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Revenge of the Stylescape

#
15
Chris Do
Published
November 30, 2016

Chris Do leads a keynote on creating stylescapes that capture the look and feel of a brand.

Read Transcript
Welcome, everybody. It is eight, 9:06 AM. This is episode 15, I think, and we're going to be talking about style escapes. It's not a real word, and that's why my keynote is giving me some autocorrect thing, saying it's not spelled correctly and I want to get into a little bit of the nuances. If you've not done a style escape before, this is a perfect time to jump in if you done them. And if you want to tune it up or if maybe you need some clarification, it's a good time to tune in as well. And we're going to be reviewing a bunch of the style scoops that you guys submitted. First of all, I want to tell you guys, overall, you guys did a really good job. I can see that the group is leveling up as a collective, but there's always room for improvement. And that's what I want to do. Now, Ben did promise a gentle critique. I can't promise that, but that is what Ben promised, and I will let you guys know what I think of them. And it's just one person's opinion. So take it with a grain of salt. Anyways, if you've not joined us before, if you're new to the group, we do these calls every single Wednesday. It used to be the first and third Wednesdays, but I'm trying to do them every single Wednesdays and we cover essentially everything from the core curriculum and we fill the gaps where we need clarification. Oops time, please. Who is that? Moving furniture on us? That's Shawn. Yeah, I was Shawn. All right. Permitted him. OK and what's happening is as we built out the curriculum. We're running out of things to talk about, so in at the end of the call, you guys feel free to make some suggestions about what you need more help with. And it doesn't have to be more at all, and I'll do my best to fill that in. And again, I'm always open to anybody doing guest co-host with me. As long as you guys have a deck and a topic that you can send to me, so I can review to see if it's relevant and where we're at in terms of the curriculum topics that we're covering. Let me know and I would be more than happy and several people have stepped up and I thought it was great. Everybody that's stepped up to give a presentation and co-hosts an episode with me or a webinar. They've done a great job. So anyways, we're going to jump right in today, I want to talk about style escapes, so for me, a brand really is about the voice and the tone and the look in the field, and you channel all of your messaging through this and we're going to talk a little bit more about look and feel. But the reason why I included voice and tone is because sometimes those words actually help to drive a visual. OK, so the first part of today's call, I'm going to show you the framework. I'm going to explain it a little bit. I'm going to show you some things that I'm doing, maybe a little differently than the way you're doing it. And then we'll jump into looking at your style shapes. And the last thing we'll do is I'll show you some of our work so you can have a point of reference. OK and as I'm going here, guys, this is a discussion. This is not one of those things where I just talked to a blank screen for an hour and a half. You guys have a question. Just stop me. Say, whoa, slow your slow your roll. I need some help with understanding that. OK, so here's a visual that I've created. Here's something that is a term that I'm using. It's called the empathy graph, and that's a fancy way of saying it's a collage of images. And essentially what this is if you look at the screen on the left hand side, you'll see this yellow sheet and I'm working on some other version of core. And right now this is an old worksheet, so don't worry too much about that. But you'll see here on the worksheet, I have voice and tone on the left column and look and feel on the right column, and we're going to pick our top three words with the client. The client is going to do that. And obviously we're looking for more visual words when it comes to the look and feel. But any word that helps you kind of come to an agreement with your client in terms of what it looks like is a good word to me. And I'm trying to take this from the point of view of I'm working with the young designer who's never done a style scape before, maybe an intern. Or maybe it's. So what I do is I ask them to create an image bucket. Go on Pinterest. Go on the hands. Go and dribble. Go on any site where you can find inspirational imagery like really beautiful design, typography, photography, anything that inspires you and create an image bucket. And here are some prompts that have included. And I bullet pointed them to the right, which is what do the users look like? So when we're profiling a user, we should come up with an image for that person. And that really helps to ground the style escapes, I think. So the person is in a really sharp fitted suit, and it's very modern that speaks to who that person is, as opposed to someone who is a little bit more down to Earth doesn't wear makeup. And it's in kind of all hemp clothing, let's say, some kind of hippy dippy kind of person. Well, that says a lot about who they are, the choices they make, and there's a lot of materials that cover things like this in terms of the things that you buy says a lot about who you are and the tribe that you belong to. So even just looking at their fashion, their face, like, are they clean shaven? Do they have a big old beard like Mr. bin burns? What did it look like? And that really helps us to kind of ground all the styles, Kate. So that's a really important one. What activities do they do? And I like to show people in action if possible. So the main picture of the profile, that's a good one. But if you have them kayaking, tying up there, some luggage on top of the roof rack give them an activity to do. It gives a context. It makes the person more relatable. It instantly tells us a little story about who they are. And here's another problem where do they play, work and relax? Do I ask these questions, I ask these questions mostly because my designers usually are not sitting in strategy sessions with me because they happen off site, they happen all day and they've got other things to do. So they're not as immersed within the world of our customers. So I just asking this question, if you don't know where they play, work or how they relax, then you don't know them yet. So try to look at the world through their eyes and put yourself in their shoes and look around. What does that look like? Do they live in a modern home? Do they live in a prefab home, attract home? What kind of home do they even live in at home? Maybe they're renting an apartment. Figure that out. What city do they live in? And so if we find a photograph of somebody doing something, maybe they're walking their dog with a cup of coffee in their hand and they're walking on a slope street like in San Francisco on a cool fall morning or something like that says a lot about who they are. What things do they buy? So that's another prop, and you're going to go through me. And collect images for all these things, right? So what things do they buy? Do they have very expensive headphones? Are they live a highly curated life with objects, or maybe they're a hoarder and they have lots of stuff and their need of organization? Another thing to look for is textures and materials. I like this because what I want a lot of you guys to do is to look beyond building a website, which is essentially what coral was designed to do, but it can be applied to so much more. Textures of materials can also drive lots of different ideas. So maybe there's a slab of marble or rough hewn stone or some piece of granite? I don't know. Reclaimed wood, some kind of smooth lacquered finish. Maybe there's a textile that's involved those of you guys are like textiles, maybe those textiles have patterns. That you can use as something to drive color palettes, things like that. Pieces of graphics and design. And this is essential because we want to help the clients look at the style escape and instantly understand. This is the world in which our brand can live in. These are the possibilities. It can be for a website. It could be for an interior design. It could be for signage. It could be things, even for a video animation. It's up to you. And, you know, when I was younger, I would play this game with my cousin and my brother. We would stare at album art, you know, on LP vinyl, we'd stand out and we'd make up stories. This is predating music videos. I know it's hard to believe, but and that old looking at that and trying to make up a story. So when you look at pieces of design, try to think of a story that you can tell. This is a really cool printing technique that we can use for your brochure. There's a Black on Black spot varnish or a foil stamp, and we could use that for x, y and z because they relate to the story that we're trying to tell. It's a little bit about discovery, or maybe you find something that there's a cool training technique where the book covers ripped open and it does something for you. Think about that. Other things that you can think about their wardrobe, what are they? Where do they wear a cap? What kind of glasses? All that kind of stuff. What did they eat and drink? So what I'm trying to do is to help immerse the person who's working on the design in this person's world. So they have a ton of context and we need to know them as well as we know our real like real people in our lives. That's just like Johnny. It's just like Mary. It's just like David. It's like Bobby. OK, now, if I ask you it, since this is the day after, I'm just going to refer to as the day after. If you can imagine what the world of President Trump looks like. And you know what it looks like because he's so well documented, everything's Gilded. It's loose fitting shirts. He likes to eat fast food. He lives in a very decadent, decadent, over-the-top life. And you can imagine one that looks like. So we know his world really well, or at least the one he shows us, that's how well you need to know this. So I'm going to show you some samples. Because there's some materials in here that I don't think I can release. You guys are going to have to do what you need to do. But I'm not going to release this deck until I'm OK with it from the client. OK so this is a profile we did of an active woman working in marketing or advertising living in Chicago, hence the Chrome balloon or whatever that thing is called. Somebody here knows, I'm sure, and she's busy, so she's doing this Blue Apron thing she likes to cook. She's active, but she's not crazy, super, you know, insane about it. And this is a really quick empathy graph. And it's from these things that we build our style escapes from, so notice there's no real consideration for design. It's mostly just a grid. I'm trying to pick images that have a similar tone, photography style, lighting, all that kind of stuff. That's what I'm looking for. And if you guys have questions about how I curate, how I organize images, I'd be more than happy to talk to you about that. Now here are a couple, four pages now for a totally different project. And you can see from the pin in the upper right hand corner, the blue pen. It's in Seattle, somebody found that image, so what my designers do, my interns do is they go out and they find tons of images. Sometimes 100. And that's a really fun part, you get to browse, you get to explore. You get to let the images lead you down a path. And I know of you guys have ever played with Pinterest. That's exactly what Pinterest does. You can get lost in it, which is awesome. I can spend hours going through Pinterest and just grabbing things and bookmarking and making a mental note something speak to me about how they're connected to the brand, the direction that can go in. You see here there's a case of milk bottles or beer bottles that are painted white. There's a little slit that's cut across it as a diagonal. I looked at, I'm like, wow, that's kind of cool. Maybe if our logo had an element like that, like a slash, a divider line, that not only is it a graphic, but it could be a dye cut and it reveals something. So that's also an opportunity for a brochure where you can see graphic bits that reveal something underneath. So you're getting a little sneak peek, a tease of what's to come. And this image in the upper left hand corner with a storefront, this is the London plane. I believe it says I just like to feel that feels like Seattle to me. I think that's Pioneer Square. And for people who haven't been in Seattle, I think that's a good thing to help them understand, hey, this is kind of the vibe. Look, the market for water, this is a waterfront property, so somebody found out, I'm like, hey, that looks really sharp. That looks to me like it's baldoni or Dido or something like that. But it's kind of one embellishment looks really neat. Here are a couple more. And we actually use this, you guys, you see the business card that's leaning against the wall, it says tied. And it looks like it's been dipped, died in some indigo ink. And that was a really cool way to kind of communicate being by the ocean. That's what makes the property unique from, say, property in Hollywood. And I showed this to the client like, oh, we love that. So this is a very noncommittal way to show lots of bits of design to kind of immerse yourself, but also to open the clients up into where this brand or the design can go. Now I told this story to some of you guys before, when you're introducing something brand new to the client, when you're doing a logo, reveal where you're showing them the finished logo and some contextual applications, even if it's really good people have a hard time, would change their image of what it is in their mind probably is very different than yours, and that's why they hired you. But if you make it gradual for them, it's called scaffolding. If you bring them in step by step into what the design is going to be. There's less likely for there to be shock at the bad kind of shock. Not like shock. You're such an amazing designer, creative person. Because you're giving them a little bit at a time. OK it's like maybe one of those really super sour lemon drop candies, if you pop that instantly in your mouth without the sugar coating on it, it would be so acidic. It'd be so sour. Your lips would pucker. But if you liked it a little bit, and that's why there's a little bit of a sugar coating, and eventually you kind of acclimate to that taste. And that's what the empty graph does for me. Here's more so we see some kind of nautical themes with the anchor. Of course, there's an octopus in there. I love octopus and some patterns, and you see the thing on the far right Eric. I think it's a Scandinavian company, something like that. And I like seeing identity systems, and this is very helpful for building your style scape. It's all curated, and you can see that from page to page, there is a style and aesthetic and it's not totally random. You see in the bottom left here Maritime signal flags. I didn't know this, but there are flags for the entire alphabet and numbers. So when I guess you're at sea, you can communicate to people. Those patterns could come in handy. So we explore this, it didn't go anywhere, I don't think. But the property is for 50 alaskan, so we could have picked the White x on the red box, the blue x on the yellow box, et cetera. It could be a pattern in the store, some kind of motif that we use. And look at the thing right next to it, the one with the Black lines, it looks like color blocking. They kind of graphic patterns and I thought that was amazing. The reason being is it's just a piece of paper with horizontal lines on it. But when it's folded, it has a wave like structure to it. It goes up and down. It was kind of an undulation that was really cool. And the one with the circle, with the ocean cut out but flipped upside down was a really neat way to take an ordinary image and make it extraordinary. And if you were my client, this is exactly how I would talk to you about the empathy graph. OK, so now you have a really awesome image bucket. This first one is not related to these other ones, right? And you are having a conversation with your client, things are going really great, you're getting further clarification as to likes, dislikes, tastes, maybe even in terms of how far they're willing to stretch conceptually. How abstract can we get with this? Lots of things here, I'm not going to talk about every little one of these things. OK, now let's do the style escape together. All right. So here's a guide that I'm putting together in some future episode, I'm going to go really deep and actually build a style scape in real time, or at least on video, so you can see how it's done from image collection curation talking you through. Why Pixar and images? Why do I'd pair this next to that one, et cetera? But a style escape has certain bits like formula bits. OK and here's how I broken it down. What's important essential is to have some kind of logo example, a typekit. This does not mean you're designing and crafting a logo. It's kind of like a really polished looking sketch, if you will, and I'm going to talk about how you do that in a second. It needs to show the color palette. It definitely needs to have a photo of the user. And I like to have a, you know, primary and secondary type specimen, because no matter what you're building for them, I think type will be a big part of it, whether it's the website, a brochure or an identity system. And I don't like showing ABCD efg because it doesn't look like anything. It's important for the type specimen to say something so you can see how letters look together in some kind of logical sense. And here's a whole bullet point list of things that you're going to want to include. And these are prompts, and we've gone over several of these already identity system, graphics patterns, materials, print collateral, contextually relevant applications. And what I mean by that is it's a sign on a glass door. It's a three dimensional wayfinding system. It's anything that has a piece of design applied to something. It's a vinyl graphic on a wall. It could be graphics on a stairwell where it's painted on the rise of each, each Tread. OK, who's that? Yeah, I'm going to mute you. Sorry. OK. Wayfinding systems that signage photography examples in terms of composition, color, style, styling, navigation systems. If you find something off a website that you like, this is really interesting. It might map really well to what we're doing. It might not. It's just an idea to sketch low commitment. Interface design, information, graphics, exhibit design and interior and exterior design. Because I want to do branding, I don't want to design a logo. I don't want to design a website. I want to do the whole thing all the touch points, which a customer user comes into contact with. It's the entire user experience design. So that's it, so there's a little cheat sheet here, it kind of lays out how it should go and proportions and all that kind of stuff, but that's very technical and formal. Let me talk a little bit about fonts and typesetting. Most of you guys that are familiar with doing design work when we know all the tight boundaries, but here's one. It's called font font. It's easy to remember because you're looking for a font and font font twice. OK it says it's the world's largest library of original contemporary typefaces. So what you're going to do here and when we're designing a logo, it's OK to use a font that's not part of what I would consider as a classic 20. Because you're looking for a custom configuration of certain letter forms that makes sense for the name of the company. OK, so this is not like what I'm going to do, but I just grab the first font that looked all right and maybe doesn't even look that good. And I typed in the word the future. And you can see here it displays it, so what I would do then is I would say to my designers, we're not going to buy that font because we're still sketching right now. Set the point size to be the largest that you can and screen capture that sucker and then taking a Photoshop and cut out the background and create a white one in a Black one that has a transparent background. Save it as P&G, and we'll drop it into the style scape. Now, some of them will go a step further. Some of them will auto trace it or quickly redraw it in Illustrator. The designers I employ are very fast. So you think that's not worth the effort? Sometimes it is. And then they'll tweak things. They'll change. They'll cut something out. They'll remove a counter from the letter form. The counter is the thing that's in the middle of the R that's the counter. In case you guys don't know your typography, ok? So you would remove that, and that would kind of start to make it feel like it's custom. Let's talk a little bit about color. Well, color can be somewhat arbitrary and abstract, and I believe that if you want a little bit of guide, what I would use is something like Adobe Color and its color dot Adobe. And it used to be spelt. What is that called phonetically? And they changed it to color, not Adobe. And what you can do is you can search by keywords. Now, I typed in fun, vibrant and this is the color palette I got. Now this is a screen capture, so there's way more colors than this. And this is not based on any kind of real color psychology. I think these are color palettes that people uploaded and typed in key words metadata. So this is not about the science of color theory, and there is a lot of that color psychology. I'm not a big believer in all that stuff. I just I'm going to pick some colors, and this is a good way to just be inspired. So you don't go to the same colors you always use. OK, very useful tool. Moving on is what I say is when you need to find a photo that represents the user and they need to have a certain style of clothing that reflects the profile you built. Notice this guy. This guy is full of personality. This guy happens to be a Shutterstock image that I purchased. I quickly cut him out. Very easy to do these days with the Photoshop Tools. Takes two minutes. Cut them out because it opens up a world of possibilities because chances are the person is not going to be in an environment that you want them to be in. And I'll tell you a little bit more why we cut them out. OK, so he's got a big old headphones on. He's got a certain pair of glasses. It says a lot about him. He seems like he's creative, but he's also very thoughtful or there's intention behind the clothing and the palette. He's heavily styled like a stylus. And then when we talk about the font, we have the primary and the secondary. Very important to have primary, secondary font because you're going to need to show how this system is going to work for lots of different applications. So here I just chose two random fonts. I didn't put a lot of thought into this, and I use a lorem ipsum text generator called hipster ipsum. So instead of it being what is it, greek? Greek text, there are some words in there like intelligentsia, squid, beard, brunch viral. It just looks a little bit more like regular english, even though there's some weird, weird words in here. Like Jan being, I don't know what that means. And freegan. Now this is going to be the foundation. I have a logo, I have a color palette. I have the user and I have a type specimen. Now let's go back and take the images. From our image bucket and start to put things together, ok? And that's going to be our style escape, and if you done this correctly, your style escape will emerge. Now I quickly grab these last night kind of in my depressed state. I put him together in his keynote, so I don't know whose workers who I just put it in. It's somewhat random order and there are a lot of images. So I didn't have I didn't bring in everybody, but I think I got most of them. So if you want me to talk about yours specifically offline, just let me know and I'll be more than happy to do that. Ok? but if you're watching this live or after the fact on YouTube within our group, just try to extract what we're talking about and pretend like it's your work, it's how you're going to learn. So we're going to go through this. But before I go through this, I want to take a quick break here to see if anybody has any questions. You guys are being very silent and that scares me a little bit. So anybody have any questions? I had a question. OK, who's that, john? Yeah hey, man. Hey how do you carry a photo? Sometimes I feel like when I'm looking for photos, I have an idea of what I want in my mind, but I can't find it online. that's the art of search. Maybe that will be the next topic. I'm very good at that, Sean. And I teach it to my the internet, like for a long time and get nowhere sometimes, and I'll just settle with like the next best thing or something. OK most of the times, if you're looking through Google, it's not a good place because the Google is just based on what people click on and their low quality images, they're not very sharp design. So I mentioned to you before I would go to Behance or Pinterest. Now Pinterest is a much better site to search. Everything is highly curated. OK, so let's go to pinterest, so sometimes you don't even know what it is you're looking for. So you began very broad. So sometimes what you think is simple, bold design is not what the world thinks of it. And you need to be more specific than that. So what I do is I just take my best guess at it. And here's the number one tip to search, whether it's Google or on Pinterest or anything. There's something called predictive typing. All you have to do is slow that down. Pardon my French. You got to just slow down. I have designers like, I got typekit in. I'm like, dude, all the options disappear and they're all gone because your idea is less refined than the world's ideas. Google is much smarter than you just slow down. So you type in simple and you're like, oh, simple, Saul Bass. I'm like, oh, maybe that's what I'm looking for. And you click on that and then you see the results. Oops not it. Go back. OK So let the predictive typing, let group intelligence crowd intelligence help you. In this case, the next thing you do. It's like once you type something in and it displays a whole bunch of images. And I guess we could do this live if there's time later I can do this with you is you're thumbing through and my theory is, if within three full screens, if you're not seeing anything close to what you want, you've put in the wrong word. It's not going to be on the bottom on the 12th screen down, you know what I'm saying? You're scrolling down one screen to screen three screen and you haven't seen anything remotely like it. It's not it. Now I probably drive some of my designers insane, and I probably scare them a little bit, but my eyes are very fast. I've trained my eyes. I can scan a page much faster than they can, or they can scan and not see what I see. So that's a skill in itself. I scan them like one to. Well, hold on. Stop right there. There's an image right there. Which one? I'm like that one. Can you see it? It's right there. So that image there in a sea of wrong images? I say, click on that. So they're going to click on it. So look at the words. Are there any words attached to it? And then you will find most likely the right word. So you want to find 100 images like that, not just one. And sometimes that's a dead end. Nothing we can do is we can go to the website where that comes from and read some, some texts. What is it talking about? Why is this paired with this? Who created this? What's the headline? So you start to figure it out? We're a little bit kind of in a detective researcher mode. That's how I do it. That's how you find the right images. So I've also found that you've got to type in the lowest common denominator. My my youngest brother is not the sharpest crayon in the box, brightest whatever. So I always kind of think of, you know, what would he search for? And that typically brings up good results like. Classy logo produces a whole body of great work that you would not expect for typing in classy logo. OK, so sometimes it's being broad, lowest common denominator, and sometimes it's adding one adjective. You type in logo, you're going to get hundreds of really bad logos. Adding the word classy or retro vintage archival. Then you start to get a bunch of things, so there are certain words that you can use if you're looking for certain things like I find that retro or vintage gives me all sorts of good stuff vintage furniture, vintage signs, vintage t-shirts. Usually you get some cool stuff. But that's within a certain kind of aesthetic palette. OK, Sean, do you have a follow up question or anybody else have another question? That was actually really helpful. All right. We'll move on anybody else. Now and I also wanted to kind of say, it seems like so far what you're doing with the empathy board is because, you know, the style scape is scaffolding to a solution, but the empathy graph is scaffolding to the style scape. Yeah, everything scaffolding. Then it's we're peeling back the layers of an onion for everything that we do, because if my designer shows me the style escape and it's totally wrong, I don't know. It's like. You don't understand this user at all. And I used to let them do that. Is like, go make me a style escape. Did you read the document? No Where'd you get these words from? I don't know. Well, no wonder this feels like it's from Mars. This is not helpful to me at all. So we've not burned a day and a half. And that's why I say, you know, especially for anybody. That's not familiar with the way I work for this process, I insist you've got to do an empathy graph. First, I just want you to gather images that inspire you relevant to some of these prompts. Think about the user and go search. Show me your search skills now, the young people. Then they're on every single trend, every photographer, every illustrator, every little thing that's going on in any kind of news site. I've never seen, so I utilize their skills. They've got a lot of time. So they're usually surfing some cool new interactive thing, whatever it is they're using. That really is probably outside of what I already know. So this is good and I've used this process for very consistent results that have led to some really awesome creative work. I've used this for music videos when I wrote a treatment, I saw one image out of almost 1,000 images. I said, I'm going to write a treatment based on that single image. And we want an Emmy for it, too, so this process works, I'm just telling you, if you trust the process. You will get, I think, similar results, especially if you have no process. Anyways, I'm a look at this one. I'm going to talk about it and you guys should be seeing archive House Speaker. OK, who's my guest back on there, rafael? I don't understand why people they don't want to say anything, but then they leave their mark on, OK, I'm going to talk about this and I'm going to ask you guys for all for permission and I'll take your silence as agreement. Complicit agreement. And that I'm just going to critique it, ok? I'm not going to worry about who it is. And if I step on your toes, it's just because I'm trying to give you feedback on how I would do it. Ok? because we know how you'll do it. You've already done it. Now, when I look at this, the overall feeling, it's really sharp. It's highly curated. I see a consistent color palette and a kind of know where this one's to go. And as a director or a client, I could sign off on this and say, yes, I love this direction, go and go in it, or I'm confused by it, but this is definitely very clear. I love this woman. She's full of spunk and style. She's an older lady, but she's super style it with her. Is that called a brooch on her, on her chest there and just even her crossing her hands in the jewelry? I don't know if she's holding a pen or a purse or something. And I like that as cut out. I see that there's this environment with some beautiful wall molding. Very classy with the little spyker green, and I like the amount of green that's in this thing, so it's not too cool or cold, and I also like seeing the bits of gold. And people are always asking like, it's an ugly color. Well, everything can be ugly, but if you use it tastefully and you use it kind of as accent, everything could be beautiful. And I like the combination of seeing serif and sans serif typeface, and I really like the marks that are included in here, from the Mel DeMar to the NRJ, just using this super thin serif typeface and removing the thin strokes. That's a good trick to doing logos. You know, just remove the thin strokes. I love that it's not necessarily original, but I don't know if there's anything that is really original. OK there I said it. It's controversial. There you are. I don't like the fact that there's no type specimen here. There's just a font and it's just a BCD. So any room for improvement, I would play around with that. And one other thing I would do, and I see some of it here when you see the novella row is to let your typography break edges because these things can tend to be very boxy. The woman helps us break that box, she breaks the frame. And I like that. So think about. Objects, elements, devices and things that are easy to do is your user cut her out, cut him out and play around with your topography, make it come to life. Think about it as a frame in an animation. Maybe it moves a little bit. In the static frame, you know, so very well done, whoever did this good job. Next up is the BPC, again, this person cut this person out. He's got the man bun or the man ponytail. Love it. The beard full of style. I love his t-shirt, his jeans, and he's on top of some kind of reclaimed wood. I really get the feeling of where he's at. The color correction on the Woodfield is a little off to me. As you know, there's the right half of the screen. And then there's the left half. The left half feels a little bit a little more stock or something like the wood underneath the bull sign feels a little bit off. And this is how insane. I am. I look at all these little bits. So if you're design is showing this to me, I'm like, you know what? That's not right. Color correct that remove it. Cut it out. Let's spend the time working on that. Ok? I like the marks, all these different end symbols, the ampersand beautiful allele script and futura. This one is missing some type specimen. Now you can see that there's a lot of cool visuals. But if you're building a website or a DNA system, I need to know how the type looks and feels across the whole thing. If you give me a small sample, which this one is, I might sign off on it. And you might find that you'll be revising this later. The whole point of this is to minimize and to streamline the actual design and production of the work itself. The right half with the lighting and all that stuff feels really good. I love the storefront with maybe that's a single Gear Fix Citi bike with the wood and the concrete that looks really sharp. This kind of distressed skull with a hat, with a lightning through it. I like that. It's all very nice. So we get very earthy materials. I like the dark prints on the cups and the identity system that you've included. This is where I would say every square inch of this style escape needs to work for you. And that doesn't mean you need to fill it up, but every image, everything you put in there needs to tell the story. So if you have this pattern here on the coffee cup, I would try to replicate that pattern. Just draw it an Illustrator really quick. Repeat it and maybe instead of doing the wood underneath the Sammy, the bull sign right crop that and then do that pattern there and let it break. Pass an edge or something. Now I'm starting to think about other things like the back of the letterhead or the inside of the envelope, and we're kind of expanding on it. So sometimes it's curation and sometimes it's extracting something and finding another design element to use. OK but overall, I tell you guys, you guys did a really good job. I love how far we've come from the very basic style shapes that we've seen from just a year ago. So good job overall. And you guys know this. I'm very thrifty and compliments. So when I say it, you guys know, I mean it. OK, I'm not just trying to prop you up here, ok? This one is the fit medical and health. So I can't read the Asian characters, but I like this. This is a very creative way to present images. I like that whoever did this cut it on a bias. There's some transparent windows. Feels very thoughtful. It's nice design and everything is going to control so you can read it. Uh, we have two users here, so we have the father and his daughter with the golden light coming across his forehead. And that's a really beautiful photo. Well, we could tighten up the clipping on this a little bit on the shoulder, but that's me just being super crazy. And I see I stock all over it. You don't want to buy these images. I totally get it. But usually those things bother me when I'm presenting. So I just go and buy the images myself. So if you're sitting there thinking, HMM, I don't want to spend the money, I get that means you're not charging enough. And you guys have heard me talk about this on YouTube and elsewhere on these webinars is I want to charge the client the most amount of money I can to give them the service that I want. That means I'm not for everybody, and that's why we charge 20, $30,000 to do these things because I don't want to have to fret over spending $30 to buy an image. Now we're on an awesome subscription plan from Shutterstock. I think we pay like three, 50 a month or something like, I don't know how much we pay, but we get to download a couple of images a month and I can never use them all. So that's why my decks are full of images, vector bits. It's well worth the money. Because if I have to draw something, it takes me a day. My day rate's way higher than $300 whatever it costs us, and it's used by the entire team. I also like that this person is included. These natural herbs, and I don't know if that's ginger or roots or dried berries, it has a very natural, earthy thing, so I'm hoping that this is what this is about. Maybe it's some kind of medicinal herbal shop. What's missing from this is design. I want to see more identity systems, patterns, packaging. That's not enough. And I feel like we're giving too much space to the health is a relationship. That's a smart bit of copy, if you wrote that, but there's lots of room here for more elements. OK really? Think about it from this set of ingredients or these tools, we will build your entire branding system way beyond the web. So I want to make sure we cover as much ground as we can. So this looks to me like it's five or six images and it could be 16. Good, because there's a repeating of elements here, right, there's two images of the same packaging. And there's multiple image is just of ingredients, and I don't know if we need that many. If you can't take the stylus and hand it over to a design team and let them run, it's not clear enough. So I think lots of great things happening here need a little bit more. OK here's one for a champion property management. OK, so again, I'm not going to harp on this, but you know, just doing the base 9 regular small, you know, ABC doesn't really help me now. I see a person here. I'm not sure that's the user, is that the user? The is like a super dude. And so that feels a little bit off to me. Maybe that's how they feel inside that reflects maybe the mission statement, but I don't know if that's the user. So I'm a little confused and I see lots of people doing very similar things, hitting the pinnacle, you know, arms outstretched people, pumping their fists in the air, guys fist bumping one another. I think one is sufficient. Pick the best one. Now in here, this feels very stock. Very straight up from stock or wherever you got these images from, because they're not candid, they feel very set up, so you have to be careful about the images that you use. There's a lot of sites that you can go to that do non-stock stock photography. And the other thing I want to say here is. It feels a little bit like these things are not integrated. We have to be mindful of a grid, so I like grid systems. Excuse me. They ground things, they connect things you're going to see here. There seems to be patches of design work, but they're not all tied together. And here's an example I wish you guys can see my mouse, but just imagine it in your mind if you see the word champion. You don't have to imagine. What am I doing? I could do this. Give me one second, you guys. OK I don't mean to go into grid systems, right, but if we see the baseline and baselines are good anchor points, right? You see this right here. The bottom of the champion that's called the baseline on which the topography sits on for all you non pipe nerds out there. If I run that across, look at how many things it lines up with. Little, if anything. So a simple device you could do is this if you were to simply put something. Like this? Sorry come on. OK if you were to simply put. A design element that lines up with that baseline, you're going to anchor the left point in the right point together, so it starts to feel like it's cohesive. And maybe some other point we'll talk about grids and how to lay these things out. But now I'm going to show you how things aren't aligned. You see this edge here, the left edge of this blue box. It doesn't line up with anything. This great thing. It doesn't line up with anything. There's I don't know what we're doing. Try and tie things together easily. You see this mission statement? Right here. It's not the edge. That should have been. Where this top bar is, this top bar is totally arbitrary. All right, so what I do is we like a rhythm and pattern, ok? And when we have too much rhythm and pattern, it becomes monotonous. Without it, it becomes noise. So this lighter kind of grayish blue color that's behind it. It should have began here on this left edge of the blue, and it should have ended somewhere around here. To tie-in with the paragraph with having that helps. I'm going to tell you another thing here. I think these are all the same size, right? Double check. Nope, not the same size and no, not the same size. OK, so we have three horizontal bars, all slightly different in size. And I think that's a little bit. Sloppy I think they should be the same size or they should be radically different. So here's the rule. If you use the rule of thirds or doubling, so what I would do is start with this. OK, that's one unit. And then I'm going to duplicate this. You guys can all see this right? I'm not talking to myself. And this is half. How many duplicate that. And I do half of that. OK, so now I can use this bar here. I can lay this here and then I can lay this here. So just look at the Black space above. Do you see how that's a really more dynamic proportion because you're using the rule of double like half each time. So if I just took those three colors and put them in there on a field of Black like this, it's going to inherently look much better. OK, maybe I don't like this on the edge, maybe it's here, I don't know. You can start to play around with the composition. This is like a basic composition thing that you might take in a class at a design school. All right. I'm going to copy this just in case I need it. Let me delete this, so I'm looking for integration. I'm looking for more inspirational design. Are we saying that this is the typeface? Or are we saying the crown is the mark the lion? They're all over the place, so stronger curation, tying things together. You're supposed to be using this to help the clients understand this is what I'm going to get. What I'm going to get is a bunch of stock looking photos and a bunch of different marks. I don't know how they're related. That doesn't really help me. So if they sign off on this, you could be in for will that hurt later in terms of revisions? I want to make a comment. Yeah, go ahead. I noticed that mission statement is spelled wrong. So I would always make sure that you don't have any typos and the last person to call people out of that potato chip. All right. Nope who is it? Come on, you guys think it's a vendetta six. I mean it, Renata, but then. OK, Bernadette, please don't unmute yourself, we don't really want to hear you eating potato chips. OK, moving on. All right, if you want to say something on mute and then we'll listen. OK, moving on, you guys. We're almost through this, ok? Here's another one. This one is. That copper. The copper restaurant, I think that's it. Yeah, copper. OK another really good style escape, I think. And it's got all the right ingredients from the subway tile wall to the graphic that's put on the wall. And maybe they Comp that in there? Probably I don't love this Broxton cow kind of coming off the dude's arm in the couch. That's such a weird, awkward composition there. So we want. I think somebody wanted to put that in there and just jammed it. It feels a little jammed in, so that's the one element that jumps out to me. I like having this cleaver. Uh, kind of breaking edges, all these kind of hipster looking icons. A computer screen with maybe this is how the website looks and feels. The photography example now in this case, I really like this. Crush image where you reduce the desaturated, but it's like got really meaty Blacks. This is where I might ask, is that the photography style or is it Black and white like the one the guy on the right? I would try to get those things to be more unified if I can. For some reason, this guy in the flannel shirt. He feels a little bit off. He feels more like street skater guy as opposed to this guy who's going to shave his beard and put beard oil on and all that kind of stuff. Beard, butter, but everything else looks really good. Now, there's a couple of different type styles here, and I think that's OK, but that may also become problematic for you. So you got this kind of brush hand-lettered script thing with this flourish underneath the word copper, which looks really good. Then you have this older surf looking font that's kind of shaped within the cow and then you have yet another kind of font. I don't know how to describe this one. The one where it's on the upper right corner of the wild. Now they all feel like they're all part of this hipster aesthetic, but they're a little bit different to me. Each one is a little bit different aesthetic. I would try and see if you like one more than the other and push for that one. Very nuanced, but I'm just seeing that, OK, next one needle and bone. This isn't beautiful. Colors are great. I like the hexagon is that hexagonal icon. The hexagon as a way to display the images, I really like that. Does this have something to do with bees or honey or something? I don't know, but it looks really good. The acupuncture place, so yeah, so um, it's just a concept for the day. OK I really like your aesthetic here and you're pulling from sources that I normally don't look at, so it looks really good. I like the serif typeface. It's not my first choice, but I like the way it feels within the context. I like the patterns, and I like that you broken the grid in times. You guys can break the grid and create kind of an organic shape. I think that's a good thing. I can see that pattern being used as part of some kind of system here. And it makes sense now that you say it's acupuncture because there's like little holes and things. You know, I've done acupuncture before. These look like little snacks here. These little trinket looking great of five images here in the middle to the right. Now this part throws me off. This girl feels super stock, and it says Shutterstock all over her face, the lighting on her is not consistent with this and the background that she's on. This is where it kind of feels like a corporate brochure. You have me on the left half. You start to lose me in the right half. So tightening up the curation here and style photography is going to help. You guys can see how the images you choose really create a feeling for. Is this going to be high end? Is this going to be corporate? What is it going to be? So you're really great up into where you have the blue diagonal cut. I think the right side is the part that it's not as strong. Ok? and one other thing I would suggest is bringing that blue edge further to the farther to the right. So you get more overlap with her shoulder and maybe a little bit of her hair in her hand. It's at a very uncomfortable tangent right now, just kind of touching the arc of her shoulder and seeing her one finger overlap since you were to cut her out, push the edge over a little bit. And you have some cutting out things that you could find. You can refine there, ok? I can see the White edge. And it's hard sometimes to cut that thing out perfectly. Are you using. Are you cutting it out in Photoshop or are you cutting it out in keynote? Um, in the last year, two. Oh my God. Do you not know how to use photoshop? I know. OK and this time we do a better job. OK it's super easy to do in Photoshop. You know that? How long to take you to cut out an illustrator? 10 minutes. I could do in 1 minute Photoshop, and it'd be perfect. OK show us how to do that because it takes me a lot longer. Yes, I can. If you guys all deposit 10 dollars? Sure I'm just making a note there, Sean. Shortsighted, believe me on this episode, it's not just about style escapes, ok? Minus, well, the blood is already kind of. In the streets, if you will. All right, next one film connection, gotham, bold, black, medium. I think this person probably just pulled that off. The website that's maybe selling the Gotham typeface and look how much nicer. This looks. When it's typeset and there's cool things happen and there's different weights and there's some copy I can't read, but it looks really good, it feels like, yeah, I can see this on a brochure, in a catalog, on a design. You guys notice the difference between the way that feels and ABCD efg. Big, big difference. And I'm not even saying you have to design it, just put it in there as like, this is a sample. OK, what are we missing on this one? We're missing the user. I see lots of design things with images of people. But I want to see the user. I don't want the user to be a graphic device. I actually want to see him her in something, doing something. OK, now I don't know if this person has already started, yeah, they must have designed us, right, because the F and the C already integrated or this could just be a really nice sketch, but either way, I like it. I also like that they're integrating the turquoise and the kind of golden rod or golden yellow color already in the color palette. So we don't need to see a color palette because it's really integrated. I like the dual tone image of the guy with the big sunglasses. That's the blue in there, and I see a little golden in the background. Now that's a trick that you can do in Photoshop really easily, and it looks really good. And I will show you how to do that, too. For an additional $0.30. OK, super easy to do. This looks really good. I want to see more design. This is where it's light. So I'm going to take you guys back to this prom. You see all these things that I says include wayfinding, and I'm going to tell you why you're going to do this in a second. I'm going to give you a very selfish motivation to do this. So easily, we can pick up two or three more items from this list and include it in here. Now I'm going to assume this is for a website. Because it looks like it's for a website. But if you really want to expand scope, I usually when I say the scope is expanding, there's scope creep. Most of you guys cringe. And the reason being is it means the client is pushing to scope out without changing the budget. But I'll tell you something that's happened, and it's happened pretty consistently. When I show clients the style escape, it does a couple of things. One most of the time, not all the time. They think, wow, you have such an incredible eye. You have really great taste. And they start to imagine you helping them with everything. That's a good thing for you. So not only did you facilitate and show them how smart you are, how great of a listener you are, how you're able to connect different things together and form relationships that they didn't see, how you're able to understand what is driving the bottom line and help them stay focused on that. That's tremendous value from a business partnership thing. And now you're showing them. Not only are you smart. You have such great taste and things about furniture, interior design. And they need three shops that need to be overhauled with consistent design and branding throughout, not just a website, not just a logo or an identity system, but help them design the furniture, help them to design the store interior the point of purchase display the counter. Now you went from doing a 15 to 20,000 website. To taking on a $200,000 project. It's the fastest way I know how. To increase your revenue and your bottom line. So only going to happen if it is, I'm a little bit. So this is like great, Johnny, you got the website. Love to see it go to town. What's going to happen, johnny? Chris is going to come in, he's going to take the rest of your business. Do you want that to happen? I don't think so. Now some of you are sitting back saying, dude, I don't do that, I just want to know, I just want to build a website. That's all I want to do. I don't know how to do the other stuff, and I'm not saying you have to. The cool thing is, if you charge enough money, you just hire other people to do that and you make your 30% markup. And you're now the creative director to all these things, so you don't have to be an expert at doing any of that stuff, but you do need to show it. Moving on. Resolution now, whoever did this did a series of these, and I'm not going to talk about all of them, but I'm going to talk about this one very interesting grid structure. Notice how the grid in this case really makes everything really unified. I almost feel like I'm going to make a wild guess that this person is like either European or German or Swiss or something or things like, you know, square box proportions or, like, really sharp. I also like that this person explored a wide range of styles. It was like all over the place, which was really cool to see. So this All For One client, they must come back like, wow, that's a lot to think about. Now, typically, when we explore things, even though they're different version one, two and three, they're all still centered around the same user, so they're not as diverse as what this person has done. But we're looking at Gregg Allman here. And it's for a company called resolution, I think. And so you get dudes and beard rockers, jeans. I get a strong sense of the aesthetic. I see this person's already picked a color palette with two shades. I think that's very flexible. That's something that we all need to do because we'll pick like three colors and then we realize that obviously it doesn't cover every application that we need to use. We see the headline title on a copy here. I'd like to see a little bit more design. We get a lot of we get a really good sense of who the people are, and I think we've done that in one or two photos. The fact that you have a whole concert kind of film here, almost that's more than necessary and you have maybe this person is already trying to design the website as they're doing this, that it's a great structure. And that's nice. But I'd like to help you help yourself to expand beyond just thinking about in this way. OK I like the kind of leathery paper that's kind of roughed up a little bit. The Allman Brothers ticket. That looks really cool, I'd like to see more of that. Maybe this is where they say, you know what? We want you to design the t-shirts. We want you to design merch for the band. And there's some kind of signage that needs to be designed and this is where you open yourself up to opportunities. Yeah hey, Chris, this is Ian Kennedy, so I submitted that and it was more of a style tile than really a style scape. Oh, OK. The client was Gregg Allman from the Allman Brothers. So as I was going through the discovery with my client who was working for him, she was very reticent to provide any information about branding Gregg Allman because he's been around for 50 years. She felt very uncomfortable with the defined and discover session that I ran with her. So I was really just trying to keep it, you know, not so much my design and it was also more of a style tile because fucking musicians don't pay for shit. So this was a 30 page site. Want you to drop two bombs right there, too? Come on. Sorry about that. Sorry, YouTubes. It's a private video. OK, but yeah, so this was, you know, we easily got paid a third of what we normally would for this particular site, so we weren't doing a lot of design up front. And she was very clear, you know, that all she wanted was a flat redesign of this website. And we wanted the we wanted the client because it's a high profile national stage client and we're just getting going. So OK, well, Ian, first of all, I want to welcome you to the group. I think you just got in recently, right? I did, yeah, Thanks. So, first of all, welcome to the group, I'm glad to hear your voice and now we have a voice to a name and a face. And I think the work is really nice, whether you call them style tile, style shapes, mood boards, whatever you call them, it's cool. And our I guess the challenge that you're facing is something I hope I can help you with inside this group. We're going to help you grow and we get you beyond these things. Ok? excellent. Thank you. Nice design work. I can see that there's a very kind of tent like a strong, clear intent in terms of the kind of images that you're choosing. OK, great, Thanks. Yes talita photography. Oh, hey, look, we have the same taste some is using the same dip dye tide cards. I just saw that really cool. I like the watercolor technique. And this is a really beautiful, simple kind of configuration. If I were to get crazy on you, I would tell you if photography is a little bit far away from talita and the spacing needs to be opened up or something. There's a little proportion issue going on with these three elements, but that's just me being crazy. But I love this giant wallpaper behind the desk. There's a lot of watercolor stuff here. I think at some point. Maybe we kind of find what else we can do with it to show that this idea has legs. And I like what you're doing here. There's a dark, indigo dye. There's some color washes and then you see it on the wall. But ultimately it's almost all the same. It's a color wash. It'd be great to see. Maybe you find a portrait. That's been painted with a watercolor that's got a very loose and organic feel that could be very nice to see here. You do have the room for it and I'm missing the user in a very clear way. I guess this woman in the background is your user. The man in front holding a cigar kind of kills it for me. So this is a tough one. looks like they're on a sailboat or something. Or at least by the ocean, so some really nice things happening here. I think you guys, the challenge will be and Sean's already raised this point. When you're looking for images, you might get stuck really fast. Where you can find other images, but they feel so foreign, but then it just becomes about one person's aesthetic. And this is where you can get yourself into a little bit of trouble. The idea of doing a style escape is to pull lots of things in that you're curating. And then somewhere in between these elements that you find is what you're designed for your client. If you only find one artist, one design aesthetic, then you're going to do something very derivative for that person's work, and that's where people will start to frown. OK, so just throwing that out there. All right, we're almost done here. And Taking a deep breath here. Two more to do, and then I'm going to show you some of ours. And then we're going to kind of go over anything else that we can in the time remaining. And we'll set the agenda for the next call. OK this is for me, too. I love this place. It's a Japanese supermarket here in town, I believe. OK, so we got lots of things going on here for the obvious things we're missing a user. I would like to pull back some of this stuff because everything is so colorful and dense. I think we do now need a moment to breathe a little bit, OK and clear pieces of design. So are we designing the website or are we designing the logo? What are we doing here? I'm not quite sure. And there's lots of little parts and pieces to this. Now, I think whoever came up with this, I think we can try to curate and unify these things a little bit. It'll start to feel more ordered and less like all over the place, from the matcha tea to the little pieces of sushi. I think that I see or noodles. These are raw ingredients and raw ingredients are great to see. But what are we going to do with this from a design point of view? And you know, what my friend Yolanda did for Pinkberry was really awesome. She said, you know, from the world of cosmetics, this is how products are presented. And in the world of fruit or ingredients, this is how that's presented. What if those two met in the middle? So she would. She hired a photographer and took berries and ingredients that you would usually put on top of your yogurt, and she photographed them as if they were photographed by a cosmetic company. And when I saw it for the first time, like, wow, looks so good. They're like little pieces of art, is that a thing of pearls, or are those little do they called Boba or little poppers? I don't know what they're called, but they look amazing. So I think here, I think we want to ground this a little bit more and to give us some room to breathe because it's so dense. OK, but it's very fun, very playful. Let's work on that in for other things like the whole typesetting thing, having a type specimen work on that cup of joy. Almost there. All right. I think this is dense, but it's not it's curated, so it feels OK. I think we see the use here. I assume that's the guy in the middle there. I think he gets a little lost in the photo here. And I would try to hear him up a little bit more. He's got to be way more important than the camera to the left there. And so I want to make sure that we kind of focus on who he is now. Before you guys remember how I was telling you what he wears, what he's doing, how he's lit can do a lot for you in one photo. So here's where I would say the image to the left. The cup of coffee by the window has that intent, whereas he seems like he's just standing there and it's a corporate photo. And some of the images feel that way. And I have I, you know, I have great fun finding images, so I would just encourage you to just dig a little bit deeper and find the kind of photos that you really think are representative of where you want to take this. Now, some of your icons don't feel wholly consistent to me. There is something the Siposs graphic, which feels a little bit like 30s clip art. And then there's the fire blend that with what are those called the laurels? The golden laurels are on it that has a vibe. And then the spotlight or the lamp is just it's a little bit all over the place. Some of it feels like 30 advertising clip art, which is really cool that Charles Anderson stuff that I love so much. And then the bottom left feels totally different. This is where I think you can keep digging and finding really great illustration samples of icons or illustration sets that I really think can set the tone. I do like that you're tipping everything in like photographs that sit on a table somewhere. There's a lot of dimensionality to that, with the exception of the cup of coffee that feels very two dimensional. And at some video I mentioned like how you create really, really good looking shadows. We're not going to get into obviously today, but I will work on that at some point. Ok? better design samples, I think, would really elevate this, and I think it needs it. All right, I've done too much talking. We have 13 minutes left together, you guys. I'm going to take a quick break here to open it up for any other questions, and then I'm going to show you guys what we've done. Anybody have a question? I have a question. What exactly constitutes a good escape like three basic elements of the cell? OK, Mara, I will answer that, but I think Gabriel said something first. OK one of the things that you mentioned was to have a few choices for your client to choose your design. And then you also said try to make things consistent. So how do you find the. Happy medium between the two. OK I like creating a board that has a very clear direction. So that the clients can pick it. I know where my team can go and how it's going to be executed, and I don't want there to be that, oh, I wasn't expecting that when you made it. So wants to be that clear and that thoughtful. So that's about consistency when I say that they're choosing design. How did I use that sentence, gabby? Which one was it? It was towards the end where, oh, the last one with the SIP and stuff where you said the clip art didn't match. Have them all be the same. So maybe what I'm hearing is show them three different style escapes where you have three different design choices for them to choose as opposed to putting it all in one. Yes if that's your question, that is the answer to that, most definitely, because here's the problem is there's a couple of different styles here. And unless you have a very long conversation with your client. And identify each and every element that they like and then go off from that you may be operating with a flawed premise. See the way the cup of joy is written. So it's a serif typeface and it's kind of a italic serif typeface. It's got some ligatures going on. It has a certain vibe to it, right? And then you see the word the wall. And then you see the fire, which looks like Trajan to me with the larger initial capital letter, and then you have this brush grip on the word sip and you give this to your design team. What are they supposed to assume from this? And they come back and you say in frustration, like what? That's not what I was expecting, so there needs to be consistency. Or if you see this one chair here with in the lower left corner, it looks like a Louis, the 14th kind of very I think it's a chair. I don't know what it is, but it looks like a chair from here that has a certain vibe to it as well, and they're all a little bit different. Now, I myself, what do you call self-described purveyor of style like I know each and every single style, like if it's from a certain era and it's from an aesthetic, how the line quality looks to me, all that stuff says something to me. So my pal is very, very refined. So when a designer shows just me, I'm like, so how do these things relate together? I'm going to challenge. I'm going to push back a little bit. So I think that's what you want to do. So there's another thing on the t-shirt, like each one of these things is a little bit different. So when you're like far away and you look at this, do you think, wow, this is really super awesome design and it's very cohesive. And then you dive in closer and closer until you're on top of the illustration, looking at one at a time. They're all a little bit different. So that's what I would encourage you guys just to spend the time, so one key way to solve that problem is to find that Illustrator who made that one and find four of them. So whoever found the SIP one, it's like go back to the catalog, see where that came from and show five of them, three of them, so that I know what I'm going to get. Now, I know what this person is doing, this person is like, I'm going to do this cup of joy type face, I'm going to pair it with an illustration and I'm going to show it to the person in a couple of different options. I think we're going too deep, too fast on this one. And I'm going to show you how we do it in a second. So they're using a cup of joy typography. That's the logo. And they're showing a couple of different ways. So this is doing something a little bit more than what I would have traditionally do in a style escape. So rather than this one, those were actually so the cup of joy is the primary brand. And those are actually finalized logos for like subdivisions that he has. So we didn't know what we design them, but they were already finished designs. We weren't doing it for the style escape. OK, so in the context of the style escape, this is how I would look at it. So Sean is showing something they've already designed and they're at some other stage now. What are you doing now? A website? Yeah, so well, he had a logo initially, and so we redesigned his logo and now we're doing a website and some packaging for him as well as designs. OK, so I'm going to tell you the way I do it and what makes sense to me, and then you guys have to adopt what makes sense to you and in your team. And your resources, ok? I had a question, though. Go ahead, fire away, man. Go ahead. Sean? oh, he froze out. OK, well, Mara, you had a question after gabby, so go ahead. And I was just asking like three basic elements that you think are important to a successful style escape. OK, you must join us late, yeah, yeah, I did. OK, I already answered it. But while we're waiting for Sean to rejoin us, it's right here, dude. We're here for this. You know, I wasn't there for that. OK, just rewatch the video. OK OK. I talked about it in depth, so rather than sit around and wait, if it has another question, I'd be happy to answer it. I just want to be mindful of time. We have about seven minutes left together. Nobody has a question. I'll show you what I'm doing and then we can talk about what we're doing next. Yeah, Chris, I got a question. You made the buzzer boom. Go ahead. How do you present this? You pick it out or you show it on the screen? Who's this talking and dress and dress? I don't do very much printing anymore. What we do is we create a PDF out of this. We send it to the client the night before we ask them to look at it, but not to. I try to like, decipher what it all means just because I don't want them looking at it for the first time when we talk. But I also don't want them to be analyzing and making notes on it because I believe one of my strengths is my ability to talk about the work, to fill in the gap. And to talk about the potential of the design. So usually I send up the day before, right before, and then we schedule a video conference and I do something just like this. I jump on fuse. I say, you have the deck, but just look at the screen and I'll talk you through everything and I'll present it to you. OK And then afterwards, I say. If I'm doing a keynote like this, if they lack a specific image, I can't do this with this one. I'll highlight I will make notes right on top of the document as we talk. I put an arrow to something else circle something. I'll put an x over something so that then I don't have to do another round of notes. So we're OK. Yep, I send that to them afterwards, and we're good. OK OK, good. All right. Yeah, good. I'm going to go through this and Sean, if we have time to get to your question. OK I think you rejoined us. OK, cool. You guys have seen this before because I've shown this and I can show this one and I will. I will move through this pretty quickly, ok? In case you've seen it before, this is for 450 Alaskan. This is a property in Seattle, Seattle, Washington. No Yeah. Seattle, Washington, OK. And we did three different style escapes, so there's our user, this older gentleman. He's got that Seattle vibe jeans kind of low key, but he still kind of very stylish and we're using this serif typeface. So this is what it looks like, ok? And this is done by one of my designers. So you can see there's lots of stuff to extract from the ticket being printed on a certain piece of card stock, et cetera. Labels for a jar signs on a building number 30 nine, et cetera. Here's another go. And there's this map, you see the map and then we put the word Pioneer Square on it. Maybe the type placement isn't great, but the map wound up being something we use for the identity system, and I'll show that to you. This was tough because this was done by a woman or actually all of them, I think, were done by women, and this aesthetic is not part of her normal palette. And so she really had to kind of figure this thing out. Lots of different typefaces here. And you guys might say, well, gross. Isn't that all over the place? Yes or no? There's a very consistent aesthetic to all of them, in my opinion. Now we can agree to disagree. But they do have a certain consistency, a certain vibe. And bless you. Here's the last one. And we call this one ocean breeze like I try to come up with when I'm feeling creative, interesting titles, names because it makes it easier to talk about. This is called Sky wood. I don't know why I came up that and this one's called basics, but it's about funny. So the ocean breeze one. I love container architecture. And so we presented a system and we're thinking, I bet you they're going to pick number one or number two. It feels like we really see it like Seattle, right? And the funny thing is on this one, I had to ask our designer to put in a picture with the mountains and trees. Because, you know, the Seattle attack was not coming across, so we had this one, we dropped this one in and she did some really interesting things with the way she types at 450 Alaskan. See the nautical motifs and each one of these are different from each other enough, but they're consistent within their own zone and lane. And Gabby seemed like my designers will also go in and retouch things, so you see this shoe box or whatever this thing is, they will put the logo on the shoe box or they'll wrap the logo around this box or this tube on the far right underneath the Puma sign. And you see this right here, right in the middle, it's just 450 in red and then 450 in red or blue backwards. And I said, you know, I looked out a lot of sailboats and kind of being on the sea, and I found that was really interesting, that on the sails you would see some kind of translucent topography coming from the front to the back. And as soon as they said that, I heard an audible like, oh, like somebody connected to that, they're like, wow, that's what that is. That's why you flip the type. Because we're about on the ocean and sales and all this kind of stuff, and she grew up sailing and she said, boom, she connected to it right away. That's where if I don't have the ability to talk about it, a lot of this stuff gets lost. People don't see it, so I had to point it out. Unlike the guide to the museum. So here are some sketches that we had done for logo types. So each one we kind of explore certain things like, oh, this is about being in Pioneer Square and these old lamps. It's a historic district. So when Sean was no was in Sean, yeah, when Sean was talking about the logo, I do things in very discreet phases, from the empathy graph to the style escape to exploring logo. I don't I don't do them all at once. And then we do applications. You remember before I was talking about the topography, those maps and those lines as they relate to navigation charts and things like that. We're using them and then we're writing messaging to a new space in the original neighborhood. Now that's not a great Comp for design, but it helps to give the client an idea. They love this plywood idea so much. They hired us to do these construction wraps. And we actually expect it out to be printed on plywood and they built it. I don't like to leave money on the table, so of course, there it is. So does this help us or the client? I don't know, but we love doing these mock UPS, finding applications to put things on. So the 450. She did a rough Comp here to put that number in there. You can see it on the sign on the door. And you can see this blue thing on top of the clear glass panel. You remember the indigo dip dye on the business card, you see where it's resurfaced here. That's just color correction. OK Chris, are you showing these at the time you've done this style escape, you're showing the style escape, is this work that has come after? No, no. I'm showing you a progression of things that have happened over a period of time. OK, I'm not coming out of the gate with all this stuff. It's too much. Right? OK. Who's asking a question? Was Rafael rafael? Ok? yeah, so we're doing this in a progression, so once we kind of figure out the design direction, we'll start doing logos with applications because otherwise there's too many variables, it's just too much work. And this was done by palou, and she's an incredible designer, and she had just graduated Art Center and the first thing I threw her on was fire escape, she said. I've never done this for anybody. I don't I don't have an idea as how to do any of this stuff. So it was a process, and she got it. So I said, you know, how do these elements relate? Show me tie it to everything. And she's an incredible designer, I wish you were still working at blind, but she's freelancing in New York now. So what we do and this is the challenge I always have. OK, I'm going to go back to the style escape here. I always say. If we had to. What part of this translates into design that I'm going to do for the client? And one of the ways I phrase it to them, and it sounds horrible when I say it like this, but I say I want to see something I can sell to the client. If I can't see something, I can sell to the client in real or figurative ways, then it's not worth anything to me. Oh, OK, so that could be like the website here. I'm looking at the middle section of the lower middle underneath the big red 30. The website could look like that, or that the letterhead or the identity system could have little bits of topography or some kind of very European type set. Or I want to build a showroom for them, so give me something to work with. I want to apply it to something. And so you can see later on because we did that kind of very thoughtful, intentional curation of imagery that you can see how it trickles into everything relating all the way back up here. It all started with this thing. See this dip dye tide card with the blue, and we're going to go all the way down. Now That was done really early on. So let's say that's week one and we're like week eight now this is how it manifests itself. So we translate, we transform our inspiration to something. So was that style scape kind of like a rough guide to where you're going? It doesn't look like it was like very clear, like you didn't adapt to any of the other colors in the styles scape. You just put blue in it. You know what I mean? Well, I understand your question, Mario. Like, I mean, like you, you put like in the other cell shape is like red, blue and another color. So you didn't follow the exact color palette, but you kind of were inspired by it, you know? No, we didn't use this color palette, but this is a fire escape. This is not a Denny's style guide, ok? We care about this. OK this is a style escape. This is the beginning of this is where our brand is going to head. So this means that the clients get to interact with and they get to talk like, we love the blue. Maybe it's too bright. Or maybe let's use a little less red, whatever it is. OK this is not a which call it a brand's guide manual. Now we do things in a very tight and specific way, but that's because that's who we are. And it's why we charge what we charge, but it's a sketch, man. See, there's lots of sketches here. OK, now the funny thing is, you think they would choose something that's in their zone, but then they choose something that's totally kind of out of the box, but they're all related to being kind of waterfront property, being in a Colder climate and thinking about nautical things, you know, nautical themes without it being so on the nose. So I don't have the rest of this here with, you know, in this deck, but this thing evolves and evolves and became this really wonderful piece of identity and marketing and branding materials for the client. These are all just sketches. That is a mild, medium and spicy that was spicy. But what's your question? No, I was just wondering those three that was an example of mild, medium and spicy. They went with the spicy. Yeah these clients tend to go with spicy, the four or five projects we've done with them almost every single time they've gone with spicy. So their tolerance for risk or pushing boundaries is very high, and that's why we get along really well. But I almost feel like if we came in with this and only presented this and went crazier than this, they'd freak out. I mentioned this concept of scaffolding, right? Every time you introduce something new to the client, you have to like warm them up. You have to ramp them up, you can't go and eat a ghost pepper on day one. You start with something like a Serrano chili or a jalapeno. You got to build up the pallet, so we do this, and it's a very thoughtful, strategic way of presenting work. And it began with words. Learn the words turned into the empathy graph. It's all here, you guys, if you look at it, it's all here. You see the topography, how it's kind of broken out certain letter forms. Thinking about patterns and all this stuff is just setting the space so that the clients can accept what's to come. And I'm not doing this as just a trick. This is our beginning process, and then week two, we do something else and we keep working on it and we keep whittling away at it until we get to the core. It's onion model, OK, I'm peeling back the layers of the onion. We've done some really cool things. This is a map that pay drew using vector art, and she did some really cool things. OK excuse me. It's 937. I got a couple of other things to do, but I want to take care of some important business first. First first things first, what do we want to do in the coming weeks? Because you guys have seen the curriculum and if you haven't, I'm going to pull it up. Has anybody seen the curriculum? Thank you. The answer is Yes. Oh, this is not it. Where is it? Here it is. OK, so you guys, I update this every time I get a chance to upload new episodes onto YouTube and put links on it. OK, so we're no longer using the fuse links. The fuse links are only available for limited time because once the YouTube thing goes up, I delete the fuse link because the fuse links are very hard to watch because it's very difficult to scrub through it and. For a lot of different reasons, it takes some effort and time energy, but I've done it. So then this PDF gets updated. So the legend says this is the great ones unavailable. The group called the futurist call it's the blue. The purple one is something that's been a topic that's been tackled by a guest co-host, a fellow member, a peer member, and the pink one is something that's just part of the public videos that we've already made. So I try to organize like this. So we can look at the bubbles here. There's still lots of bits of gray, but that's just because I haven't had time to link everything yet. So the blue ones are from this call that is available exclusively through this membership group, and that's it. They're not released to the public. So what do we need to deal with, what is next? A precor. You're talking about sales. Yeah, we've done a lot of conversation, is this sean? Yeah, so we've talked about sales. Yeah so what specifically do you want to know from the money workshop that you went to, which I explain concepts that I'm using and selling strategy? What can I need more specifics from you if I can, I'm not trying to be difficult, I just want to know what you need to know. Let me think about it because I feel like we've covered a lot and I've been equipped with, but I feel like there was a question that I haven't necessarily like formulated in my head that articulate. OK all right, why don't you think about that, does anybody have some topics that they feel are hot burning to them that we haven't yet covered? And if you're not sure, just say something, I'll write it down and we can then out what we want to do. I'm going to write down the things that Sean asked to. Art of search. Chris, have you have you had a session specifically on overcoming objections like just like a whole set of objections and different approaches to responding to those? Maybe I missed it, but no, you didn't miss it. We we have a couple of things it's called. Is it called The Art of negotiation? I don't cover it too deeply because it's actually one of the modules we sell. I have a lot of scripts in terms of here are like 10 objections you're going to hear. Here's how you put together the proposal template. Here's how you do the first meeting and the first meeting worksheets in terms of how you're able to establish the upper hand, so to speak. Right? so that you're not an order taker. I can delve into one specific area, but I wouldn't want to cover the whole thing. So that's one of the modules that you're selling that is sold through. Uh-huh OK. OK, got it. OK and I can give you more information offline. OK overcoming objections did you do anything on positioning, positioning in depth, positioning about positioning? I don't. I'm pretty sure we have. That's on YouTube, but I'm writing them all down anyway. OK and Sean, what else did you want to know? Who has the question about positioning as mario? OK, Mario, there are protocols that have specific homework assignments, so if you check out the Google Doc that has a whole bunch of homework assignments that will help you in your positioning search. So the first thing I want to say to you guys is this as members of this community, I have to say, if you look at the PDF that I've already created with links to all the videos, do us all a favor and watch all of them. But it's going to take some time, but at least then we're all at the same base level, so we're not all joining this at level 1 on one and level three. Oh, one, you know, we're all different levels here. So the faster you can do that and watch the previous episodes, the more we can start to talk about higher level conversations and go much deeper. I don't want to make these webinars for three people. Whether there be the new group or the existing group who's kind of really moving far along, I'd like to make them for everybody. So the only way we do that is you guys have to watch the videos you've paid for them, minus we'll watch them. I know it's a time commitment for you, but since putting them on YouTube, the complaint that it's too hard to watch. You know, I'm trying to make it easier for you, ok? What else? Can I ask another question or something? Yeah, well, the question I had earlier. It was kind of like a three part question, which is I know that you're not nowadays doing your own style escapes, right? You have your designers doing them for you. Is that correct? That's correct. I've never done them. I'm going to be honest with you. I've never done so, do you? How long do you give them to do one style escape a day? A day, OK, and yeah, and if they do it for the first time, it takes a lot longer than a day. Do you give ever one designer to do three, because I'm doing my case right now. And I feel like after I do the first one I like, that's it. That's all I got. It's tough to do. 3 and if you're doing it right, maybe you can only do one right because you're like, this is the user, this is what they look like. And this is the world. And it's all I got. This is where the rabbit hole can be very interesting. In your search, you can come up with other things that are like, oh, tangentially, I can see how that relates and then can build a whole direction off that. So I have never done them, so I don't know, but my designers do get stuck. They start to look the same even across different projects. They start looking the same, so it's important to get fresh eyes on it. And if you have two or even three people working on it, it helps they challenge each other and they do very different things. What Jose will do, and he talked about this in the past is he'll give each designer the words and he'll say, you're going to do spicy. I don't want you to meet him, but I want you to go bananas. You go as far away from this, but just try to anchor around these three words, but go crazy. And he picks them based on their style. So if he looks at their portfolio, it's like it's all wacky, crazy Cal Arts experimental typography. Well, he's going to give this that person the spicy direction. Now I'm going to give you a better way of doing this or an alternative way, I should say, excuse me, is instead of doing mild, spicy or mild, medium and spicy, which are just degrees of heat, right? So it's like, is it a 10 in volume of 301 that may or may not help you? We talked about this before it uses three hours the rhinoceros. The rainbow and the rhombus, you guys got that. So let me write this down. So that we have a note of this, ok? What is that rhinoceros rainbow rumba? I'll write down for you. Give me one second. So here is the style's Cape. And paste it in here. Sorry, guys. Give me one second. OK rhinoceros. Rainbow and rumpus. Hopefully, I spelt that all correctly. These are your three prompts. And let me do one more thing. Mild, medium and spicy. OK, so the way we've been doing style escapes, if you purchase score is to do mild, medium and spicy, those your props. Well, I find that those have limited utility. And in the creative strategy book, they talk about prompts like rhinoceros, rainbow and rhombus. I'm like, wow, that's much better. Rhinoceros is a big, strong, powerful animal. If you think about the brand, the project that you're working on. Think about the attributes that make the brand really strong and powerful. What are they really good at? So try to build a direction based on their strength. And rainbow is about color. So when you look at the brand attributes, think about a color palette and let the colors drive the direction. So you could almost say the style scape for 450 Alaskan with the really brilliant red and blue could be about the rainbow direction and the rhombus. It's a shape. So look at the shape. So if you're packaging the product, if it's a watch, try to derive inspiration from the unique shape. Fill it off that does that might help shut. Where you think, OK, fine with a coffee place, it's really about the flavorful, aromatic qualities of the coffee, it's smooth. It's rich. I'm going to that's the strength. Well, the rainbow direction is it's this very muted color palette and these textures, I'm going to just build it all up on that. And the rhombus could be he's got to find some kind of interesting shape to build the inspiration from. He could find something in Pinterest and say, wow, if the brand was really about this chair. Well, that look like. So there's some really cool, ornate carvings in that chair and this kind of Baroque detail. I'm going to do something off of that. So maybe a lot of arcs, so when he's doing a typeset and it's got kind of like that one copper one, let's see, it's in here. Here it is. So, you know, he can say like the chair has all these really beautiful curved carvings, these Baroque details. I'm going to use that to inspire or drive this kind of typeset where it's kind of on lots of curves. I'm gesturing with my hand. I don't know if you guys can see my hand, but. I described it to you. OK does that make sense? Yes I don't know if Rafael said that I can't tell everybody's voice right now. Yeah, that was great, thank you. OK you're welcome in. Rafa, you're like OG right, you went to the first workshop. Yeah, I remember you, your OG. He's like old school. We go way back, guys. All right. That's what I got. I'm a little bit tired to be showing you guys Photoshop cut out demos, but it will take a second. I'll try and record it at some point. My my to do list is ginormous. And Gabby knows that so she can vouch for it. Ben burns knows it. OK and the art of search. Those are two things I wrote down. Any other questions, guys, before I sign off here? There's my affiliate link, you guys, people keep asking me, what book did you recommend will do or to put this together in a bookstore? There it is. Go to that bookstore and has a list of a bunch of books I recommend and you can see behind me. I'm not just telling you, I mean, I do well in the books and there they are. And so I want to try to end on a really positive note here, you guys. Let let me go over some. A couple of different announcements here. I got to tell you, I'm a pretty even keeled person. I try to keep my emotions in check and all that kind of stuff, right? And I've been riding on this high, so never in my life have been on such a high, only to come down with such like low crash. And I think you guys know where I'm going with this. Let me start with some really positive, positive things. We just hit 50,000 subscribers, and I have you guys to thank for that. This group is growing and blossoming. I love what's happening. I hear stories of your individual success and a really lifts my spirits. I do this not because I need the money, although I will take your money, but I want to see you guys succeed. And when I hear guys like Aaron Pearson closing 120,000 engagement, and this is the guy who drove to loot to Las Vegas from Arizona to come and see me speak because he wanted to have a face to face meeting with me. And we've become the internet friends since then. That really just lifts me up and I hear people charging for strategy now. A $5,000 strategy game engagement. Yeah, it's not 10 or twenty, but it's a lot better than zero and that blows me away, so it blows my mind. And the guy that's on the call today, Ben burns. I met through the internet through Facebook, and we're going to be working together. And we've been working together. He's been helping me. So things are just taking off. And I just I just love this feeling of, I actually genuinely hopefully making an impact on your lives. And I hear it on the internet all the time.

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