this way or that way and put things in perspective. And then you get instant dimension. There's a line from Pixar. There's like Pixar's guide, how to draw and design frames. And one of their key tips was don't put all your characters on a tightrope rope. If you think about a tight rope, I imagine there's a tight rope here and all the characters stand on the tight rope. There's no dimensionality at all. They're all just standing here like this. But if you move them into space and you have something big in the foreground and something small here, it creates a lot of visual interest and it creates depth in your shot. And all you have to do that is move the camera. There's another tip I'm going to give you. Shooting through things and around things is always very visually appealing. OK, I'm going to demonstrate right now real time here. OK, let's just say you have a shot, and it's not that interesting, I would say. Then go outside of your house and shoot through the window. mean, that's a little voyeuristic, but I'm just trying to tell you about ways to do things. So if I had this cup? Let's see here and this cup was in the foreground and you, you move the camera to reveal me. So it's here. See, and you can even leave this in here. And shoot your shot. OK, you guys see that. You notice a lot of horror films, the ones that are really designed well, they conveniently put jars of things everywhere because what's going to happen? They shoot through the jar. So in the Texas Chainsaw Massacre remake in the shed, they have all these jars of preserved animal parts and things like that, and they're really beautiful. And so they put a light on there. And then the camera's moving and they're like, framing it like this here. We grab two things. Steven Spielberg does this a lot, and he does it really well. OK so those are like little tricks that you can do to make your shots much, much more interesting if you have a macro lens. That's always great. So when we talk about creating excitement and some visual energy for your shoots. Well, the easiest thing to do is to make something big or small, it's something small, big. And I'll tell you what I mean, if you've seen these shots before, when they're top of a building and they shoot down and they blur parts of it, it makes people look like miniature people. Miniature trains, miniature airplanes and trucks and all that kind of stuff. It's pretty cool and that is that makes it novel, you showed. You showed me something I've not seen before. Conversely, if you have macro lens that allows you to get really, really close to something and then you can see the detail of the keyboard keys, your fingertips touching, caressing or stroking the keys on your keyboard. Or you pinch Zoom something on a screen when you're really close. People are like, wow, look at the detail and the dry skin that Chris has on his knuckles, whatever. Those kinds of things are very visually exciting. If you change the frame rate, if you're able to do that on your camera, people do that quite a bit. So they it's called over cranking where you're shooting more frames. So if you're editing at 24 or 25 frames a second, if you shoot at 50 or 48 frames a second, that's twice the speed you'll slow things down. And when you slow things down, they tend to feel like there's more gravity and weight to them. But it's always nice to do that, and it will help you make kind of boring, uninteresting shots more interesting. There's a very famous shot for the movie, the right stuff, and I forget the actors, but there's a line of them and they're walking towards camera in their spacesuits and their helmets, and they shoot that over cranked. And then they played back. So it's like slow motion. So these people are about to board to board the rocket ship, and they're just moving just with that sense of epicness. And this is an important point in the story. And a moment that they're kind of embark on. So those are some tips and tricks there. I'll give you one more. There's something in film production, it's called the goba or a cookie, and what it is it's a piece of foam core or Black card with holes punched in it, and it creates a pattern of light on your subject like I'm not going to do now because I don't have anything here. But if you obscure some of the light and it creates a little dappled lighting on the person. So it can create the illusion that you're underneath a canopy of trees or there's a window with what is that panes of glass and lights in the window. So it creates more interesting shape on you. Another tip here is if you don't have a budget for lighting, you can go to one of those home improvement stores like Lowe's or Home Depot and buy one of those halogen work lights. As long as it's color balance for you and bounce it off the wall, you don't want to shine that on you because it's very harsh. It's not flattering bouncing off the wall or bounce it off your desk. If your desk is white, it creates a really big light source. Then there's a simple rule about lighting. The bigger the light source relative to the distance to you, the more flattering. It gets. Notice the sun is a really big light source, but the distance to us, it becomes very small, so direct sunlight is not actually very flattering. But on an overcast day, the light gets scattered amongst the cloud and the whole sky becomes your light box. That's why overcast, you look really good. Use that same principle, small lights, very harsh, big lights, very flattering to you. So start blasting with light and you look good. OK, Brendan, is there more that we can add to this? I know that that's pretty much like answered all the questions that I had, but Thanks for setting me up, dude. No problem. Nice job. I'll give you a couple more tips in a second. Anybody else have another question? I was just going to say mobile gimbals are extremely cheap now. I got this mobile two for like 90 bucks. Whoops there's always breaking 90 bucks. Yeah, you can do. Obviously, it's extremely stable, but you can do time lapse. You can do motion lapse for you guys as b-roll shots. So like, you know, you take pictures of freeways, the cars going by really fast and it slowly pans as it's also going by really fast. It all does that kind of crazy stuff, and it's super cheap, in my opinion, for what it does. OK all right. I'm going to show you another thing here, so this is a book, obviously, you know what a book is, and most people will shoot a book straight on like this. Not interesting. Then you turn it, it becomes much more interesting. So you start to look at the things and you're seeing like pieces of architecture. You want to find the angle that looks the best. OK, give it. Move it around. Kind of move the lighting and see what happens there. This is an interesting book, by the way. It's called the secret lives of color. But I'll tell you another way to shoot this with this other way. So you foreshortened perspective if you put something right into the lens. Obviously, I didn't shoot that well or display because my camera is fixing. My lighting is fixed, but the opening titles, 7 will give you a lot of ideas on how to shoot something. Now, you don't want to make things that dark, but what he did was he put a spotlight really close to the book or the manual, and he had somebody turned the pages very slowly. And as the light is obscured by the pages turning, it makes that shot really mesmerizing by putting the book really close to the camera or the lens in a way so that you can get that foreshortened perspective and the pages turn beautifully. This book is too small for it to turn like that, but. That's the idea. OK off topic, henryk, anyone else having issues with zoom? Now Stanley's here. Oh, Stanley's there, Stan. Yeah hey, hey, man. Where are you? Yeah, there you are. Let's watch your video OK. OK, but I don't think that it's really great, to be honest. I mean, I've tried my best, but you know what it is? Yeah, that'd be great. But it's done. Yeah you know this. I actually have this big sign done is better than perfect. So that's right. So let's do. Done OK. OK unless you don't want to. No, I want to. Really? OK, so go when you go to share screen. Make sure you click on that button. Share computer sound. OK, cool. Just the second. The I guess I'm a little bit late, everybody showed already theirs, right? Yep. OK. OK, so I guess it's. Share and. OK OK. So you want to become the product designer? Good thing is, that's actually very good place to be. Nowadays, spectrum of work is wide, so we get to pick from web apps all the weight of the car. Dashboard designs and tools are better than ever. So learning is easy. So whether you worked as a designer before or you are just getting into it, that's not a problem. In this course, you will build your first digital product, backed up with tests and research within two weeks. After this course, you will be able to create your own digital products. And that's why we'll give you access to the weekly challenges. So it can keep on designing until you build your portfolio and get the first product design job. So buckle up and see you on the course. Good job, man. Are you training red right now? Yeah, I guess. Good job. OK did you read this off the screen? No, actually, I tried to. I memorize it for like whole day. Yes and I struggled because I changed the script so many times that I had problems sometimes. Yeah and where are you calling us from right now? Where is this your house or is this the office? Yeah, yeah, that's exactly my house. OK, so did you shoot this at night? Yeah, it looks very similar to where you are at right now. Yeah, it's the same exact place, to be honest right now. Cool advice from Roxy to office, and I guess I might do that, you know, just stay after work and shoot it. Yeah, why not? Yeah I also believe that's a great piece of advice. OK what would you like to do differently to make it back? So there is very much, to be honest, I would add some shots for when I design like, you know, screen capture or about the things that you just said, maybe some close UPS on the keyboard or something like this to make it more convincing. How to. Actually, I would try more to have the script seem. It's more natural because it looks so fake, man. I see that. Yeah, look OK. Did you guys feel like it was fake? It may feel like it's fake. I didn't feel as a fake. No, really? Yeah see, it's like you're just because, you know, you're memorize the script that it's not your natural way of speaking, but nobody else knows that. It knows that. I just thought, you're being a little funny. That's all funny. What way, Michael like? I just thought you were just trying to be a little humorous. Like, I don't know. It seemed like you were excited about it and you weren't like, you know, nervous at all. Yeah, actually, I would say that I was too calm for myself, and that's how I recognize that. I say stress, you know, because usually I'm very I would say that, you know what I mean? Right? Yes. So, you know, some people don't emote a lot like Michael Michaels, like deadpan guy, right? He's like, it's like one way of speaking. The building could be on fire, and he's like the buildings on fire. I think we need to go. And that's his style. But it's kind of funny. It is dark humor sense. But that's Michael and you. You're kind of funny and you're jovial and you do all these things. So yeah, maybe, maybe on the 15th take, you'll let some of that personality out. I think it's OK to have your body move and your head sway around like the way you do normally when you're speaking. I think that makes it a little bit more engaging and let your personality out. Mm-hmm OK you know, and what do you think actually about the script itself? Is it good or would you change something in it? Yeah, I think it's pretty good, but let me I'm going to need to look at it again. OK, so everybody, just watch it on your own computer screen unless you already have some advice for him. OK all I can say is, dude, is when you were just playing that, I had a smile on my face, I couldn't really help it. Well, I'm glad to hear that. You know, I would actually love it to be this kind of fun course because I've learned a lot of on Udemy and I with my friends always joked from this one guy. I think he is called Rob Percival. He always looks the same. Whatever happens, he has the same face. So I thought about bringing it. I don't know. You know, just a bit more lively or something like this. So, all right, I watched it again. I have a question for you. Where did you learn to speak English from like the internet? Yeah are you serious? Yeah how do you learn to speak English on the internet? You know, you just play games when you're young, and I guess you just kind of go with it. Oh, interesting. OK so I don't know if you guys noticed. If you watch Stanley's video again, it's almost like he's like this Italian New yorker, so you want to learn how to design a. All right, I'm right I'm your guy. There was a little bit of that vibe. It's kind of funny. And maybe that's why Michael said, did you guys pick that up? Hey, Yo, so you told me, you want to learn the internet's all right. Ok? like, you're having fun, dude. Yeah so are you able to do have a camera? You can move around camera. I used my phone and I've used my microphone in a kind of connected together. OK but you don't have a DSLR or anything you could borrow. I think I can borrow it from someone, OK, if you can try that. There there's a guy. His name is Brendan Lee. Do you know who Brendan Lee is? I'll send you a link to his video and he talks about how to create transitions. Brendan Brendan used to shoot for MTV, and then he started to create his own channel. He's a pretty low key guy, and he's pretty cool about how he talks about things, and he has some very inventive camera angles, transitions that he builds that make it really visually interesting. I could totally see you doing that. Oh, OK, that's cool. I'll check it. Yeah, and there's like that way. Like, people are captivated. I personally believe your script is pretty good. There's some weird pauses. Or I think you were searching for the word in your mind and do this 15 times. It'll be very natural. Yeah, that's it. Yeah, I just need to practice it more. And I guess that will be better. Maybe with some close UPS. And what do you think about the content of the. Yeah, I thought the content was pretty good. I think when you get into the details of the course, it starts to become a little thin. Maybe that's the part where you just write a script and say exactly what it is and just read it and then just show b-roll. Mm-hmm mm-hmm. OK, so I think you sold me on the idea that I want to be a product designer, but maybe you can talk a little bit about your background. Mm-hmm OK I really, to be honest, I really wanted to don't do that. I just wanted to talk about the benefits for the customer, for the user. So it would be nice to include that little introduction. Yeah not at the beginning. Not the beginning. But yeah, you need to say, my name is Stanley. I've been working this and blah blah, and I've been able to work on these kinds of projects. So you qualify yourself. Mm-hmm OK mm-hmm. And do you have a lot of work that you can show? Yeah you know that I can show, I guess that's the tricky part. But yeah, but I got plenty work, so I guess that's not a problem. Yeah show some things. Make it visual. OK, cool. And what programs do you use to design in? Mm-hmm Yeah so actually, I wanted to make. I don't know if you saw because I was a little bit late with that sales page in, you know, just how to page selling that course would look like. And I explained that in this course, I want to show all the tools and let people choose which ones they want like the most. Yeah, but what tools you use? I use Figma myself and. OK so Figma has an interface and screen record that. Mm-hmm So you working through the process? OK, so get some really cool b-roll of you building a project and that way it's visual and like, you get people excited. Mm-hmm OK maybe some even something like, I'll do my project on phone and give it to someone. So it's kind of like testing. Yeah, that would be cool. Yeah OK, cool. So this is called we kind of jokingly refer to this as to suit up. The suit up is if you think about iron man, when he has a suit up or Batman or rambo, they have to go through a series of steps. And if you write that down and shoot that, it could look really good. And I'll explain what I mean when you I don't know if you guys saw first blood or rambo, Sylvester Stallone when he's pushed to the brink and he snaps, he's now going to go to war with people, right? And there's a very specific sequence that he does. He takes the knife and he puts it in its sheath, and it's like he puts on his vest and he zips it up and he attaches grenades or. And he does his ammo. He laces his boots, and he pulls The strings tight and he puts a little of the block under his eye. And the last shot, the reveal is when he has a bandanna and he ties it tight and he looks up, and then you finally see him and he looks like he's going to kill people. That's a suit up, OK, and is a series of tight shots sequence together to then have a big reveal. So your suit up is you're doing some sketches moving some post-it notes around. Maybe there's a mind mapping that you're doing and then doing something on Figma and then you see the code, you know, typing in some code, whatever it is, and then you hit Enter and then some and then you hand somebody the phone and they try it out and then you cut to them and they're delighted and it's cool. That's sexy, and then people are like, wow, I really do want to learn that, how did you do all that, sammy? Then you can get into it. So when I said that when you describe and many of you guys have the same problem, which is when you describe what's in it, be very, very super clear. You can talk about this will include four hours of this to this and you can watch me work at, I'm going to take you through from beginning to end this, this and that there are four templates 14 pages long, blah blah blah. That's the really boring stuff. But people do need to know that because once you capture them, you have to tell them what they're going to get and then call them to. There's a call to action. You want them to do something. OK, but I don't want your money just yet. Click on the link below and you'll get this, this and that and see the first module or the first lesson and decide if this is right for you. You could do that. Are you planning to launch an Skillshare or are you going to launch your own page? I have no idea for now, OK, that'll impact your sales video. OK Yeah and that will impact how I should define it. Yeah, because on skillshare, it's all you can eat. So if you launch a video or your course on skillshare, you don't need to tell them to have a giant call to action. You can just say, I'll see you inside the class. That's all because they already bought it. Yeah but you know, when I think about just launching it independently and as a website, I just see no way how to generate people to go there. So I guess the Skillshare is the only way to do this. No, no, no, no. I don't want you to think like that. Just stay with me one thing at a time. OK if you develop your product, you create your sales page. Then we'll talk about how to drive traffic to your sales page. Oh, cool.

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