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Creating Buzz Part 1- Ideal Customer

#
62
Chris Do
Published
May 25, 2017

Chris Do reviews ideal customer mood boards with the pro group and invites an open discussion about them.

Read Transcript
Here we go, guys, this is call number 60 two, and today we're going to be talking about buzz. How do you create buzz for yourself, the art of self-promotion? And I want to start off by saying this, ok? A lot of you guys bristle at the idea of self-promotion, and it's because we confuse self-promotion with being a braggart braggadocious. So self-promotion is educating relevant people about your skills and the value that you bring to an organization or marketplace. So this is a different way of looking at it, whereas bragging is overexpressing over expressing your value to relevant and irrelevant audiences for the purposes of making yourself secure or superior. OK, and I want to just take a moment I'm going to stop the deck for a second. And I want to talk about this, I'm going to share a personal story here. My personal story goes something like this when I met Jose, I was not very, how shall I say, outgoing in terms of being in front of the camera. I'm OK in small groups. I hadn't done a lot of public speaking at that point in time. And I especially was not really taking advantage of the social media platforms but being exposed to him. My my first reaction was God. It's just like, it's just too much of you, Jose. Like, you're everywhere, you're saying things. And it seems like all you're doing is talking about yourself. And I think I have the reaction that some of you might have, maybe even towards us in that, gosh, he's just talking about himself all the time. Well, I'd like to point out a couple things here. One is what I was seeing from Jose oftentimes was only talking about the things he was doing and not celebrating anything else or not really helping anybody else. Now that changed over the course of time when we started to work together, but that was my initial impression, and it might not even be true. It's just how we reacted to it. So I was thinking, if I'm annoyed by that, I definitely don't want to be a person who is doing that. Now, do you guys want to contribute to this conversation a little bit about this idea of self-promotion and bragging bragging is just really puffing yourself up, right to feel self-important. Whereas I think self-promotion is to try to inform other people of skills that they might be able to take advantage of. So the word educate an education or inform is really important there. Hey, Chris. Yes do you feel like you have figured out kind of where your voice is like in comparison to Jose's like, do you? I think so. Like and so were you did you consciously craft a voice that is what you want it to be and not because sometimes I think it's a personality thing. There are people who are very successful and they speak to certain people, but maybe not to me. And then I look at that and think, Oh gosh, I don't. I don't want to be that. I don't want to seem like I'm overconfident or I don't know how to put it like that balance between seeming like, you think you're all that in a bag of chips? And like, you know, just confidently saying what you know, how to do. But I would like to ask you this, this question, Jennifer, which is, do I appear to you to be a blowhard or arrogant or whatever the word that you use? And I want to talk about that a little bit because I want to tell you how I think about myself. And then you tell me how you perceive me and then we'll take notes, right? We'll compare. You seem very confident in what you're talking about. But to be honest, like when I listen to Jose speak, I think he has a lot of really great things to say. But my first impression, I think, was similar maybe to what you were describing, which was like, Oh gosh, he just. And it's just a personality thing like, I know he knows what he's talking about, too, but it's just it's a different approach. Yours is a little quieter, which appeals a little bit more to me, but perhaps not to somebody else. Right? so I guess what I'm trying to say is that there's not a right and a wrong way. And I kind of wish I had some more of Jose's like braggadocio or whatever, you know. But it's not quite me. It's like trying on a coat and going, oh, no, OK, here's what I think. I really have a Supreme belief in myself, and I'm not looking for others to validate me. When people say nice things like, Oh my gosh, your video really help me. I feel pretty good about that. But I don't feel like, Oh my god, I'm walking on Cloud9 because I felt that before they said that because I spent a lot of time and energy learning and sharing and constantly working on myself to try to give as much of that away to the groups that are interested in listening to me. So I'm not necessarily looking for that kind of validation. Now when somebody walks in the room and acts and behaves the way that I do. Sometimes people read that is man, that is super annoying. That guy is just like he just says what he thinks and he thinks he's always right. And of course, I think I'm always right in my mind until I get a new piece of information that tells me that I'm wrong. So I do have Supreme belief in self. And Jennifer, it's very nice for you to say that I don't think you cross that line, but there are a lot of people on the internet who literally type in arrogant a-hole your mother motherfer, this and that. And that's how they feel. And I just like, OK, that's you're entitled to that. And maybe that's true, but I don't even care. Whereas Jose comes across, like, really super confident and he says things with conviction and a lot of passion. But what I found by spending a lot of time with him is there's still this little boy inside of him that is looking for validation from others. Well, when you're faced with certain kinds of professional or lack of professional like instances, whether it's in education or it's in the professional space and we are around people like that and it does happen, is there a way to address that, but in kind of like a human way or just kind of let it die down because that's happened a few times in a few instances with my case where going to a design event and going with a friend and. Is there a way to address that? Or is it always in private? Or how do you dilute that energy that it causes? Let me see if I understand what you're saying. Yeah, you're around people who have this same kind of energy that I'm describing, and it's not a good energy. OK, so there are some choices that you can make. Now, I feel like I have a very strong sense of who I am and who I want to be around. And those people aren't the people I like to be around, so I get to make a decision here. And they and I also respect the fact that they get to live the life that they want. First thing, once I see this behavior, I recognize it right away and actually have great empathy for those people because instead of seeing this really aggressive, annoying person, I try to see through that and try to see a young boy, a young girl who is hurting and nobody has been able to pay attention to that little person inside of them to let them say it's OK to be vulnerable, it's OK to feel like you miss your mom or your dad, or that your brother used to beat you up or whatever it was, and they're hurting and they inflict that same hurt on other people to mask that. So I can choose to take the really super high road and just engage them and just try to talk to them in a very different way, to disarm them, to let that go. And you'll notice this, too. Every once in a while, you'll see these stereotypical alpha type people the jock who befriends like some weird kid, some weird kid, because that kid sees him for who he is and then they can relate. And so you could try that, you can try to approach it with empathy, to try and break down that facade and make that person feel safe to be themselves and then they'll chill out. The other thing that you can do is you can still feel that same way, but not talk to them and just have compassion for people and just move about the space and limit your exposure. The third thing that you can do is I think you could just remove yourself from that situation because you get to choose where you want to be. Now, if this happens to be your boss or your coworker, there's a much bigger issue that we need to address, right? And I'm not sure is that the case? Is this a coworker or a boss? This is a friend who I go to with a lot of design events such as Art Center Cal Arts. A lot of the design schools locally. So whenever we come together, I feel like when there are moments when we're around a big group, there are some of those. I know what it is. Yeah so yeah, it's yeah, I had to be around those kinds of people growing up in high school because they're everywhere, because people are just not figuring out who they are and being the introverted, shy person who's somewhat insecure at that point in time. It was just like it seemed like everybody was like that, and I was just like this weirdo trying to hide from them. Now in our community, there are times when I run into these people. And I just try to limit my exposure and just smile, smile on my way through it. I remember one time going to a rival motion design company, and they challenge to challenge us to like a foosball game. And I played. I was just having fun. And then and then we didn't win. And then that person who owned the company started just getting in my face about it was like, Holy cow, this is how you this is your company culture. That's cool. You guys drink beer and like your bro, that's cool. I'm going to leave. I'm not going to come back. That's totally cool. They get to run their environment and their team and their community and their culture, whatever way they want, right? And then some people are attracted to that. Unfortunately, it's off putting to a lot of creative types, and it's off putting, I think, to a lot of women. That kind of attitude, so they're going to lose out on a great talent pool. That's the way I look at it. That's true. Right, so if these are your friends, this and you really care about this friend, I suggest perhaps just pulling them aside and just having that really intimate conversation and creating space for them to feel safe to be who they are. Mm-hmm OK, and I don't have enough time on this call to kind of work that part out. I mean, I can do it on another call if you allow me to think about it. Sure but then that would derail this whole call. OK, thank you. Yeah, you're welcome. Does anybody else have a question about this? Well, we have. We do have comments like Eric, Eric Gonzaga says, you know, he used to have a brother who felt the need to put us down in order to bolster his sense of self. I stopped pursuing art and illustration because of the criticism, and it took me nearly a lifetime to get his voice out of my head. For you guys, when you're feeling like you're not quite sure what's going on inside your head to really seek out a coach or a teacher, and they're call therapists in our society, psychologists anybody to help you through this to understand what's going on. That level of self-awareness will allow you to make different decisions than the ones that you've been making for most of your life. That's how you start to change your habit and those behaviors. OK, I strongly, strongly encourage you to do that. Hi, Chris, I have one question for you, please. Like I know, sometimes if I go for a meeting, I know what I'm talking because I like to prepare myself ahead of time. But like within the room, if anybody has a strong voice. In the past, they used to, like just control me, talk less. Then I completely shut down because the voice they are using, the words they're using. I feel very insecure. Maybe I don't know what I'm talking. So how can I improve on that? Because definitely I do a lot of homework before I get into the room to present my stuff. But this has ruined my self-confidence. I always have self-doubt. My girl within the group because when people with strong voice, they overpower the other person want to talk. I hardly get any time to speak what my ideas or thoughts around that? OK. That's an excellent question. I'm going to take a stab at it, and then I would love to hear another female talk about their experiences and how they're overcoming that because I think their experience is going to maybe shed more light on this thing. Thanks, very. Yes, you're welcome. For a very long time, I've had difficulty speaking up in meetings and in classrooms, but what allowed me to do was to have a great place just to kind of observe and to listen. And then when the time came to speak, to really organize my thoughts and be able to distill it into very powerful, potent bytes of information. And I noticed something that happened, right? So I've been in meetings before when they're like 30 people in the room. And I remember when we first making commercials, I got invited to these big production meetings. So we're talking about 10 or 12 people from the agency. Then we have the producer, the director and assistant director and then me. And there's so many people in this room and I'm only responsible for one very small part. And I was just kind of in all in terms of how the director commanded the room, controlled his language and describe things. I was watching, how he was slowly and methodically describing his process. And at the same time, when an objection came up from an agency client, he would then. Address it and then pivot out of it each and every time, so it was just amazing. So one of the benefits of being quiet and not the person who is expected to speak is the power of observation. And so at some point, all these ideas started collecting in my head and I, I had that time to think like, right now you guys are thinking really clearly because you don't have to hold this meeting, you don't have to think about the next slide or run Zoom. And so that gives you your mind like optimal power if you're listening and focus in on the conversation. So eventually, after an hour's worth of talking from everybody, then they turn to me and said, Chris, what do you think? And then I was able to say, well, here's my biggest concern. Time for you to shoot this, you need to prepare for this, this and that and that. And I probably took up all of 1 minute to say that. And that's all I had to say. So I didn't feel the need to fill the space. So I think sometimes we might mistakenly see people who spend the most time speaking as the most valuable. But what we should recognize is that people in the room are very smart. They're thinking per minute of dialogue. The ratio of information to dialogue is very small. Yet when she speaks, I don't know how to pronounce your whole name there. It's OK if I call you shy. Say, satan, you know, you can call me Chad. That's OK. OK all right. So when you speak, you don't need to fill all that space up and to feel that it's OK, I think this is an advantage actually of a person who is a little bit quieter, who's not expected to say all these things to let the blowhard speak. And people recognize that. And so I remember a couple of times. And I think I've shared this story with you guys before. I would say very little during these meetings and I would remember people coming up after me. It's like, oh, that was a really great point. I can tell you're a thinker. I was like, really? I was kind of just afraid to talk. But this is how the world is perceiving me. So I'm using this to my advantage now. Now, it took a long time for me to go from that quiet person who barely spoke to the person now who's running the meeting. That's in front of you. And I think that's OK. OK, thank you. OK I would love to hear a female perspective on this. Anybody or not? Oh, I'll go. Go ahead. So I'm challenged with being very similar whenever I'm in a board meeting with Sam on the foundational board at our school or with a client. I find that when do you have an idea? People kind of stop and just look at me funny. Like, I can't tell if they're saying that's a good idea or why are you talking? OK oh, I thought you're going to provide a solution, so you're laying the problem in here, right? OK, this is fantastic. All right. So she's saying that I haven't learned your name yet. What was your name? D just d, OK, perfect. Yeah the letter. I get it, so so D was saying, you get a funny look, so people give us funny looks and then we interpret these looks, and most of us are not good at reading expressions. So unfortunately, we fall into the trap of reading it in the most negative possible way. Like they're thinking, what a weirdo. What a blowhard. She doesn't know what she's talking about. And until we get better at reading faces, which I think I'm pretty good at reading because I've had a lot of practice doing this, I would just not assume anything. I would just think I gave the information to the best of my ability, how you want to interpret how I gave it is up to you and I've got it doesn't bother me at all. I pay no mind to it until somebody actually says something to you. Now there are some clear signs, like when people are like this and the very big body gestures that you know, to be like, that's not good. Like, like when people close up and they cringe, then, you know, like, oh, I crossed the line. Right, I cross the line, I said something that was inappropriate culturally, socially or whatever, but I don't think that's the case. I think all you have to do and obligation is to share the information you have so that it helps everybody do what they need to do. And then once you deliver that, the rest is up to them in terms of how they want to interpret or react to you. That's why I think one of the key things in terms of achieving true self confidence is not to worry too much about what other people say to the point in which you don't care at all. OK hey, Chris. Yes do you mind if I say something real quick, please? One thing I'm working on this myself and I've been observing you for a time now. I relate a lot to you. Personality wise, and what helps me with when I'm getting like what I might interpret as like, are they understanding me? They're giving me a look. I will try and stay focused on what I'm trying to say. And then make sure to conclude it with a question to invite them to participate with me and make sure that there's still a partnership feeling. And I'm not just talking. And then. There is no discussion happening or there's no involvement with everyone else, and you're not just talking to talk, you're talking to bring them in to make the decision or whatever is going on. I don't know if that makes sense, but totally makes sense. I love that approach, and I think so. Those are the guys are in the business boot camp. We talked about communication and communication styles. I'll share some nuggets from what we talked about, which is the tone. The intonation in which you say things actually impacts people a lot. So if you take some kind of benign sentence like the quick Brown Fox jumps over the lazy dog, if you just say it straight, it has its own meaning. But if you say it with a rising intonation has a different meaning. If you say it really fast, like it sounds like you're really excited or. If you take dramatic pauses, it causes people to lean in. So the speed and the tone in which you say things really helps to make an impact on how people perceive it. Tony Robbins says this, and he says style matters more than substance because people remember how you said it more than what you said. And that'll help. I think adding a question, an invitation to come in also really helps. So when I want to say no to a client, I try to think of two ways to say no and let them choose either option. I could do this, or I can do that, but I can't do both. Which do you prefer? So that's a weird way to say no, right? OK anybody else? Another thing actually I learned from you recently was through a couple of videos through the Academy was the whole preface and prepare them the disclaimer that you drop on people. I've actually used that on a couple of occasions and found great success to it. Yeah, I come across as a center of attention, kind of know it all talkative talk too much kind of guy and letting them know that in advance puts them at ease. So like kind of getting out there and putting it all straight kind of does sometimes help. And so just accepting who you are. And being OK with it and saying, hey, by the way, I'm going to talk too much and be too long winded, kind of like hell in there's text message. Yeah, OK, perfect. I have a question. Guys, I noticed that Ashley is here actually simple, right? She was doing this, this discussion with Chris about how to deliver the information to the CEOs like very top notch people. So I would like to ask Ashley, how you like being surrounded with like top notch people to selling the product of hundreds k? How do you face that question? How do you gain your confidence and how do you do that? I freak out before my meetings. I give myself the room to freak out before, and I give myself the room to freak out after and every time I have that large meeting, you know, my other half knows that he's going to come home and I'll probably be freaking out and I'll be doubting myself or going over everything or even just being really happy for it. But I feel like there's been a bit of a switch like the, you know, the Sylvester Stallone like, pull the hat back. And arm wrestle anything. Oh, Roadhouse. That's the movie. Yeah you know what I mean? Not Roadhouse. The other 1 over the top. Over the top. Over the top. Yeah where it's like, right? And I go in and I in that meeting there's always somebody who called me, right? There's always somebody who did the initial call and said, we want to work with you. And the pattern. So far has been, everything's been word of mouth. So behind that person, there is another small army of people who know what I've done and remembering that gives me the opportunity to go into a meeting and just be sure and quiet, right? And when I go into them, I look for the quietest person because that person is usually the person that ends up making the decision and the people who are talking and all want to be heard. They're the people who are fighting for space. Do you know what I mean? Like, that's sort of the main structure of these meetings. And it took a lot of time to sort of analyze and figure out how do they usually go. But with my clients, that's the main structure of them. So I have my freakout moment. I have another one at the end away from the meeting, but I just go in and I remember there's a reason that I'm here and this is the value that I'm bringing them. And then I listen. For example, if you don't have a background in there in that kind of sphere that the client has more experience than you, how do you bring the value of your own self to the meeting? How do you respond? If you don't if you're unsure of yourself. Yeah, exactly, yeah, because like you don't have a background in this, like, how do you do this? Like, how do you manipulate the public? In some case, like. I don't know the self-promotion, Chris, I got to hand it over to Yemen, self-promoting. You go, you look. Let me answer this question. All right. Here we go. Here we go. I've been thinking, as Ashley is explaining this, how she's like, freaking out before and after I was thinking and just this is rhetorical, and if you want to answer it, you can. I was like, why is Ashley freaking out? What is she thinking about? Because in a normal life, she's going to walk around in pajamas on a t-shirt and have her hair all messy, and it's fine. That's just 100% who she is. Then she feels like she has to become somebody else to impress these people to warrant the authority and respect that she already deserves. So one key difference in terms of the way I approach things, especially when I walk into the rooms with celebrities and billionaires, is I'm not fazed by them at all because I guess I've become desensitized to Fame into money. It's like, I don't care if you're a billionaire, you're just another human being. You were born in the world the same way I was, and you're going to die the same way I'm going to die. Everything else in between is how we choose to live. And a lot of this is, I think, is just to know that you can't be somebody else that you aren't to show up as you are and to be OK with that. And if you're not going to get the gig, you're not going to get the gig your life goes on. And we used to think early in our career that, Oh my gosh, if we ever just did that job with Nike and we've done three that our career and our life would change and it didn't. Oh my gosh, if we just worked with some gigantic band like Coldplay. Our life would change. We did, and it didn't change. So come to the realization that no amount of Fame or fortune is going to do anything for you. You have to just come in as who you are. And I've been thinking about this. I've been thinking about this. Like, I wonder if we could do a social experiment sometime, like if we all live like monks, if we all came in, shaved their head, wore an orange robe and we're bare feet and we're devoid of our possessions and our individual identity in a way that we would have to just let go of our ego. So we would all come in without makeup or any kind of preparation, and we'd be ugly and as beautiful as we normally are, and we would just learn that people would just accept us. And that if we stripped away our individuality or how we pretend to be to other people, maybe having spent like a year in some kind of remote location, we would find that we're OK and we're going to be at peace with all this stuff. There were no mirrors. There are no blow dryers. There's nothing, right? It was just us just getting together, sharing meals, sharing conversations, ideas, philosophy, that kind of stuff. And then just to learn, to accept ourselves because I find that people that are kind of living this lifestyle tend to be very comfortable with who they are. And so if you can construct that in your mind and pretend to go through that process, how might that impact you and change you? So if I were actually walking to this room, I'm like, OK. Maybe I'm an idiot, I'm just going to walk in and just do my thing if it helps them, awesome, if they find and see the value in what it is that I do. Amazing if not, they deserve somebody else. Where are they going to feel that way? And I think Ashley is right, I mean, smart people know when people are saying something valuable versus talking all the time and what they have to do is they tolerate those people, they're not celebrating them, trust me behind their back. They are not celebrating those people. Rex has his hand up. I'm sorry. Go ahead. Fire away, man. Chris, you are talking about this episode. I just want to pick up on how was it during this London tour? Did you see any past traces or was there any distance between the old Josie and the transmission there in the brief period? OK. I think Jose was I didn't know what to expect, what energy he was going to bring because I don't know if you guys saw this really super long post that he posted on Facebook about his birthday yesterday. And he did some things that are going on, but he said he felt very hurt after we split up. He probably felt hurt for a number of different reasons hurt financially, maybe hurt emotionally that we're breaking up as two people. And he did say this to me. He did say that by being a part of the space. And the company, I validated him. And I don't want that responsibility. That him being associated with us gave him credibility, and he and he felt good about himself, and I said, that's a dangerous thing to put yourself worth in the hands of somebody else, or even to attach it to an inanimate object like our building or our space. So I wasn't sure what to expect, but when we got together, I gave him a big hug. Now he must be living well because he is. He was a bigger man physically than he used to be. It's like, OK, give him a hug. We talked a little bit and he reverted back into his old routines, which is I got to prepare my deck and I'm going to get ready for the talk. And I was thinking, Oh my gosh, Jose, are you seriously literally preparing your deck like minutes before? When when I imagine that you must, you must have a gazillion decks and you're going to do what I think you're always going to do. So why are you going through this right? But I didn't see any of that weird negative energy that could be present. And I think he was fairly open, but he still did his old Jose things right? He gave his talk. And as soon as he gave his talk, he left. And then and then I was going to speak, and I didn't realize he left the building. He went to go get a massage. Like, oh, that took a lot out of you, I get that right. So as I'm nearing the end of my talk, Josie comes back and blurts out something and I was like, OK, but he was actually saying something in support of what it is that I was doing. So I didn't feel any weird energy. But it's not that there was a giant evolution, considering we hadn't really been in the same space for over a year. And I just feel like, you know, if you're not moving forward, you're moving backwards, and that's why it's like, I always want to be moving forward. I hope that was satisfactory. Let's get back into the deck. I mean, let's actually start the deck because we haven't even done anything, ok? I love seeing 51 people in here, so I don't even know why you guys are tuning in. There's like a record number of people in here, at least for one of my calls for Matthew. That's a normal thing. OK, first off, I'm going to do a really quick review. I'm going to make up for some lost time here. All right. Am I sharing the deck? Yeah, I am. OK, so here's the review. I'm going to do this exercise. OK, I want you to look at the mood board that was created for an ideal customer. And then if you feel so compelled, unmute yourself and tell me what you think of who this ideal customer is. Just buy these visuals, and then what we'll do is we'll actually look at the profile. Can we do that? So this is from I hope I'm saying this right outta here. Yes OK, so you don't say anything. Everybody else can say whatever, so we're looking at this board. What can you draw from this in terms of who the ideal customer is? Chris, I'm thinking this will be for a restaurant or the OK for the grocery business. I'm thinking, OK, and why do you think I'm seeing a lot of the food jars, the flowers, the vegetable basket, the cheese, visually, the coffee it is attracting me. Probably this is kind of some food business or the grocery store. I also see like flowcharts ideation and the books. It felt a little confusing because the majority of the pictures in the mood board is about the food order like grocery related stuff. So I felt it is really somewhat vague, but some are really pointing out to me to that direction. OK, perfect. Now I meant to jump in here just to kind of speed this thing up. All right. So there's a lot of food items on here, and I think that this person must be in the food and beverage space. I think there's something about sustainability because it's a natural almond and these things look like organic vegetables to me. And there's a quote here is we don't have a society if we destroy the environment. And so this is a very mindful entrepreneur and somebody who's somewhat forward thinking because they're not just in the food space, they're also involving teams and doing strategy and mapping out user experience, something like that. OK, buttery. Who is your ideal customer? My ideal customers. There are three of them. Wait, I'm trying to remember this. Social partners, companies with CSR projects, and there you go. Don't you know your customer at this point? Yeah, foundations that focus basically about the environmental and they have social impacts and stuff. Yeah OK, now this is going to be very good for what we're about to do. So I'm going to show you some examples. I scraped off the internet, and I didn't. Well, we'll talk about it. So imagine just keep this in mind. This is her ideal customer and this is what they care about. She's using this term. Social preneur. All right. Solopreneur, so she's going to do something to capture their attention, we should tailor it for them, right? Yes OK. Let's think about that, so we're going to move on. OK, so who's up next is Ashley ludgate. Ashleigh, are you on the line? I think it's actually, yeah, it is. No, I'm sorry, it's not, Ashley, this is your. Is this the name of the client or is this? Who did this? Hey, Chris, this is Nicholas. Do you hear me? It's Nicholas. Yeah so this. Yeah all right, your. OK, thank you, Nicholas. Maybe I did such a good job. You actually thought Ashley was a person? Yeah OK, hey, this is great. You made it really easy because you put your name real big up there. But OK, so this is excellent. So let's talk about who Nicholas is. An ideal client is. An active woman, I'd say, beauty blogger, beauty blogger. OK, you guys are getting real specific now. I like that. Anybody else? I guess. I think so. Who cared about health and wellness and the lifestyle? I'm guessing that. Ok? anybody else? Active millennial, female, health conscious, fashionable. Um, it's a very clean, hot. It feels kind of high end sensibilities to me. Mm-hmm That box of vegetables makes me feel like she's ordering kind of premium food stuff. Mm-hmm You know, straight to her door, like, thrive or something like that. Yeah, she blends her coffee with butter and coconut oil, grass Fed butter. Of course, I also like health coach or something in the health coach. OK this is very good. So the ideal customer here is definitely feminine, very fit, very image conscious into fashion, what she puts in her body and all this kind of stuff. Not to overproduce like I see the shirt and the jeans and their little torn. I mean, it's very curated, but it's not. It's trying to look like she's not trying too hard. OK And then we see some kind of cafe with some very rustic materials, hanging lights and exposed brick wall. It feels urban to me in that image. So this blend of urban and natural, that's what I'm getting from this board. OK, Nicholas, who's your ideal customer? Well, I had three. This one's a bit modeled after my wife a little bit, so that was pretty easy and that I had a male counterpart to her. And then my last like stretch partner stretch client would be more of an older male 45 to 50. OK, let me ask you a question here. This board is for one woman, right? Not for all three profiles. Oh yeah, just the one woman. Yeah Yeah. So we're just talking about this ideal customer. Singular that's good. Why is your wife your ideal customer? Well, she has her own business, and she's very driven and passionate, and I find myself more wanting to go after individuals who are passionate and actually have a drive to them and want to better themselves. And she's all around just a pretty awesome lady. Well, you can share the replay after this. Yeah, definitely. I'm sure you this is great. It could be wonderful or it could be horrible for you because you know, the customer type really well. Is this the customer typekit can afford you that it's going to hire you to do everything that you want to do? That's the ideal customer, right? Yeah, that's why I was doing these. I had that epiphany. I was like, well, this particular person probably was not my ideal financial person to go after because they won't have that much money. So I had that epiphany at the end of the profile was like, well, OK, I need it. Yeah, I can tell you what, the exercise just do it. I love it. OK so for clarification for everybody, this is not your ideal life partner. This is your ideal customer, the person who can actually utilize everything that you have to offer them. And just like sky's the limit in terms of budget and scope, that's who we're trying to profile right now. You want to build a road towards them now. You don't want to build a road towards actually elongate because you already haploid married, so just be careful here right now. OK, so we need to do this again. All right, let's move on here. So Andrew smith, I hope I got this name right. Now, or is this profiling another person called Andrew smith? Who did this? I get I'm terrible, I don't even read the who posted it, I just downloaded the PDFs. OK, so minibar, I don't tell you about this, right? What do we know about this person? Andrew smith? Her ideal customer. Obviously, starting a restaurant like a trendy restaurant. Why do you say it's trendy? It's actually that picture right there that says Peaky blinders, and it has all the people talking and kind of like the food that's being offered the nice wine, the tacos is very kind of millennial esque to me. I feel like that's what they're targeting is like somebody 25 through 40 kind of in that range. And likes to go out like, have a good time. But yeah, restaurant, that's not good. OK, so family style photos thrown me off, though, which is the family style photo. The bottom right bottom or the chicken? The chicken, everybody reads, he goes to mom for Sunday lunch. And also the Falcon. I don't understand it. Oh, is that? I don't know if that's real. Or is that an actual illustration on a wall? Oh, OK. Yeah OK, maybe that's a tattoo he wants. Well, if that's the case, then we should have a tattoo on somebody's arm. And we need supplies. Yeah, OK. All right. What I'm seeing here is a variety of different things like I see, perhaps I don't know what perky blender's is, but it looks like a premium coffee shop, and it has that kind of all that ornate detail in terms of how it set up. So this is not an inexpensive or fast place, right? So this is, it says, premium to me. We see some kind of tacos. We see chicken and people sharing conversations, that kind of thing. And then there's a DJ and then there's a camper. So those things kind of throw me off a little bit because there's this really rustic vibe, like where hipster types would go and people who really care about food. So some of the images are kind of strange to me and that bar image throws me off. But I guess it's all the same place, right? Because perky blenders is everywhere. And I'm just curious, modiba, did you put the logo on everything or is it just happens to be one place? OK, so this is a client I was in discussion with, and he owns it's an up-and-coming startup. It's a speciality coffee place. They've been picked up by a lot of the sort of well-crafted coffee connoisseur type magazines, and they've won an award. So they're quite up and coming. They're getting into a lot of the bigger sort of bigger places, bigger companies. They're sort of doing kiosks in department stores and that sort of thing. And because I thought it was a mood board in terms of an empathy graph, so he's kind of crossing over with him and his lifestyle, so he likes to DJ in his spare time. He's an outgoing guy. He lives in walthamstow, which is the same area I live in, and that's the bird on the wall. It's quite the area that I live in. There's a lot of it's a creative hub, so there's a local counsel has commissioned all the creatives, the artists to do a lot of this war. So five of the area, there's a lot of new restaurants and eateries opening up. OK, so I'm a little confused. Does he like to eat at these places? He's this is his business. He he's sort of partners with. So if you look at his Instagram, he partners with other people who make quite, you know, great food. OK, so here's where I'm a little confused. So this is a project that you're actually trying to get or working on. Is that right? Yeah OK. So this is theoretically done in some kind of hypothetical space. So to try and teach, everybody had to profile people. And so if we're trying to create an empathy graph for this person, I would like to see him a little bit more centered to kind of like, what do we focus on, right? So instead of shoving him to the side, so I still am a little confused as to who this person is. Is this a venture capitalist? Is he a serial entrepreneur? I don't understand him just yet. Yep. OK. Sure and then and then we would then make these other things a lot smaller. Relatively speaking, because size communicates importance and position also communicates importance. So when you guys do this later on for yourself? I didn't mean to go this deep into this kind of conversation. Typically, then you would put the person on the left hand side. So we read him first, like, this is our main person and he doesn't have to be. Physically doing that, like you could show a person who's dressed the way that he is dressed and then show that he likes music and DJing and eating at these places, or investing and showing us a slice of his world and how he lives. OK And I get that, so there's probably a. Would you actually did you actually present this to him? No, no, no, no, no. OK I've just done. I've had a strategy session done. Yes I see you build this out on him. Oh, I see. I see. OK I get it. OK, so he's into the outdoors and he's into going to clubs and bars and DJing. So he's got a lot of interest, right? OK, so I get that. So here's what we probably would do, too, is if I was advising you to do this, what I would try to do is not lean too much on any one thing. There's a lot of images of coffee and perky blenders here, so I think you're trying to tell the client as you're profiling this person. He goes to the coffee shop a lot and he cares what coffee is that right? Yeah OK. So what I would do is to not dovetail it into what the clients want to see already, but just give us a sense of the world that he lives in, like where does he live? Is it in a loft? Is it flat? What does it look like? Does he have a family? And then to build that all out, so we get a sense of his life. This is a photo album of his life. Right OK. All right. I'm going to move on. OK, let's. This is. Is this Smiley graphics? Whoever's work this is that would be me who's saying, who's that? The a beautiful baby. Yeah, beautiful. OK, so here, what do we see? Who's our her ideal customer? Looks like someone that likes. You know, they like. Organization, form, style, happiness, some sort of, you know, kind of tranquility. I was thinking, who is very environmentally conscious, like they really care about improving not just like the environment, but like family lifestyle because you've got kids and you kind of got this cool location where it could be like New homes and things like that. So it's like somebody who wants to just improve the environment, but kind of like start something new starts kind of like start a revolution of like how I guess you live, like, like a lifestyle, like a cleaner, healthier lifestyle. Mm-hmm Well, there's images of rocks balancing, so there's must be something about that. And we see that there's a connection to family and the outdoors, very natural things. And then I see this thing up here says, don't buy this jacket. What is all about? There's a newspaper saying, don't buy this jacket. So maybe there's this thing about sustainability or consumerism, something like that. And then the image looks like a community of all different shapes, sizes, races coming together. So I don't know if there's like some kind of potluck or is this after a disaster happens providing food for communities? There's something there and it's centered. I thought it could have been a craft fair, but it does look more like sharing of a meal, right? Something like that. then you see this really trippy. I don't know, just re-imagining of Port like this harbor that's happening here. There's something very futuristic about that, so this person is not just some earthy person, I also thinking about the future. OK, so who are we talking about? Who's the ideal customer here? They shop. You want me to go. Yeah Yeah. Yes. You guys are all hitting it on the nail. We got it. Yep, perfect. OK beautiful. So you've done a good job. So then you guys can read this. Of course, everybody posted their PDF via Dropbox link, so you guys can check that out, right? All right, let's go on. This is where I go. So here's just move forward. Based on the images that he selected, who's this ideal customer? Kid Minecraft boys, Minecraft. Where's the Minecraft image? I'm just saying it looks like a kid who likes to build stuff. Oh, I see, OK. OK most of everything is made out of wood almost, but there's not a hovering vintage car or. Right, right in the middle there, middle, right? Anybody else minimalistic? Mm-hmm Future oriented science stuff. Mm-hmm Right educational toys. Mm-hmm I would have said educational toys for kids wouldn't focused. So my read on this is that I don't think he's targeting the child. Maybe I don't know. I think he's targeting the company that makes toys for kids' educational toys that are sustainable, that are natural. They're probably a little bit more premium. And maybe there's a bigger mission about education and the belief in play. I know that's a big, important thing. And there's this weird glass out in the forest, which is super cool. So, so maybe about mixing modern and old together. And then I see that same idea echoed in the wooden laptop. And there's something that's really cool about that and about exploration with this kind of futuristic lunar looking vehicle on the far right and the floating car. OK so what do we got here? I go. Who's your ideal customer? What are you guys? Basically nailed it is everything you described is basically that. OK, so it's our company, it's a CEO of a company that is building these toys that would be had to be more creative and to develop these new skills that are not only targeted for like smaller children, but everyone in any age can use those. But yeah, everything you described kind of meant that just to add for that, the reason why I picked this, I think it was more about how I relate to that to most. And that would be my ideal client in the sense of where I can learn myself as well. These topics in this industry? You know what? What would be interesting for me? I'm going to give you some, some design advice on how to do these things, especially if you're going to present them to a client. OK like I said before, ideally I'd like to see the person who you're targeting in here somewhere like this is what he looks like or she and maybe that they wear some kind of really casual suit, but really funky sneakers. So you know that there's business and there's play all in one thing, and curating and finding these images takes time and it's like you have to be very intentional and the child is important in this person's life and looking at them, but they're not the person you're targeting. So that's where I think we need an image there. The other thing I was going to say is, you have all this space. I would love for you to just make your images a little bit bigger and to capitalize on this. And not to make them. Also, even so that we help to direct the eye towards something like this is really important. Guys look at this first and then from that, look at these things. So we want to control how the AI flows through these mood boards. OK and you don't have to have so much white space because you're only per the limitation of the assignment. Exercise is just use one page. So you have to be very careful about how you design a lay these things out. But OK, so it looks like who this person is, and we're trying to look at the world through their eyes. So tell me what they're doing at home. What are they doing at work or what do they do for fun? I want to see, like I said, it's a snapshot of photo album of their life. Not just the things that they want to make. OK

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