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Business and Design Terminology Overview

#
39
Chris Do
Published
March 11, 2017

Chris Do explains why knowing business and design terminology is vital and covers the ones we should know.

Read Transcript
This is episode 39. Officially, I guess it's episode 40 because we had to open the agenda call last week, but since it's an open agenda, I didn't have a slate for it or anything, so sequentially. We're going to call this episode 39 guys, welcome. This week we're going to talk about terminology, specifically business terminology. And then Kerry green asked if we can talk about some design stuff as well. So we're going to jump into that as well. OK, now I'm going to do my best and you've heard me say this before and make a liar out of myself. Is it worth to try to get this done in an hour so you guys can get on with your day or you can go to bed or whatever it is and not feel like you miss something? All right, so let's see what we can do here. So let's rock, and I want to ask you guys for the time being. Everybody, please unmute yourself unless you have something to say, unless you just want to show off your brand new Yeti mic. And that's cool, too. All right. And if Zach monitoring this, if you guys have anything you want to talk to him about. Let him know in the chat, specifically address it to him. If you want to remain anonymous, otherwise just send it to the group. All right, I'm going to ask the group right now, is there something that you are personally really passionate about? Something that you feel like, you know, a lot about, so it could be about baseball cards, it could be about comics, any kind of sport, anything, and if somebody is deeply passionate about something, I want to hear from you right now because I want to ask you a few questions. The we want who wants to go. I have a lot of hobbies myself, and I can talk about this without your help, but I really want to kind of just have you share a little bit, just take a few minutes to share with the group who wants to step up. Can anybody go? Yeah, I can hear you. Who's this? I can't see you, Sean. All right. I don't have my video on. OK, that's cool. About Sean, I am passionate about evangelism. OK, can you give us a little context? So, yeah, as a Christian minister, minister evangelism is essentially sharing gospel, but also teaching people how to do that. So in the context of a church setting, I basically teach Christians how to share the gospel. And so that's basically my passion and how long you been doing this since 2007 or actually 2008 1,000 eight? OK, it's been almost 10 years. Did you grow up in a religious background? Kind of, but not the same way that I believe today. OK, now when you're ready. And so as a minister and as evangelists, are there things that you? Oh, you would say to other people who are kind of in the fold, if you will, to let them know that. You understand them or that you're a learned person in this space. Like what? I walk up to people in the church and tell them, like I'm an expert in evangelism or something. Yeah, like in your congregation, like when people come to see you and when you give you call it to Sermon or I don't know the terms. So I don't even know. Yeah, sure. So it's a little bit different, I guess, in the church. And for this, it's not like you. You want to go around talking about yourself. So typically, the way that it was found out in me is that I just went out and I did it. I actually was really involved in street evangelism and people caught notice of that and saw. And then in starting to lead Bible studies and things like that, people saw that I had an ability to teach. And so it was, I guess, by word of mouth, so to speak. OK, well, let me rephrase the question because I'm a little out of my depth here. I was raised Catholic and there are certain things that I used to do and believe in. You know, first of all, like, there's a baptism, there's confessional. We we share in the Eucharist and there are certain things that we do. If you guys have ever been to a Catholic ceremony, there are tons of very traditional things that they do, depending on how deep you go. So if you go to a church like a really big formal church, there's I don't even know what they call them, the little assistant guys that wear the White outfits, they swing the little balls, you know, and there's incense or something. So there's this whole ceremony. And if I knew more about this, I can give a term to every single thing I'm talking about. You see what I'm talking about? Like, you guys can tell right now that I have some knowledge in this, but not a lot, because I can't talk about things in very specific ways. You see what I'm doing here, you guys. So Sean theoretically, has a lot of gospel. He he can quote scripture. So right, sean? Yeah do you know your Bible really well? Yeah old and New Testament. Yeah OK, so what's your favorite scripture? First current or actually second corinthians? 521 OK, hold on. That's an easy one to remember because I haven't had it on my arm, so what is the 521 mean? So chapter 5 verse 20 one? OK and what does it mean? So that verses for God made him talking about Jesus who knew notes in to be sin for us that we might be the righteousness of God in Christ. So essentially, God made the perfect man to be a sin, basically a curse for us so that we could be seen as righteous and God's sights. It's not anything that we've done. Basically, God created his son as if he lived our lives and in return will treat us as if we lived his. I see. OK all right. I'm going to take a little pause here. Thanks for doing that. Sean, Thanks for stepping up, and I'm going to give you a little breakdown in a second. Does anybody else want to share something maybe secular, since everybody is a different faiths or denominations or not religious at all? Anybody else? Something you're really into could say music. OK, who's that? Who's talking? I can't see you right now. Charles Charles OK, Charles, you're really interested in music. You're passionate about music, any kind of specific music? Or are you a musician? I am a musician. All right. What do you play? I play drums. OK, talk to me about the drums you play. I played drums in an Alt rock band. It's not pop music. It kind of sounds like third Eye Blind meets Weezer. used to tour in a band just for fun. OK all right, what brand of drums do you use or is it a collection of different brands and do you have specific sticks that you use? I use Vader sticks and my kit is a custom kit. It's called Stubb Stubblefield drums. Just a small company in charlottesville, Virginia. Why did you pick that particular brand or that kit? I traded a website for the custom kit. I thought, you're going to say it has a very unique sound at a certain. It was a business transaction, but we approached me and needed a website and didn't have the funds, so we worked out a little trade. Now are there different sounds or why drummers would pick a different kit versus another? Yeah, you could get acrylics shells or you get wood shells. Different types of wood shells. Wood sounds warmer than acrylic. Yeah, usually. But Yeah. And what is yours, what are acrylic? Acrylic are it's like translucent, you can see through it. You can get different colors. Mine are maple and maple. OK Yeah. OK all right, perfect. Thank you, Charles. All right, guys, I'm just going to ask the group now what they heard and why do you think I'm talking about what each person is passionate about? How does this relate to anything? And we have a guest. What do you guys think? I can't see the chat window, I mean, I want to see how confident someone is in talking about what they know. OK good, specifically the terminology as well. and what does that let as a person who's listening to this? Whether they're actually knowledgeable about their passion. OK all right. Check this out, guys. So because Sean is a Christian minister, he can quote scripture like I've always wanted like know, is it. Chapter 5 verse 21 second corinthians? I don't even know what Corinthian is from the book of Corinthian, so he can speak about what he's really passionate about and immediately get the sense that this guy knows what he's talking about. That instills confidence in you. Hold on a second, guys. I'm going to close my window here. All right, sorry about that. That's why I don't do these calls on Monday. The Gardener is here, and the blower and the mower is going strong. All right. OK, so that's what I got from Sean, and you can tell, like he's been doing this for some time, almost 10 years, and maybe he's. Been religious for a lot longer, that's what it sounded like to me. And he's taken it to a level where now he's actually a minister and he's doing this as part of who he is as a human being. Charles, the musician, I noticed, Charles said, I play the drums and he's in an Alt rock band. He just didn't say rock, and there's some very specific terminology there. And he says it's not pop, so we kind of know where he stands. And he said it's kind of a mix between third Eye Blind and something else. I forgot, but I wrote it down somewhere. What's that, sir? There it is. I actually crossed out Weezer for some reason. So third eye, so it's very specific. It's kind of between these two styles. That's somebody who is really into music that would be super clear in their head. For me, not so much. He plays with a certain kind of sticks and a kit. He talks about the warmth of one material versus the other. OK now, when it comes to design, a lot of us are in the design, branding space, but we didn't study design, so we don't have the same kind of knowledge base as we do with what we're passionate about. Sean did not study design. I know his history. He's kind of mostly self-taught. He was helping his mom run her business, found some clients and started to do this thing. OK, so now he's entering into a space where he needs to be as specific, as knowledgeable as he is with Christian ministry. Now, Charles, did you study design or what do you do, charles? I don't know that much about you. I run a small design firm. I went to school for music business and got into design through doing album art and CD packaging and website. OK, so you're mostly self-taught as well? Yeah all right. So we will see now later on when we dig into this. So and you guys have said it very perfectly. The reason why we need to learn the terminology is because we have a common language with the business people. And if we don't know the business terms, how do we connect with them? How do we understand what they're saying back to us? So there's something that's very important about the specificity of language. I hope that's a word. And as much as I hate to use jargon, these terms are an indicator of experience and depth of knowledge to the other person. And the more specific you can describe something that color a texture of material, printing technique, type, type, terminology, that kind of stuff. It really makes you seem knowledgeable and that's going to instill confidence in the other person. And that's what a formal design education can give you. The good news is most, if not all, of the stuff is already out there on the internet. So what we have to do is we have to make some effort to go and search this stuff out to make it a part of the normal way in which we speak. Now this will help you if you hang around with a lot of other designers or art people. Because it just starts to become ingrained in how you speak. Hearing somebody else used in a sentence also helps out quite a bit. Now chances are you're not going to be hanging around a lot of business, folks. So maybe this is our group. This is how you guys can practice. OK, so I'm going to jump into this and I'm going to break out of this sharing session in one second because I want to hear about the terms that or that you want to know more about. OK, so I have about three pages of business terms here. Here we go. And you guys can screencap this and we can talk about it. OK so I have alignment, arbitrage, roic, sweet surfacing, landing runway. A lot of airplane metaphors there. Swing and gone CPA. M&A, MVP. Gross profit. Net profit and buy in. That's just page one. Now there's a bunch of terms here. I don't want to sit down and talk about all of them because we won't have time. But are there any terms or acronyms that you see here that you want me to go a little deeper and before I go in advance to page 2 and three? Go ahead and unmute yourself and ask away. There's no judgment here, so you guys can say whatever you want. Ok? I think swag and gum are the ones. I don't know what those are. OK, let me share this with you. OK, let me go one at a time. Swing OK, let me share my Navigator. I have something in here. See if I can find it. I have a slight here swag. All right, swag, not like you have swagger. That's a different kind of swag. Swing is oddly enough a term, and when I first heard it, I heard of it as wag wag. And then I looked it up, and it's sometimes referred to as swag because we want to add the word scientific in front of it. Otherwise it's just a wild ass. Guess, OK, now when we don't have enough information and the client is asking us for a bid? They're asking us for a wag. And there's a way that you can respond to this, OK, if you're uncomfortable giving a price, and here's how I do this. So I was in actual meeting with one of my really big clients, a multi-billion client and the IT director CTO had asked me, so how much is this project going to cost us? And I said to him knowing that he's in the IT space that he would understand this term. I said, guys, we don't have enough information to have a scope of work. And so w So the best I can do is give you a wag, right? And I'm on a guess on the high side because I don't want to burn my team and burn myself, right? So I prefer not to do that. If you're asking me for a swag, I'll say it's going to be between 30,000 to 125,000. But let's just put a pin on that for now until we define a scope. Figure out what the heck we're doing, so don't have to do a wag for you. And he laughed, and everybody else in the room is looking at me like, what the heck are you guys talking about? I said, OK, for those of you guys that don't know. I made a joke about it. I'm using this term that I only learned like two days ago. Wag stands for a wild ass guess, and then they all laughed and they're like, engage in the conversation. So I also know when to use jargon and make fun of myself when I use jargon, ok? Especially because literally, I did just learn it two days ago. Ever understand that I have a quick question? Go ahead. How long? Yes how would you guys hold on before you guys say anything? Because I don't have your faces up and I'm learning your voices? Just say this is Christian. Here's my question. Go ahead. OK all right. I guess we've covered that. But I'm wondering, how often do business people know these terms and how often do you need to define them for them as you're using them? Really good question there. I think a lot of business people understand these terms. This is just as familiar to them as kerning tracking type, face color palette, et cetera brand attributes as they are to you. OK and when I'm in a room with people, I want to quickly identify what kind of language they're using so that I can speak the same language as them. Now, if they don't know the term, when I use it, you can. I'm reading the room constantly. And if I see people have that kind of glazed over, look, I take make a point to say, you guys know what that term is. This is what this means. I don't want to alienate anybody in the room. And I use it more as a point of comedy and also to establish that, yeah, I understand these concepts. You guys and everybody can understand a ballpark figure. But oddly enough, when you put an acronym on things and you make it seem like you've studied this stuff, it makes it more real and it gives you more credibility. Now, I know that most people that are in the deaf space development space or an IT technology space, they know these terms like agile scrum waterfall. Triage, they use these terms all the time, all you have to do is hang out with some techie kind of guys for like half a minute and you're going to be able to write down every term that they always use. OK I hope that answers that question. Thank you. OK, cool. I'm going to go into Gombe now, ok? And I learned this by being on a panel and debating somebody about pricing hourly versus value based many years ago. A video, I'll share with you guys at some point. And he talked about researching the different ways of bidding because when they're bidding on these projects, they're dealing with the city, they're dealing with government, they're dealing with big organizations, and they have a very specific way that you need to bid. So sometimes they'll just say, we need a game for this, and that's it. So he had to look up all this stuff. And in Gombe is an acronym for general order of magnitude. So what kind of ballpark are we playing in the military uses this a lot. For example, when you're developing a new airplane or aircraft or destroy or something like that, they want to know what's the development cycle going to be like? How many billions of dollars or trillions of dollars are they going to spend because they got to go get funding and they got to get it approved? And that's really important for them. So it tends to be something that comes up with really large organizations where the scope of the project and the process and the budget is completely unknown. So they're very related in general orders of magnitude, what kind of money are we talking about? So then there's the example of is it the one x, the 10 x, 100x or 1,000 x, what are we talking about? And you can see this very clearly, even in just logo design, depending on what logo designer you speak to. You could spend $10 $100 1,000 or over 100,000 or even a million. Is that? Because there are different kinds of designers who design logos. So far, so good. All right, let's get back to M&A. M&A, a term that I learned recently, I guess in the last year and a half, two years stands for mergers and acquisition, merger and acquisition. So when a company is like, we're tied up doing M&A. They're buying companies. Just so you know what that is M&A, OK, I think that's pretty straightforward, unless you guys have an additional question on that merger and acquisition. OK, now MVP is something you need to learn about as well, and that isn't Sanford most valuable player or person MVP stands for Minimum viable product. I want to find that slide for you in one second. Here we go. Minimum viable product, and this is often referred to in the software development world is what's the bare bones operational version that we can produce for the cheapest price for the least amount of time? What can we do? And we'll add other features and benefits later. But right now, we just want to make sure like, for example, for uber, what do you think an MVP is, guys? What's an MVP for uber? Anybody? or nobody? A car? And at. Uh-huh what else? The basic app that could just call the car without the whistle, basically. Right so enter where you are and to where you want to go. That's essentially the MVP, and we're assuming that it's developing a product so cars and people are necessary in the city and fuel. We don't talk about that in an MVP. We're just talking about the app itself, right? What do you need? You need to be able to just call somebody near you. And we need to be able to tell them where you're going. And we probably need some kind of map guidance system for the driver. So that's what these guys do. They create maps and they're ugly. The buttons barely look like anything, and it just works, and they keep iterating on that until they get to something where they can release it public. Most software companies work this way. OK all right. Are there any terms here that you need to know that you would like a little bit more information about than anybody? No Yes. Yes, please fire away. The second one. Yeah so much so that he says it's so much. I had to look it up. Another effort. He just uses that term all the time. OK, you guys can look it up. Arbitrage is somebody who trades. He buys low, sells high. So and usually it's dealing with stocks or commodities, right? And Gary says, I'm an arbitrage of time or attention. He's buying attention at a cheap price and selling at a high price. So he's just using a different context that most people don't use it. I would strongly encourage you not to use that word, but since he's using it all the time, I had to look it up myself. OK one key idea in this page here is buy in. So when we're talking about onboarding and buy in, we wanted to get buy in from the entire team we want to. Not just the person who's hiring you, but their boss and their boss's boss. We want to get buy-in from the entire team so that we don't get late cycle revisions. Again, some terms I'm dropping in here, meaning very close to the end when you're about to deliver a late cycle revision, as the CEO sees it for the first time, did not buy in on it, on the idea or the direction and says everybody change everything. So then the person who hired you is stuck in an awful position. They're sitting there thinking, Oh my gosh, I had no more money. We have no more time. But my CEO is not happy. So guess where? Who's going to take a dump and where is it going to be? It's going to be in front of you, and you're going to have to figure it out. So it's very important that you get buy in. And that's one of the reasons why we do discovery with the key stakeholders, the decision makers. So there is any kind of surprise later on. OK excuse me. All right. We'll move on to page 2 unless there's any other questions. Feel free to ask me. Ahmed, Chevron is asking about surfacing, landing and runway, OK, perfect surfacing. Here's an analogy for you, and I think I might have a slide on this. Where the heck is it? Let's see if I have it. They have one there, the surfacing act of bringing deep seated issues, I can't even spell that correctly for grandma on my part. OK, now the way you can think about surfacing is this, you know, sometimes on your face, you got a little bump like a razor bump or a little pimple, what that's about to begin. And after a while, you kind of rub and play with it for a little bit and start to get to the top becomes a white head. You pop the little white head. You've surfaced that piece of dirt and oil. Now, if you think about an organization or somebody who's standing in front of you who's got this, this motivation as to why they're doing something, they want to build a website. But if we keep asking why questions, we're surfacing, surfacing the reasons why it was because I'm under pressure. To hit our quota for the quarter, and it's not performing and I don't see it's going to perform. I can see there's a very high bounce rate and I need help in fixing this. So if you go in saying great, I will solve your website for you. I'll design you something incredible, but you actually haven't surfaced the reason why they are asking you to do this in the first place. You're going to solve the wrong problem. Most designers go in trying to solve a design and aesthetic problem and not solving a business or marketing or conversion issue. OK, that's surfacing. I have one for runway here. OK OK, so a couple of terms in here. Runway is you think about an airplane and the airplane is going to land. How long is the runway because we know the airplane's going to take a certain amount of distance before it can safely come to a stop when the runway is too short? Guess what happens? There's going to be a crash and people are going to die. All right, so when we talk about a company, a company spends a certain amount of money every single month, oftentimes referred to as burn rate. So what's your burn rate? 100 thousand? Let's say. So if I don't bring in 1.2 million of business annually, I'm going to be underwater. And so if I'm burning $100,000 a month, my salespeople, my executive team needs to make sure there's enough business coming in, opportunities coming in that we can then go after and close that business so that we can cover our burn rate. Often overhead, like if we do no new business, how much money are we spending for rent, for utilities, for software, for upkeep, for our staff, for building maintenance taxes? That's our burn rate. So how many months. Can the company operate before going completely bankrupt? Now you guys need to know what your runway is, and we've talked about how to calculate this before. I won't go into it right now unless there's time at the end. You guys want me to go into that a little bit more. All right. So we're talking about runway here. Oops I didn't mean to do that. Sorry, guys. And then we talked a landing, right? Landing is the other term landing a runway. OK again, another airplane metaphor when we're talking about landing the client is the airplane. And what we're trying to do is land the client. So this is what we refer to as closing the client, closing the sale and figuring out what objections are spoken and unspoken. So that we can bring them in. I shared many stories before you guys. When I thought the client was taking off, I needed help land the client and it was listening to what the issues were. And I think I've developed certain skills that have helped me to become a pretty good closer of new business. Those are the terms. Excuse me. OK, here's a bunch of new terms now. Why don't you guys scan these? We talk about double keystone vision, mission goal tactic, customer lifetime value overhead, which is very similar to burn rate conversion, agile project management, waterfall project management milestones, scope of work, also SJW proposal and adapt. What's the difference between the two? Anybody have any questions about any of these terms? At one is a statement of work the same as scope of work? So W I think so. I use them interchangeably. It's a description of what you're going to do. Basically, I like scope because sculpted describes it in just one word versus statement. The statement of work is basically a declaration of what we're going to do, and the scope is just kind of defining what is and isn't included in the work, right? So when you say to a client, that request is going to take us out of scope, most business people understand what that means. Someone's asking about the waterfall. Beautiful I have something. A waterfall is when you go to the border of the United States and Canada and a body of water. No, I'm just kidding and find out where waterfall is. Where are you, waterfall? There it is. Boom, waterfall. Well, let me just read it to you so you can understand what the dictionary definition means. A sequential non-native, iterative design process used in software development processes in which progress is seen as flowing steadily Downward like a waterfall. Through the phases of conception, initiation, analysis, design, construction, testing, production, implementation and maintenance. What does that mean? So if you break your project out into different phases, this one lists quite a few. That one phase doesn't begin until the other one is complete. OK, so the concept starts, right, and then eventually there's analysis and design and then the build and implementation. We don't maintain something until it's been built. We don't build something until we design it. We don't design something until we analyze that. We need it until client hires us. That's waterfall project management. It's very typical. This is how you manage projects. Now there's a different way to Manage Project. It's called agile, and we'll talk about that in a second. But hopefully you guys understand waterfall. So, OK. So the opposite of that is something called agile project management, you can hear this a lot in Silicon valley, in startups. Whenever you hang around with Jose for five minutes, he's going to be agile, agile, agile. That's all he talks about. OK, and agile is a different way of managing a project, and I'll read the definition for you there. It's a focus on continuous improvement. Does that sound familiar like something Jose would say? Continuous improvement, scope, flexibility, team input and delivering essential quality products. OK and some of the methodologies include scrum. I'd never heard of extreme programming before. Leon, you've heard of. So essentially agile project management. As far as I understand it, the developers, the designers, the business people, the accountants all work on the project simultaneously at the same time. They work on it concurrently. So the development team is building something. They're not even sure what they're building. We have a goal and they're building something while the designers are working out the looks and the features. So each completion of an agile cycle, we build an MVP. And we define it with the team. So, for example, with the Uber app, we define it. As for the first. Sometimes they call it the tranche first tranche. Everybody, we need to figure out the part of it. And so everybody puts their mind to that. The next. Cycle, they're going to say, well, let's figure out how people are going to hail a cab. How do I identify where I'm at, et cetera, et cetera, and they just keep building and building and building on this together. So there's a term called scrum, which is, I believe, something they lifted from rugby. Right, rugby, when the ball is pitch, somebody grabs it and the entire team. Puts their bodies together and pushes the ball forward while the other team pushes it back. So that's a pretty appropriate metaphor for what they're trying to do. They're trying to take the ball and move it inches, yards, whatever it is, feet, whatever meters forward. Now, visuals would help. Unfortunately, I don't have any visuals right now, but if you can imagine a cross section of a waterfall, how it flows from a river, it falls down a little cliff and it keeps going and drops down and keep going. It's like a stairway. One task isn't done until the other one is completed, and why are people in Silicon valley, in the startup space so hot on agile? The reason being is this is because the development cycle and process of waterfall project management takes so long to complete by the time you finish your product. It might not be what you're looking for when you started. So the advantages of agile is you always have something you're constantly checking for feedback, usability, scalability, all that kind of stuff the entire time. And I don't work in the software space now, I know that developing a website, especially a really large website, would require agile project management. It's not something that we do all the time. So anybody in the software dev world that knows more about this, you guys can feel free to tell me I don't know what I'm talking about because I really don't. And we can dive deeper if you'd like anybody. Anybody want to add anything to that? Not hearing anybody saying yay. I will go back to the page. That's OK. All right, you guys are so silent, it's creeping me out, maybe my mic went dead. Who knows? Here we go. Hi, thank you. All right. Double keystone, double keystone. You guys, are you guys familiar with double keystone? Can't it's Monday, Monday. OK double keystone is typically a term used in retail. OK when the customer buys a product for $1 the retailer bought it for $50 cents and sold it to them for 100% markup. Right so I bought something for $0.50 and I sold it to the end consumer for $1. So I've made 50% I mean, 100% of my investment 50 plus 50. OK that means the manufacturer. Had to sell it to them, I had to produce it for $0.25 so that they can make a profit, so they're doubling their money as well. So that's a double keystone model. So when you see something at retail for $1 the manufacturing, the design requirements from the manufacturer side says we can only spend $0.25 to make this product. This is an important concept to understand. OK, so each person that touches the product makes money on it, so the manufacturer is working on it. They source all the materials, the labor, assembly, packaging and shipping and all in it has to be $0.25 or less. Then they sell it to the retailer who buys it, and then the retailer buys it for 50 cents, right? So they made their money and they're happy. Then the retailer now has to sell it. Now why is this important. If you ever watch Shark tank? They always ask you, what's your cost of goods sold or manufacturing costs? And what is it retail for? So whenever somebody says it's anything less than 25% of the retail price, they're like, wow, those are really good margins. That's what they're talking about. Or they say you're insane. It cannot cost 70% to make this because there's no margins. Nobody else can pick this up because if I buy it for 70 cents, I have to sell it, then for $1.40 or whatever it is. And then the market can't bear that price. OK that's double keystone. And that's important if you work with anybody in retail space that you understand the concept. Anything else, guys? OK, now I want you guys to pay attention to vision, mission and goal, and they're different. Sometimes we talk about it and we use them interchangeably and they're not interchangeable. Can I just briefly go through this? I have a slide somewhere for this, so let me find it. The vision is like a snapshot. It's a picture of what we are like in the future. So its future looking, it's forward looking. OK so there's a slide there, and the mission is actually the opposite. So why do we create this company in the first place? What is it we do? How do we do it? For whom are we doing it? Its mission and vision and the goal are the little steps required for us to accomplish the vision. If you go back to the vision slide, Chris, real quick, yeah, sure. OK just think about it, it has to do with your eyes, so it's a picture of what we're going to be like in the future. The mission is why the heck are we doing this in the first place? It's like the mission statement. So yes, it is exactly like the mission statement. OK, so your vision can change. Your mission should not. OK, goals versus objectives, ok? Goals are usually broad general expressions of guiding principles and aspirations, while objectives are precise targets that are necessary to achieve the goals. Detailed statements of quantitative and qualitative, qualitative and measurable results. And the tactics of the specific steps the company takes to execute its strategy, excuse me, its strategies. He describes what is to be done by whom and resources needed. So oftentimes you hear this and you too can use this. So when you're in a meeting, you're talking about defining the direction of the brand, the brand attributes and somebody gets into like, what are we going to eat for lunch or shipping orders? And this and that you can easily dismiss them by saying that's fine and dandy, but I think we're getting to tactical. Let's stay high level. When somebody is getting into the weeds, you're saying, I think we're getting too tactical. And we're doing vision planning right now. Or I'm trying to figure out what your mission is. So it is way about talking about something and potentially a weapon for you to dismiss something. Use it carefully. As I silenced the group, OK, I think we're good on this, Yeah. OK, now what do you say? Well, I think it's my understanding that. Thank you. OK here's the last slide for the business terminology, and then it has some design terminology that I think you guys might want to talk about. So whoever's meeting themselves, can you please, Zach, take care of them, please. Oh, thank you. Yeah mute. Anybody doesn't have anything that they want to say. Here we go. Zach OK. All right. OK this is almost no, I think this is the exact same slide that is from the creative strategy book review. Chapter 1 or part one. Have you guys do you guys remember this? So there's a lot of new people in the group rather than me sit here and go through the exact same slides again, even though they're included in the deck that I have today. I'm going to suggest that you guys go and watch that video. OK, so if you want to know more about insight, what that means Maslow's hierarchy of needs, segmentation, differentiation, features versus benefits, what the difference between the two are, what a purchase funnel looks like marketing allowable a metric of brand ladder positioning statement, brand activation, scenario analysis and create a strategy framework. Can we just agree that you guys will look that up? Is that ok? Or I can talk about some of them right now, if you like. Where was that? Where was that from again, chris? The creative strategy and the business of design book review part one. There are four parts of the book a book review. OK, and it looks something like this. So I have these slides. If these slides look familiar to you, it's because they're from the Book Review. What does it mean to have insight? OK, and then I created this graphic for you guys from Maslow's hierarchy of needs, it's very important to understanding the conversation of business goals and just so you even know what it is so that you can pull this up as a reference point. It's just like Sean saying Corinthians four, 22 or five, what do you say? Five, 20 one? Segmentation looks like this. The purchase funnel a term you definitely need to be aware of and be using right now to understand this concept. We have a whole course on this. The term metric. Like, how are we going to measure the success of this thing? And I love this quote, management is doing things right. Leadership is doing the right things. Talks about the brand ladder. Which I like a lot. And then the positioning statement. OK and I think I have a definition of tagline. In the next chapter, ok? Resources, guys, I want to share some resources with you. When I was stuck, I was like, shoot, what do these things mean? And I want to just pull it out of thin air? Well, there's this great thing. It's called the business dictionary.com. Swear to God it exists, and there are popular terms. And they're randomly generated, I think, or maybe these are the top popular terms, but if you go and view all the terms, you can go diving into what each one means the brand or the business dictionary is not perfect. I search for certain terms I just felt like I got ads and not the answer. But they have enough terms there. I'm sure there are better resources. But as you guys will soon find out, if you just search for something and mean put in two minutes of effort, you will find the answer. If you're good at search, which I think everybody in the space needs to be not just good, but great. OK was it helpful to you guys because we're going to move on to the next part? Anybody before we move on to the next part. Any other questions about the business stuff, why it's important or when should you use the house should use? How can you practice it? Yeah, that was great, Chris, thank you. Oh, you're welcome. Who's talking, paulina? Hi, Paulina. Hello I thought it was you, but I didn't want to guess and B make a mistake. OK all right. Let's go into design terms and concepts. So this is part two design terms and concepts. So here are a couple of things that I wrote down. Of course, there are a lot more than this, but this is what I wrote down and I've included more than this. Knowing the difference between a typeface and a font kerning versus tracking widows and orphans. We're just talking about typekit. So you don't have to get too sad for the widows or orphans because there aren't any identity design, wordmark, logo type, archetype, brand, brand architecture, brand attributes, brand equity, brand gap, a challenger brand and core values. So who's a smarty pants in this group and can tell me the difference between a typeface versus a font? What's the difference, you guys? And I screwed this up myself until some type Nazi called me up like, dude, you got that wrong, you need to fix that. You're not using the term correctly. I'm like, oh, I'm sorry, my bad. Well, I think font is basically the whole thing like the whole thing in general, but typeface like a gotham, futura, et cetera. Or the opposite? No, that's right. Yeah, the typeface is the actual he was saying, futura Helvetica. That's a typeface. And then whatever is used in a document specific point size to specific whatever is the font. And right. No, you both are totally wrong. But those are very common. Those are very common definitions. But go ahead. It's up, Paulina. Yeah, it's a Thai phrase like the family of font. So you have different weights and like future of future bolt and stuff. So you have to try to be the font and the future is, you know, the family of fonts. Hey, that's awesome, but also incorrect. OK, here we go. The title nerds have attacked me on this very friendly attack. They're friends of mine. Ok? the typeface is what you would normally refer to as the font. It's Helvetica in all of its weights, and the design of that letter form. The font is the delivery vehicle of the typeface. OK, so there's a digital font, there's a wood font, there's a metal font, there's a photo font, if you can believe it or not. When they used to do photo typesetting and each one is different, you guys understand. So Helvetica has like woodblock, where somebody can do letterpress, press and assemble it. So that's the font. Now, the reason why most people use font interchangeably with typeface is because in the software, the digital delivery of it is called the font. So you're looking at the font. and that's where most people screw this up. This one is not that critical that you get totally right, but now you know, and knowledge is power. OK, so when I was like, choose any font like, you mean, choose any typeface? Chris, I'm like, oh, I'm sorry. That was Rachel McDonald to me. Yes yes, I know you had to mention her name. Well, they're friends of mine, too. So yeah, they're all over me. They're like, mishear, that is a mistake. So I screwed up all kinds of things, I even spelled typefaces incorrectly, you guys. That's how good I am. All right. Kerning versus tracking. You guys know the difference between counting versus tracking. Yeah kerning is the spacing between individual letters, tracking is the overall letter spacing, so you can open up the tracking, but you can occur in individual letters. Not that big of a deal. Widows and orphans, since Zack is here and it's a disciple of type Ed. He can tell us what widows and orphans are. This is not a great definition here, you guys. I was looking for it. Well, yeah, no, basically widows and orphans are maybe like a single word or that's ending or beginning a paragraph that kind of just really disrupts the readability and rhythm of paragraph, section or text section. It's definitely something that should be avoided. That's excellent. That's excellent. So widow is the one that we most common because orphans are not that common. A widow is when you end a paragraph with one word. And it doesn't look good. He says it disrupts the rhythm and legibility of the copy, and so you're sitting there thinking, well, what can I do? That's where it ended, right? Well, there are things that you can do not so much in layout where you've got pages and pages of text. But if you were working on a poster, you could just change the size the column with. You would also force a what is that a line break? So for example, you would go to the previous line and hit Return. And that way it can end with two words and not one. OK, the orphan is the exact opposite of that. It's the beginning of a paragraph with one word. And it's not that common that you would see that now when I was looking up this type terminology from so-called reliable sources. They're basically saying to me, widows and orphans are the same. And when I learned this in school, they're not the same, and I think Zach just back me up on that. But maybe I'm just being a dork about it. No, no, you're right. They're not the same. They're not the same. But it's funny that when you look this up on these so-called type terminology and design resources, that this is the definition you get, it's kind of lame. Ok? keep going here, wordmark logo typekit separate archetype, so logo type, is this the name of the company designed in a visual way? Now, logo type is logos. Is it Greek for word that right, so there's a lot of different classifications. I don't think it's that important that, you know, all of them. But you do need to know some. So there are symbols. And again, I pull this from a website, this exact image and this definition, and I'm not sure I totally agree with all this stuff. So there are symbols which are these icons without words like the apple, the WWF World Wildlife Foundation and the CBC designed by Luke Dorfman. Those are beautiful. Those are symbols. OK and there are monograms which what monograms look like. A combination of letters sometimes referred to as an acronym, but monogram. And then there's combination of word, symbol and monitor, even in a crest or whatever. It can get very complicated. So sometimes when you're talking to your client, you might show them examples of what you're talking about versus using a term. Hopefully, hopefully, I didn't butcher that too bad. Hey, hey, hey, Chris. Who's talking, carrie? Hey, Carrie. Hey hey. What is it? When they mean when they say lockup and referencing a logo? That's perfect. OK the lockup is the. Configuration of all the different elements, and you might have different lockups, believe it or not, a horizontal lock up, a vertical lock up. So when you have a symbol and a word mark, and sometimes it needs to be like for a masthead, the top of a magazine, right? You might want to have more of a horizontal lockup, so you might rearrange the symbol to the left and the word mark to the right. OK, so take, for example, the Girl Scouts that I'm hopefully going to work with when she says, I'm going to send you the lock up. That's the combination of everything. Yes is that what you're saying? Ok? It's the combination of the symbol and the word mark and anything else they've got going on in a very specific configuration. And you're not supposed to break that. OK all right. OK this is where the next term that I don't have up here is identity guideline, identity, Bible style guide. Whatever it is, there's a lot of different terms that they use for this. And basically some designers sat down and thought about all the different lockups, the different color combinations, how much space you should designate around the logo itself. So it doesn't become crowded. When can you invert it? When can't you, et cetera? So they define all these rules, and you can get one of these identity guideline manuals as a template and then apply your own rules. What's important in that, I think that's more instructional than anything else is showing how not to use it. Like, don't put a photograph inside in the symbol. Don't use these colors, don't invert it, don't cut it, don't turn it 30 30 degrees to the left. So those are a lot more instructional for people, because you have to imagine when you do a big rollout of an identity designed for a large company, lots of people that are uneducated in terms of design are going to use it poorly. Think about somebody who is in the I don't know it space and they have to put together a deck to present to their boss. I'm not picking an IT person, I'm just I was looking for another example, but then they have to put together a keynote or a PowerPoint presentation and they start using the logo and all kinds of weird ways. These are pairing it with the typeface that is not supposed to be used with it. So that's where the guidelines help out a lot. Good question, Kerry, Thanks very much. Anybody else is with the FedEx logo, not be considered a brand mark. Does FedEx have a brand, mark? You mean, like a symbol? Well, like I was looking at the definition of brand mark and. It doesn't seem like FedEx. Based on that definition, would have a brand mark. I don't think so. I think Fedex, because it's the letters would be a word mark to me. OK now, there's a little kind of between the E and x, there's a little negative space, and it was very carefully designed to do that. The arrow, I mean, one could argue that is it, but they never use that arrow on anything. It's more of a negative space. OK if you guys kind of analogous color scheme. Well, you guys remember your color wheel, Roy g. Biv, red, orange, yellow, green, blue and a golden violet. Well, apparently any three colors next to each other is an analogous color scheme. So staying close to each other in the color spectrum. This is from Canada. You can see that there's Little Canada thing at the bottom there. Ok? and then there's complimentary, which is the opposite on the color wheel and split complementary. You guys understand all that stuff, you guys can look that up, right? It's kind of important to know a little bit about color theory, but not to go too deep into that. A lot of people have a hard time picking color schemes. So the if you're going to pick two colors, generally speaking, you pick complementary colors because they give you the greatest amount of contrast. Like the orange and blue, and you see that a lot, union 76 gas station, orange and blue. Tons of things that are orange and blue or purple and yellow. Which is, I think, because it's basketball season. Golden State warriors, I mean, it's a golden yellow and it's a purple, but those are complementary colors. You get a lot of contrast and contrast is critical. So analogous colors, if we're talking about two colors next to each other. Not a lot of contrasts. But it feels soothing. He feels part of the same family because they're right next to each other in the color wheel. So I'm going to talk to you guys a little bit about some other things. I'm not going to talk about this white space thing. I just pulled this from Canada. Whatever I was going a copy paste kind of mood. You guys can screencap this if you want. And for me, nothing is more important than white space, and it's underutilized. Well, people don't understand is the lack of putting something on is actually showing a lot of design, restraint and sophistication. It's not about what you put in its work and what you add on to something that to me is typically a sign that you're not a confident designer. You're putting on textures, you're adding a little doodads and little flourishes everywhere. There's a time and place to do that. But generally speaking, simple, simple. A lot of clean, negative space. And so here's one trick if you guys are doing layouts and you feel like the design is not working for you and you just can't put your finger on it. I'm going tell you, make everything smaller. OK when you have a small room and you're putting in a bed nightstand on a lamp, if it's not scaled for the room, all of a sudden, the room feels really cramped. But if you scale everything to the room, it feels like there's a lot of space to move around. And conversely, if you have a really large living room and the furniture is teeny little, tiny stuff. It also couldn't make it feel even smaller than it really is, and that's why you will see in some of these really large fancy homes, they have these really large oversized couches. We almost kind of are in a bed. When you're sitting down. That's why that is. It scaled for the room? OK there's all kinds of wonderful things. I think mostly I grab this because I really like the layout, how the 1 and the two are cropped off at the bottom of the page. All right. Here's a term we used in the sales and marketing course and for Kerry, I think it was a little bit of a breakthrough because she's like, wow, I never thought about that. So here it is. Here's the term it's called challenger brand, a new rising brand that is viable in spite of other existing brands dominating the category. Is this important to you as a person who is interested in increasing sales for your business? Well, most of us want to work with the dominant brand. The category leader and we don't have a lot of access because everybody is trying to work with Nike and Adidas right now. But way down at the bottom, not the bottom, but could be puma, converse fila. Bc, I mean, Reebok isn't so much a challenger brand, but they're not in the top two. Skechers and a host of other brands you never heard of before. So those are challenger brands and they're carving out a niche for themselves, and it's more likely that somebody can get connected to them because guess what? They want to become the dominant brand. So they're in a growth mode, and they know that marketing design can help them get an edge. Because then they cannot compete on anything else because the other guys will destroy them. That's why they don't have big sponsorships, key athletes that are working or under their label. OK core values. Take a screencap if you want. Corporate identity, I think we know what that is. There it is. I want to talk a little bit about the next one brand gap. The difference between the brand strategy and actual experience is not just the title to Marty numeros book. The brand gap. And hopefully and I've mentioned this before. What we do is we build bridges across these gaps. We tried to close the gap. We close the imagination gap. We closed the brand gap. Our business about closing gaps. Oh here's one eponymous Ipanema never even heard of this before, and this is why I like doing these kinds of conversations with you guys because it's an opportunity for me to learn. So I'm digging them like, wow, I better stop at some point up and in our names created on fictional or real characters such as Victoria's Secret Betty Crocker. So Starbucks is the name derived from a fictional character in Herman Melville's Moby Dick. OK John Hancock, et cetera, monogram we talked about, you guys know what a monogram is, Volkswagen. You know, I mean, here's another term you guys should know this already. When I first heard about this term five or six years ago during a faculty meeting at art center, like, whoa, that's an interesting approach. Swat SWOT analysis. Because when they kept saying, like swat, what the heck are they saying? And it's short for strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. And it's very commonly used in brand assessment. OK very, very common. And the thing that you need to just know this, and I'm pretty sure this is right, but I could be wrong here. Strengths and weaknesses are internal opportunities and threats are external. So you make if you take a piece of paper and you fold it once lengthwise and once width wise or whatever, height wise and you unfold it, you get four quadrants. So the W and O and the are in the lower quadrant and S and W are in the top. So use right? What are our strengths? We can talk about this community in this organization. What are our strengths of the future brand? What are our weaknesses? Where our opportunities for us and who is going to threaten us that we're not aware of, let's write those things down. It's a very good exercise to perform for yourself, for anybody on just about anything. Oh, OK. Here's the tagline. And then I think I'm going to go into resources and open it up for any kind of Q&A a tagline, frequently repeated word, phrase or statement that captures the essence of a brand's promise. A lot of times clients ask us to write the tagline, and they're kind of hard to come up with. And what you want to do is to reflect what people already think about. OK and so, Marty Neumeier does a really great job of breaking down what a tagline is first, you said, what's your true line? What do people think about right now? So his example is in Southwest airlines, I think where Southwest Airlines is so cheap, it's almost as cheap as driving there yourself. So I think their tagline is free, feel free to roam the country, something like that. BMW is the ultimate driving machine. And that's what people think about it, these precise German engineering, a driver's car. And Lexus. Lexus the relentless pursuit of perfection. We'll talk about that a little bit like for a long time, I didn't really understand. Like, why is that? Why is it relentless pursuit of perfection? But when I went to Japan last year, I was like, wow, this whole culture and society is about doing the same thing over and over again and making tiny little bits of refinement into it's perfect, whether it's like a little bonsai tree or the creation of a piece of sushi in front of you. They just work on it and work on it until it's perfect. So it captures the entire Japanese philosophy about perfection. And it makes total sense, so they're all about refinement and making sure that every part of the experience is perfect. Not necessarily like most thrilling ride. It's not like an Italian manufacturer where it's stirring the soul, and it's beautiful, exciting design, but it's just about making experience perfect. So if you need some tips on writing a tagline, think about how your customers think of the product, service, or organization and write those things down, then reduce the words until you find something that's kind of catchy. Memorable OK. Resources kind of at that point. Resources here's the first one. Design school Canada. So 50 design terms explained simply for nine designers, especially if you guys didn't go to formal design school, this is a good resource for you to pick up. And then a lot of terms are some of them are not that great. But I'm just going to say it. Some of them, I literally copy. Paste it into this document. You can see it was in the clear. It was late. That's what I got. And there's this thing called the financial brand the glossary of branding terminology. There is a great resource to somewhere on land or site, and they talk about all the different things in relation to branding. A lot of you guys want to be in the branding space. I could not find it again last night, but I know it exists or used to exist. I don't know where to find it again because I was just digging around thinking about. So this one's pretty good. The glossier branding terminology. And as soon as I fix this thing, I will share this deck with you guys. So there will be links like so when you click on that yellow button, it should take you to that site. OK, Thanks very much, you guys. I'm over my time, so I'm going to now transition to Q&A. Stop sharing this thing. All right, was I recording you recording? All right. All right. Thanks, Zach. OK, so let's open it up, you guys want to talk about anything. Anybody? I ask a question. Yeah, let me turn on the gallery view, OK, who's talking? This is my business life. You know what happens here is he got called away suddenly, so he had to leave. It was going to come back. OK, so your name one more time for me, Shannon FHA Behnam. OK shot, man, perfect, what's your question? So I don't know if I'm going off on a tangent, but it is about using terminology you said about using terminology, especially for commercial clients, so that you sound more knowledgeable and experienced. Now these days, most of my clients are domestic clients. And previously, I used to work in other bigger practice, I'm quite used to using all this jargon. And when I made the transition into my own business, I was continuing to do so and I'm quite comfortable doing that with other structural engineers or, you know, anyone else within the industry. And when it came to clients, I mean, this is the one who's helping me on the business side of things because I don't have a business thing. But he was saying, is that you need to break your language down so that it's more understandable for the clients, for the domestic client. Because when I was using my terminology and address would help me check all the documents or emails that I'm sending out, he'd be like, does this even mean, you know, the client doesn't know what a feasibility study means? What does it mean for them or, you know, contract administration? What does it mean for them? Now, I'm a little bit confused that I do want to sound knowledgeable and experienced and above the amateur. So I do want that to come across for the client. But these are domestic clients. I'm not sure which way to go. You know, should I use some of the jargon or yeah, I think I get it. All right. So I'm going to say something. It's going to sound a little strange, but this whole thing is a dance and there's push and pull. Sometimes you need to lead, sometimes you need to follow. So when we're talking to really big clients, very sophisticated clients, you have to learn how to speak their language and you have to elevate up, especially for those of us that aren't trained in either design or whatever else that's going on. OK, now for you, you're going the opposite direction. So now this is you don't push you. Maybe you pull. Right? so in this instance, you have to find the common language and common language is the most important part. So when using terminology that people don't understand, you're only alienating them and you're not communicating. So I think then you have to kind of use much more basic terms and talk with them that way. There's no point in you coming in and brow beating people and saying, you know, feasibility studies or user assessment, whatever it is, and they're sitting there. Like what? I don't I don't like the way you talk. I don't understand anything, you make me feel dumb. Guess what happens to the client? OK, so I say for you, since you study this and you're used to working in the big market, you need to pull it back. Whereas a lot of other people need to up their game and understand the terminology and understand their craft much better. That is one advantage, excuse me, of having a formal design education. Ben burns and I were talking about this and we might make an episode out of this. He said, Chris, I need help, man, because in the presentations that we're doing with these multimillion dollar, multibillion dollar companies, I feel a little awkward talking about the work, and I run out of words to say, I don't have the language that you have to describe the work. And I realized there was a whole other level here, so help me out, where do I learn these terms? How do I figure this stuff out? And it just so happened that we had this conversation last week. After this agenda had already been set, so it's kind of interesting how it works out, ok? All right, let's open up to another person. Anybody else? Oh, I see you have your hand raised there. That's pretty cool. So proper, like it had to do that. No, it's a little less formal than that here, but I appreciate you being there. Who's next? Far away, man. This is sort of more of a business question than a business terminology question. Um, but. Do you think when you're operating agile versus waterfall, does that require different business models? Like, like not business models, but maybe business structure like with a waterfall cater more towards hiring freelancers per project or vice versa? Oh, that's an interesting question. I know when you're bidding the project, it looks very different. So when we're doing our projects, we pretty much bet on a waterfall thing like we're going to do strategy here. And we will do style escapes here and we'll do messaging and then wireframes pretty much our dependencies based on each phase being completed prior to us moving on to the next thing. And I've seen Jose bid before he bids it in these circular diagrams where first circle is the first tranche or the first milestone and the entire team is working on it. So it's very important for him to have a shared goal with the team so that somebody is not waiting at the end of the line to produce it. So the developer is in the conversation at the very beginning. So issues about feasibility, design functionality are going to be addressed right away so you don't get to the development stage. And you know, if you had changed these two features, we could have saved you $50,000. And it is messy, it's ugly, there's a lot of friction because everybody's just like, we don't know what we're doing, right? Take seven people drop off on an island like you guys need to survive and nobody's in charge and everybody's in charge, and it is a little messy. But the software world lives this way. I know it works. I just don't have that much experience with it in terms of the business model, whether it's freelancers or staff. I would almost think that, yes, waterfall, I'm sorry, agile. You almost have to have them on your team. But I know Jose has worked as a solo guy for a very long time, and he's done agile the entire time. And they're not on staff. You just have to get people committed to the project. Now there's a guy named Scott carruth, who's one of the founders of philosophy, the design firm. He does it like this thing where I don't know what it's going to cost, and you just keep paying us for each tranche. When you say we're done, we're done. That's how he does it, so he's like the client, have a lot of visibility on the money they're spending on the product they're getting because each chunk of money is spent. They know what they got. Then they determine if they want to go another tranche, et cetera. OK yeah, it seems like my brain likes the waterfall approach, but doesn't like the agile. It's just hard for us to know exactly what we're working towards. We could work towards a number and facilitate like pay a team, right? We did work just get as many projects as possible. And I don't know, I guess. Truth be told, there's probably some kind of hybrid thing that you can do and. The reason why I charge so much money to do what I do is because I don't know what it's going to take. I'm just charging enough so that no matter what happens, no matter what the clients throw at me, I can pretty much accommodate it. And that's pretty good. So if they don't throw these weird things at me, it's totally fine. And I just put the money elsewhere into the customer experience or embellishing something. I know I'm covered. And when we're designing something, if we're going into uncharted territory and we're going to need to check in with the dev team to make sure this can be done, then any suggestions that we want to follow them at the beginning, they don't have to build the model as we go. But just so that they're in on key moments. So that they can advise us as we go along. All right. I'm in. All right, guys, anybody else, I'm going to just say that it's already an hour and 20 minutes, I know we started a little bit late. Not that we started late. I just needed to give people time to get into the room. I can go for another 5 or 10 minutes here and then want to rap for sure. Anybody else want to bring anything else up? I was thinking maybe on a future call, we might be able to do like media buying terms or maybe not terms, but just help in doing media buys and stuff like that when it comes to buying radio or buying TV or something like that. I don't know if that's a topic we can cover, but are your clients asking you for that, scott? Well, I mean, I used to do I used to sell radio. That's how I got into some of this. But now I'm getting back into it. So I want to start placing media buys for my clients as just another way to integrate myself into their business more, you know? OK I think if anything, the media buy that's going to be the most relevant in the next five, 10, 20 years is going to be online, and it's probably going to be creative services along with strategy on one of the social platforms. OK, right? I was getting ready to write a post and I couldn't do it from the road. But the post is going to be the aging demographic of Facebook and why it's important to you. OK, I'm going to share it just because we're going off a tangent here, but that's OK, because now it's like open mic session, so we can totally talk about this. All right. So Scott, you and I are going to talk about this. Let me spotlight my husband, Mike sound, by the way. Yeah, you hold it up. Hold it up. Where is it? It's attached to a boom arm, so I can't just like me. Yeah, I got it. I got a full pro. You said, great. I love that. I want everybody to get a Yeti. I don't even make any money on this. So it's not like my video. OK, let's hear a couple of stories with you guys. I love giving you these updates, and I just hope at one point this encourages you guys to go do this for yourself. OK there are older people on Facebook. Much younger people inhabit spaces like Snapchat. Other platforms where they share videos about singing and that kind of stuff. But why is that important to you? Is this is because older people have businesses and they have money and they want to hire you. Something wonderful has been happening to me. I'm starting to get a fairly steady stream of people that I've known for years, but I haven't talked to in a really long time. And almost every one of them sends me a message, and it almost sounds the same from person to person, regardless of what industry they're in. It's like, Chris, I am seeing you on my feed all over the place. I can't escape you and I don't understand what you're doing, but I'm really fascinated by it. It's starting to make me think about my brand and what I'm doing, or we need to get on the social game like the way you guys are doing it. Is there anything I can do to help you? And I like to hire you as a consultant to do x, y and z. These things are happening more frequently. So I'm going to tell you about three stories really quick. One former tenant mine there in the shoe manufacturing space and the owner don, he reached out to me and said, Chris, we need to talk. I don't understand anything, but I think we need to talk to you. I feel like what you're talking about. That's a great thing for me to a guy I hadn't talked to in probably 10 years. He's hired me as a coach for him. He's like, gosh, you figure something out. We're in the same space we used to be. Now I need to know what the heck you're doing, so I can do it for myself. Number three, somebody left a voicemail for me just last Friday and said, dude, we haven't talked. I need help. Social, all this kind of stuff. Let's do something together. And so this is something I want to encourage you guys to start creating value for people and putting it out there. I'm still not seeing it in the volume that I want to see it in from this group. I'm still seeing little test within the group, and that's great. I really want you to push it out there. All right. If there's anything I can do, any tips, anything that you want to know, ask me and I will do the best I can to share that with you. Tonight, there's a question in the chat here, the Harry you left us with last week. Oh, you want another cliffhanger? Yeah all right, I'm going to hit Stop Recording before I tell you the secret sauce. Here it comes. You guys ready? Anybody else have any questions? Oh OK, great. We're going to end on these last five minutes. So Thanks to Tony and you guys, we'll see you next time.

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