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Creative Strategy & The Business of Design Pt.2

#
24
Chris Do
Published
January 20, 2017

In this 4 part series, Chris Do leads a keynote on his takeaways from the book “ Creative Strategy & The Business Of Design ”

Read Transcript
OK, great. Here we go. So this is episode 20 four, I believe, and this is part two, the creative strategy in the business of design with Douglas Davis. OK, I want to remind you guys, if you want to buy the book to use our Amazon affiliate link and we're going to review the homework first and the homework looks something like this. I asked you guys to find any ad or promotion in any channel, and this is straight up from the book, I believe. I think it's one. It's something that's inside the book. Identify the objective of the marketing material, like what are they trying to get you to do? Ok? and then identify the message of the marketing material. And the best way to do this is try and put it in your own words. If you cut through all the stuff and you read between the lines, what are they really saying? And then is there a clear call to action? What is that? What are you asked to do at the end of it? OK, now three people turned in something, and I don't remember who turned in anything, so I'm just going to be talking about it, ok? And at first, I tried to capture what you guys wrote and put it inside these boxes because the instructions for what to do for homework was really clear. Besides step one, which is find any ad, the first thing you're supposed to do is identify the objective. So if you wrote it just like that, then great. But I found that as I was going through this, it wasn't a one to one lineup because Freddie wrote a whole article and then he posted the article. So I had to like, dig through his article to figure out how he wanted to identify each one of these things, which is fine as in terms of building an audience. But for the sake of the assignment, it's not exactly adhering to the structure, and I think understanding the structure is really important. When I was in school, we were given assignments to study films and watch films, and I knew every single week we're going to talk about in a very specific way. And it trained my mind to understand and break down films in a way that has forever changed the way I watch films. So if you adhere to structure, formula process, these kinds of things, I think it'll help you a lot more. When you're looking at things, it starts to train your mind and your eye as to what to look for. OK, so the first one was the sandwich board is just tired of being fat and ugly. Just be ugly, Jim. It's like it's like fragmented sentences and all that stuff. It's pretty cool. So I think for me, the objective of this after identifying the ad number two is get butts in, Jim. And the message after reading all this stuff is, as things are out of your control, being fat isn't one of them. So let's do something about it. Call the gym. Sign up. Really straightforward, super effective. Maybe not win any design awards, but it's perfect. And I'll just check the chat window here, as you guys can see that Marlene says she's spaced out on the homework. Will adapt to the structure. Cool all right. Moving on this one, I remember who posted this. I just want to let you guys know this is not me. This is Mark posh. As much as Mark hates Trump, he said, this is the best ad of the year. And, OK, so the objective is to win the presidency of the United states, he did right that. A the middle part, I think what this is saying, if you read between the lines, as America is broken, I can save it from the elites. Is that because it's like this red trucker cap that identifies with the average person, the average Joe, if you will, and for vote for Trump. Because I'm one of you. OK, now here's Freddie's version, and now he didn't give me an ad he put a whole commercial in there, so it's like it was hard for me to. I don't want to sit here and watch that, so I just search for an ad from Lincoln. And so here it is. This is nobody's fool. They're all very similar. And if you read the fine copy in case you guys can't see it, it's kind of small. It says, don't let anyone tell you luxury. 41 miles per gallon in the city and reasonably priced are contradictions in terms. It's not just luxury, it's smarter than that. Learn more about the Lincoln hybrid, the most fuel efficient luxury car in America. OK their objective is to recapture the luxury automotive market, which they were part of and have kind of disappeared from, so they need to become relevant again. Now, the takeaway from this is you are being manipulated. Don't be told what to do and think I'm nobody's fool is what it's saying. And this is a message that is very similar in design as the Audi campaign, as the alternative European luxury automobile maker. So it's a very similar strategy. It's just said differently. And then number four, what they want you to do is rethink the definition of luxury. In this case, I think they want you to. I don't know what they want you to do. Oh, OK. They assume in the lower right hand corner that you should go to Lincoln. But there is no clear call to action here. That's why I didn't write a clear call to action, at least in this ad it doesn't say, call this, go to this site by this or anything. And I think the reason why is I think Lincoln has a lot of work to do to bridge the gap of first creating awareness before even understanding like somebody needs this thing. And we talked about this in the sales conversion funnel thing on our Facebook Live webinar. All right. OK, so Thanks for those three people who did the homework, I want to ask, does anybody have any questions or comments about what we just looked at? Maybe Jared might, since he's Jared. You're a writer, right? OK, yeah, he said. I think it's more about awareness. That's what he's saying. Yeah so there are a couple of ad people in our group, and I love that because they can be a little bit more nuanced if they breaking these things down. OK move it out. The one thing that I don't know if we covered this last time, but white space Gary Vaynerchuk talks about this all the time. He says, I live in White space. And that's where he's investing money personally as a venture capitalist and also where he's exploring. So before Snapchat was like a big thing, he was playing around with Snapchat. He's always looking for emerging technologies that create space where nobody's at, and white space is simply where unmet and unarticulated needs are uncovered to create innovation opportunities. So oftentimes we have this kind of Herd mentality where it gets really hot, everybody crowds in, for example, the motion industry has been hot for a really long time. And so the schools react to that and they create motion specific programs and then all the students desire to do the motion work. But the motion industry is already kind of collapsed on itself. And now the schools are still pumping up students thinking they're going to be able to get a job. This is a real problem. And that's no. I'm not saying that to point out the faults of schools, but they're just slow to react to what's going on instead of looking for the White space. They're busy looking at where it's crowded, where there's demand to a point in which they can't ignore it anymore, which to me is almost too late. There's a YouTube video called did you know? And I'll find the link for you guys later. And it's a pretty cool video and it's got this kind of electronic music and it keeps asking you this. Did you know? Did you know, you know, like, for example, one of the things that it says is, did you know that the average person in the 18th century, the entire their knowledge could be captured within, like one Wall Street journal? And did you know that there are more honor students than there are students in America, like more honor students in India, and it keeps talking about all these facts about how quickly everything is changing, how everything you learn in school is already relevant by the time you finish school. That's the problem there. OK, moving on, I have about that last slide, actually. Go ahead. So I really like that. Basically, instead of responding to the demands of the market, try to predict the demands of what the demands of the market are going to be in the near future. And try to fill the gaps, look for where gaps are and fill them. I feel like in what we do, we're so busy practicing our craft and serving our clients and doing what we're doing that. A lot of times it's hard to think about where that white space is and like, how often should you be thinking about that? Are you setting aside like dedicated time to think about like, OK, how am I going to put myself out of business? Or I think Aaron Pearson has been talking a lot about disrupt or be disrupted. How often are you thinking about that, like even with blind or the future? That's a great comment. Question there, Sean. I think your video screen froze up. I'm going to talk about your video and then turn it back on and see if you move around, John. Hello can you see yourself? Yeah, I see myself. OK, cool. So here's the thing, that's a really great question. So this is a great opportunity for us to have a little side to our conversation. Oftentimes, you guys are 1 to 3 person shops and your hands are in everything you're doing. The client calls, you're doing new business, you're doing the bidding, you're doing the design, the art direction you, you package it up and drop it off at FedEx. So the problem there is who's planning for the future? Who's out kind of in the crow's nest looking beyond the horizon to see what's coming and that's going to be a problem. So a lot of you guys that are running smaller shops who, for whatever reason, just can't let the work go. You'll be forever doomed just to do that thing. And then before you know it, you look up, and there's no more road or the bridge is out and you're stuck in the forest or whatever it is. So I think for me personally, I've depended on creative people to do the work for me as soon as work came in. I would try to find somebody to help me do it every single time. And inevitably, the question is, so how long into your career did you take for you to do that? I would say, like the second job I got. Maybe I'm lazy or I just look at it like, you know what, my value isn't necessarily in doing the work, it's bringing in the work and finding somebody who's got a lot of design potential who's good but doesn't have access to the client. So what I ask them is, how much would you charge? I pay them what they're worth, and I just make sure the spread and I live in the spread, the gap between what the client pays me and what I pay the person to do the work. And I manage that. And then I'm able to multiply or scale out what it is I can produce. So more work would come in. I would find more people, and eventually that was consistent enough for me to hire on a person. But the meantime, what I did was the most important thing, which was to spend time with the clients. To talk to them, to be reading, to be, like I said in one of the YouTube episodes. Be jamming through macworld and trying to figure out what's going on or reading a book or going out to see things. And that's how you're going to take in what's out there. OK, so today we have basically through creative directors in Greg Gunn, Matthew Insana and now Ben burns, and they're doing almost all of the work and it's awesome. Like, Ben is not on the call today because why, he said. You know, I'm not going to be on the call because I want to get the new side up. So he's jamming really hard on the site, and that means that I don't have to worry about that. And I get to sleep a little easier. Because I know the is getting taken care of, and that's valuable to me. Excuse me. And Ben knows that so he can watch the replay later, he's like, you don't need me, right? I'm like, no, it's cool. You could do it. Right so that's how I'm doing, I'm doing it right away, and I have a story to share with you guys, I talked about it on one of our calls or maybe Facebook Live. But Ben worked on a bid for 100,000 logo rebrand for a city. It came to us through one of our fans. Somebody sent me an email and said, look, Chris, here's an RFP. I think you guys should get in on this. Let me see what the budget is. And then they sent me something and says, if you get the job, you know, give me my hashtag. 10 percent, it's all good. And so I was like, I'm too busy. There's too many things going on. I'm working on a new episode. I'm writing content. I'm editing things. Ben burns, take a look at this. He vets it and says, this is good. And then he builds the entire bid based on a couple of templates I gave him. Right, and then they required a hard copy, FedEx to them yesterday. And he took care of all that stuff. This is me, you know. I'm sorry, you guys can't see me, you see, Sean, I should switch the camera back to me, huh? Which one am I? Shoot, there's two of us the future, not that one. All right, hold on. Sorry, guys. Oh, it's all crazy, though. Mona, hide the screen. Where am I? Here is Matthew know why my camera, not here we go, there we are. Sorry, little brain. Malfunction there. OK, so here's my hands, this is me kind of washing them. Because if work comes in and I hire really good, competent people who are smart, who take initiative, who don't need to be told what to do. Who like autonomy and things work out really well. So this is the case of Ben burns just jumping on it. He threw himself on top of it. And we're moving forward and we got another gigantic bid to put together. He's going to take care of that, too. I think cousin Marie is like, wait a second. That goes against win without pitching. Are you bidding on an rfp? I am that is true. That is true. It totally we're unqualified. The client is unvetted. This is what we would consider like a Hail Mary pass, just to see what would happen. And the money in that project is enticing enough. These people did not come to us. It's just an open RFP, and it's actually how a lot of cities and governments work. Right, they just sent out an RFP. Yeah, anybody. That's all they do. They don't they won't even talk to anybody unless the they're responding to proposals. Yeah so it's unusual for us and it's a long shot, you guys. I really don't know what will come from this. And Ben burns and I were talking about yesterday and he's like, what do you think? It's like, you know what? Here's what I think, but I'm kind of cocky like this. I think if they look at our work compared to anybody that's responding to this locally because it's a very small town in Texas, our work must stand heads and shoulders above everybody else in town. So if it's based on the quality of the work, we should be invited to follow up with this, but that's how it works. He now wants to see the proposal. Yeah I bet she does. Well, you could see it if we win. How's that? There's no pitch. Cousin Marlene, they're there. You guys don't. I think we have different understandings of what a proposal is. There is no pitch. What Ben did was he put together a budget based on a price sheet that we already have and all the templates have been built in Keynote already. The only thing he needed to do was put in his picture and his bio. And then he wrote a couple of notes just to address who they are. So if you guys have seen RFP before, they're not asking for creative work, ok? Maybe in the next episode is on our ropes and how to respond because we will pretty soon. They confirmed they received our package yesterday and they'll get back to us next week, so stay tuned. As the days of our lives turn over like sand to an hourglass. All right. OK oh, so no, creative, yeah, yeah, an ERP that asked me for creative, I said, no, no, thank you. And they do ask quite often just to clarify, not that you're doing creative for the rfu, but you'll send like capabilities of things you've already done right, like your yeah, they're called case studies. Yeah, yeah, you show relevant work. So one could argue that there is creative work being done because we're aligning the work we've already done to the things that we think they're asking for and just putting those two together. But that's minimal. Like, if you can't do that, then you're not going to do business with people. OK, now, if I had to go through, say, a website and scope and bid the specifics of the website, that is work and that is time to build the estimate that's still not pitching. But it is giving a client a proper estimate. She said it's like multitasking here, OK, it's cool. Let's go back to the. You know, all right. Any other questions, guys? Cool I think that was awesome is a little detour. Thanks for prompting that, Sean. All right. This whole idea of balancing work, and life. Like this responsibility that we have to the business to help them grow. And this passion for the Arts and the craft of what it is that we do, we're always trying to find that balance right. And oftentimes we sent her to much of our attention on the passion, the art. So here's a quote I pulled from the book. Excuse me. It's something that Douglas Davis learned when working now I focus my visual, verbal and conceptual thinking on design options that achieve the business and marketing objectives. The work should be beautiful and effective. So focus on design options that are viable and creative and more importantly, on strategy. So I want you guys, this is a rhetorical question just to think about the last couple of projects that you worked on, not bids or proposals, but actual projects that you worked on. Was your focus to achieve a business and marketing goal? Or was it to make it cool to elevate the brand, to make it more contemporary? Or it's a fresh ended up. So this is the lesson that Douglas Davis learned while going to business school. OK, so the work has to be beautiful and effective, that's the challenge. And when we're talking about being effective, we have to understand what the different stakeholders want, what do they consider success and what are their goals? And so if you're talking to somebody who has a marketing objective, here are some things that they want to achieve. They want to they're making the target customers aware of a new product. They're communicating the product or service benefits and the language and style that target would be receptive to. So let's circle back to this. Is this crafted in a way that the audience would be receptive to, and it is in the language of the brand of the gym? Sean, you work out, what do you think about this? I think it's hilarious. I don't know, like for me, I don't know, I think it's an effective ad I think it's actually good. It doesn't look pretty, but I think it accomplishes what it was supposed to do. Yeah, I think I don't know how deliberate these kind of hometown ads are, but I almost give them. I want to give them more credit to say that it was deliberately like not designed. Yeah there's something about this chunky like, it's almost like they're using this typeface like impact or something. And it's meant to be like really not refined. Yeah, I remember being all about it, that seems more genuine to me. What's that? I remember watching on Netflix, there's a documentary from kt Fletcher who's this like, Jim personality? If you look him up on YouTube, he's kind of funny, vulgar, old, tired, like, run down, guy. But he's really big and his gym is intentionally ugly. And so when he started his gym, you know, he spent a lot of money doing it, but he got all used equipment, all worn down benches. And he said it's all old and tired and worn out just like me. And I think when I see this kind of sign, I don't know if it's indicative of like what the gym is kind of like, but it might go with the culture. So I think, yeah, it doesn't have to look if it was like really modern looking with clean typeface, it might send the wrong message for who this gym is. Yeah you know, I bumped Amy. I'm going to have Jared come on because Jared's our resident copywriter and he's an ad man, so maybe he can also comment on this stuff, ok? So we'll wait for Jared to accept there. Jared, are you on? And can you hear me? Go go ahead. Oh, you can hear me. Yep yeah, I mean, I think it just really comes back to like, like you said, I mean, what's the key objective? Do you know what I mean? And there's such small real estate and you have to understand context to, you know, because with this work, unlike, you know, gosh, Radiohead or whatever, you know what I mean? It's like the kind of copywriting 101 where it's basically getting someone's attention, gaining rapport and then leading them to the sell, right? So they got that. I mean, you're walking by. You see that right? You know, and you know, it's just a simple way to kind of get someone's attention and give a simple call to action, you know? And it's like, how many signs do you, you know, you have to think to how many signs or billboards do you see, you know? And if they could just do those two things or just get, you know, I mean, again, it's a sign, how much can you do with it? But that's the whole thing where I think it kind of, you know, achieves it were is you might just walk down the street and see 10 million of those. Yeah, I think personally, it's super effective and I'm not a gym guy myself, but I think this is super effective for a number of different reasons. One is, the ad promises you a benefit. Mm-hmm mm-hmm. You don't have to be fat. So it's self-selecting, and it's also in a way that it's written, it feels like this gem is not going to be asked you at all. Yeah, no, I'm not going to deny and tell you you're not ugly, you are, but we can work on that part. So it's super truthful, like you're fat and you're ugly, and sometimes you're dumb. But you know, they left that part out. Yeah so it's not going to appeal to a whole lot of people, but it's only going to appeal to people who are attracted to this kind of messaging. Yeah, it reminded me of the sidewalk. You know, we have a lot of cool signs like this in Seattle, and there was this one sign that totally thought of it was basically this and it had an arrow and it basically said beer, no beer. And there was an arrow that pointed to the street or said no beer. And then where it said beer pointed to the body, that was it. It was like, Oh my gosh, this sounds brilliant, you know? You know what? I thought you were going to say something else because I lived in Seattle, myself. Seattle must be just known for telling the truth. Yeah Pikes market. There's a strip club. And I used to live across the street on the third floor in this corporate apartment, which was pretty awesome, and I would look at the sign on the building. It would say something like 49 beautiful girls and one ugly one. So super like just on point. And it made me laugh. You know, I don't like those kind of things myself, but I was like, wow, that's pretty funny. Like, if I wanted to go, that would be the place I would go to. OK, so let's keep moving on the marketing objective. So you have to speak in the style, in the language that the target would be receptive to positioning the product relative to its competitors in the target's mind. Establishing a brand preference among the potential choices. A loyalty or increased frequency of purchase, increasing social media engagement around a brand, product or service. So when you guys are talking to a client and you are able to get into the c-suite, meaning the C level executives CEO, CMO, CRO. Right, CTO, you have to remember, each person wants something very different. And that's excuse me, that's a tough task to manage all of these things at the same time and try to get alignment from everybody. So we're going to keep going on here. So if you bought the book, you already have this as a reference. If you want to screen capture, it's all cool. The business objectives, this is what I to tend to focus a lot on myself acquiring customers into an insurance, installation or maintenance plan online or by direct mail. I hope I wrote that correctly, decreasing the cost of live phone customer service by driving customers online to troubleshoot themselves. And you see this a lot now where they try to automate things to reduce the amount of humans and they have to respond to requests. You notice how now and it's really weird when you go to the grocery store, there's these self-checkout lines. And we sometimes prefer to get in those things where we're decreasing the human interaction. And I don't know why, but that is a trend. When you're in Japan, as I have been for the first time, you kind of order through robots and machines. It prints out a ticket. You hand it to another human who then delivers your food, and no words are spoken between the two of you. So usually that's a business objective, kind of taking the human out of it. I'm not sure how I feel about it, though in Japan is a novelty, so it was cool, but I don't know if that's the way everything's going to go. Driving customers online to schedule appointments or pickups, the same thing. Retaining a high level of customer brand engagement through email content with deep links to the website. And then cross selling related products for. I think that's upselling upsetting. Upselling if they tried additional services based on purchase behavior, Amazon does this and they've mastered that. OK to educate. This is specifying minimum compatibility requirements. This is probably what like Dell would do, demonstrating the product's features and ease of use. This this one seems super boring to me, driving prospects to a website to learn more or capturing email addresses for newsletters. Increasing frequency of use and expanding user activities with the new product. Increasing app downloads. Highlighting a product's benefits or differences relative to competition. And we're going to get more into features and benefits in a little bit. And brand advocacy, increasing sharing from a customer to his or her friends. So if you guys are doing social media marketing for some of your clients, this is exactly what they want. Increasing favorable product reviews on websites. that's pretty much the Yelp business model, right? Increasing word of mouth referral visits to retailers. OK, the last one. Driving sales, which is kind of like a the business objective. I don't know why it's broken out like this, but I'm just capturing what was in the book, building a list of prospects based on the best current customers. Think there's extra space here? Increasing overall purchase amounts, liquidating a certain product to make room for another. So here here's the summary of everything that we just went through creatives. Their goals are to make it beautiful and unique. The account management team and Jared could probably testify to this is to please the client. Business development is to win new accounts. And marketers is to move the needle. So the thing is, we've got to get away from the beauty and unique part and be a part of the conversation of what we need to do to satisfy the client, to win new business and to make a difference. So everybody keeps asking, how do I charge more? How do I get out of charging whatever it is, I'm charging. There's a good chance that if you are focused on the beauty and unique part which you think is the most valuable thing because it's self-serving, there's a good chance that you're going to have a very difficult time changing your rates. All right. Any any thoughts? Sean and jared? Man, yeah, it's know, the positioning is key. You know, I know that for me, you know, when I want to first started, I really took, you know, I really took to, I guess, this book because I did a lot of this stuff when I first started. I mean, I looked at dozens of other copywriting websites and I said, how could I separate myself from everyone else that's doing that? So, you know, back in 2006, 2008, I started blogging, but I thought, you know, I want to add a better design aspect of it because I see copywriters just think it's just like words on a page, you know? So I wanted to make sure that visually it looks a lot better than any other copywriting copywriter website. Then I added a video because I'm like, dude, what other copywriter like does their own video to kind of promote their work? And I purposely didn't do a portfolio site because I looked at myself as a business. So, you know, I gradually increased my rate because I was super. I knew I was super different than everyone else and people. And the reason I kind of got into us and when I tell people I didn't get into copywriting because I thought it was a great idea, I got into it because it worked right out of the gate where a lot of times, man, I mean, I had like 30 jobs before that. But ever since copywriting kind of came into play, everything kind of fell into place. So now I know when somebody comes to me or Google's me and is like, oh, I really love your site, I want to work together right away. I kind of know, OK, they're coming to me, you know? So that adds a certain kind of leverage that I think I have versus other people and also to. It's all about how you present yourself. And again, I know for me, my work is password protected because it works for me. I know if I could get people on the phone and create a certain kind of engagement and position it like we talked about as a key objective and kind of know what I'm talking about, I know that I could add charge more because there's more value in it, you know? And I think that really comes from positioning how you position yourself different from everyone else that does what you do provide unique things that no one else provides. You know, I've done my own ebooks, you know, a while ago, but you know, programs and stuff like that invited to speak, you know, so every time I feel like you add a notch of being able to charge more and I feel like you get to that point. I think people kind of ask where you get to sometimes a point where it's like, you know what? I feel like I need to charge more, you know what I mean? Like, I went from 30 charging 35 an hour to like, gosh, these clients are just killing me. When I first started to like, 75 an hour started getting quality people. And then, you know? Charge more on that end, and you realize it's really about, I think, positioning of the value you provide and the unique perspective that you bring to the table. So cool. Hey, Jared, I'm going to I'm going to drop you a Catherine wants in on this conversation. Yeah, she has a question. So Thanks for your input, man. Yeah let me focus this screen here. Well, every time I do this, it's confusing to me. So, Catherine, I'm going to invite you on, OK, because I see that you have a question. Her question is based on that slide, can you share a little bit about what you think is different between the goals of the business development and marketing, she says. I still get confused about this. Sean, do you want to take a crack at answering that question? No well, I'm with her on that, I don't know. Well, I guess at first glance, so business development is less about the dollar and more about what's good for future business and marketers moving the needle like we need to bring in money. I think actually it's. Or is it the other way around, but I'm not sure either, as Douglas defines it to me, the business objective is to make more money and marketing is the vehicle on how to get there. So marketing is about increasing awareness of the product, communicating the benefits. So they're doing the tactical parts. The business is like, I want 10 million new customers and I want to increase it from the average spend from $10 to $15. When we achieve that, that's when I'm happy. How we get there is up to the marketing team. That's how I see the difference, but Catherine, maybe you want to weigh in on this? No, this is something that I've been trying to get clear about, too with a company that I'm working on. I feel like they have me to support with digital marketing, but I'm not sitting in on some of the business discussions and I'm like that limits what I can do because I need to understand your business objectives. And also, I find myself helping them to define their business objectives. So like, knowing when I'm in my lane has been blurry, so it's just something that has been on my mind. But I do. I do think that the goal of business development is to win more clients, and marketing is the help to set the path that we're going to take to get there. But there is a lot of overlap and when it comes to like roles and responsibilities, that's when I think it might. It might be better to have some kind of clarity around what are the responsibilities of each team and how do we work together. There's a term that Jose has used with me, and I like it a lot, and it's an acronym. He's like, what's a gbo, the global business objective? What are you trying to get done? And that will address the business goal. And then if somebody is like, we want to run 15 marketing campaigns, he's like, that's not the GPO. That's the tactics on how to get there. Let's focus back on the gbo. Yeah, it's doing revenue, you know? So, Sean, I was just saying in thinking of my own process because I have my marketing efforts, but then I also have my onboarding process, and when I think of business development, I think of my process of onboarding new clients. And so where they go from initial engagement to the first like face to face phone call and basically the whole sales process. And I think like that goes hand in hand with business development, like what is the client experiencing while there were onboarding them? And so marketing is like the precursor to the biz dev. OK, I got a couple more slides we want to power through because I want to be mindful of the time and I want to save time for us to kind of talk about anything at the end of this thing. I only have a few more slides to go through. OK so let's think about this. You guys, if we're focused on the beauty and making unique, making it a more luxurious, premium looking brand, which is what we've all been guilty about of including myself, then we're probably not addressing the other things on the table and. So here we go, so this is understanding the differences between what they want versus what they need. Now a lot of designers talk about this. You don't want that. You need this. You need a more premium brand. You need brand consistency, you need a brand refresh. And this is not that. So let's dive in a little bit deeper. OK the goal here is to move from having a one time transaction to having a long term relationship with your client and how you unlock that is, is what this book is talking about. Now, I want you guys to also think about the clients that you have today and what Jose talks about and we've talked about this in an episode is most designers are looking for a job. OK, and then a job becomes a client, a client becomes an account. Start thinking about it like you want the account. Meaning all their creative needs go to you. And that's the relationship agencies traditional advertising agencies have with their clients. I'm lucky that I live where I live and work in the industry because I get to see a lot of great big agencies from Foote Cone Belding to shy day. When you walk through their office, you get to see how deeply involved. They are in their client's business. So I remember one time I think it was Foote Cone and Belding FKB, and they had the Taco Bell account. And we walked into their offices. They had a Taco Bell restaurant mocked up inside their office. And they're constantly designing and redesigning the menu to try to get it to be super clear and effective, and if they wanted to promote a particular item, they would test it in their agency. Now, wouldn't that be pretty amazing when we all get to that place, when we're managing a couple of staff and employees, designing everything and consulting the client on every business marketing objective? That's pretty cool. How do you get there? So here's one of my favorite images I'd like to use this guy a lot. The way that you build that trust and that long term relationship with your client is to solve the problem that keeps them up at night. So again, I'm going to ask you, since we can't have a real conversation about this using crowd. Are you guys doing that? Are you thinking about? Taking things off their plate so they can sleep better at night. And how do you do that and what does that look like? Earlier? I gave you the example of Ben burns doing the bid for me now in the plus years of running the company or the agency blind. I do most of the bids that are the weird, unique ones because nobody seems to know how to figure it out. But Mr. burns, he said, Chris, I got this. He did the research. He read the RFP. He put it together and got it 90% of the way there and showed it to me. Said, let's change these two things. He's I got it. He took care of everything else. So instead of me staying up to 4:00 in the morning, working on that myself and doing the reading and thinking about it and possibly stressing out about it, he took care of that. So again, think about what it is that you're keeping your client up at night, and sometimes it actually helps to ask them what keeps you up at night. So when they say we need a website, it's like, OK, great, I totally understand that. I just want to know what keeps you up at night. What's your global business objective? What can I do to help understand? What keeps the doors open and how you guys grow? OK, so here's a scenario that's in the book, you guys, if you haven't bought it, I would recommend that you guys buy it. And if you bought it and you haven't read it, I recommend you read it. So here we go. What they say, I need a website. That's what the client says and what we hear. They need a cool website, and we're really excited about that. So we think about things, we're interacting with the client. What does it look like? What are the details, the colors, the typefaces and the layout? OK, we're all we are all there, we're trying to move away from this part. So what we should say instead? This is a script, a template you guys can use something to this effect. What are your business and marketing objectives? What can we do to increase traffic? We increase repeat and unique visits, increase page views, time on site, average order size. Pass along value. Facilitate brand advocacy. And if you are talking to your client in this manner, the first thing that they'll do is if you're a creative shop, they're going to probably be taken aback. They're like, whoa, this person is engaging in something that I didn't think we were going to talk about because I was prepared to tell you what my favorite colors are, where we're going to take the logo. Those kinds of things. We need to move things around on the layout. This is why it's very helpful for you guys to understand the conversion funnel or as we talked about it, the user journey. Because we can design that. We can solve that problem. OK, I only have three more for more slides before I talk about the homework. I want to take a quick break here and kind of ask you guys what you guys think of this so far. There's a bunch of comments they're talking about the previous slide. What keeps you up all night? Amy said it turns into a mini therapy session. OK, so I'm going to now drop. Catherine, thanks, Catherine. And I'll bring on Amy. Maybe once back in sea, it's kind of funny, like Amy was on, she didn't say two words. Now she's off and she wants to talk to us. OK, here we go. Maybe there's something meaty in there. So let me say this. Let's see here. OK, Jared worked at draft FCB, Matthew says, we asked us on a phone to our clients, we do literally ask this, you guys. The thing that I learned from my business coach here is to not be afraid to ask the thing that you need to know. So we will literally ask our clients, how will you decide who to give this job to? And it always kind of ends the conversation really abruptly until they take a deep breath, and they actually tell us. Now, before I learned to ask this question, I was kind of beating around the bush, I'd ask him lots of weird questions and try to. Distill what it is that they're going to use to judge us. And then you asked this question, and then I now look back and say, like, why don't I ask that question since the beginning? I don't even understand what I'm doing, wasting my time on this. Amy, what do you want to say? So about a year ago, I went to a branding workshop and they were talking about niche, but in a way that I never heard it talked about before. So they were saying that there's do I need to turn on my camera? Oh yeah, my hair. They were saying that there's four basic niches that every business or brand fits in, pretty much. And it's either helping people get more money, get healthier, loving relationships. And the other one is something to do with self. So not help like not physical health, but like the other inner. So that really kind of helped restructure what I help my clients to do, and I think that's more the money aspect. So and then they asked us, like, what keeps your customer up at night? Is it like that because they're not married yet? Then that's like love and relationships or any one of those four basic niches. So that, yeah, it reminded me of that slide. I'm going to ask you guys right now what keeps you guys up at night? So Sean and Amy, what keeps you up at night right now? Oh, we lost, Amy. Yeah, my mind is going back to my previous question is just planning for the future? It's kind of a nerve wracking thing for me because I feel like, OK, cool, I went from just being, you know, a designer for small mom and pops to now being a ThoughtWorker and selling strategy services. And I'm like, yes, I want to camp out there. And then one of in our staff meetings we're talking about for as butler, we don't want to just be a better version of what already exists. We want to be something completely different, which is why we're now offering strategy. And now the question is, OK, well, now what if everybody's doing strategy? How am I going to put myself out of business in the next year or two? And so that kind of keeps me up. And I think about like, how do I stay above ahead of the curve? How do you stay ahead of the curve, huh? And you answer the question is free up my creative capacity by hiring people to do the busy work? Yeah well, look, Sean, I'll just say this to you, since you're on camera, how do you stay ahead of the curve? You're already so far ahead of the curve. You don't even know how far ahead of the curve are. To be honest, if you focus, if you guys that are listening to this broadcast now live or at some point in the future, if you follow the prescription, learn core, learn to facilitate these discussions happening. Elevate yourself from talking about the beauty and the uniqueness of the work and focus on the other people's goals and objectives. You're going to be so far ahead. You didn't understand it, so we know that at Stanford, there's the school for design, their teaching business. People design. OK you ever met a non creative person and try and teach them how to be creative? That's a tough order to teach, right? That's that's a difficult task ahead of them. And I think it's through conditioning that we lose our creativity, it's there, it's latent. So let's see if they can unlock it. But here you guys are, you guys are all creative in one way or the other, whether you do design or not, whether you went to school for it or not, you are creative. It's I think personally and this is self-serving, it's much easier to teach you the business aspects of it, at least that's my theory, then to teach it the creative parts. And if I haven't said it before, I'll say it again to this group. Creativity is about being able to connect abstract ideas, disconnected thoughts and put them together and find the correlation between those two things. I think we, Amy, is having a camera or audio problems, but she's able to still type, which is cool. OK where is this thing, is this one? OK, I want to go back to the slide, so you guys just remember this and the pivot between I need a website into what are your business marketing objectives? That's just through language and kind of just through finessing. It would be kind of abrupt if the client says, I need a website. Then you came in and just abruptly said, what are your business and marketing objectives? And this is the whole embrace and pivot tactic. First, you need to acknowledge what they say. That's awesome. You know, I build amazing websites, so thank you for reaching out to me. But before we dive into that, this is your pivot. Let me just ask you. What are your business and marketing objectives and then tell them your why? Why are you asking about this? Because you're going to throw them off a little bit. And the reason why I ask this is because I find that when we build websites without knowing what the business or marketing objectives are, we have a very slim chance of achieving those goals. It's like telling me to go to a city, but not telling you what city to go to. I could arrive there by luck. But since this is your money and I treat your money like my money, I don't want to gamble on luck. Let's talk about, you know, your KPIs. Key performance indicators, what do you want us to do? I don't want to make any assumptions, and this is the relationship that we're going to build together. All right. And before we end the conversation, I say, look, I know you have to do your due diligence and speak to several other vendors. I totally respect that, so if they're not asking these questions, maybe you can think about why they're not asking these questions. That usually will start to seal the deal. Because the other vendors will not be asking these questions. This is why I say Sean and everybody else in this group, you are so far ahead of the curve. The reason why it doesn't feel like that is because you haven't committed your, your mind and your body to following through with this, which boggles my mind. Here you guys are, you've paid a lot of money, this is going to be me now ranting, OK, guys, sorry, if you want to just mute me right now, you can. Here's your Warning. It boggles my mind that many of you guys have paid for $500 kit. Some of you guys have paid for a $1,200 kit paid for personal coaching from me, have paid for them to be a subscriber to this group and attend the calls. But you haven't taken action and action trumps everything else. So I use that word, Trump. It beats everything else. OK, so that's why I write these crazy posts on my business designer page about taking action. Stop talking. Stop thinking. Make a decision and go for it. Just accept the fact that it's not going to be right. And be liberated by that, that it's OK to make mistakes. All you need to do is adjust along the way. We don't arrive where we want to be overnight, it doesn't happen. OK one of my friends who was suffering from cancer, who then ultimately passed away, sadly, she shared something that somebody shared with her. The way that a bow works is you have to pull it back. It feels like it's going backwards before you can release it and goes forward. But you've got to be willing to pull it backwards, and it's going to feel like you're making reverse progress. Ok? a couple more slides and we'll open up the discussion. I think I'm still on time here. So here's your checklist for when you're working with a client. Now I want you to think about this. You need to align the teams and the teams are the people in the marketing, the CEO, the business concerns. And the need to educate maybe the needs of the technology person to make sure it doesn't become a headache for them, that it integrates into existing platforms and systems that they already have. The other thing that you need to do is you need to be a whisper of people. The old Robert Redford thing, you know, you have to read between the lines and guess what, these ads here? The exercise, had you done them, was to help you read between the lines. What a really saying this is an exercise that is very useful to you in all aspects of your life. So we've got to learn to interpret. And I play this game a lot with people at the office or even my kids when we watch a movie and the guy says to the girl, are you leaving now? And she looks at him and he looks back at her and she's like, yeah, and she walks away. What he meant to say was is if you leave, I won't be here when you get back. And we as the audience know this on a subconscious level. The challenge is to be able to recognize that on a conscious level, what's really happening is the reason why they're so attracted to us is because it's easier to read the lines in real life. It's harder to read between the lines. Another thing that you want to do. Is to ask open ended questions that leads to discovery, and I'm guilty of this myself all the time where I presume I know the answer, so I ask very leading questions. I need to keep remembering to ask open ended questions. Now, if you want help on asking open ended questions, listen to great podcast where they're interviewing people. Dick Gordon does an amazing job. He has a podcast called The story, and I don't think he's airing it anymore, but you can find archives of Dick Gordon the story. Look him up. He's so good. He'll ask, like, how did that make you feel? And that's what a professional does. How I ask it. Were you embarrassed at that time? No, no, no. I wasn't embarrassed. Instead of just leaving it open. OK and lastly, and not least by any stretch of the imagination surface, the business objectives. Get away from the aesthetics, all right. OK to wrap up this next chapter here, I think I condense it down to this thing. Is this speak like a native? To remember. You most definitely are not the target in most cases. But this is a disease that most designers suffer from. They always think they're the target. Immerse yourself in learning who the target is, and that's the exercise that's built into core, the user profiling your ability to identify with somebody that's totally different than you. I was listening to fresh air last night on my drive home with Terry gross, I believe who's the host? And she was interviewing Jim Jarmusch and she asked him about this one line in the movie, which is a little girl who's reciting a poem to Adam driver's character. And it's kind of written in a very innocent way because she's a young girl and she asked him, do you like it? And Adam says that's beautiful. And then Terry asked him, what was it like for you to write like a 13-year-old girl to write poetry? He explains all that stuff, but that to me, I was like, I was kind of like, Wow. I was driving home on the PCH thinking, this is an amazing guy. That he can pretend to write poetry through the eyes of a 13-year-old girl, and it sounded real, authentic. The question is, can you do that? And we need to know what are their attitudes and beliefs. And lastly, we need to challenge assumptions. Businesses and people that are potentially your clients have all these assumptions about what to do. What I do is I listen to those, I acknowledge them, and then I ask him questions like why? Why do you believe that to be true? Why do you want that to happen? That's how I challenge it. Ok? down to three slides here features benefits and values, as explained by Douglas Davis. I personally think benefits and values are almost the same. But he delineates it out as a separate item, so let's understand what this is. Features what a brand or product offers. The benefits is what does it do for me and the values, why should I care? So there's a matrix here. The product, the target, the feature, the benefit and the value. So there's, you know, it's easy to understand things in 3's like so you can recognize the pattern. And so planet fitness, which is the gym. I think we did some work for them, target people who want to get in shape without feeling like a loser. This is exactly the opposite of the other one. Of this one, I here. I think gold's gym, this jam, they're a little bit different. They're like raw. Just unvarnished. Bam, it hits you in the face. Planet fitness is about making you feel welcome. So the whole know lung kids allowed. I'm not sure I'm familiar with the term lung heads, but since he used it, I will use it. So I think musclebound people, right? John Plunkett is. All right. The benefit is you won't feel intimidated every time you work out, the value is. Feel confident. As you get healthier. And I don't know if you guys know this, but planet fitness, they have a tagline, it says no gym intimidation. That's the creative aspect of it. Then the interesting thing for me is because I'm no copywriter. Is that I would never be able to write a line like no Jim intimidation, but if I did, this matrix did the target, the feature, the benefit and the value. It almost kind of presents itself to you. This is the creative, creative part, and you're putting the little things together feel kind of interesting. You know, I feel intimidated. I want to be. Intimidation, Jim, Jim intimidation. No intimidation. I almost feel like I can come up with that if I understood. All these categories, like the way he's broken it down here. Ok? Disney Rewards Visa cards. The target is mom's feature 0% vacation financing to benefit save money in your trip. The value? Is a magical family experience at an affordable price? And that is almost like, I don't know if it's Mastercard or visa, whose line is it, you know, for everything else, there's visa. Like, you know, a box of apples, $74. Um, a trip with your family while not having to stress out, that's priceless. So for everything else, it's like Visa or something like that. I totally butchered that. Sorry Jared Nike running shoes target weekend athletes feature built in extra cushioning. The benefit knees won't hurt when you go running. Look great. Feel great. OK, so it's very important for us when I say surface things is to understand the values and psychology behind why they do what they do. So this one is really important. Understanding the why? Why they do what they do. And lastly, your targets should not see the designers or team behind the work, and this was shared in our first call together about this, like the things that you guys got from reading the book. Your target should not see your hand in it because if it's really reflective of who they are, you kind of have to make a lot of assumptions about imposing your own aesthetics. Now I'm not picking on anybody. Let me see who said it. I think it was Tim Tim's like, yeah, my tenancy as a designer would be to kind of make this Swiss model and make it beautiful, you see, because this is what we want. But people are going to the gym, lifting weights and throwing some iron around, maybe they want something different. OK, so I'm going to go for the homework, you guys, because that's end of part two. I think I timed out, all right. And here we go. Here's action items for your homework, ok? So let's do a screencap of this in case I don't get this out in time. Here's another assignment from the book itself. Identify your favorite brand. This is yours, it could be for you like a lot. And you're going to answer these three questions, what is it about the language that speaks to you. Is that? So we look at the gym one, we can answer those kind of questions. What words do they use that catch your attention and what do they mean to you? And lastly, in the Maslow's pyramid, which I talked about in the previous conversation, what underlying Maslow need? Are they speaking to in you? Self-awareness, self-actualization, is it about safety, shelter, belonging? What is it?

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